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Publication numberUS20050168819 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/087,901
Publication dateAug 4, 2005
Filing dateMar 23, 2005
Priority dateApr 1, 2002
Also published asUS6910780, US20040013431
Publication number087901, 11087901, US 2005/0168819 A1, US 2005/168819 A1, US 20050168819 A1, US 20050168819A1, US 2005168819 A1, US 2005168819A1, US-A1-20050168819, US-A1-2005168819, US2005/0168819A1, US2005/168819A1, US20050168819 A1, US20050168819A1, US2005168819 A1, US2005168819A1
InventorsEd Vail, Gideon Yoffe, Bardia Pezeshki, Mark Emanuel, John Heanue
Original AssigneeSantur Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laser and laser signal combiner
US 20050168819 A1
Abstract
An optical communication system for transmitting multiple optical beams, each at a different wavelength is disclosed. The optical communication system includes a laser array having multiple laser transmitters transmitting multiple optical beams, each at a different wavelength. The optical communication system further includes a diffraction grating optically coupled to the laser array, the diffraction grating diffracting each of the optical beams at a substantially equal diffraction angle to form a combined optical beam. The combined beam is then focused into an optical communication media.
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Claims(18)
1. An optical communication system, comprising:
a laser array having a plurality of laser transmitters transmitting a plurality of optical beams at a plurality of different wavelengths;
a diffraction grating optically coupled to said laser array, the diffraction grating diffracting each of the optical beams at a substantially equal diffraction angle to form a combined optical beam; and
an optical communication media optically coupled to the diffraction grating, the optical communication media receiving the combined optical beam.
2. The optical communication system of claim 1 wherein each of the plurality of optical beams transmitted by the laser array is incident upon the diffraction grating at a different angle of incidence.
3. The optical communication system of claim 2 wherein the angle of incidence on the grating for each of the plurality of optical beams transmitted by the laser array varies in accordance with separation in wavelength between optical beams formed by adjacent laser transmitters.
4. The optical communication system of claim 1 further comprising a collimating lens optically coupled between the laser array and diffraction grating, wherein the collimating lens collimates the transmit optical beams and forwards collimated beams to the diffraction grating.
5. The optical communication system of claim 4 further comprising a focusing lens optically coupled between the diffraction grating and the optical communication media wherein the focusing lens focuses the combined optical beam into the optical communication media.
6. The optical communication system of claim 1 wherein spacing in wavelength between optical beams formed by adjacent lasers in the laser array is nonlinear.
7. The optical communication system of claim 1 further comprising a receiver coupled to the optical communication media.
8. The optical communication system of claim 1 further comprising one or more electro-absorption modulators monolithically integrated with one or more of the plurality of laser transmitter in the laser array, wherein the electro-absorption modulators modulate the optical beam of a corresponding laser transmitter in accordance with an information signal.
9. The optical communication system of claim 1 wherein the diffraction grating comprises a reflection diffraction grating.
10. The optical communication system of claim 1 wherein the diffraction grating comprises a transmission diffraction grating.
11. The optical communication system of claim 4 further comprising a beam splitter optically coupled between the collimating lens and the diffraction grating, wherein the beam splitter separates the collimated optical beams from the diffracted optical beams.
12.-19. (canceled)
20. An optical communication system comprising:
a laser array having a plurality of laser transmitters transmitting a plurality of optical beams at a plurality of different wavelengths;
a waveguide grating coupler optically coupled to said laser array wherein a diffraction order of the grating matches a propagating mode of the waveguide; and
an optical communication media optically coupled to the waveguide grating coupler, wherein the optical communication media receives the combined optical beam.
21. The optical communication system of claim 20 wherein each of the plurality of optical beams transmitted by the laser array is incident upon the waveguide grating coupler at a different angle of incidence.
22. The optical communication system of claim 21 wherein the angle of incidence on the waveguide grating coupler for each of the plurality of optical beams transmitted by the laser array varies in accordance with separation in wavelength between optical beams formed by adjacent laser transmitters.
23. The optical communication system of claim 20 further comprising a collimating lens optically coupled to the laser array, wherein the collimating lens collimates the plurality of transmitted optical beams and forwards the collimated optical beams to a micro-mirror that aligns the collimated optical beams with the waveguide grating.
24. An optical communication system comprising:
a laser array having a plurality of laser transmitters formed on a common substrate transmitting a plurality of optical beams at a plurality of different wavelengths;
an arrayed waveguide grating monolithically formed on the common substrate, wherein the arrayed waveguide grating receives the plurality of transmit optical beams and combines the plurality of optical beams into a combined optical beam; and
an optical communication media optically coupled to the arrayed waveguide grating, wherein the optical communication media receives the combined optical beam.
25. The optical communication system of claim 24 wherein length of individual waveguides in the arrayed waveguide grating are such that the plurality of optical beams are coupled to the optical communication media.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/369,492, entitled “LASER AND LASER SIGNAL COMBINER”, filed Apr. 1, 2002, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference as if set forth in full.

