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Publication numberUS20050177928 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/906,417
Publication dateAug 18, 2005
Filing dateFeb 18, 2005
Priority dateFeb 18, 2004
Publication number10906417, 906417, US 2005/0177928 A1, US 2005/177928 A1, US 20050177928 A1, US 20050177928A1, US 2005177928 A1, US 2005177928A1, US-A1-20050177928, US-A1-2005177928, US2005/0177928A1, US2005/177928A1, US20050177928 A1, US20050177928A1, US2005177928 A1, US2005177928A1
InventorsDarrell Moreau, Andre Moreau
Original AssigneeMoreau Darrell A., Moreau Andre W.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hard Hat Lanyard
US 20050177928 A1
Abstract
A hard hat lanyard having a lower strap having a first end and a second end, a lower strap fastener adapted to fasten the lower strap second end to an article of a wearer's clothing, an upper strap having a first end and a second end, an intermediate release buckle fastened to the lower strap first end and the upper strap second end that is secures the lower strap to the upper strap in a releasable manner, and an upper strap fastener adapted to fasten the upper strap first end to a hard hat.
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Claims(17)
1. A hard hat lanyard for securing a hard hat to a wearer comprising:
a lower strap having a first end and a second end;
a lower strap fastening mechanism fastened to the lower strap second end adapted to fasten the lower strap second end to an article of a wearer's clothing;
an upper strap having a first end and a second end;
an intermediate release mechanism fastened to the lower strap first end and the upper strap second end that is adapted to releasably secure the lower strap to the upper strap; and
an upper strap fastening mechanism adapted to fasten the upper strap first end to a hard hat.
2. The hard hat lanyard of claim 1, wherein the lower strap fastening mechanism is selected from the group consisting of a suspender clip, a garter clip, a button snap, sewn stitches, and adhesive.
3. The hard hat lanyard of claim 1, wherein the intermediate release mechanism is a side release buckle.
4. The hard hat lanyard of claim 1, wherein the upper strap fastening mechanism is selected from the group consisting of a slip through cam buckle, a hook and loop fastener, a button snap adapted to fasten to a hard hat inner brim, and a button snap adapted to fasten to a hard hat.
5. The hard hat lanyard of claim 1, wherein the upper strap is made of a stretchable fabric adapted to dampen the shock loading of a hard hat falling off of a wearer.
6. The hard hat liner of claim 5, wherein the stretchable fabric is polyester elastic webbing.
7. The hard hat lanyard of claim 1, wherein the lower strap is made of a stretchable fabric adapted to dampen the shock loading of a hard hat falling off of a wearer.
8. The hard hat lanyard of claim 7, wherein the stretchable fabric is polyester elastic webbing.
9. A hard hat lanyard for securing a hard hat to a wearer comprising in combination:
a lower strap having a first end and a second end;
a lower strap fastening mechanism fastened to the lower strap second end adapted to fasten the lower strap second end to an article of a wearer's clothing;
an upper strap having a first end and a second end;
an intermediate release mechanism fastened to the lower strap first end and the upper strap second end that is adapted to releasably secure the lower strap to the upper strap;
an upper strap fastening mechanism adapted to fasten the upper strap first end to a hard hat; and
a hard hat.
10. The hard hat lanyard of claim 9, wherein the lower strap fastening mechanism is one selected from the group consisting of a suspender clip, a garter clip, a button snap, sewn stitches, and adhesive.
11. The hard hat lanyard of claim 9, wherein the intermediate release mechanism is a side release buckle.
12. The hard hat lanyard of claim 9, wherein the upper strap fastening mechanism is one selected from the group consisting of a slip through cam buckle, a hook and loop fastener, a button snap adapted to fasten to a mating snap on a hard hat inner brim, and a button snap adapted to fasten to a mating snap on the hard hat.
13. The hard hat lanyard of claim 9, wherein the upper strap is made of a stretchable fabric adapted to dampen the shock loading of a hard hat falling off of a wearer.
