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Publication numberUS20050181439 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/106,649
Publication dateAug 18, 2005
Filing dateApr 15, 2005
Priority dateOct 31, 1996
Also published asCA2269663A1, CA2271720A1, DE69737125D1, DE69737125T2, DE69737125T3, DE69739981D1, EP0941335A2, EP0942983A2, EP0942983B1, EP0942983B2, EP1400592A1, EP1770164A2, EP1770164A3, EP1770164B1, US6420135, US6573082, US6929930, US7056510, US7141418, US8168205, US20020032323, US20020061545, US20040029118, US20070154986, US20100196410, US20100221287, WO1998018930A2, WO1998018930A3, WO1998018931A2, WO1998018931A3
Publication number106649, 11106649, US 2005/0181439 A1, US 2005/181439 A1, US 20050181439 A1, US 20050181439A1, US 2005181439 A1, US 2005181439A1, US-A1-20050181439, US-A1-2005181439, US2005/0181439A1, US2005/181439A1, US20050181439 A1, US20050181439A1, US2005181439 A1, US2005181439A1
InventorsGil Choi, Charles Kunsch, Steven Barash, Patrick Dillon, Brian Dougherty, Michael Fannon, Craig Rosen
Original AssigneeHuman Genome Sciences, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens and vaccines
US 20050181439 A1
Abstract
The present invention relates to novel vaccines for the prevention or attenuation of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The invention further relates to isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding antigenic polypeptides of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antigenic polypeptides are also provided, as are vectors, host cells and recombinant methods for producing the same. The invention additionally relates to diagnostic methods for detecting Streptococcus nucleic acids, polypeptides and antibodies in a biological sample.
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Claims(21)
1. An isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a polynucleotide having a nucleotide sequence at least 95% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of:
(a) a nucleotide sequence encoding any of the amino acid sequences of the polypeptides shown in Table 1; and
(b) a nucleotide sequence complementary to any of the nucleotide sequences in (a).
2. An isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a polynucleotide which hybridizes under stringent hybridization conditions to a polynucleotide having a nucleotide sequence identical to a nucleotide sequence in (a) or (b) of claim 1 wherein said polynucleotide which hybridizes does not hybridize under stringent hybridization conditions to a polynucleotide having a nucleotide sequence consisting of only A residues or of only T residues.
3. An isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a polynucleotide which encodes the amino acid sequence of an epitope-bearing portion of a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence in (a) of claim 1.
4. The isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 3, wherein said epitope-bearing portion of a polypeptide has an amino acid sequence listed in Table 2.
5. A method for making a recombinant vector comprising inserting an isolated nucleic acid molecule of claim 1 into a vector.
6. A recombinant vector produced by the method of claim 5.
7. A method of making a recombinant host cell comprising introducing the recombinant vector of claim 6 into a host cell.
8. A recombinant host cell produced by the method of claim 7.
9. A method of producing a polypeptide encoded by said isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising culturing the host cell of claim 8 under conditions favoring expressing the heterologous polypeptide.
10. A polypeptide produced according to the method of claim 9.
11. An isolated polypeptide comprising an amino acid sequence at least 70% identical to a sequence selected from the group consisting of an amino acid sequence of any of the polypeptides described in Table 1.
12. An isolated polypeptide antigen comprising an amino acid sequence of an S. pneumoniae epitope shown in Table 2.
13. An isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising a polynucleotide with a nucleotide sequence encoding a polypeptide of claim 9.
14. An isolated antibody that binds specifically to a polypeptide of claim 11.
15. A hybridoma which produces an antibody according to claim 14.
16. A vaccine, comprising:
(1) one of more S. pneumoniae polypeptides selected from the group consisting of a polypeptide comprising an amino acid sequence identified in Table 1, or a fragment thereof; and
(2) a pharmaceutically acceptable diluent, carrier, or excipient;
wherein said polypeptide is present, in an amount effective to elicit protective antibodies in an animal to a member of the Streptococcus genus.
17. A method of preventing or attenuating an infection caused by a member of the Streptococcus genus in an animal, comprising administering to said animal a polypeptide of claim 11, wherein said polypeptide is administered in an amount effective to prevent or attenuate said infection.
18. A method of detecting Streptococcus nucleic acids in a biological sample obtained from an animal involving assaying for one or more nucleic acid sequences encoding Streptococcus polypeptides in a sample comprising:
(a) contacting the sample with one or more of the above-described nucleic acid probes, under conditions such that hybridization occurs, and
(b) detecting hybridization of said one or more probes to the one or more Streptococcus nucleic acid sequences present in the biological sample.
19. A method of detecting Streptococcus nucleic acids in a biological sample obtained from an animal, comprising:
(a) amplifying one or more Streptococcus nucleic acid sequences in said sample using polymerase chain reaction, and
(b) detecting said amplified Streptococcus nucleic acid.
20. A kit for detecting Streptococcus antibodies in a biological sample obtained from an animal, comprising
(a) a polypeptide of claim 12 attached to a solid support; and
(b) detecting means.
21. A method of detecting Streptococcus antibodies in a biological sample obtained from an animal, comprising
(a) contacting the sample with a polypeptide of claim 12; and
(b) detecting antibody-antigen complexes.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a divisional of U.S. application Ser. No. 08/961,083, filed Oct. 30, 1997, which claims benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/029,960, filed Oct. 31, 1996; this application is also a divisional of U.S. application Ser. No. 09/765,271, filed Jan. 22, 2001, which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 09/536,784, filed Mar. 28, 2000 (now U.S. Pat. No. 6,573,082, issued Jun. 3, 2003), which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 08/961,083, filed Oct. 30, 1997, which claims benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/029,960, filed Oct. 31, 1996; U.S. application Ser. No. 09/765,271 is also a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 08/961,083, filed Oct. 30, 1997, which claims benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/029,960, filed Oct. 31, 1996.
  • REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING ON COMPACT DISC
  • [0002]
    This application refers to a “Sequence Listing” which is provided as an electronic document on two identical compact discs (CD-R), labeled “Copy 1” and “Copy 2”. These compact discs each contain one file designated “PB340P2C3D1.ST25.txt” (537,687 bytes, created on Apr. 12, 2005), which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates to novel Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens for the detection of Streptococcus and for the prevention or attenuation of disease caused by Streptococcus. The invention further relates to isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding antigenic polypeptides of S. pneumoniae. Antigenic polypeptides are also provided, as are vectors, host cells and recombinant methods for producing the same. The invention additionally relates to diagnostic methods for detecting Streptococcus gene expression.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    Streptococcus pneumoniae has been one of the most extensively studied microorganisms since its first isolation in 1881. It was the object of many investigations that led to important scientific discoveries. In 1928, Griffith observed that when heat-killed encapsulated pneumococci and live strains constitutively lacking any capsule were concomitantly injected into mice, the nonencapsulated could be converted into encapsulated pneumococci with the same capsular type as the heat-killed strain. Years later, the nature of this “transforming principle,” or carrier of genetic information, was shown to be DNA. (Avery, O. T., et al., J. Exp. Med., 79:137-157 (1944)).
  • [0005]
    In spite of the vast number of publications on S. pneumoniae many questions about its virulence are still unanswered, and this pathogen remains a major causative agent of serious human disease, especially community-acquired pneumonia. (Johnston, R. B., et al., Rev. Infect. Dis. 13(Suppl. 6):S509-517 (1991)). In addition, in developing countries, the pneumococcus is responsible for the death of a large number of children under the age of 5 years from pneumococcal pneumonia. The incidence of pneumococcal disease is highest in infants under 2 years of age and in people over 60 years of age. Pneumococci are the second most frequent cause (after Haemophilus influenzae type b) of bacterial meningitis and otitis media in children. With the recent introduction of conjugate vaccines for H. influenzae type b, pneumococcal meningitis is likely to become increasingly prominent. S. pneumoniae is the most important etiologic agent of community-acquired pneumonia in adults and is the second most common cause of bacterial meningitis behind Neisseria meningitidis.
  • [0006]
    The antibiotic generally prescribed to treat S. pneumoniae is benzylpenicillin, although resistance to this and to other antibiotics is found occasionally. Pneumococcal resistance to penicillin results from mutations in its penicillin-binding proteins. In uncomplicated pneumococcal pneumonia caused by a sensitive strain, treatment with penicillin is usually successful unless started too late. Erythromycin or clindamycin can be used to treat pneumonia in patients hypersensitive to penicillin, but resistant strains to these drugs exist. Broad spectrum antibiotics (e.g., the tetracyclines) may also be effective, although tetracycline-resistant strains are not rare. In spite of the availability of antibiotics, the mortality of pneumococcal bacteremia in the last four decades has remained stable between 25 and 29%. (Gillespie, S. H., et al., J. Med. Microbiol. 28:237-248 (1989).
  • [0007]
    S. pneumoniae is carried in the upper respiratory tract by many healthy individuals. It has been suggested that attachment of pneumococci is mediated by a disaccharide receptor on fibronectin, present on human pharyngeal epithelial cells. (Anderson, B. J., et al., J. Immunol. 142:2464-2468 (1989). The mechanisms by which pneumococci translocate from the nasopharynx to the lung, thereby causing pneumonia, or migrate to the blood, giving rise to bacteremia or septicemia, are poorly understood. (Johnston, R. B., et al., Rev. Infect. Dis. 13(Suppl. 6):S509-517 (1991).
  • [0008]
    Various proteins have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenicity of S. pneumoniae, however, only a few of them have actually been confirmed as virulence factors. Pneumococci produce an IgA 1 protease that might interfere with host defense at mucosal surfaces. (Kornfield, S. J., et al., Rev. Inf. Dis. 3:521-534 (1981). S. pneumoniae also produces neuraminidase, an enzyme that may facilitate attachment to epithelial cells by cleaving sialic acid from the host glycolipids and gangliosides. Partially purified neuraminidase was observed to induce meningitis-like symptoms in mice; however, the reliability of this finding has been questioned because the neuraminidase preparations used were probably contaminated with cell wall products. Other pneumococcal proteins besides neuraminidase are involved in the adhesion of pneumococci to epithelial and endothelial cells. These pneumococcal proteins have as yet not been identified. Recently, Cundell et al., reported that peptide permeases can modulate pneumococcal adherence to epithelial and endothelial cells. It was, however, unclear whether these permeases function directly as adhesions or whether they enhance adherence by modulating the expression of pneumococcal adhesions. (De Velasco, E. A., et al., Micro. Rev. 59:591-603 (1995). A better understanding of the virulence factors determining its pathogenicity will need to be developed to cope with the devastating effects of pneumococcal disease in humans.
  • [0009]
    Ironically, despite the prominent role of S. pneumoniae in the discovery of DNA, little is known about the molecular genetics of the organism. The S. pneumoniae genome consists of one circular, covalently closed, double-stranded DNA and a collection of so-called variable accessory elements, such as prophages, plasmids, transposons and the like. Most physical characteristics and almost all of the genes of S. pneumoniae are unknown. Among the few that have been identified, most have not been physically mapped or characterized in detail. Only a few genes of this organism have been sequenced. (See, for instance current versions of GENBANK and other nucleic acid databases, and references that relate to the genome of S. pneumoniae such as those set out elsewhere herein.) Identification of in vivo-expressed, and broadly protective, antigens of S. pneumoniae has remained elusive.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0010]
    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules comprising polynucleotides encoding the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1 and having the amino acid sequences shown as SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6, and so on through SEQ ID NO:226. Thus, one aspect of the invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules comprising polynucleotides having a nucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of: (a) a nucleotide sequence encoding any of the amino acid sequences of the polypeptides shown in Table 1; and (b) a nucleotide sequence complementary to any of the nucleotide sequences in (a).
  • [0011]
    Further embodiments of the invention include isolated nucleic acid molecules that comprise a polynucleotide having a nucleotide sequence at least 90% identical, and more preferably at least 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identical, to any of the nucleotide sequences in (a) or (b) above, or a polynucleotide which hybridizes under stringent hybridization conditions to a polynucleotide in (a) or (b) above. This polynucleotide which hybridizes does not hybridize under stringent hybridization conditions to a polynucleotide having a nucleotide sequence consisting of only A residues or of only T residues. Additional nucleic acid embodiments of the invention relate to isolated nucleic acid molecules comprising polynucleotides which encode the amino acid sequences of epitope-bearing portions of an S. pneumoniae polypeptide having an amino acid sequence in (a) above.
  • [0012]
    The present invention also relates to recombinant vectors, which include the isolated nucleic acid molecules of the present invention, and to host cells containing the recombinant vectors, as well as to methods of making such vectors and host cells and for using these vectors for the production of S. pneumoniae polypeptides or peptides by recombinant techniques.
  • [0013]
    The invention further provides isolated S. pneumoniae polypeptides having an amino acid sequence selected from the group consisting of an amino acid sequence of any of the polypeptides described in Table 1.
  • [0014]
    The polypeptides of the present invention also include polypeptides having an amino acid sequence with at least 70% similarity, and more preferably at least 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% similarity to those described in Table 1, as well as polypeptides having an amino acid sequence at least 70% identical, more preferably at least 75% identical, and still more preferably 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% identical to those above; as well as isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding such polypeptides.