BACKGROUND

Optical communication systems using for example, optical fiber as a transmission medium, have low loss and very high information carrying capacity. In practice, the bandwidth of optical fiber may be better utilized to increase the bandwidth of a communication system by transmitting many distinct channels simultaneously using different carrier wavelengths. In WDM (wavelength division multiplexed) networks, for example, multiple optical signals each at different wavelengths are combined and transmitted over an optical fiber. WDM systems therefore sometimes utilize multiple laser sources that coupled into a single optical fiber.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one aspect of the present invention an optical communication system includes a laser array having a plurality of laser transmitters transmitting a plurality of optical beams at a plurality of different wavelengths. The optical communication system further includes a diffraction grating optically coupled to the laser array, the diffraction grating diffracting each of the optical beams at a substantially equal diffraction angle to form a combined optical beam. The combined beam is then focused into an optical communication media.

In another aspect of the present invention an optical communication system includes a laser array having a plurality of laser transmitters transmitting a plurality of optical beams at a plurality of different wavelengths. In this aspect of the invention the optical communication system further includes a virtual image phased array optically coupled to the laser array. In this aspect of the invention the ratio of the angular separation between adjacent lasers in the array of lasers divided by the wavelength separation between the adjacent lasers in the laser array is approximately equal to the dispersion of the virtual image phased array so that the virtual image phased array combines the plurality of optical beams into a combined optical beam. An optical communication media optically coupled to the virtual image phased array, receives the combined optical beam.

In a further aspect of the present invention an optical communication system includes a laser array having a plurality of laser transmitters transmitting a plurality of optical beams at a plurality of different wavelengths. In this aspect of the invention the communication system further includes a waveguide grating coupler optically coupled to the laser array wherein the diffraction order of the grating matches the propagating mode of the waveguide. An optical communication media optically coupled to the waveguide grating coupler receives the combined optical beam.

In a still further aspect of the present invention an optical communication system includes a laser array having a plurality of laser transmitters formed on a common substrate transmitting a plurality of optical beams at a plurality of different wavelengths. In this aspect of the invention the communication system further includes an arrayed waveguide grating monolithically formed on the common substrate, wherein the arrayed waveguide grating receives the plurality of transmit optical beams and combines the plurality of optical beams into a combined optical beam. An optical communication media optically coupled to the arrayed waveguide grating receives the combined optical beam.

These and other aspects of the present invention are more readily understood upon viewing the figures indicated below in conjunction with the following detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of an optical communications system for combining a plurality of transmit optical beams transmitted at a plurality of different optical wavelengths by a laser array into a single fiber;

FIG. 2 illustrates a perspective cross-sectional view of a DFB laser suitable for use in the laser array of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 graphically illustrates the relationship between laser frequency and stripe position of the lasers in the laser array of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 illustrates another embodiment of an optical communications system for combining a plurality of transmit optical beams transmitted at a plurality of different optical wavelengths by a laser array into a single fiber;

FIG. 5 illustrates a perspective cross-sectional view of a DFB laser array with integrated electro-absorption modulators suitable for use in the laser array of FIG. 1 or FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 illustrates an embodiment of an optical communications system for combining a plurality of transmit optical beams transmitted at a plurality of different optical wavelengths by a laser array into a single fiber;