14. The hard hat liner of claim 13, wherein the stretchable fabric is polyester elastic webbing.
15. The hard hat lanyard of claim 9, wherein the lower strap is made of a stretchable fabric adapted to dampen the shock loading of a hard hat falling off of a wearer.
16. The hard hat liner of claim 15, wherein the stretchable fabric is polyester elastic webbing.
17. A method of making a hard hat lanyard for securing a hard hat to a wearer comprising the steps of:
providing a lower strap having a first end and a second end;
providing an upper strap having a first end and a second end;
providing a lower strap fastening mechanism adapted to fasten the lower strap second end to an article of a wearer's clothing;
providing an intermediate releasing mechanism adapted to releasably secure the lower strap to the upper strap;
fastening the lower strap to the upper strap with the intermediate releasing mechanism fastened to the lower strap first end and the upper strap second end; and
providing an upper strap fastening mechanism adapted to fasten the upper strap first end to a hard hat.
Description
    BACKGROUND
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The invention is related to apparel worn for personal protection, namely hard hats.
  • [0003]
    2. Description of the Prior Art
  • [0004]
    Hard hats are a mandatory safety item used in or around electrical power plants, chemical plants, construction sites, warehouses, and other industrial sites. The requirements are mandated through safety programs due to overhead hazards associated in these types of industries. Hard hats are intended to be a type of safety equipment that will protect the wearer from overhead hazards as well as from bumping one's head in areas where there are low clearances. However there are cases when the hard hat can be considered a hazard in itself. For instance, in most industrial work places where overhead work is being performed, workers are typically wearing a hard hat. If a worker leans over or bumps their head the hard hat most likely will fall off. This is fine except for where the hard hat can becomes a falling object and a hazard to personnel or vital plant equipment below.
  • [0005]
    In other cases, such as at nuclear power plants, workers often will work from a bridge crane that straddles the reactor vessel cavity that is filled with water. If the hard hat falls off the worker, it may land in the pool of water. If the hard hat cannot be retrieved before it sinks the retrieval process may be time consuming and very costly. Typically, a nuclear power plant will lose approximately $100,000 per hour of down time during a refueling or maintenance outage. Depending on where the hat finally came to rest, it could take up to several hours to retrieve, and consequently could delay the plant from coming back online.
  • [0006]
    A chin strap used with a hard hat is one method to keep the hard hat on a wearer's head. However this method can be uncomfortable and sometimes a bit cumbersome. Another issue is that the chin strap is in direct contact with exposed skin. When working in contaminated environments, items that are in direct contact with exposed skin should be laundered prior to donning. However, hard hats, even with chin straps, are not typically laundered. Therefore, if the hard hat is used in a harsh or contaminated environment, it can spread to the wearer's exposed skin.
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat. No. 701,639 (1902, Stamm) discloses a hat guard device that prevents a straw hat from blowing away. One end of the retainer is hooked through the hat, and the other end is hooked into the lapel button hole. This system may have been acceptable for straw hats. However, one cannot insert a hook into a hard hat because the hard hat material is too hard by its very nature. Also, the weight of the hard hat would pull through a lapel button hole. Furthermore, industrial workers are unlikely to wear formal jackets having lapel button holes.
  • [0008]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,991,236 (1991, Pritchett) discloses a hat retaining device that attaches at one end to a hat and at the other end around the wearer's neck. This would be unsuitable for use with a hard hat because of the danger of attaching a loop around the wearer's neck when working in an industrial environment.
  • [0009]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,154,887 (2000, Yagi) discloses a hat and retaining device having a permanent stopper affixed to the crown of the hat on one end and a clip on the other. This would also be unsuitable for use with a hard hat because it would require modifying standard safety equipment made to a particular standard. Adding devices to the crown of a hard hat may make it unsafe in an accident. None of the above references employ a feature that can easily release the hat from the wearer without completely removing the retaining device.