  • [0015]
    The present invention further provides a vaccine, preferably a multi-component vaccine comprising one or more of the S. pneumoniae polynucleotides or polypeptides described in Table 1, or fragments thereof, together with a pharmaceutically acceptable diluent, carrier, or excipient, wherein the S. pneumoniae polypeptide(s) are present in an amount effective to elicit an immune response to members of the Streptococcus genus in an animal. The S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention may further be combined with one or more immunogens of one or more other streptococcal or non-streptococcal organisms to produce a multi-component vaccine intended to elicit an immunological response against members of the Streptococcus genus and, optionally, one or more non-streptococcal organisms.
  • [0016]
    The vaccines of the present invention can be administered in a DNA form, e.g., “naked” DNA, wherein the DNA encodes one or more streptococcal polypeptides and, optionally, one or more polypeptides of a non-streptococcal organism. The DNA encoding one or more polypeptides may be constructed such that these polypeptides are expressed fusion proteins.
  • [0017]
    The vaccines of the present invention may also be administered as a component of a genetically engineered organism. Thus, a genetically engineered organism which expresses one or more S. pneumoniae polypeptides may be administered to an animal. For example, such a genetically engineered organism may contain one or more S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention intracellularly, on its cell surface, or in its periplasmic space. Further, such a genetically engineered organism may secrete one or more S. pneumoniae polypeptides.
  • [0018]
    The vaccines of the present invention may be co-administered to an animal with an immune system modulator (e.g., CD86 and GM-CSF).
  • [0019]
    The invention also provides a method of inducing an immunological response in an animal to one or more members of the Streptococcus genus, preferably one or more isolates of the S. pneumoniae genus, comprising administering to the animal a vaccine as described above.
  • [0020]
    The invention further provides a method of inducing a protective immune response in an animal, sufficient to prevent or attenuate an infection by members of the Streptococcus genus, preferably at least S. pneumoniae, comprising administering to the animal a composition comprising one or more of the polynucleotides or polypeptides described in Table 1, or fragments thereof. Further, these polypeptides, or fragments thereof, may be conjugated to another immunogen and/or administered in admixture with an adjuvant.
  • [0021]
    The invention further relates to antibodies elicited in an animal by the administration of one or more S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention and to methods for producing such antibodies.
  • [0022]
    The invention also provides diagnostic methods for detecting the expression of genes of members of the Streptococcus genus in an animal. One such method involves assaying for the expression of a gene encoding S. pneumoniae peptides in a sample from an animal. This expression may be assayed either directly (e.g., by assaying polypeptide levels using antibodies elicited in response to amino acid sequences described in Table 1) or indirectly (e.g., by assaying for antibodies having specificity for amino acid sequences described in Table 1). An example of such a method involves the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify and detect Streptococcus nucleic acid sequences.
  • [0023]
    The present invention also relates to nucleic acid probes having all or part of a nucleotide sequence described in Table 1 (shown as SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, and so on through SEQ ID NO:225) which are capable of hybridizing under stringent conditions to Streptococcus nucleic acids. The invention further relates to a method of detecting one or more Streptococcus nucleic acids in a biological sample obtained from an animal, said one or more nucleic acids encoding Streptococcus polypeptides, comprising: (a) contacting the sample with one or more of the above-described nucleic acid probes, under conditions such that hybridization occurs, and (b) detecting hybridization of said one or more probes to the Streptococcus nucleic acid present in the biological sample.
  • [0024]
    The invention also includes immunoassays, including an immunoassay for detecting Streptococcus, preferably at least isolates of the S. pneumoniae genus, comprising incubation of a sample (which is suspected of being infected with Streptococcus) with a probe antibody directed against an antigen/epitope of S. pneumoniae, to be detected under conditions allowing the formation of an antigen-antibody complex; and detecting the antigen-antibody complex which contains the probe antibody. An immunoassay for the detection of antibodies which are directed against a Streptococcus antigen comprising the incubation of a sample (containing antibodies from a mammal suspected of being infected with Streptococcus) with a probe polypeptide including an epitope of S. pneumoniae, under conditions that allow the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which contain the probe epitope containing antigen.
  • [0025]
    Some aspects of the invention pertaining to kits are those for: investigating samples for the presence of polynucleotides derived from Streptococcus which comprise a polynucleotide probe including a nucleotide sequence selected from Table 1 or a fragment thereof of approximately 15 or more nucleotides, in an appropriate container; analyzing the samples for the presence of antibodies directed against a Streptococcus antigen made up of a polypeptide which contains a S. pneumoniae epitope present in the polypeptide, in a suitable container; and analyzing samples for the presence of Streptococcus antigens made up of an anti-S. pneumoniae antibody, in a suitable container.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0026]
    The present invention relates to recombinant antigenic S. pneumoniae polypeptides and fragments thereof. The invention also relates to methods for using these polypeptides to produce immunological responses and to confer immunological protection to disease caused by members of the genus Streptococcus, at least isolates of the S. pneumoniae genus. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences which encode antigenic S. pneumoniae polypeptides and to methods for detecting S. pneumoniae nucleic acids and polypeptides in biological samples. The invention also relates to S. pneumoniae-specific antibodies and methods for detecting such antibodies produced in a host animal.
  • [0000]
    Definitions
  • [0027]
    The following definitions are provided to clarify the subject matter which the inventors consider to be the present invention.
  • [0028]
    As used herein, the phrase “pathogenic agent” means an agent which causes a disease state or affliction in an animal. Included within this definition, for examples, are bacteria, protozoans, fungi, viruses and metazoan parasites which either produce a disease state or render an animal infected with such an organism susceptible to a disease state (e.g., a secondary infection). Further included are species and strains of the genus Streptococcus which produce disease states in animals.
  • [0029]
    As used herein, the term “organism” means any living biological system, including viruses, regardless of whether it is a pathogenic agent.
  • [0030]
    As used herein, the term “Streptococcus” means any species or strain of bacteria which is members of the genus Streptococcus. Such species and strains are known to those of skill in the art, and include those that are pathogenic and those that are not.
  • [0031]
    As used herein, the phrase “one or more S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention” means polypeptides comprising the amino acid sequence of one or more of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1 and disclosed as SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6, and so on through SEQ ID NO:226. These polypeptides may be expressed as fusion proteins wherein the S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention are linked to additional amino acid sequences which may be of streptococcal or non-streptococcal origin. This phrase further includes polypeptide comprising fragments of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention.
  • [0032]
    Additional definitions are provided throughout the specification.
  • [0000]
    Explanation of Table 1
  • [0033]
    Table 1, below, provides information describing 113 open reading frames (ORFs) which encode potentially antigenic polypeptides of S. pneumoniae of the present invention. The table lists the ORF identifier which consists of the letters SP, which denote S. pneumoniae, followed immediately by a three digit numeric code, which arbitrarily number the potentially antigenic polypeptides of S. pneumoniae of the present invention. The table further correlates the ORF identifier with a sequence identification number (SEQ ID NO:). The actual nucleotide or amino acid sequence of each ORF identifier is shown in the Sequence Listing under the corresponding SEQ ID NO.
  • [0034]
    Thus, for example, the designation “SP126” refers to both the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of S. pneumoniae polypeptide number 126 of the present invention. Further, “SP126” correlates with the nucleotide sequence shown as SEQ ID NO:223 and with the amino acid sequence shown as SEQ ID NO:224 as is described in Table 1.
  • [0035]
    The open reading frame within each “ORF” begins with the second nucleotide shown. Thus, the first codon for each nucleotide sequence shown is bases 2-4, the second 5-7, the third 8-10, and so on.
  • [0000]
    Explanation of Table 2
  • [0036]
    Table 2 lists the antigenic epitopes present in each of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1 as predicted by the inventors. Each S. pneumoniae polypeptide shown in Table 1 has one or more antigenic epitopes described in Table 2. It will be appreciated that depending on the analytical criteria used to predict antigenic determinants, the exact address of the determinant may vary slightly. The exact location of the antigenic determinant may shift by about 1 to 5 residues, more likely 1 to 2 residues, depending on the criteria used. Thus, the first antigenic determinant described in Table 2, “Lys-1 to Ile-10” of SP100, represents a peptide comprising the lysine at position 1 in SEQ ID NO:2 through and including the isoleucine at position 10 in SEQ ID NO:2, but may include more or fewer residues than those 10. It will also be appreciated that, generally speaking, amino acids can be added to either terminus of a peptide or polypeptide containing an antigenic epitope without affecting its activity, whereas removing residues from a peptide or polypeptide containing only the antigenic determinant is much more likely to destroy activity. It will be appreciated that the residues and locations shown described in Table 2 correspond to the amino acid sequences for each ORF shown in Table 1 and in the Sequence Listing.
  • [0000]
    Explanation of Table 3
  • [0037]
    Table 3 shows PCR primers designed by the inventors for the amplification of polynucleotides encoding polypeptides of the present invention according to the method of Example 1. PCR primer design is routine in the art and those shown in Table 3 are provided merely for the convenience of the skilled artisan. It will be appreciated that others can be used with equal success. For each primer, the table lists the corresponding ORF designation from Table 1 followed by either an “A” or a “B”. The “A” primers are the 5′ primers and the “B” primers 3′. A restriction enzyme site was built into each primer to allow ease of cloning. The restriction enzyme which will recognize and cleave a sequence within each primer is shown in Table 3, as well, under the heading “RE” for restriction enzyme. Finally the sequence identifier is shown in Table 3 for each primer for easy correlation with the Sequence Listing.
  • [0000]
    Selection of Nucleic Acid Sequences Encoding Antigenic S. pneumoniae Polypeptides
  • [0038]
    The present invention provides a select number of ORFs from those presented in the fragments of the S. pneumoniae genome which may prove useful for the generation of a protective immune response. The sequenced S. pneumoniae genomic DNA was obtained from a sub-cultured isolate of S. pneumoniae Strain 7/87 14.8.91, which has been deposited at the American Type Culture Collection, as a convenience to those of skill in the art. The S. pneumoniae isolate was deposited on Oct. 10, 1996 at the ATCC™, 10801 University Boulevard, Manassas, Va. 20110-2209 (present address), and given accession number 55840. A genomic library constructed from DNA isolated from the S. pneumoniae isolate was also deposited at the ATCC™ on Oct. 11, 1996 and given ATCC™ Deposit No. 97755. A more complete listing of the sequence obtained from the S. pneumoniae genome may be found in co-pending U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/029,960, filed Oct. 31, 1996, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Some ORFs contained in the subset of fragments of the S. pneumoniae genome disclosed herein were derived through the use of a number of screening criteria detailed below.
  • [0039]
    The selected ORFs do not consist of complete ORFs. Although a polypeptide representing a complete ORF may be the closest approximation of a protein native to an organism, it is not always preferred to express a complete ORF in a heterologous system. It may be challenging to express and purify a highly hydrophobic protein by common laboratory methods. Thus, the polypeptide vaccine candidates described herein may have been modified slightly to simplify the production of recombinant protein. For example, nucleotide sequences which encode highly hydrophobic domains, such as those found at the amino terminal signal sequence, have been excluded from some constructs used for in vitro expression of the polypeptides. Furthermore, any highly hydrophobic amino acid sequences occurring at the carboxy terminus have also been excluded from the recombinant expression constructs. Thus, in one embodiment, a polypeptide which represents a truncated or modified ORF may be used as an antigen.
  • [0040]
    While numerous methods are known in the art for selecting potentially immunogenic polypeptides, many of the ORFs disclosed herein were selected on the basis of screening all theoretical S. pneumoniae ORFs for several aspects of potential immunogenicity. One set of selection criteria are as follows:
  • [0041]
    1. Type I signal sequence: An amino terminal type I signal sequence generally directs a nascent protein across the plasma and outer membranes to the exterior of the bacterial cell. Experimental evidence obtained from studies with Escherichia coli suggests that the typical type I signal sequence consists of the following biochemical and physical attributes (Izard, J. W. and Kendall, D. A. Mol. Microbiol. 13:765-773 (1994)). The length of the type I signal sequence is approximately 15 to 25 primarily hydrophobic amino acid residues with a net positive charge in the extreme amino terminus. In addition, the central region of the signal sequence adopts an alpha-helical conformation in a hydrophobic environment. Finally, the region surrounding the actual site of cleavage is ideally six residues long, with small side-chain amino acids in the −1 and −3 positions.
  • [0042]
    2. Type IV signal sequence: The type IV signal sequence is an example of the several types of functional signal sequences which exist in addition to the type I signal sequence detailed above. Although functionally related, the type IV signal sequence possesses a unique set of biochemical and physical attributes (Strom, M. S. and Lory, S., J. Bacteriol. 174:7345-7351 (1992)). These are typically six to eight amino acids with a net basic charge followed by an additional sixteen to thirty primarily hydrophobic residues. The cleavage site of a type IV signal sequence is typically after the initial six to eight amino acids at the extreme amino terminus. In addition, type IV signal sequences generally contain a phenylalanine residue at the +1 site relative to the cleavage site.