FIG. 7 illustrates another embodiment of an optical communications system for combining a plurality of transmit optical beams transmitted at a plurality of different optical wavelengths by a laser array into a single fiber; and

FIG. 8 illustrates another embodiment of an optical communications system for combining a plurality of transmit optical beams transmitted at a plurality of different optical wavelengths by a laser array into a single fiber.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

An embodiment of the present invention provides an apparatus for coupling multiple optoelectronic sources into an optical communications medium. For example, FIG. 1 illustrates an optical communication system 10 with an array of lasers 20 optically coupled to a collimating lens 30. The collimating lens 30 collimates the output optical beam of each of the lasers in the laser array and forwards the collimated beams 40 to a diffraction grating 50 that diffracts each of the incoming beams at the same diffraction angle to form a combined optical beam. In this embodiment a coupling lens 60 collimates the combined optical beam and couples the collimated combined optical beam into an optical fiber 70. The optical fiber transports the combined optical signal to, for example, a receiver 90 and/or add/drop multiplexer that demultiplexes the combined ray in accordance with any of a variety of techniques known in the art.

In an embodiment of the present invention the array of lasers 20 is formed on a common substrate, with each laser having a different lasing wavelength. In addition, in one embodiment the lasers are, by way of example, controlled such that each laser in the laser array can be simultaneously turned on.

In one embodiment the array of lasers 20 are formed from a plurality of semiconductor waveguide lasers such as, for example, the ridge waveguide laser 200 illustrated in FIG. 2. Each of the lasers in the array of lasers may be referred to as a laser stripe. In other embodiments buried heterostructure, buried rib, or other types of lasers are used.

Typically, the material composition of the waveguide lasers is some combination of group III-V compound semiconductors, such as GaAs/AlGaAs, InGaAs/AlGaAs or InP/InGaAsP. However, other direct bandgap semiconductor materials may also be used.

In this embodiment any one of a number of techniques may be used to assign different wavelengths to each laser. For example, directly-written gratings with electron beam lithography, stepping a window mask during multiple holographic exposures, UV exposure through an appropriately fabricated phase mask, or changing the effective index of the mode of the lasers may be used to assign different wavelengths to each laser.

In some embodiments, a controlled phase shift is also included in the laser or gain/loss coupling is used in the grating for stable single mode characteristics. The wavelength of such lasers can be accurately controlled by varying dimensional features, such as stripe width or layer thickness, across the array.

In one embodiment the lasers may be epitaxially grown on an n-type indium phosphide (InP) substrate 210. As is conventional in the art, the laser 200 comprises an un-doped active region 230 disposed between an n-type layer 220 and a p-type layer 240. In an exemplary embodiment, the p-type layer may be doped with suitable dopants known in the art, such as, for example, zinc (Zn) and the n-type layer may be doped with a suitable dopant such as, for example, silicon (Si).

For example, in one embodiment an n-type InP lower cladding layer 220 may be epitaxially formed adjacent the substrate 210. An undoped active region 230 comprising at least one small-bandgap InGaAsP quaternary active layer sandwiched between a pair of InGaAsP barrier layers (not explicitly shown) is then formed on the lower cladding layer 220 followed by an upper p-type InP cladding layer 240. One of skill in the art will appreciate that the fractional concentrations of In, Ga, As and P may be varied to provide bandgap energy levels as may be preferable for the formation of the laser diode and low loss optical waveguide.

In this embodiment the upper p-type InP cladding layer 240 is etched in the shape of a ridge using conventional photolithography. For a DFB laser, the growth of the device may be interrupted approximately midway through the process and a grating etched into the laser (not shown). After the ridge is etched, the wafer is coated with an insulating dielectric 250, such as silicon nitride. In this embodiment the dielectric is then removed from on top of the ridge.

A conductive coating or metallization 260 is then applied to the top of the ridge. A second metallization step provides a contact region 270, shown at the end of the stripe. In an exemplary embodiment a conductive layer or metallization 280 may also be deposited on the backside of the substrate 210 to form an electrical contact.