  • [0010]
    What is needed, therefore, is a device that prevents a hard hat from falling to a place where it cannot be easily retrieved. What is also needed is a hard hat retaining device that does not require modifying a piece of safety equipment. What is needed is also device that prevents contamination of the wearer by not coming into direct contact with a wearer's skin. What is further needed is a hard hat device that can be easily released when the hard hat is not being used.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    It is an object of the present invention to provide a device that prevents a hard hat from falling to a place where it cannot be easily retrieved. It is also an object of the present invention to provide a hard hat retaining device that does not require modifying a piece of safety equipment. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a device that prevents contamination of the wearer by not coming into direct contact with the wearer's skin. It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a hard hat device that can be easily released when the hard hat is not being used.
  • [0012]
    The present invention achieves these and other objectives by providing a hard hat lanyard having a lower strap having a first end and a second end, a lower strap fastening mechanism adapted to fasten the lower strap second end to an article of a wearer's clothing, an upper strap having a first end and a second end, an intermediate release mechanism fastened to the lower strap first end and the upper strap second end that is adapted to releasably secure the lower strap to the upper strap, and an upper strap fastening mechanism adapted to fasten the upper strap first end to a hard hat.
  • [0013]
    The intermediate release mechanism is preferably a side release buckle but may be any type of release mechanism known to those of ordinary skill in the art that can be used to repeatedly join and release two straps to each other. The upper and lower straps are preferably made of a stretchable fabric but may be any type of flexible and/or resilient material used for tethering two items together. The upper strap fastening mechanism is preferably includes a cam buckle that is used to secure a portion of the strap that is wrapped around the hard hat inner brim. It should be noted, however, that the upper strap fastening mechanism may be removably attached to the hard hat or permanently fixed to a portion of the hard hat. The lower strap second end that attaches to the clothing of wearer may be removably attached or permanently attached to the wearer's clothing. Any of the known methods of removable and permanent attachment mechanisms may be used.
  • [0014]
    These and other features, aspects, and advantages of the present invention will become better understood with regard to the following description, claims, and accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
  • [0015]
    FIG. 1 is a plan view of the hard hat lanyard of the present invention.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0016]
    The invention is a hard hat lanyard for securing a hard hat to a wearer, the lanyard comprising a lower strap having a first end and a second end, a lower strap fastening mechanism adapted to fasten the lower strap second end to an article of a wearer's clothing, an upper strap having a first end and a second end, an intermediate release mechanism fastened to the lower strap first end and the upper strap second end that is adapted to releasably secure the lower strap to the upper strap, and an upper strap fastening mechanism adapted to fasten the upper strap first end to a hard hat.
  • [0017]
    The preferred embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 1. Turning now to FIG. 1, the hard hat lanyard 10 includes an upper strap 12 and a lower strap 14. The straps are preferably made of a stretchable fabric. The stretchable fabric is a polyester elastic webbing, such as that made by American Cord and Webbing. Use of a stretchable fabric helps dampen, or soften, the initial shock of the hard hat when it has fallen from the wearer's head. Although a non-stretchable fabric can be used, the trauma to all the components of the hard hat lanyard, clothing attached to the hard hat lanyard, and the hard hat itself would be much greater when the hard hat falls from the wearer's head. This could accelerate wearing, or even tearing of components of the hard hat lanyard, as well as the clothing or hard hat attached to the hard hat lanyard.
  • [0018]
    The lower strap 14 has a first end 24 and a second end 26 opposite the first end. A lower strap fastening mechanism 28 is fastened to the lower strap second end. The lower strap fastening mechnism 28 is adapted to fasten the lanyard 10 by the lower strap second end 26 to an article of a wearer's clothing, such as a shirt, jacket, or overalls. The lower strap fastening mechanism 26 could be any of a suspender clip, garter clip, button snap, or the lower strap second end could even be secured to clothing by sewn stitches, adhesive and the like.