  • [0043]
    3. Lipoprotein: Studies of the cleavage sites of twenty-six bacterial lipoprotein precursors has allowed the definition of a consensus amino acid sequence for lipoprotein cleavage. Nearly three-fourths of the bacterial lipoprotein precursors examined contained the sequence L-(A,S)-(G,A)-C (SEQ ID NO:453) at positions −3 to +1, relative to the point of cleavage (Hayashi, S. and Wu, H. C., J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 22:451-471 (1990)).
  • [0044]
    4. LPXTG motif: It has been experimentally determined that most anchored proteins found on the surface of gram-positive bacteria possess a highly conserved carboxy terminal sequence. More than fifty such proteins from organisms such as S. pyogenes, S. mutans, E. faecalis, S. pneumoniae, and others, have been identified based on their extracellular location and carboxy terminal amino acid sequence (Fischetti, V. A., ASM News 62:405-410 (1996)). The conserved region consists of six charged amino acids at the extreme carboxy terminus coupled to 15-20 hydrophobic amino acids presumed to function as a transmembrane domain. Immediately adjacent to the transmembrane domain is a six amino acid sequence conserved in nearly all proteins examined. The amino acid sequence of this region is L-P-X-T-G-X (SEQ ID NO:454), where X is any amino acid.
  • [0045]
    An algorithm for selecting antigenic and immunogenic S. pneumoniae polypeptides including the foregoing criteria was developed. Use of the algorithm by the inventors to select immunologically useful S. pneumoniae polypeptides resulted in the selection of a number of the disclosed ORFs. Polypeptides comprising the polypeptides identified in this group may be produced by techniques standard in the art and as further described herein.
  • [0000]
    Nucleic Acid Molecules
  • [0046]
    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules comprising polynucleotides encoding the S. pneumoniae polypeptides having the amino acid sequences described in Table 1 and shown as SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6, and so on through SEQ ID NO:226, which were determined by sequencing the genome of S. pneumoniae and selected as putative immunogens.
  • [0047]
    Unless otherwise indicated, all nucleotide sequences determined by sequencing a DNA molecule herein were determined using an automated DNA sequencer (such as the Model 373 from Applied Biosystems, Inc.), and all amino acid sequences of polypeptides encoded by DNA molecules determined herein were predicted by translation of DNA sequences determined as above. Therefore, as is known in the art for any DNA sequence determined by this automated approach, any nucleotide sequence determined herein may contain some errors. Nucleotide sequences determined by automation are typically at least about 90% identical, more typically at least about 95% to at least about 99.9% identical to the actual nucleotide sequence of the sequenced DNA molecule. The actual sequence can be more precisely determined by other approaches including manual DNA sequencing methods well known in the art. As is also known in the art, a single insertion or deletion in a determined nucleotide sequence compared to the actual sequence will cause a frame shift in translation of the nucleotide sequence such that the predicted amino acid sequence encoded by a determined nucleotide sequence will be completely different from the amino acid sequence actually encoded by the sequenced DNA molecule, beginning at the point of such an insertion or deletion.
  • [0048]
    Unless otherwise indicated, each “nucleotide sequence” set forth herein is presented as a sequence of deoxyribonucleotides (abbreviated A, G, C and T). However, by “nucleotide sequence” of a nucleic acid molecule or polynucleotide is intended, for a DNA molecule or polynucleotide, a sequence of deoxyribonucleotides, and for an RNA molecule or polynucleotide, the corresponding sequence of ribonucleotides (A, G, C and U), where each thymidine deoxyribonucleotide (T) in the specified deoxyribonucleotide sequence is replaced by the ribonucleotide uridine (U). For instance, reference to an RNA molecule having a sequence described in Table 1 set forth using deoxyribonucleotide abbreviations is intended to indicate an RNA molecule having a sequence in which each deoxyribonucleotide A, G or C described in Table 1 has been replaced by the corresponding ribonucleotide A, G or C, and each deoxyribonucleotide T has been replaced by a ribonucleotide U.
  • [0049]
    Nucleic acid molecules of the present invention may be in the form of RNA, such as mRNA, or in the form of DNA, including, for instance, cDNA and genomic DNA obtained by cloning or produced synthetically. The DNA may be double-stranded or single-stranded. Single-stranded DNA or RNA may be the coding strand, also known as the sense strand, or it may be the non-coding strand, also referred to as the anti-sense strand.
  • [0050]
    By “isolated” nucleic acid molecule(s) is intended a nucleic acid molecule, DNA or RNA, which has been removed from its native environment. For example, recombinant DNA molecules contained in a vector are considered isolated for the purposes of the present invention. Further examples of isolated DNA molecules include recombinant DNA molecules maintained in heterologous host cells or purified (partially or substantially) DNA molecules in solution. Isolated RNA molecules include in vivo or in vitro RNA transcripts of the DNA molecules of the present invention. Isolated nucleic acid molecules according to the present invention further include such molecules produced synthetically.
  • [0051]
    Isolated nucleic acid molecules of the present invention include DNA molecules comprising a nucleotide sequence described in Table 1 and shown as SEQ ID NO:1, SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, and so on through SEQ ID NO:225; DNA molecules comprising the coding sequences for the polypeptides described in Table 1 and shown as SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6, and so on through SEQ ID NO:226; and DNA molecules which comprise sequences substantially different from those described above but which, due to the degeneracy of the genetic code, still encode the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1. Of course, the genetic code is well known in the art. Thus, it would be routine for one skilled in the art to generate such degenerate variants.
  • [0052]
    The invention also provides nucleic acid molecules having sequences complementary to any one of those described in Table 1. Such isolated molecules, particularly DNA molecules, are useful as probes for detecting expression of Streptococcal genes, for instance, by Northern blot analysis or the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
  • [0053]
    The present invention is further directed to fragments of the isolated nucleic acid molecules described herein. By a fragment of an isolated nucleic acid molecule having a nucleotide sequence described in Table 1, is intended fragments at least about 15 nt, and more preferably at least about 17 nt, still more preferably at least about 20 nt, and even more preferably, at least about 25 nt in length which are useful as diagnostic probes and primers as discussed herein. Of course, larger fragments 50-100 nt in length are also useful according to the present invention as are fragments corresponding to most, if not all, of a nucleotide sequence described in Table 1. By a fragment at least 20 nt in length, for example, is intended fragments which include 20 or more contiguous bases of a nucleotide sequence as described in Table 1. Since the nucleotide sequences identified in Table 1 are provided as SEQ ID NO:1, SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, and so on through SEQ ID NO:225, generating such DNA fragments would be routine to the skilled artisan. For example, such fragments could be generated synthetically.
  • [0054]
    Preferred nucleic acid fragments of the present invention also include nucleic acid molecules comprising nucleotide sequences encoding epitope-bearing portions of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides identified in Table 1. Such nucleic acid fragments of the present invention include, for example, nucleotide sequences encoding polypeptide fragments comprising from about the amino terminal residue to about the carboxy terminal residue of each fragment shown in Table 2. The above referred to polypeptide fragments are antigenic regions of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides identified in Table 1.
  • [0055]
    In another aspect, the invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules comprising polynucleotides which hybridize under stringent hybridization conditions to a portion of a polynucleotide in a nucleic acid molecule of the invention described above, for instance, a nucleic acid sequence identified in Table 1. By “stringent hybridization conditions” is intended overnight incubation at 42° C. in a solution comprising: 50% formamide, 5×SSC (150 mM NaCl, 15 mM trisodium citrate), 50 mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.6), 5× Denhardt's solution, 10% dextran sulfate, and 20 g/ml denatured, sheared salmon sperm DNA, followed by washing the filters in 0.1×SSC at about 65° C.
  • [0056]
    By polynucleotides which hybridize to a “portion” of a polynucleotide is intended polynucleotides (either DNA or RNA) which hybridize to at least about 15 nucleotides (nt), and more preferably at least about 17 nt, still more preferably at least about 20 nt, and even more preferably about 25-70 nt of the reference polynucleotide. These are useful as diagnostic probes and primers as discussed above and in more detail below.
  • [0057]
    Of course, polynucleotides hybridizing to a larger portion of the reference polynucleotide, for instance, a portion 50-100 nt in length, or even to the entire length of the reference polynucleotide, are also useful as probes according to the present invention, as are polynucleotides corresponding to most, if not all, of a nucleotide sequence as identified in Table 1. By a portion of a polynucleotide of “at least 20 nt in length,” for example, is intended 20 or more contiguous nucleotides from the nucleotide sequence of the reference polynucleotide (e.g., a nucleotide sequences as described in Table 1). As noted above, such portions are useful diagnostically either as probes according to conventional DNA hybridization techniques or as primers for amplification of a target sequence by PCR, as described in the literature (for instance, in Molecular Cloning, A Laboratory Manual, 2nd. edition, Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E. F. and Maniatis, T., eds., Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. (1989), the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated herein by reference).
  • [0058]
    Since nucleic acid sequences encoding the S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention are identified in Table 1 and provided as SEQ ID NO:1, SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, and so on through SEQ ID NO:225, generating polynucleotides which hybridize to portions of these sequences would be routine to the skilled artisan. For example, the hybridizing polynucleotides of the present invention could be generated synthetically according to known techniques.
  • [0059]
    As indicated, nucleic acid molecules of the present invention which encode S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention may include, but are not limited to those encoding the amino acid sequences of the polypeptides by themselves; and additional coding sequences which code for additional amino acids, such as those which provide additional functionalities. Thus, the sequences encoding these polypeptides may be fused to a marker sequence, such as a sequence encoding a peptide which facilitates purification of the fused polypeptide. In certain preferred embodiments of this aspect of the invention, the marker amino acid sequence is a hexa-histidine peptide, such as the tag provided in a pQE vector (Qiagen, Inc.), among others, many of which are commercially available. As described by Gentz and colleagues (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:821-824 (1989)), for instance, hexa-histidine provides for convenient purification of the resulting fusion protein.
  • [0060]
    Thus, the present invention also includes genetic fusions wherein the S. pneumoniae nucleic acid sequences coding sequences identified in Table 1 are linked to additional nucleic acid sequences to produce fusion proteins. These fusion proteins may include epitopes of streptococcal or non-streptococcal origin designed to produce proteins having enhanced immunogenicity. Further, the fusion proteins of the present invention may contain antigenic determinants known to provide helper T-cell stimulation, peptides encoding sites for post-translational modifications which enhance immunogenicity (e.g., acylation), peptides which facilitate purification (e.g., histidine “tag”), or amino acid sequences which target the fusion protein to a desired location (e.g., a heterologous leader sequence).
  • [0061]
    In all cases of bacterial expression, an N-terminal methionine residues is added. In many cases, however, the N-terminal methionine residues is cleaved off post-translationally. Thus, the invention includes polypeptides shown in Table 1 with, and without an N-terminal methionine.
  • [0062]
    The present invention thus includes nucleic acid molecules and sequences which encode fusion proteins comprising one or more S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention fused to an amino acid sequence which allows for post-translational modification to enhance immunogenicity. This post-translational modification may occur either in vitro or when the fusion protein is expressed in vivo in a host cell. An example of such a modification is the introduction of an amino acid sequence which results in the attachment of a lipid moiety.
  • [0063]
    Thus, as indicated above, the present invention includes genetic fusions wherein a S. pneumoniae nucleic acid sequence identified in Table 1 is linked to a nucleotide sequence encoding another amino acid sequence. These other amino acid sequences may be of streptococcal origin (e.g., another sequence selected from Table 1) or non-streptococcal origin.
  • [0064]
    The present invention further relates to variants of the nucleic acid molecules of the present invention, which encode portions, analogs or derivatives of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1. Variants may occur naturally, such as a natural allelic variant. By an “allelic variant” is intended one of several alternate forms of a gene occupying a given locus on a chromosome of an organism (Genes II, Lewin, B., ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York (1985)). Non-naturally occurring variants may be produced using art-known mutagenesis techniques.
  • [0065]
    Such variants include those produced by nucleotide substitutions, deletions or additions. The substitutions, deletions or additions may involve one or more nucleotides. These variants may be altered in coding regions, non-coding regions, or both. Alterations in the coding regions may produce conservative or non-conservative amino acid substitutions, deletions or additions. Especially preferred among these are silent substitutions, additions and deletions, which do not alter the properties and activities of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides disclosed herein or portions thereof. Silent substitution are most likely to be made in non-epitopic regions. Guidance regarding those regions containing epitopes is provided herein, for example, in Table 2. Also especially preferred in this regard are conservative substitutions.
  • [0066]
    Further embodiments of the invention include isolated nucleic acid molecules comprising a polynucleotide having a nucleotide sequence at least 90% identical, and more preferably at least 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identical to: (a) a nucleotide sequence encoding any of the amino acid sequences of the polypeptides identified in Table 1; and (b) a nucleotide sequence complementary to any of the nucleotide sequences in (a) above.