In operation, current flowing vertically through the laser, from the upper cladding layer 240 to the substrate contact 280, causes the laser to lase. More specifically, light is generated in the active region 230 and confined by the lower cladding layer 220 and the upper cladding layer 240. The light is guided longitudinally by the ridge structure, which has been etched into the top cladding layer 240. As a result, the light is confined to oscillate between a partially or anti-reflecting front facet 290 and a highly reflecting rear facet (not shown).

Returning to FIG. 1, in this embodiment, the stripes in the laser array are translated relative to the focal point of the collimating optical lens 30. Therefore, the collimating optical lens 30 presents a different compound angle to each of the laser stripes in the laser array. Accordingly, each of the collimated optical beams 40 are incident upon the diffraction grating 50 at a slightly different angle of incidence in accordance with the separation between stripes in the laser array.

In this embodiment the focal length of the collimating lens 30, the period of the grating, and the positions of the optical elements are chosen such that the diffraction angle is approximately the same for each beam transmitted by the laser array. Coupling lens 70 then couples the diffracted beams into the same optical fiber 80.

For example, diffraction from a periodic grating is governed by the grating equation given below.
mλ/d=sin(θi)+sin(θd)
where m is an integer representing the diffraction order, d is the grating period, λ is the wavelength of the light incident upon the grating, θi is the angle of incidence, and θd is the diffraction angle. In practice both the angle of incidence and the diffraction angle are measured from the normal of the grating surface.

In one embodiment the array of lasers is located at the focal point of the collimating lens 30 (see FIG. 1). Thus if xn is the distance from the center laser stripe to the nth laser stripe, the grating equation may written as follows for an array of n lasers. m ( λ n ) d = sin ( θ i + a sin ( x n F ) ) + sin θ d
where θi is the angle of incidence of the beam transmitted by the center laser stripe on the grating, λn is the wavelength separation between channel and F is the focal length of the collimating lens.

In this embodiment, the plurality of transmit optical beams optimally couple into the optical fiber when the diffraction angle for each beam incident on the grating is equal. Therefore, assuming that x<<<F optimal coupling into a single fiber occurs when the difference in wavelength Δλ between two stripes separated by a distance Δx is given by: Δλ = d Δ x m F cos ( θ i )

Therefore, the difference in transmission wavelengths for optimal coupling decreases with decreasing grating period, d, and increasing angles of incidence θi. For example, in one embodiment the distance between adjacent laser stripes is 8 μm and the center wavelength of the laser array is 1545 nm. In this embodiment the focal length of the collimating lens is 2 mm so that at normal incidence, the minimum grating period for which a diffraction order exists is 1545 nm. At this grating period, the diffraction angle is 90 degrees, which generally is not practical. However, the diffraction angle for a grating period of 1.6 μm is approximately 75 degrees providing an achievable wavelength separation of 6.4 nm.

Therefore, in some embodiments the grating is swept relative to the optical path of the collimated beams. For example, in one embodiment the collimated beams are incident on the grating at an angle of incidence of about 78.4 degrees. In this embodiment the grating has, by way of example, a grating period of 1.0 μm which provides a wavelength spacing i.e. the minimum wavelength separation between adjacent lasers for optimal coupling of approximately 0.8 nm. The wavelength separation in this embodiment corresponds to an optical frequency of 100 GHz, a typical channel spacing in DWDM (dense wave division multiplex) networks.

However, for this optical arrangement the relationship between laser frequency and stripe position is slightly nonlinear, as shown in FIG. 3. Therefore, in an exemplary embodiment the spacing between adjacent lasers in the array of lasers of FIG. 1 is slightly nonlinear to provide accurate frequency separation.

In some embodiments the grating is, by way of example, placed at the rear focal plane of the collimating lens of FIG. 1 to achieve optimum coupling efficiency. In addition, the diffraction angle for this embodiment is approximately 34.4 degrees. Therefore it may be difficult to separate the diffracted beams from the forward beams without clipping the forward beams for this lens-grating spacing and orientation.