  • [0019]
    For industries where protective clothing is used it may be helpful to eliminate the lower strap fastening mechanism 26, and stitch the stretchable fabric directly to the protective clothing itself. This could be particularly handy in those cases where a uniform such as coveralls or other protective clothing is worn on a daily basis. In this embodiment, one portion of the hard hat lanyard will remain on the clothing at all times.
  • [0020]
    The upper strap 12 has a first end 20 and a second end 22 opposite the first end. Cooperating ends of an intermediate release mechanism 30 are fastened to the upper strap second end 22 and the lower strap first end 24. The intermediate release mechanism is adapted to releasably secure the lower strap 14 to the upper strap 12. Preferably, the intermediate release mechanism 30 is a side release buckle.
  • [0021]
    The intermediate release mechanism enables the hard hat lanyard 10 to separate into two pieces. This allows the wearer to remove the hard hat 16 from the head without the entire hard hat lanyard 10 still being attached to the clothing. This becomes particularly convenient when the wearer is taking a break from work, or is even done work for the day. When the wearer puts the hard hat 16 back on the head, it is then an easy process to reattach the intermediate release mechanism 30, thus making the hard hat lanyard 10 one piece again.
  • [0022]
    To the upper strap first end 20 is secured an upper strap fastening mechanism 32 that may optionally include an inner brim securing strap 13 that wraps around a hard hat inner brim 18. Upper strap fastening mechanism 32 is adapted to fasten the upper strap first end 20 to a hard hat 16. When the optional inner brim securing strap 13 is used, one end of inner brim securing strap 13 couples to upper strap fastening mechanism 32. The upper strap fastening mechanism 32 is preferably selected from the group consisting of a slip through cam buckle or a hook and loop fastener. When optional inner brim securing strap 13 is not used, upper strap fastening mechanism 32 may be one of a button snap adapted to fasten to a mating snap on hard hat inner brim 18, a button snap adapted to fasten to a mating snap on the hard hat shell, or may be permanently fastened to either hard hat inner brim 18 or to hard hat 16. The upper strap fastening mechanism 32 may also be configured to allow a wearer to make minor adjustments to the length of the hard hat lanyard 10.
  • [0023]
    It is important to note that the types of fastening mechanisms described such as clips, buckles, fasteners, and the like, is not limiting and that any type of fastening mechanism (both releasable and permanent or combinations thereof) may be used with the present invention.
  • [0024]
    Although the preferred embodiments of the present invention have been described herein, the above description is merely illustrative. Further modification of the invention herein disclosed will occur to those skilled in the respective arts and all such modifications are deemed to be within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8117678 *Feb 22, 2008Feb 21, 2012Moreau Darrell AHard hat lanyard
US8618936Mar 25, 2011Dec 31, 2013National Oilwell Varco, L.P.Headgear and method of using same
US9038869 *Aug 12, 2013May 26, 2015Ty-Flot, Inc.Double tool pouch with retractor pockets
US9510634 *Jan 21, 2014Dec 6, 2016Alphasource Inc.Hat lanyard
US20080134416 *Feb 22, 2008Jun 12, 2008Moreau Darrell AHard Hat Lanyard
US20090199322 *Feb 9, 2009Aug 13, 2009Parrish Rodney LHeadgear accessory clip
US20130219597 *Sep 5, 2011Aug 29, 2013Sean Van WaesHelmet with integrated means for securely locking it
US20140201888 *Jan 21, 2014Jul 24, 2014Alphasource, Inc.Hat lanyard
US20150021372 *Aug 12, 2013Jan 22, 2015Ty-Flot, Inc.Double tool pouch with retractor pockets
WO2011119966A2Mar 25, 2011Sep 29, 2011National Oil Well Varco, L.P.Headgear and method of using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/421, 2/410
International ClassificationA42B7/00, A42B1/00, A42B3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA42B3/04, A42B3/0406, A42B7/00, A42B3/0413
European ClassificationA42B3/04, A42B3/04B2, A42B7/00, A42B3/04B