  • [0067]
    By a polynucleotide having a nucleotide sequence at least, for example, 95% “identical” to a reference nucleotide sequence encoding a S. pneumoniae polypeptide described in Table 1, is intended that the nucleotide sequence of the polynucleotide is identical to the reference sequence except that the polynucleotide sequence may include up to five point mutations per each 100 nucleotides of the reference nucleotide sequence encoding the subject S. pneumoniae polypeptide. In other words, to obtain a polynucleotide having a nucleotide sequence at least 95% identical to a reference nucleotide sequence, up to 5% of the nucleotides in the reference sequence may be deleted or substituted with another nucleotide, or a number of nucleotides up to 5% of the total nucleotides in the reference sequence may be inserted into the reference sequence. These mutations of the reference sequence may occur at the 5′ or 3′ terminal positions of the reference nucleotide sequence or anywhere between those terminal positions, interspersed either individually among nucleotides in the reference sequence or in one or more contiguous groups within the reference sequence.
  • [0068]
    Certain nucleotides within some of the nucleic acid sequences shown in Table 1 were ambiguous upon sequencing. Completely unknown sequences are shown as an “N”. Other unresolved nucleotides are known to be either a purine, shown as “R”, or a pyrimidine, shown as “Y”. Accordingly, when determining identity between two nucleotide sequences, identity is met where any nucleotide, including an “R”, “Y” or “N”, is found in a test sequence and at the corresponding position in the reference sequence (from Table 1). Likewise, an A, G or “R” in a test sequence is identical to an “R” in the reference sequence; and a T, C or “Y” in a test sequence is identical to a “Y” in the reference sequence.
  • [0069]
    As a practical matter, whether any particular nucleic acid molecule is at least 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identical to, for instance, a nucleotide sequence described in Table 1 can be determined conventionally using known computer programs such as the Bestfit program (Wisconsin Sequence Analysis Package, Version 8 for Unix, Genetics Computer Group, University Research Park, 575 Science Drive, Madison, Wis. 53711). Bestfit uses the local homology algorithm of Smith and Waterman (Advances in Applied Mathematics 2:482-489 (1981)), to find the best segment of homology between two sequences. When using Bestfit or any other sequence alignment program to determine whether a particular sequence is, for instance, 95% identical to a reference sequence according to the present invention, the parameters are set, of course, such that the percentage of identity is calculated over the full length of the reference nucleotide sequence and that gaps in homology of up to 5% of the total number of nucleotides in the reference sequence are allowed.
  • [0070]
    The present application is directed to nucleic acid molecules at least 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% identical to a nucleic acid sequences described in Table 1. One of skill in the art would still know how to use the nucleic acid molecule, for instance, as a hybridization probe or a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer. Uses of the nucleic acid molecules of the present invention include, inter alia, (1) isolating Streptococcal genes or allelic variants thereof from either a genomic or cDNA library and (2) Northern Blot or PCR analysis for detecting Streptococcal mRNA expression.
  • [0071]
    Of course, due to the degeneracy of the genetic code, one of ordinary skill in the art will immediately recognize that a large number of nucleic acid molecules having a sequence at least 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% identical to a nucleic acid sequence identified in Table 1 will encode the same polypeptide. In fact, since degenerate variants of these nucleotide sequences all encode the same polypeptide, this will be clear to the skilled artisan even without performing the above described comparison assay.
  • [0072]
    It will be further recognized in the art that, for such nucleic acid molecules that are not degenerate variants, a reasonable number will also encode proteins having antigenic epitopes of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention. This is because the skilled artisan is fully aware of amino acid substitutions that are either less likely or not likely to significantly effect the antigenicity of a polypeptide (e.g., replacement of an amino acid in a region which is not believed to form an antigenic epitope). For example, since antigenic epitopes have been identified which contain as few as six amino acids (see Harlow, et al., Antibodies: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd Ed.; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. (1988), page 76), in instances where a polypeptide has multiple antigenic epitopes the alteration of several amino acid residues would often not be expected to eliminate all of the antigenic epitopes of that polypeptide. This is especially so when the alterations are in regions believed to not constitute antigenic epitopes.
  • [0000]
    Vectors and Host Cells
  • [0073]
    The present invention also relates to vectors which include the isolated DNA molecules of the present invention, host cells which are genetically engineered with the recombinant vectors, and the production of S. pneumoniae polypeptides or fragments thereof by recombinant techniques.
  • [0074]
    Recombinant constructs may be introduced into host cells using well known techniques such as infection, transduction, transfection, transvection, electroporation and transformation. The vector may be, for example, a phage, plasmid, viral or retroviral vector. Retroviral vectors may be replication competent or replication defective. In the latter case, viral propagation generally will occur only in complementing host cells.
  • [0075]
    The polynucleotides may be joined to a vector containing a selectable marker for propagation in a host. Generally, a plasmid vector is introduced in a precipitate, such as a calcium phosphate precipitate, or in a complex with a charged lipid. If the vector is a virus, it may be packaged in vitro using an appropriate packaging cell line and then transduced into host cells.
  • [0076]
    Preferred are vectors comprising cis-acting control regions to the polynucleotide of interest. Appropriate trans-acting factors may be supplied by the host, supplied by a complementing vector or supplied by the vector itself upon introduction into the host.
  • [0077]
    In certain preferred embodiments in this regard, the vectors provide for specific expression, which may be inducible and/or cell type-specific. Particularly preferred among such vectors are those inducible by environmental factors that are easy to manipulate, such as temperature and nutrient additives.
  • [0078]
    Expression vectors useful in the present invention include chromosomal-, episomal- and virus-derived vectors, e.g., vectors derived from bacterial plasmids, bacteriophage, yeast episomes, yeast chromosomal elements, viruses such as baculoviruses, papova viruses, vaccinia viruses, adenoviruses, fowl pox viruses, pseudorabies viruses and retroviruses, and vectors derived from combinations thereof, such as cosmids and phagemids.
  • [0079]
    The DNA insert should be operatively linked to an appropriate promoter, such as the phage lambda PL promoter, the E. coli lac, trp and tac promoters, the SV40 early and late promoters and promoters of retroviral LTRs, to name a few. Other suitable promoters will be known to the skilled artisan. The expression constructs will further contain sites for transcription initiation, termination and, in the transcribed region, a ribosome binding site for translation. The coding portion of the mature transcripts expressed by the constructs will preferably include a translation initiating site at the beginning and a termination codon (UAA, UGA or UAG) appropriately positioned at the end of the polypeptide to be translated.
  • [0080]
    As indicated, the expression vectors will preferably include at least one selectable marker. Such markers include dihydrofolate reductase or neomycin resistance for eukaryotic cell culture and tetracycline or ampicillin resistance genes for culturing in E. coli and other bacteria. Representative examples of appropriate hosts include, but are not limited to, bacterial cells, such as E. coli, Streptomyces and Salmonella typhimurium cells; fungal cells, such as yeast cells; insect cells such as Drosophila S2 and Spodoptera Sf9 cells; animal cells such as CHO, COS and Bowes melanoma cells; and plant cells. Appropriate culture mediums and conditions for the above-described host cells are known in the art.
  • [0081]
    Among vectors preferred for use in bacteria include pQE70, pQE60 and pQE-9, available from Qiagen; pBS vectors, Phagescript vectors, Bluescript vectors, pNH8A, pNH16a, pNH18A, pNH46A available from Stratagene; pET series of vectors available from Novagen; and ptrc99a, pKK223-3, pKK233-3, pDR540, pRIT5 available from Pharmacia. Among preferred eukaryotic vectors are pWLNEO, pSV2CAT, pOG44, pXT1 and pSG available from Stratagene; and pSVK3, pBPV, pMSG and pSVL available from Pharmacia. Other suitable vectors will be readily apparent to the skilled artisan.
  • [0082]
    Among known bacterial promoters suitable for use in the present invention include the E. coli lacI and lacZ promoters, the T3 and T7 promoters, the gpt promoter, the lambda PR and PL promoters and the trp promoter. Suitable eukaryotic promoters include the CMV immediate early promoter, the HSV thymidine kinase promoter, the early and late SV40 promoters, the promoters of retroviral LTRs, such as those of the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), and metallothionein promoters, such as the mouse metallothionein-I promoter.
  • [0083]
    Introduction of the construct into the host cell can be effected by calcium phosphate transfection, DEAE-dextran mediated transfection, cationic lipid-mediated transfection, electroporation, transduction, infection or other methods. Such methods are described in many standard laboratory manuals (for example, Davis, et al., Basic Methods In Molecular Biology (1986)).
  • [0084]
    Transcription of DNA encoding the polypeptides of the present invention by higher eukaryotes may be increased by inserting an enhancer sequence into the vector. Enhancers are cis-acting elements of DNA, usually about from 10 to 300 bp that act to increase transcriptional activity of a promoter in a given host cell-type. Examples of enhancers include the SV40 enhancer, which is located on the late side of the replication origin at bp 100 to 270, the cytomegalovirus early promoter enhancer, the polyoma enhancer on the late side of the replication origin, and adenovirus enhancers.
  • [0085]
    For secretion of the translated polypeptide into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, into the periplasmic space or into the extracellular environment, appropriate secretion signals may be incorporated into the expressed polypeptide. The signals may be endogenous to the polypeptide or they may be heterologous signals.
  • [0086]
    The polypeptide may be expressed in a modified form, such as a fusion protein, and may include not only secretion signals, but also additional heterologous functional regions. For instance, a region of additional amino acids, particularly charged amino acids, may be added to the N-terminus of the polypeptide to improve stability and persistence in the host cell, during purification, or during subsequent handling and storage. Also, peptide moieties may be added to the polypeptide to facilitate purification. Such regions may be removed prior to final preparation of the polypeptide. The addition of peptide moieties to polypeptides to engender secretion or excretion, to improve stability and to facilitate purification, among others, are familiar and routine techniques in the art. A preferred fusion protein comprises a heterologous region from immunoglobulin that is useful to solubilize proteins. For example, EP-A-O 464 533 (Canadian counterpart 2045869) discloses fusion proteins comprising various portions of constant region of immunoglobin molecules together with another human protein or part thereof. In many cases, the Fc part in a fusion protein is thoroughly advantageous for use in therapy and diagnosis and thus results, for example, in improved pharmacokinetic properties (EP-A 0232 262). On the other hand, for some uses it would be desirable to be able to delete the Fc part after the fusion protein has been expressed, detected and purified in the advantageous manner described. This is the case when Fc portion proves to be a hindrance to use in therapy and diagnosis, for example when the fusion protein is to be used as antigen for immunizations. In drug discovery, for example, human proteins, such as, hIL5-receptor has been fused with Fc portions for the purpose of high-throughput screening assays to identify antagonists of hIL-5. See Bennett, D. et al., J. Molec. Recogn. 8:52-58 (1995) and Johanson, K. et al., J. Biol. Chem. 270 (16):9459-9471 (1995).
  • [0087]
    The S. pneumoniae polypeptides can be recovered and purified from recombinant cell cultures by well-known methods including ammonium sulfate or ethanol precipitation, acid extraction, anion or cation exchange chromatography, phosphocellulose chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, affinity chromatography, hydroxylapatite chromatography, lectin chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (“HPLC”) is employed for purification. Polypeptides of the present invention include naturally purified products, products of chemical synthetic procedures, and products produced by recombinant techniques from a prokaryotic or eukaryotic host, including, for example, bacterial, yeast, higher plant, insect and mammalian cells.
  • [0000]
    Polypeptides and Fragments
  • [0088]
    The invention further provides isolated polypeptides having the amino acid sequences described in Table 1, and shown as SEQ ID NO:2, SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6, and so on through SEQ ID NO:226, and peptides or polypeptides comprising portions of the above polypeptides. The terms “peptide” and “oligopeptide” are considered synonymous (as is commonly recognized) and each term can be used interchangeably as the context requires to indicate a chain of at least two amino acids coupled by peptidyl linkages. The word “polypeptide” is used herein for chains containing more than ten amino acid residues. All oligopeptide and polypeptide formulas or sequences herein are written from left to right and in the direction from amino terminus to carboxy terminus.
  • [0089]
    Some amino acid sequences of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1 can be varied without significantly effecting the antigenicity of the polypeptides. If such differences in sequence are contemplated, it should be remembered that there will be critical areas on the polypeptide which determine antigenicity. In general, it is possible to replace residues which do not form part of an antigenic epitope without significantly effecting the antigenicity of a polypeptide. Guidance for such alterations is given in Table 2 wherein epitopes for each polypeptide is delineated.
  • [0090]
    The polypeptides of the present invention are preferably provided in an isolated form. By “isolated polypeptide” is intended a polypeptide removed from its native environment. Thus, a polypeptide produced and/or contained within a recombinant host cell is considered isolated for purposes of the present invention. Also intended as an “isolated polypeptide” is a polypeptide that has been purified, partially or substantially, from a recombinant host cell. For example, recombinantly produced versions of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1 can be substantially purified by the one-step method described by Smith and Johnson (Gene 67:31-40 (1988)).
  • [0091]
    The polypeptides of the present invention include: (a) an amino acid sequence of any of the polypeptides described in Table 1; and (b) an amino acid sequence of an epitope-bearing portion of any one of the polypeptides of (a); as well as polypeptides with at least 70% similarity, and more preferably at least 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% similarity to those described in (a) or (b) above, as well as polypeptides having an amino acid sequence at least 70% identical, more preferably at least 75% identical, and still more preferably 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% identical to those above.