Therefore, referring to FIG. 4, in one embodiment a beam splitter 400 may be inserted into the optical path to direct the diffracted beam 60 out of the forward beam path toward the coupling lens 70. However, the inclusion of the beam splitter may reduce the efficiency of the optical system. Therefore, in other embodiments a transmission, grating rather than a reflection grating may be used. In this case, the diffracted beams are easily accessed however, it may be more difficult to achieve a high-efficiency grating.

One of skill in the art will appreciate that the coupling efficiency into the optical fiber decreases as the differences between the diffraction angles of the diffracted optical beams increases. Therefore, one embodiment further includes a laser wavelength controller coupled to the laser array that controls the temperature of the laser array or the excitation current supplied to the laser transmitters to compensate for loss associated with mismatches that may be present between the diffraction angle associated with the various laser transmitters.

The described exemplary laser combiner may also be utilized to combine the output from an array of monolithic integrated laser-modulator devices as illustrated in FIG. 5. In this embodiment, corresponding electro-absorption modulators 520 a-d are coupled to one or more of the plurality of lasers 510 a-d that form the laser array 500. For example, laser 510 a is coupled to electro-absorption modulator 520 a. In this embodiment, the electro-absorption modulators modulate the output of the correponding laser output.

In one embodiment the optoelectronic device 500 comprises an active region 540 disposed between a substrate 530 that also serves as a lower cladding layer and a partially etched upper cladding layer 550 that forms a ridge type waveguide having an inverted mesa structure. In this embodiment a lower electrode 560 is disposed below the substrate 530 and separate upper electrodes (not specifically shown) are formed on the upper surface of the electro-absorption modulators 520 a-d and on the upper surface of the lasers 510 a-d.

In this embodiment each of the lasers are driven by a common drive signal. In other embodiment the lasers are driven by separate drive signals for independent device operation using separate drive signal lines 570 a-d. Similarly, each of the electro-absorption modulators are also driven by separate information signals using separate data signal lines (e.g. 580).

As previously described with respect to FIG. 1, the spacing between stripes in the array of lasers may be on the order of 10 μm or less. In some embodiments such relative spacing between lasers may result in heat from laser stripes affecting operation of adjacent laser stripes. Accordingly, in some embodiments a thermoelectric (TE) cooler (not shown) is thermally coupled to the semiconductor device 500 to control the temperature of the lasers. The TE cooler may be abutting or near the semiconductor device or may be mounted outside of the housing (not shown).

As is known in the art, the TE cooler heats and cools the laser as required to drive the output wavelength of the laser to the desired wavelength. However, the time required to tune the devices with a TE cooler may be relatively long, often on the order of a second. For many applications, such as wavelength provisioning in the SONET telecommunication format, much faster tuning times on the order of milliseconds is preferred.

Therefore, one embodiment of the present invention further includes resistive elements coupled to each laser stripe to fine tune the temperature of individual lasers on a per laser stripe basis. Examples of structures and methods for tuning on a per laser stripe basis may be found, for example, in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/000,141, filed Oct. 30, 2001, entitled LASER THERMAL TUNING, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference as if set forth in full.

An alternative optical communication system 600 having a more compact geometry is shown in FIG. 6. In this embodiment an optical waveguide grating coupler 610 combines beams from multiple sources in a laser array 20 and couples them into an optical transmission media, such as an optical fiber 670. In this embodiment the array of lasers 20 is again optically coupled to a collimating lens 30. The collimating lens 30 collimates the output optical beam of each of the lasers in the laser array and forwards the collimated beams 40 to a reflective element 620 which forwards reflected beams 630 to a cylindrical lens 640. The cylindrical lens 640 focuses the reflected beams into the optical waveguide grating coupler 610.

In one embodiment the reflective element is, by way of example, a micro mirror, such as, for example, a micro-electrical-mechanical structure (MEMS). In this embodiment the micro-mirror fine-tunes the alignment between the array and the grating so that the coupled wavelengths properly align with the grating grid.

In one embodiment optical waveguide 650 comprises, for example, an integrated optical silica waveguide formed on a planar silicon substrate (not explicitly shown). In this embodiment the waveguide is formed by depositing base, core and cladding layers on a silicon substrate. In one embodiment the base layer can be made of undoped silica to isolate the fundamental optical mode from the silicon substrate thereby preventing optical loss at the silica substrate interface.