  • [0092]
    By “% similarity” for two polypeptides is intended a similarity score produced by comparing the amino acid sequences of the two polypeptides using the Bestfit program (Wisconsin Sequence Analysis Package, Version 8 for Unix, Genetics Computer Group, University Research Park, 575 Science Drive, Madison, Wis. 53711) and the default settings for determining similarity. Bestfit uses the local homology algorithm of Smith and Waterman (Advances in Applied Mathematics 2:482-489 (1981)) to find the best segment of similarity between two sequences.
  • [0093]
    By a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence at least, for example, 95% “identical” to a reference amino acid sequence of a S. pneumoniae polypeptide is intended that the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide is identical to the reference sequence except that the polypeptide sequence may include up to five amino acid alterations per each 100 amino acids of the reference amino acid sequence. In other words, to obtain a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence at least 95% identical to a reference amino acid sequence, up to 5% of the amino acid residues in the reference sequence may be deleted or substituted with another amino acid, or a number of amino acids up to 5% of the total amino acid residues in the reference sequence may be inserted into the reference sequence. These alterations of the reference sequence may occur at the amino or carboxy terminal positions of the reference amino acid sequence or anywhere between those terminal positions, interspersed either individually among residues in the reference sequence or in one or more contiguous groups within the reference sequence.
  • [0094]
    The amino acid sequences shown in Table 1 may have on or more “X” residues. “X” represents unknown. Thus, for purposes of defining identity, if any amino acid is present at the same position in a reference amino acid sequence (shown in Table 1) where an X is shown, the two sequences are identical at that position.
  • [0095]
    As a practical matter, whether any particular polypeptide is at least 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% identical to, for instance, an amino acid sequence shown in Table 1, can be determined conventionally using known computer programs such the Bestfit program (Wisconsin Sequence Analysis Package, Version 8 for Unix, Genetics Computer Group, University Research Park, 575 Science Drive, Madison, Wis. 53711). When using Bestfit or any other sequence alignment program to determine whether a particular sequence is, for instance, 95% identical to a reference sequence according to the present invention, the parameters are set, of course, such that the percentage of identity is calculated over the full length of the reference amino acid sequence and that gaps in homology of up to 5% of the total number of amino acid residues in the reference sequence are allowed.
  • [0096]
    As described below, the polypeptides of the present invention can also be used to raise polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, which are useful in assays for detecting Streptococcal protein expression.
  • [0097]
    In another aspect, the invention provides peptides and polypeptides comprising epitope-bearing portions of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the invention. These epitopes are immunogenic or antigenic epitopes of the polypeptides of the invention. An “immunogenic epitope” is defined as a part of a protein that elicits an antibody response when the whole protein or polypeptide is the immunogen. These immunogenic epitopes are believed to be confined to a few loci on the molecule. On the other hand, a region of a protein molecule to which an antibody can bind is defined as an “antigenic determinant” or “antigenic epitope.” The number of immunogenic epitopes of a protein generally is less than the number of antigenic epitopes (Geysen, et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81:3998-4002 (1983)). Predicted antigenic epitopes are shown in Table 2, below.
  • [0098]
    As to the selection of peptides or polypeptides bearing an antigenic epitope (i.e., that contain a region of a protein molecule to which an antibody can bind), it is well known in that art that relatively short synthetic peptides that mimic part of a protein sequence are routinely capable of eliciting an antiserum that reacts with the partially mimicked protein (for instance, Sutcliffe, J., et al., Science 219:660-666 (1983)). Peptides capable of eliciting protein-reactive sera are frequently represented in the primary sequence of a protein, can be characterized by a set of simple chemical rules, and are confined neither to immunodominant regions of intact proteins (i.e., immunogenic epitopes) nor to the amino or carboxyl terminals. Peptides that are extremely hydrophobic and those of six or fewer residues generally are ineffective at inducing antibodies that bind to the mimicked protein; longer, peptides, especially those containing proline residues, usually are effective (Sutcliffe, et al., supra, p. 661). For instance, 18 of 20 peptides designed according to these guidelines, containing 8-39 residues covering 75% of the sequence of the influenza virus hemagglutinin HA1 polypeptide chain, induced antibodies that reacted with the HA1 protein or intact virus; and 12/12 peptides from the MuLV polymerase and 18/18 from the rabies glycoprotein induced antibodies that precipitated the respective proteins.
  • [0099]
    Antigenic epitope-bearing peptides and polypeptides of the invention are therefore useful to raise antibodies, including monoclonal antibodies, that bind specifically to a polypeptide of the invention. Thus, a high proportion of hybridomas obtained by fusion of spleen cells from donors immunized with an antigen epitope-bearing peptide generally secrete antibody reactive with the native protein (Sutcliffe, et al., supra, p. 663). The antibodies raised by antigenic epitope-bearing peptides or polypeptides are useful to detect the mimicked protein, and antibodies to different peptides may be used for tracking the fate of various regions of a protein precursor which undergoes post-translational processing. The peptides and anti-peptide antibodies may be used in a variety of qualitative or quantitative assays for the mimicked protein, for instance in competition assays since it has been shown that even short peptides (e.g., about 9 amino acids) can bind and displace the larger peptides in immunoprecipitation assays (for instance, Wilson, et al., Cell 37:767-778 (1984) p. 777). The anti-peptide antibodies of the invention also are useful for purification of the mimicked protein, for instance, by adsorption chromatography using methods well known in the art.
  • [0100]
    Antigenic epitope-bearing peptides and polypeptides of the invention designed according to the above guidelines preferably contain a sequence of at least seven, more preferably at least nine and most preferably between about 15 to about 30 amino acids contained within the amino acid sequence of a polypeptide of the invention. However, peptides or polypeptides comprising a larger portion of an amino acid sequence of a polypeptide of the invention, containing about 30 to about 50 amino acids, or any length up to and including the entire amino acid sequence of a polypeptide of the invention, also are considered epitope-bearing peptides or polypeptides of the invention and also are useful for inducing antibodies that react with the mimicked protein. Preferably, the amino acid sequence of the epitope-bearing peptide is selected to provide substantial solubility in aqueous solvents (i.e., the sequence includes relatively hydrophilic residues and highly hydrophobic sequences are preferably avoided); and sequences containing proline residues are particularly preferred.
  • [0101]
    Non-limiting examples of antigenic polypeptides or peptides that can be used to generate Streptococcal-specific antibodies include portions of the amino acid sequences identified in Table 1. More specifically, Table 2 discloses antigenic fragments of polypeptides of the present invention, which antigenic fragments comprise amino acid sequences from about the first amino acid residues indicated to about the last amino acid residue indicated for each fragment. The polypeptide fragments disclosed in Table 2 are believed to be antigenic regions of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1. Thus the invention further includes isolated peptides and polypeptides comprising an amino acid sequence of an epitope shown in Table 2 and polynucleotides encoding said polypeptides.
  • [0102]
    The epitope-bearing peptides and polypeptides of the invention may be produced by any conventional means for making peptides or polypeptides including recombinant means using nucleic acid molecules of the invention. For instance, an epitope-bearing amino acid sequence of the present invention may be fused to a larger polypeptide which acts as a carrier during recombinant production and purification, as well as during immunization to produce anti-peptide antibodies. Epitope-bearing peptides also may be synthesized using known methods of chemical synthesis. For instance, Houghten has described a simple method for synthesis of large numbers of peptides, such as 10-20 mg of 248 different 13 residue peptides representing single amino acid variants of a segment of the HA1 polypeptide which were prepared and characterized (by ELISA-type binding studies) in less than four weeks (Houghten, R. A. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:5131-5135 (1985)). This “Simultaneous Multiple Peptide Synthesis (SMPS)” process is further described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,631,211 to Houghten and coworkers (1986). In this procedure the individual resins for the solid-phase synthesis of various peptides are contained in separate solvent-permeable packets, enabling the optimal use of the many identical repetitive steps involved in solid-phase methods. A completely manual procedure allows 500-1000 or more syntheses to be conducted simultaneously (Houghten, et al., supra, p. 5134).
  • [0103]
    Epitope-bearing peptides and polypeptides of the invention are used to induce antibodies according to methods well known in the art (for instance, Sutcliffe, et al., supra; Wilson, et al., supra; Chow, M., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:910-914; and Bittle, F. J., et al., J. Gen. Virol. 66:2347-2354 (1985)). Generally, animals may be immunized with free peptide; however, anti-peptide antibody titer may be boosted by coupling of the peptide to a macromolecular carrier, such as keyhole limpet hemacyanin (KLH) or tetanus toxoid. For instance, peptides containing cysteine may be coupled to carrier using a linker such as m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (MBS), while other peptides may be coupled to carrier using a more general linking agent such as glutaraldehyde. Animals such as rabbits, rats and mice are immunized with either free or carrier-coupled peptides, for instance, by intraperitoneal and/or intradermal injection of emulsions containing about 100 μg peptide or carrier protein and Freund's adjuvant. Several booster injections may be needed, for instance, at intervals of about two weeks, to provide a useful titer of anti-peptide antibody which can be detected, for example, by ELISA assay using free peptide adsorbed to a solid surface. The titer of anti-peptide antibodies in serum from an immunized animal may be increased by selection of anti-peptide antibodies, for instance, by adsorption to the peptide on a solid support and elution of the selected antibodies according to methods well known in the art.
  • [0104]
    Immunogenic epitope-bearing peptides of the invention, i.e., those parts of a protein that elicit an antibody response when the whole protein is the immunogen, are identified according to methods known in the art. For instance, Geysen, et al., supra, discloses a procedure for rapid concurrent synthesis on solid supports of hundreds of peptides of sufficient purity to react in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Interaction of synthesized peptides with antibodies is then easily detected without removing them from the support. In this manner a peptide bearing an immunogenic epitope of a desired protein may be identified routinely by one of ordinary skill in the art. For instance, the immunologically important epitope in the coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus was located by Geysen et al. supra with a resolution of seven amino acids by synthesis of an overlapping set of all 208 possible hexapeptides covering the entire 213 amino acid sequence of the protein. Then, a complete replacement set of peptides in which all 20 amino acids were substituted in turn at every position within the epitope were synthesized, and the particular amino acids conferring specificity for the reaction with antibody were determined. Thus, peptide analogs of the epitope-bearing peptides of the invention can be made routinely by this method. U.S. Pat. No. 4,708,781 to Geysen (1987) further describes this method of identifying a peptide bearing an immunogenic epitope of a desired protein.
  • [0105]
    Further still, U.S. Pat. No. 5,194,392, to Geysen (1990), describes a general method of detecting or determining the sequence of monomers (amino acids or other compounds) which is a topological equivalent of the epitope (i.e., a “mimotope”) which is complementary to a particular paratope (antigen binding site) of an antibody of interest. More generally, U.S. Pat. No. 4,433,092, also to Geysen (1989), describes a method of detecting or determining a sequence of monomers which is a topographical equivalent of a ligand which is complementary to the ligand binding site of a particular receptor of interest. Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 5,480,971 to Houghten, R. A. et al. (1996) discloses linear C1-C7-alkyl peralkylated oligopeptides and sets and libraries of such peptides, as well as methods for using such oligopeptide sets and libraries for determining the sequence of a peralkylated oligopeptide that preferentially binds to an acceptor molecule of interest. Thus, non-peptide analogs of the epitope-bearing peptides of the invention also can be made routinely by these methods.
  • [0106]
    The entire disclosure of each document cited in this section on “Polypeptides and Fragments” is hereby incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0107]
    As one of skill in the art will appreciate, the polypeptides of the present invention and the epitope-bearing fragments thereof described above can be combined with parts of the constant domain of immunoglobulins (IgG), resulting in chimeric polypeptides. These fusion proteins facilitate purification and show an increased half-life in vivo. This has been shown, e.g., for chimeric proteins consisting of the first two domains of the human CD4-polypeptide and various domains of the constant regions of the heavy or light chains of mammalian immunoglobulins (EPA 0,394,827; Traunecker et al., Nature 331:84-86 (1988)). Fusion proteins that have a disulfide-linked dimeric structure due to the IgG part can also be more efficient in binding and neutralizing other molecules than a monomeric S. pneumoniae polypeptide or fragment thereof alone (Fountoulakis et al., J. Biochem. 270:3958-3964 (1995)).
  • [0000]
    Diagnostic Assays
  • [0108]
    The present invention further relates to a method for assaying for Streptococcal infection in an animal via detecting the expression of genes encoding Streptococcal polypeptides (e.g., the polypeptides described Table 1). This method comprises analyzing tissue or body fluid from the animal for Streptococcus-specific antibodies or Streptococcal nucleic acids or proteins. Analysis of nucleic acid specific to Streptococcus can be done by PCR or hybridization techniques using nucleic acid sequences of the present invention as either hybridization probes or primers (cf Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, second edition, edited by Sambrook, Fritsch, & Maniatis, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 1989; Eremeeva et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:803-810 (1994) which describes differentiation among spotted fever group Rickettsiae species by analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR-amplified DNA). Methods for detecting B. burgdorferi nucleic acids via PCR are described, for example, in Chen et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:589-595 (1994).