The core layer is, by way of example, silica doped with an appropriate dopant such as phosphorus or germanium to increase its refractive index to achieve optical confinement. In one embodiment the cladding comprises a silica layer that is doped with appropriate dopants such as boron and/or phosphorus to facilitate fabrication and provide an index matching that of the base. The waveguide is formed using well-known photolithographic techniques.

In this embodiment the grating 660 is, by way of example, composed of multiple periodic elements of substantially equal length formed on an upper surface of the optical waveguide. The grating elements intersect the optical waveguide perpendicularly to its length.

In this embodiment optical beams incident on the grating 660 couple into the optical waveguide 650 when the diffraction order of the grating matches the propagating mode of the waveguide. The conditions for coupling into the waveguide may be determined as follows: β = 2 π λ ( n sin ( θ ) - i λ Λ )
where β is the propagation constant for the waveguide mode, i is the diffracted order of the grating, n is the refractive index of the waveguide, θ is the angle of incidence, λ is the wavelength of the incident optical beam, and Λ is the grating spacing.

As previously described with respect to FIG. 1, the stripes in the laser array 20 are offset from the focal point of the collimating optical lens 30. Therefore, the collimating optical lens presents a unique compound angle to each of the laser stripes in the laser array. Accordingly, each of the collimated optical beams 40 at different optical wavelengths are incident upon the reflective element 620 at a slightly different angle of incidence in accordance with the separation between adjacent stripes in the laser array.

Therefore, the reflective element 620 reflects each of the collimated optical beams at a different angle so that each of the beams transmitted by the laser is incident upon the waveguide grating array 620 at a different angle of incidence. Therefore, the spacing of the laser stripes in the laser array which operate at predetermined channel spacings may be chosen to provide optimal coupling into the output optical fiber.

In this embodiment the output fiber 670 is, by way of example, butt-coupled to the waveguide grating coupler 610. However, in other embodiments a lens is coupled between the waveguide grating coupler 610 and the fiber 670 to focus the combined beam into the fiber. In addition, in some embodiments the micro-mirror is used to adjust the alignment between the array and the grating to compensate for temperature induced wavelength drift in the transmit optical beams as well as for temperature induced variations in the performance of the waveguide grating coupler.

Another embodiment of the present invention includes a virtual image phased array (VIPA) which combines the light from the plurality of sources into a single fiber. The VIPA has optical properties analogous to a high angular-dispersion grating. (See for example “Large Angular Dispersion By A Virtually Imaged Phased Array And Its Application To A Wavelength Demultiplexer” by M. Shirasaki, Optics Letters, Vol. 21, No. 5, Mar. 1, 1996, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference as if set forth in full).

Referring to FIG. 7, in this embodiment the array of lasers 20 again transmits a plurality of optical beams, each at a different wavelength. The transmitted optical beams are again optically coupled to the collimating lens 30. The collimating lens 30 collimates the output optical beam of each of the lasers in the laser array and forwards the collimated beams 40 to VIPA 700.

The VIPA forwards a combined optical waveform including each of the plurality of optical beams to a cylindrical lens 740. The cylindrical lens 740 converts the combined waveform to a uniform waveform which is forwarded to a focusing lens 750 that focuses the uniform waveform into a single optical fiber 760.

The VIPA is formed from a plate 710 made of an optically transparent material, such as, for example, glass, having reflective coatings. 720 and 725 formed thereon. In one embodiment reflective coating 725 has, by way of example, a reflectance of approximately 95% or higher, but less than 100%. In this embodiment, reflecting coating 720 has a reflectance of approximately 100%. The VIPA 700 further includes a low reflectivity region 730 formed on the plate that is optically coupled to the collimating lens to receive the collimated optical beams.

In this embodiment the VIPA 700 outputs optical beams at an output angle that varies as a function of the wavelength of the input light and angle of incidence. For example, when input light 40 is at a wavelength λ1 and incidence angle θ, VIPA 700 outputs an optical beam at wavelength λ1 in a specific angular direction. Similarly, when input light 40 is at a wavelength λ2 with the same incidence angle, VIPA 700 outputs an optical beam at wavelength λ2 in a different angular direction. Therefore, if the laser array transmits optical beams at wavelengths λ1n which are incident on the VIPA at the same incident angle, the VIPA simultaneously outputs separate optical beams at wavelengths λ1n in different directions.