  • [0109]
    Where diagnosis of a disease state related to infection with Streptococcus has already been made, the present invention is useful for monitoring progression or regression of the disease state whereby patients exhibiting enhanced Streptococcus gene expression will experience a worse clinical outcome relative to patients expressing these gene(s) at a lower level.
  • [0110]
    By “assaying for Streptococcal infection in an animal via detection of genes encoding Streptococcal polypeptides” is intended qualitatively or quantitatively measuring or estimating the level of one or more Streptococcus polypeptides or the level of nucleic acid encoding Streptococcus polypeptides in a first biological sample either directly (e.g., by determining or estimating absolute protein level or nucleic level) or relatively (e.g., by comparing to the Streptococcus polypeptide level or mRNA level in a second biological sample). The Streptococcus polypeptide level or nucleic acid level in the second sample used for a relative comparison may be undetectable if obtained from an animal which is not infected with Streptococcus. When monitoring the progression or regression of a disease state, the Streptococcus polypeptide level or nucleic acid level may be compared to a second sample obtained from either an animal infected with Streptococcus or the same animal from which the first sample was obtained but taken from that animal at a different time than the first. As will be appreciated in the art, once a standard Streptococcus polypeptide level or nucleic acid level which corresponds to a particular stage of a Streptococcus infection is known, it can be used repeatedly as a standard for comparison.
  • [0111]
    By “biological sample” is intended any biological sample obtained from an animal, cell line, tissue culture, or other source which contains Streptococcus polypeptide, mRNA, or DNA. Biological samples include body fluids (such as plasma and synovial fluid) which contain Streptococcus polypeptides, and muscle, skin, and cartilage tissues. Methods for obtaining tissue biopsies and body fluids are well known in the art.
  • [0112]
    The present invention is useful for detecting diseases related to Streptococcus infections in animals. Preferred animals include monkeys, apes, cats, dogs, cows, pigs, mice, horses, rabbits and humans. Particularly preferred are humans.
  • [0113]
    Total RNA can be isolated from a biological sample using any suitable technique such as the single-step guanidinium-thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform method described in Chomczynski and Sacchi, Anal. Biochem. 162:156-159 (1987). mRNA encoding Streptococcus polypeptides having sufficient homology to the nucleic acid sequences identified in Table 1 to allow for hybridization between complementary sequences are then assayed using any appropriate method. These include Northern blot analysis, S 1 nuclease mapping, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcription in combination with the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and reverse transcription in combination with the ligase chain reaction (RT-LCR).
  • [0114]
    Northern blot analysis can be performed as described in Harada et al., Cell 63:303-312 (1990). Briefly, total RNA is prepared from a biological sample as described above. For the Northern blot, the RNA is denatured in an appropriate buffer (such as glyoxal/dimethyl sulfoxide/sodium phosphate buffer), subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis, and transferred onto a nitrocellulose filter. After the RNAs have been linked to the filter by a UV linker, the filter is prehybridized in a solution containing formamide, SSC, Denhardt's solution, denatured salmon sperm, SDS, and sodium phosphate buffer. A S. pneumoniae polypeptide DNA sequence shown in Table 1 labeled according to any appropriate method (such as the 32P-multiprimed DNA labeling system (Amersham)) is used as probe. After hybridization overnight, the filter is washed and exposed to x-ray film. DNA for use as probe according to the present invention is described in the sections above and will preferably at least 15 bp in length.
  • [0115]
    S 1 mapping can be performed as described in Fujita et al., Cell 49:357-367 (1987). To prepare probe DNA for use in S 1 mapping, the sense strand of an above-described S. pneumoniae DNA sequence of the present invention is used as a template to synthesize labeled antisense DNA. The antisense DNA can then be digested using an appropriate restriction endonuclease to generate further DNA probes of a desired length. Such antisense probes are useful for visualizing protected bands corresponding to the target mRNA (i.e., mRNA encoding Streptococcus polypeptides).
  • [0116]
    Preferably, levels of mRNA encoding Streptococcus polypeptides are assayed using the RT-PCR method described in Makino et al., Technique 2:295-301 (1990). By this method, the radioactivities of the “amplicons” in the polyacrylamide gel bands are linearly related to the initial concentration of the target mRNA. Briefly, this method involves adding total RNA isolated from a biological sample in a reaction mixture containing a RT primer and appropriate buffer. After incubating for primer annealing, the mixture can be supplemented with a RT buffer, dNTPs, DTT, RNase inhibitor and reverse transcriptase. After incubation to achieve reverse transcription of the RNA, the RT products are then subject to PCR using labeled primers. Alternatively, rather than labeling the primers, a labeled dNTP can be included in the PCR reaction mixture. PCR amplification can be performed in a DNA thermal cycler according to conventional techniques. After a suitable number of rounds to achieve amplification, the PCR reaction mixture is electrophoresed on a polyacrylamide gel. After drying the gel, the radioactivity of the appropriate bands (corresponding to the mRNA encoding the Streptococcus polypeptides)) is quantified using an imaging analyzer. RT and PCR reaction ingredients and conditions, reagent and gel concentrations, and labeling methods are well known in the art. Variations on the RT-PCR method will be apparent to the skilled artisan.
  • [0117]
    Assaying Streptococcus polypeptide levels in a biological sample can occur using any art-known method. Preferred for assaying Streptococcus polypeptide levels in a biological sample are antibody-based techniques. For example, Streptococcus polypeptide expression in tissues can be studied with classical immunohistological methods. In these, the specific recognition is provided by the primary antibody (polyclonal or monoclonal) but the secondary detection system can utilize fluorescent, enzyme, or other conjugated secondary antibodies. As a result, an immunohistological staining of tissue section for pathological examination is obtained. Tissues can also be extracted, e.g., with urea and neutral detergent, for the liberation of Streptococcus polypeptides for Western-blot or dot/slot assay (Jalkanen, M., et al., J. Cell. Biol. 101:976-985 (1985); Jalkanen, M., et al., J. Cell. Biol. 105:3087-3096 (1987)). In this technique, which is based on the use of cationic solid phases, quantitation of a Streptococcus polypeptide can be accomplished using an isolated Streptococcus polypeptide as a standard. This technique can also be applied to body fluids.
  • [0118]
    Other antibody-based methods useful for detecting Streptococcus polypeptide gene expression include immunoassays, such as the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the radioimmunoassay (RIA). For example, a Streptococcus polypeptide-specific monoclonal antibodies can be used both as an immunoabsorbent and as an enzyme-labeled probe to detect and quantify a Streptococcus polypeptide. The amount of a Streptococcus polypeptide present in the sample can be calculated by reference to the amount present in a standard preparation using a linear regression computer algorithm. Such an ELISA for detecting a tumor antigen is described in lacobelli et al., Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 11:19-30 (1988). In another ELISA assay, two distinct specific monoclonal antibodies can be used to detect Streptococcus polypeptides in a body fluid. In this assay, one of the antibodies is used as the immunoabsorbent and the other as the enzyme-labeled probe.
  • [0119]
    The above techniques may be conducted essentially as a “one-step” or “two-step” assay. The “one-step” assay involves contacting the Streptococcus polypeptide with immobilized antibody and, without washing, contacting the mixture with the labeled antibody. The “two-step” assay involves washing before contacting the mixture with the labeled antibody. Other conventional methods may also be employed as suitable. It is usually desirable to immobilize one component of the assay system on a support, thereby allowing other components of the system to be brought into contact with the component and readily removed from the sample.
  • [0120]
    Streptococcus polypeptide-specific antibodies for use in the present invention can be raised against an intact S. pneumoniae polypeptide of the present invention or fragment thereof. These polypeptides and fragments may be administered to an animal (e.g., rabbit or mouse) either with a carrier protein (e.g., albumin) or, if long enough (e.g., at least about 25 amino acids), without a carrier.
  • [0121]
    As used herein, the term “antibody” (Ab) or “monoclonal antibody” (Mab) is meant to include intact molecules as well as antibody fragments (such as, for example, Fab and F(ab′)2 fragments) which are capable of specifically binding to a Streptococcus polypeptide. Fab and F(ab′)2 fragments lack the Fc fragment of intact antibody, clear more rapidly from the circulation, and may have less non-specific tissue binding of an intact antibody (Wahl et al., J. Nucl. Med. 24:316-325 (1983)). Thus, these fragments are preferred.
  • [0122]
    The antibodies of the present invention may be prepared by any of a variety of methods. For example, the S. pneumoniae polypeptides identified in Table 1, or fragments thereof, can be administered to an animal in order to induce the production of sera containing polyclonal antibodies. In a preferred method, a preparation of a S. pneumoniae polypeptide of the present invention is prepared and purified to render it substantially free of natural contaminants. Such a preparation is then introduced into an animal in order to produce polyclonal antisera of high specific activity.
  • [0123]
    In the most preferred method, the antibodies of the present invention are monoclonal antibodies. Such monoclonal antibodies can be prepared using hybridoma technology (Kohler et al., Nature 256:495 (1975); Kohler et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 6:511 (1976); Kohler et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 6:292 (1976); Hammerling et al., In: Monoclonal Antibodies and T-Cell Hybridomas, Elsevier, N.Y., (1981) pp. 563-681). In general, such procedures involve immunizing an animal (preferably a mouse) with a S. pneumoniae polypeptide antigen of the present invention. Suitable cells can be recognized by their capacity to bind anti-Streptococcus polypeptide antibody. Such cells may be cultured in any suitable tissue culture medium; however, it is preferable to culture cells in Earle's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (inactivated at about 56° C.), and supplemented with about 10 g/l of nonessential amino acids, about 1,000 U/ml of penicillin, and about 100 μg/ml of streptomycin. The splenocytes of such mice are extracted and fused with a suitable myeloma cell line. Any suitable myeloma cell line may be employed in accordance with the present invention; however, it is preferable to employ the parent myeloma cell line (SP2O), available from the American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, Md. After fusion, the resulting hybridoma cells are selectively maintained in HAT medium, and then cloned by limiting dilution as described by Wands et al. (Gastroenterology 80:225-232 (1981)). The hybridoma cells obtained through such a selection are then assayed to identify clones which secrete antibodies capable of binding the Streptococcus polypeptide antigen administered to immunized animal.
  • [0124]
    Alternatively, additional antibodies capable of binding to Streptococcus polypeptide antigens may be produced in a two-step procedure through the use of anti-idiotypic antibodies. Such a method makes use of the fact that antibodies are themselves antigens, and that, therefore, it is possible to obtain an antibody which binds to a second antibody. In accordance with this method, Streptococcus polypeptide-specific antibodies are used to immunize an animal, preferably a mouse. The splenocytes of such an animal are then used to produce hybridoma cells, and the hybridoma cells are screened to identify clones which produce an antibody whose ability to bind to the Streptococcus polypeptide-specific antibody can be blocked by a Streptococcus polypeptide antigen. Such antibodies comprise anti-idiotypic antibodies to the Streptococcus polypeptide-specific antibody and can be used to immunize an animal to induce formation of further Streptococcus polypeptide-specific antibodies.
  • [0125]
    It will be appreciated that Fab and F(ab′)2 and other fragments of the antibodies of the present invention may be used according to the methods disclosed herein. Such fragments are typically produced by proteolytic cleavage, using enzymes such as papain (to produce Fab fragments) or pepsin (to produce F(ab′)2 fragments). Alternatively, Streptococcus polypeptide-binding fragments can be produced through the application of recombinant DNA technology or through synthetic chemistry.
  • [0126]
    Of special interest to the present invention are antibodies to Streptococcus polypeptide antigens which are produced in humans, or are “humanized” (i.e., non-immunogenic in a human) by recombinant or other technology. Humanized antibodies may be produced, for example by replacing an immunogenic portion of an antibody with a corresponding, but non-immunogenic portion (i.e., chimeric antibodies) (Robinson, R. R. et al., International Patent Publication PCT/US86/02269; Akira, K. et al., European Patent Application 184,187; Taniguchi, M., European Patent Application 171,496; Morrison, S. L. et al., European Patent Application 173,494; Neuberger, M. S. et al., PCT Application WO 86/01533; Cabilly, S. et al., European Patent Application 125,023; Better, M. et al., Science 240:1041-1043 (1988); Liu, A. Y. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:3439-3443 (1987); Liu, A. Y. et al., J. Immunol. 139:3521-3526 (1987); Sun, L. K. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:214-218 (1987); Nishimura, Y. et al., Canc. Res. 47:999-1005 (1987); Wood, C. R. et al., Nature 314:446-449 (1985)); Shaw et al., J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 80:1553-1559 (1988). General reviews of “humanized” chimeric antibodies are provided by Morrison, S. L. (Science, 229:1202-1207 (1985)) and by Oi, V. T. et al., BioTechniques 4:214 (1986)). Suitable “humanized” antibodies can be alternatively produced by CDR or CEA substitution (Jones, P. T. et al., Nature 321:552-525 (1986); Verhoeyan et al., Science 239:1534 (1988); Beidler, C. B. et al., J. Immunol. 141:4053-4060 (1988)).