However, in this embodiment the stripes in the laser array 20 are again translated relative to the focal point of the collimating optical lens 30. Therefore, the collimating optical lens presents a unique compound angle to each of the laser stripes in the laser array. Accordingly, each of the collimated optical beams 40 at unique frequencies are incident upon the VIPA 700 at a slightly different angle of incidence as a function of the separation between laser stripes.

In this embodiment the plurality of optical beams transmitted by the laser array optimally couple into the optical fiber when the ratio of the angular separation between adjacent stripes divided by the wavelength separation between adjacent stripes is approximately equal to the dispersion (i.e. angular change in output signal divided by the change in wavelength) of the VIPA. For example, the dispersion for a 0.100 mm thick glass plate installed at a small angle of incidence to the incoming optical beam is on the order of 1 deg/nm. Therefore, in this embodiment the transmit optical beams will optimally coupled into the optical fiber if the dispersion (i.e. the ratio of the spacing and wavelength separation between adjacent stripes) is equal to approximately 1 deg/nm.

In one embodiment the DFB array has a spacing, Δx, of 8 μm between elements. The array in this embodiment is, by way of example, located at the focal point of a collimating lens having a 1 mm focal length, F. Therefore, the angular separation of the elements (i.e. sin−1(Δx/f)) in this embodiment is approximately 0.5 deg. Therefore, in this embodiment the wavelength separation between adjacent sources is on the order of 0.5 nm to match the dispersion of the VIPA to optimally couple the transmit optical beams into the output optical fiber.

In one embodiment the VIPA 700 is, by way of example, rotated to optimally align the DFB laser array 20 with the output fiber. Alternatively a MEMs mirror may be optically coupled between the collimating lens 20 and VIPA 700 or between the cylindrical lens 740 and the fiber coupling lens 750 to provide the necessary alignment. The MEMs mirror may also adjust the alignment to compensate for temperature induced variation in the system.

In an alternate embodiment a dispersive component such as an Eschelle grating or an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) is integrated with the laser array to provide a monolithic solution. The monolithic solution avoids the loss that may be associated with an integrated optical combiner. The AWG for example, has low loss, does not need exacting vertically etched mirrors and is readily integrated with active elements.

Referring to FIG. 8, in another embodiment an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) couples the outputs from the plurality of optical sources in the DFB laser array 20 into a common optical fiber. In this embodiment the AWG includes an input waveguide 800 coupled to the laser array 20 to receive the transmitted optical beams. The input waveguide 800 is coupled with a first waveguide coupler 810 which in turn is coupled with an array of waveguides 820. The array of waveguides 820 terminate in a second waveguide coupler 830 which is coupled to an output optical fiber 840.

In an exemplary embodiment the length of the individual waveguides and shape of the couplers are chosen so that input beams of predetermined wavelengths pass through the array of waveguides and create a diffraction pattern on the output optical fiber 840. The AWG therefore couples the plurality of input beams into a single output. (see U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/000,142, filed Oct. 30, 2001, entitled TUNABLE CONTROLLED LASER ARRAY, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference).

Arrayed waveguide gratings may be used as demultiplexers in the receiving end of a WDM link. These AWGs may be fabricated in silica-on-silicon. However, AWGs formed from InP waveguides may also be used as dispersive components monolithically integrated with an array of InP detectors to form a multi-channel receiver. Similarly, AWGs may be integrated into the laser cavity of an optoelectronic source to provide feedback to determine the lasing wavelength. However, the longitudinal modes of such devices are unstable due to the long cavity length.

Similarly, dispersive components such as PHASARS or AWGs may also be integrated with with an array of distributed Bragg relfectors (DBRs) lasers. However, in these devices the DBRs are only tunable over a narrow frequency range and the AWG only works to combine the output of all the lasers into a single waveguide, and is not part of the lasing cavity.