  • [0127]
    Suitable enzyme labels include, for example, those from the oxidase group, which catalyze the production of hydrogen peroxide by reacting with substrate. Glucose oxidase is particularly preferred as it has good stability and its substrate (glucose) is readily available. Activity of an oxidase label may be assayed by measuring the concentration of hydrogen peroxide formed by the enzyme-labeled antibody/substrate reaction. Besides enzymes, other suitable labels include radioisotopes, such as iodine (125I, 121I), carbon (14C), sulphur (35S), tritium (3H), indium (112In), and technetium (99mTc), and fluorescent labels, such as fluorescein and rhodamine, and biotin.
  • [0128]
    Further suitable labels for the Streptococcus polypeptide-specific antibodies of the present invention are provided below. Examples of suitable enzyme labels include malate dehydrogenase, staphylococcal nuclease, delta-5-steroid isomerase, yeast-alcohol dehydrogenase, alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, triose phosphate isomerase, peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase, asparaginase, glucose oxidase, beta-galactosidase, ribonuclease, urease, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucoamylase, and acetylcholine esterase.
  • [0129]
    Examples of suitable radioisotopic labels include 3H, 111In, 125I, 131I, 32P, 35S, 14C, 51Cr, 57To, 58Co, 59Fe, 75Se, 152Eu, 90Y, 67Cu, 217Ci, 211At, 212Pb, 47Sc, 109Pd, etc. 111In is a preferred isotope where in vivo imaging is used since its avoids the problem of dehalogenation of the 125I, or 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody by the liver. In addition, this radionucleotide has a more favorable gamma emission energy for imaging (Perkins et al., Eur. J. Nucl. Med. 10:296-301 (1985); Carasquillo et al., J. Nucl. Med. 28:281-287 (1987)). For example, 111In coupled to monoclonal antibodies with 1-(P-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-DPTA has shown little uptake in non-tumorous tissues, particularly the liver, and therefore enhances specificity of tumor localization (Esteban et al., J. Nucl. Med. 28:861-870 (1987)).
  • [0130]
    Examples of suitable non-radioactive isotopic labels include 157Gd, 55Mn, 162Dy, 52Tr, and 56Fe.
  • [0131]
    Examples of suitable fluorescent labels include an 152Eu label, a fluorescein label, an isothiocyanate label, a rhodamine label, a phycoerythrin label, a phycocyanin label, an allophycocyanin label, an o-phthaldehyde label, and a fluorescamine label.
  • [0132]
    Examples of suitable toxin labels include diphtheria toxin, ricin, and cholera toxin.
  • [0133]
    Examples of chemiluminescent labels include a luminal label, an isoluminal label, an aromatic acridinium ester label, an imidazole label, an acridinium salt label, an oxalate ester label, a luciferin label, a luciferase label, and an aequorin label.
  • [0134]
    Examples of nuclear magnetic resonance contrasting agents include heavy metal nuclei such as Gd, Mn, and iron.
  • [0135]
    Typical techniques for binding the above-described labels to antibodies are provided by Kennedy et al., Clin. Chim. Acta 70:1-31 (1976), and Schurs et al., Clin. Chim. Acta 81:1-40 (1977). Coupling techniques mentioned in the latter are the glutaraldehyde method, the periodate method, the dimaleimide method, the m-maleimidobenzyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester method, all of which methods are incorporated by reference herein.
  • [0136]
    In a related aspect, the invention includes a diagnostic kit for use in screening serum containing antibodies specific against S. pneumoniae infection. Such a kit may include an isolated S. pneumoniae antigen comprising an epitope which is specifically immunoreactive with at least one anti-S. pneumoniae antibody. Such a kit also includes means for detecting the binding of said antibody to the antigen. In specific embodiments, the kit may include a recombinantly produced or chemically synthesized peptide or polypeptide antigen. The peptide or polypeptide antigen may be attached to a solid support.
  • [0137]
    In a more specific embodiment, the detecting means of the above-described kit includes a solid support to which said peptide or polypeptide antigen is attached. Such a kit may also include a non-attached reporter-labeled anti-human antibody. In this embodiment, binding of the antibody to the S. pneumoniae antigen can be detected by binding of the reporter labeled antibody to the anti-S. pneumoniae antibody.
  • [0138]
    In a related aspect, the invention includes a method of detecting S. pneumoniae infection in a subject. This detection method includes reacting a body fluid, preferably serum, from the subject with an isolated S. pneumoniae antigen, and examining the antigen for the presence of bound antibody. In a specific embodiment, the method includes a polypeptide antigen attached to a solid support, and serum is reacted with the support. Subsequently, the support is reacted with a reporter-labeled anti-human antibody. The support is then examined for the presence of reporter-labeled antibody.
  • [0139]
    The solid surface reagent employed in the above assays and kits is prepared by known techniques for attaching protein material to solid support material, such as polymeric beads, dip sticks, 96-well plates or filter material. These attachment methods generally include non-specific adsorption of the protein to the support or covalent attachment of the protein, typically through a free amine group, to a chemically reactive group on the solid support, such as an activated carboxyl, hydroxyl, or aldehyde group. Alternatively, streptavidin coated plates can be used in conjunction with biotinylated antigen(s).
  • [0000]
    Therapeutics and Modes of Administration
  • [0140]
    The present invention also provides vaccines comprising one or more polypeptides of the present invention. Heterogeneity in the composition of a vaccine may be provided by combining S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention. Multi-component vaccines of this type are desirable because they are likely to be more effective in eliciting protective immune responses against multiple species and strains of the Streptococcus genus than single polypeptide vaccines. Thus, as discussed in detail below, a multi-component vaccine of the present invention may contain one or more, preferably 2 to about 20, more preferably 2 to about 15, and most preferably 3 to about 8, of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides identified in Table 1, or fragments thereof.
  • [0141]
    Multi-component vaccines are known in the art to elicit antibody production to numerous immunogenic components. Decker, M. and Edwards, K., J. Infect. Dis. 174:S270-275 (1996). In addition, a hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis tetravalent vaccine has recently been demonstrated to elicit protective levels of antibodies in human infants against all four pathogenic agents. Aristegui, J. et al., Vaccine 15:7-9 (1997).
  • [0142]
    The present invention thus also includes multi-component vaccines. These vaccines comprise more than one polypeptide, immunogen or antigen. An example of such a multi-component vaccine would be a vaccine comprising more than one of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1. A second example is a vaccine comprising one or more, for example 2 to 10, of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides identified in Table 1 and one or more, for example 2 to 10, additional polypeptides of either streptococcal or non-streptococcal origin. Thus, a multi-component vaccine which confers protective immunity to both a Streptococcal infection and infection by another pathogenic agent is also within the scope of the invention.
  • [0143]
    As indicated above, the vaccines of the present invention are expected to elicit a protective immune response against infections caused by species and strains of Streptococcus other than strain of S. pneumoniae deposited with that ATCC™.
  • [0144]
    Further within the scope of the invention are whole cell and whole viral vaccines. Such vaccines may be produced recombinantly and involve the expression of one or more of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides described in Table 1. For example, the S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention may be either secreted or localized intracellular, on the cell surface, or in the periplasmic space. Further, when a recombinant virus is used, the S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention may, for example, be localized in the viral envelope, on the surface of the capsid, or internally within the capsid. Whole cells vaccines which employ cells expressing heterologous proteins are known in the art. See, e.g., Robinson, K. et al., Nature Biotech. 15:653-657 (1997); Sirard, J. et al., Infect. Immun. 65:2029-2033 (1997); Chabalgoity, J. et al., Infect. Immun. 65:2402-2412 (1997). These cells may be administered live or may be killed prior to administration. Chabalgoity, J. et al., supra, for example, report the successful use in mice of a live attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain which expresses a portion of a platyhelminth fatty acid-binding protein as a fusion protein on its cells surface.
  • [0145]
    A multi-component vaccine can also be prepared using techniques known in the art by combining one or more S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention, or fragments thereof, with additional non-streptococcal components (e.g., diphtheria toxin or tetanus toxin, and/or other compounds known to elicit an immune response). Such vaccines are useful for eliciting protective immune responses to both members of the Streptococcus genus and non-streptococcal pathogenic agents.
  • [0146]
    The vaccines of the present invention also include DNA vaccines. DNA vaccines are currently being developed for a number of infectious diseases. Boyer, J et al., Nat. Med. 3:526-532 (1997); reviewed in Spier, R., Vaccine 14:1285-1288 (1996). Such DNA vaccines contain a nucleotide sequence encoding one or more S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention oriented in a manner that allows for expression of the subject polypeptide. The direct administration of plasmid DNA encoding B. burgdorferi OspA has been shown to elicit protective immunity in mice against borrelial challenge. Luke, C. et al., J. Infect. Dis. 175:91-97 (1997).
  • [0147]
    The present invention also relates to the administration of a vaccine which is co-administered with a molecule capable of modulating immune responses. Kim, J. et al., Nature Biotech. 15:641-646 (1997), for example, report the enhancement of immune responses produced by DNA immunizations when DNA sequences encoding molecules which stimulate the immune response are co-administered. In a similar fashion, the vaccines of the present invention may be co-administered with either nucleic acids encoding immune modulators or the immune modulators themselves. These immune modulators include granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and CD86.
  • [0148]
    The vaccines of the present invention may be used to confer resistance to streptococcal infection by either passive or active immunization. When the vaccines of the present invention are used to confer resistance to streptococcal infection through active immunization, a vaccine of the present invention is administered to an animal to elicit a protective immune response which either prevents or attenuates a streptococcal infection. When the vaccines of the present invention are used to confer resistance to streptococcal infection through passive immunization, the vaccine is provided to a host animal (e.g., human, dog, or mouse), and the antisera elicited by this antisera is recovered and directly provided to a recipient suspected of having an infection caused by a member of the Streptococcus genus.
  • [0149]
    The ability to label antibodies, or fragments of antibodies, with toxin molecules provides an additional method for treating streptococcal infections when passive immunization is conducted. In this embodiment, antibodies, or fragments of antibodies, capable of recognizing the S. pneumoniae polypeptides disclosed herein, or fragments thereof, as well as other Streptococcus proteins, are labeled with toxin molecules prior to their administration to the patient. When such toxin derivatized antibodies bind to Streptococcus cells, toxin moieties will be localized to these cells and will cause their death.
  • [0150]
    The present invention thus concerns and provides a means for preventing or attenuating a streptococcal infection resulting from organisms which have antigens that are recognized and bound by antisera produced in response to the polypeptides of the present invention. As used herein, a vaccine is said to prevent or attenuate a disease if its administration to an animal results either in the total or partial attenuation (i.e., suppression) of a symptom or condition of the disease, or in the total or partial immunity of the animal to the disease.
  • [0151]
    The administration of the vaccine (or the antisera which it elicits) may be for either a “prophylactic” or “therapeutic” purpose. When provided prophylactically, the compound(s) are provided in advance of any symptoms of streptococcal infection. The prophylactic administration of the compound(s) serves to prevent or attenuate any subsequent infection. When provided therapeutically, the compound(s) is provided upon or after the detection of symptoms which indicate that an animal may be infected with a member of the Streptococcus genus. The therapeutic administration of the compound(s) serves to attenuate any actual infection. Thus, the S. pneumoniae polypeptides, and fragments thereof, of the present invention may be provided either prior to the onset of infection (so as to prevent or attenuate an anticipated infection) or after the initiation of an actual infection.
  • [0152]
    The polypeptides of the invention, whether encoding a portion of a native protein or a functional derivative thereof, may be administered in pure form or may be coupled to a macromolecular carrier. Example of such carriers are proteins and carbohydrates. Suitable proteins which may act as macromolecular carrier for enhancing the immunogenicity of the polypeptides of the present invention include keyhole limpet hemacyanin (KLH) tetanus toxoid, pertussis toxin, bovine serum albumin, and ovalbumin. Methods for coupling the polypeptides of the present invention to such macromolecular carriers are disclosed in Harlow et al., Antibodies: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd Ed.; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. (1988), the entire disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.
  • [0153]
    A composition is said to be “pharmacologically acceptable” if its administration can be tolerated by a recipient animal and is otherwise suitable for administration to that animal. Such an agent is said to be administered in a “therapeutically effective amount” if the amount administered is physiologically significant. An agent is physiologically significant if its presence results in a detectable change in the physiology of a recipient patient.
  • [0154]
    While in all instances the vaccine of the present invention is administered as a pharmacologically acceptable compound, one skilled in the art would recognize that the composition of a pharmacologically acceptable compound varies with the animal to which it is administered. For example, a vaccine intended for human use will generally not be co-administered with Freund's adjuvant. Further, the level of purity of the S. pneumoniae polypeptides of the present invention will normally be higher when administered to a human than when administered to a non-human animal.