In the present invention the DFB laser array includes quarter-wave phase shifts to provide high modal stability. Thus all the lasers stay single mode with high side-mode-suppression-ratios. In addition, in the described exemplary embodiment the dependence of the wavelength of the optical beams transmitted by the laser array is approximately equal to the wavelength dependence of the AWG. Therefore, as the temperature of the chip is changed, the wavelength of the DFB array and the AWG shift together maintaining alignment between the DF array and AWG as well as the tuning of the grating.

In one embodiment the drive current of individual lasers is varied to fine tune the output wavelength of individual device so that the entire array is properly registered in wavelength to the AWG. Varying the drive current of individual devices has the parasitic effect of changing the power emitted by each laser. However, the mismatch in registration between the wavelengths of the AWG and the laser array generally has a much larger effect on the total output power. In fact, equal power can often be obtained from all channels if the current to each laser is properly adjusted, since the sharp wavelength characteristics of the AWG moderate any increase in laser power obtained by increasing the lasing current.

Additionally in one embodiment resistive elements are coupled to each laser stripe to fine tune the temperature and wavelength of individual lasers on a per laser stripe basis as described with respect to FIG. 5. Examples of structures and methods for tuning on a per laser stripe basis may be found, for example, in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/000,141, filed Oct. 30, 2001, entitled LASER THERMAL TUNING, integrated heaters can also be used to fine tune the wavelength of each laser.

In this embodiment the AWG and the DFB array are monolithically formed on a single chip. Therefore, in this embodiment, the DFB array and AWG are automatically aligned by the lithographic process used to fabricate the chip. For example, in one embodiment the active waveguide is formed over the entire wafer. However, the heavy doping typically used in the p-type cladding of many lasers would absorb too much light in the AWG. Similary, the quantum wells in the laser active region would present too much loss in the AWG structure. Therefore, in some embodiments the upper cladding and active region comprising one or more quantum wells in the passive region of the chip occupied by the AWG are removed by a standard etching process.

In this embodiment a non-absorbing waveguide and an undoped upper cladding are then re-grown on this passive region of the chip. In this embodiment the AWG waveguide contains a non-absorbing waveguide, where the bandgap of the core region is sufficiently higher than the operating wavelengths to present negligible absorption. In addition, the waveguide structure of both the AWG and the laser are, by way of example, formed together in a single mask step, using a ridge or a buried process.

An alternate embodiment uses a continuous waveguide under the active region in lieu of the direct coupled method described above. Alternatively, two vertically coupled waveguides with transition regions between the active and the passive sections are used in some embodiments.

Although this invention has been described in certain specific embodiments, many additional modifications and variations would be apparent to one skilled in the art. It is therefore to be understood that this invention may be practiced otherwise than is specifically described. Thus, the present embodiments of the invention should be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive. The scope of the invention to be indicated by the appended claims, their equivalents, and claims supported by the specification rather than the foregoing description.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7590162Jul 6, 2006Sep 15, 2009Pd-Ld, Inc.Chirped bragg grating elements
US7633985 *Jul 6, 2006Dec 15, 2009Pd-Ld, Inc.Apparatus and methods for altering a characteristic of light-emitting device
US7796673May 30, 2008Sep 14, 2010Pd-Ld, Inc.Apparatus and methods for altering a characteristic of a light-emitting device
US8306088Apr 19, 2006Nov 6, 2012Pd-Ld, Inc.Bragg grating elements for the conditioning of laser emission characteristics
US20120012762 *Mar 2, 2011Jan 19, 2012Nowak KrzysztofLaser device, laser system, and extreme ultraviolet light generation apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification359/557
International ClassificationH04B10/155, G02B6/34, H01S5/40, G02B6/42
Cooperative ClassificationG02B6/4206, H01S5/4031, H04B10/506, H01S5/40, H01S5/4012
European ClassificationH04B10/506, H01S5/40, H01S5/40H2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 19, 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: SANTUR CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SILICON VALLEY BANK;REEL/FRAME:027090/0703
Effective date: 20111012
Jun 4, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: SILICON VALLEY BANK, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:SANTUR CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:022783/0137
Effective date: 20090528