  • [0155]
    As would be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art, when the vaccine of the present invention is provided to an animal, it may be in a composition which may contain salts, buffers, adjuvants, or other substances which are desirable for improving the efficacy of the composition. Adjuvants are substances that can be used to specifically augment a specific immune response. These substances generally perform two functions: (1) they protect the antigen(s) from being rapidly catabolized after administration and (2) they nonspecifically stimulate immune responses.
  • [0156]
    Normally, the adjuvant and the composition are mixed prior to presentation to the immune system, or presented separately, but into the same site of the animal being immunized. Adjuvants can be loosely divided into several groups based upon their composition. These groups include oil adjuvants (for example, Freund's complete and incomplete), mineral salts (for example, AlK(SO4)2, AlNa(SO4)2, AlNH4(SO4), silica, kaolin, and carbon), polynucleotides (for example, poly IC and poly AU acids), and certain natural substances (for example, wax D from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as well as substances found in Corynebacterium parvum, or Bordetella pertussis, and members of the genus Brucella. Other substances useful as adjuvants are the saponins such as, for example, Quil A. (Superfos A/S, Denmark). Preferred adjuvants for use in the present invention include aluminum salts, such as AlK(SO4)2, AlNa(SO4)2, and AlNH4(SO4). Examples of materials suitable for use in vaccine compositions are provided in Remington's Pharmaceutical Sciences (Osol, A, Ed, Mack Publishing Co, Easton, Pa., pp. 1324-1341 (1980), which reference is incorporated herein by reference).
  • [0157]
    The therapeutic compositions of the present invention can be administered parenterally by injection, rapid infusion, nasopharyngeal absorption (intranasopharangeally), dermoabsorption, or orally. The compositions may alternatively be administered intramuscularly, or intravenously. Compositions for parenteral administration include sterile aqueous or non-aqueous solutions, suspensions, and emulsions. Examples of non-aqueous solvents are propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, vegetable oils such as olive oil, and injectable organic esters such as ethyl oleate. Carriers or occlusive dressings can be used to increase skin permeability and enhance antigen absorption. Liquid dosage forms for oral administration may generally comprise a liposome solution containing the liquid dosage form. Suitable forms for suspending liposomes include emulsions, suspensions, solutions, syrups, and elixirs containing inert diluents commonly used in the art, such as purified water. Besides the inert diluents, such compositions can also include adjuvants, wetting agents, emulsifying and suspending agents, or sweetening, flavoring, or perfuming agents.
  • [0158]
    Therapeutic compositions of the present invention can also be administered in encapsulated form. For example, intranasal immunization of mice against Bordetella pertussis infection using vaccines encapsulated in biodegradable microsphere composed of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) has been shown to stimulate protective immune responses. Shahin, R. et al., Infect. Immun. 63:1195-1200 (1995). Similarly, orally administered encapsulated Salmonella typhimurium antigens have also been shown to elicit protective immunity in mice. Allaoui-Attarki, K. et al., Infect. Immun. 65:853-857 (1997). Encapsulated vaccines of the present invention can be administered by a variety of routes including those involving contacting the vaccine with mucous membranes (e.g., intranasally, intracolonicly, intraduodenally).
  • [0159]
    Many different techniques exist for the timing of the immunizations when a multiple administration regimen is utilized. It is possible to use the compositions of the invention more than once to increase the levels and diversities of expression of the immunoglobulin repertoire expressed by the immunized animal. Typically, if multiple immunizations are given, they will be given one to two months apart.
  • [0160]
    According to the present invention, an “effective amount” of a therapeutic composition is one which is sufficient to achieve a desired biological effect. Generally, the dosage needed to provide an effective amount of the composition will vary depending upon such factors as the animal's or human's age, condition, sex, and extent of disease, if any, and other variables which can be adjusted by one of ordinary skill in the art.
  • [0161]
    The antigenic preparations of the invention can be administered by either single or multiple dosages of an effective amount. Effective amounts of the compositions of the invention can vary from 0.01-1,000 μg/ml per dose, more preferably 0.1-500 μg/ml per dose, and most preferably 10-300 μg/ml per dose.
  • [0162]
    Having now generally described the invention, the same will be more readily understood through reference to the following example which is provided by way of illustration, and is not intended to be limiting of the present invention, unless specified.
  • EXAMPLES Example 1
  • [0000]
    Expression and Purification of S. pneumoniae Polypeptides in E. coli
  • [0163]
    The bacterial expression vector pQE10 (QIAGEN, Inc., 9259 Eton Avenue, Chatsworth, Calif., 91311) is used in this example for cloning of the nucleotide sequences shown in Table 1 and for expressing the polypeptides identified in Table 1. The components of the pQE10 plasmid are arranged such that the inserted DNA sequence encoding a polypeptide of the present invention expresses the polypeptide with the six His residues (i.e., a “6×His tag”)) covalently linked to the amino terminus.
  • [0164]
    The DNA sequences encoding the desired portions of the polypeptides of Table 1 are amplified using PCR oligonucleotide primers from either a DNA library constructed from S. pneumoniae, such as the one deposited by the inventors at the ATCC™ for convenience, ATCC™ Deposit No. 97755, or from DNA isolated from the same organism such as the S. pneumoniae strain deposited with the ATCC™ as Deposit No. 55840. A list of PCR primers which can be used for this purpose is provided in Table 3, below. The PCR primers anneal to the nucleotide sequences encoding both the amino terminal and carboxy terminal amino acid sequences of the desired portion of the polypeptides of Table 1. Additional nucleotides containing restriction sites to facilitate cloning in the pQE10 vector were added to the 5′ and 3′ primer sequences, respectively. Such restriction sites are listed in Table 3 for each primer. In each case, the primer comprises, from the 5′ end, 4 random nucleotides to prevent “breathing” during the annealing process, a restriction site (shown in Table 3), and approximately 15 nucleotides of S. pneumoniae ORF sequence (the complete sequence of each cloning primer is shown as SEQ ID NO:227 through SEQ ID NO:452).
  • [0165]
    For cloning the polypeptides of Table 1, the 5′ and 3′ primers were selected to amplify their respective nucleotide coding sequences. One of ordinary skill in the art would appreciate that the point in the protein coding sequence where the 5′ primer begins may be varied to amplify a DNA segment encoding any desired portion of the complete amino acid sequences described in Table 1. Similarly, one of ordinary skill in the art would further appreciate that the point in the protein coding sequence where the 3′ primer begins may also be varied to amplify a DNA segment encoding any desired portion of the complete amino acid sequences described in Table 1.
  • [0166]
    The amplified DNA fragment and the pQE10 vector are digested with the appropriate restriction enzyme(s) and the digested DNAs are then ligated together. The ligation mixture is transformed into competent E. coli cells using standard procedures such as those described in Sambrook et al., Molecular Cloning: a Laboratory Manual, 2nd Ed.; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. (1989). Transformants are identified by their ability to grow under selective pressure on LB plates. Plasmid DNA is isolated from resistant colonies and the identity of the cloned DNA confirmed by restriction analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing.
  • [0167]
    Clones containing the desired constructs are grown overnight (“O/N”) in liquid culture under selection. The O/N culture is used to inoculate a large culture, at a dilution of approximately 1:25 to 1:250. The cells are grown to an optical density at 600 nm (“OD600”) of between 0.4 and 0.6. Isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (“IPTG”) is then added to a final concentration of 1 mM to induce transcription from the lac repressor sensitive promoter, by inactivating the lacI repressor. Cells subsequently are incubated further for 3 to 4 hours. Cells are then harvested by centrifugation.
  • [0168]
    The cells are stirred for 3-4 hours at 4 C in 6M guanidine-HCl, pH 8. The cell debris is removed by centrifugation, and the supernatant containing the protein of interest is loaded onto a nickel-nitrilo-tri-acetic acid (“NiNTA”) affinity resin column (available from QIAGEN, Inc., supra). Proteins with a 6×His tag bind to the NI-NTA resin with high affinity and can be purified in a simple one-step procedure (for details see: The QIAexpressionist, 1995, QIAGEN, Inc., supra). Briefly, the supernatant is loaded onto the column in 6 M guanidine-HCl, pH8, the column is first washed with 10 volumes of 6 M guanidine-HCl, pH8, then washed with 10 volumes of 6 M guanidine-HCl pH6, and finally the polypeptide is eluted with 6 M guanidine-HCl, pH 5.0.
  • [0169]
    The purified protein is then renatured by dialyzing it against phosphatebuffered saline (PBS) or 50 mM Na-acetate, pH 6 buffer plus 200 mM NaCl. Alternatively, the protein can be successfully refolded while immobilized on the Ni-NTA column. The recommended conditions are as follows: renature using a linear 6M-1M urea gradient in 500 mM NaCl, 20% glycerol, 20 mM Tris/HCl pH7.4, containing protease inhibitors. The renaturation should be performed over a period of 1.5 hours or more. After renaturation the proteins can be eluted by the addition of 250 mM imidazole. Imidazole is removed by a final dialyzing step against PBS or 50 mM sodium acetate pH6 buffer plus 200 mM NaCl. The purified protein is stored at 4° C. or frozen at −80° C.
  • [0170]
    The DNA sequences encoding the amino acid sequences of Table 1 may also be cloned and expressed as fusion proteins by a protocol similar to that described directly above, wherein the pET-32b(+) vector (Novagen, 601 Science Drive, Madison, Wis. 53711) is preferentially used in place of pQE10.
  • [0171]
    Each of the polynucleotides shown in Table 1, was successfully amplified and subcloned into pQE10 as described above using the PCR primers shown in Table 3. These pQE10 plasmids containing the DNAs of Table 1, except SP023, SP042, SP054, SP063, SP081, SP092, SP114, SP122, SP123, SP126, and SP127, were deposited with the ATCC™ as a pooled deposit as a convenience to those of skill in the art. This pooled deposit was deposited on Oct. 16, 1997 and given ATCC™ Deposit No. 209369. Those of ordinary skill in the art appreciate that isolating an individual plasmid from the pooled deposit is trivial provided the information and reagents described herein. Each of the deposited clones is capable of expressing its encoded S. pneumoniae polypeptide.
  • Example 2
  • [0000]
    Immunization and Detection of Immune Responses Methods
  • [0000]
    Growth of Bacterial Innoculum, Immunization of Mice and Challenge with S pneumoniae.
  • [0172]
    Propagation and storage of, and challenge by S. pneumoniae are preformed essentially as described in Aaberge, I. S. et al., Virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in mice: a standardized method for preparation and frozen storage of the experimental bacterial inoculum, Microbial Pathogenesis, 18:141 (1995), incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0173]
    Briefly, Todd Hewitt (TH) broth (Difco laboratories, Detroit, Mich.) with 17% FCS, and horse blood agar plates are used for culturing the bacteria. Both broth and blood plates are incubated at 37° C. in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Blood plates are incubated for 18 hr. The culture broth is regularly 10-fold serially diluted in TH broth kept at room temperature and bacterial suspensions are kept at room temperature until challenge of mice.
  • [0174]
    For active immunizations C3H/HeJ mice (The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Me.) are injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) at week 0 with 20 g of recombinant streptococcal protein, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), given a similar booster immunization in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) at week 4, and challenged at week 6. For challenge S. pneumoniae are diluted in TH broth from exponentially-growing cultures and mice are injected subcutaneously (s.c.) at the base of the tail with 0.1 ml of these dilutions (serial dilutions are used to find medium infectious dose). Streptococci used for challenge are passaged fewer than six times in vitro. To assess infection, blood samples are obtained from the distal part of the lateral femoral vein into heparinized capillary tubes. A 25 ul blood sample is serially 10-fold diluted in TH broth, and 25 ul of diluted and undiluted blood is plated onto blood agar plates. The plates are incubated for 18 hr. and colonies are counted.
  • [0175]
    Other methods are known in the art, for example, see Langermann, S. et al., J. Exp. Med., 180:2277 (1994), incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0000]
    Immunoassays
  • [0176]
    Several immunoassay formats are used to quantify levels of streptococcal-specific antibodies (ELISA and immunoblot), and to evaluate the functional properties of these antibodies (growth inhibition assay). The ELISA and immunoblot assays are also used to detect and quantify antibodies elicited in response to streptococcal infection that react with specific streptococcal antigens. Where antibodies to certain streptococcal antigens are elicited by infection this is taken as evidence that the streptococcal proteins in question are expressed in vivo. Absence of infection-derived antibodies (seroconversion) following streptococcal challenge is evidence that infection is prevented or suppressed. The immunoblot assay is also used to ascertain whether antibodies raised against recombinant streptococcal antigens recognize a protein of similar size in extracts of whole streptococci. Where the natural protein is of similar, or identical, size in the immunoblot assay to the recombinant version of the same protein, this is taken as evidence that the recombinant protein is the product of a full-length clone of the respective gene.
  • [0000]
    Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA).
  • [0177]
    The ELISA is used to quantify levels of antibodies reactive with streptococcus antigens elicited in response to immunization with these streptococcal antigens. Wells of 96 well microtiter plates (Immunlon 4, Dynatech, Chantilly, Va., or equivalent) are coated with antigen by incubating 50 l of 1 g/ml protein antigen solution in a suitable buffer, typically 0.1 M sodium carbonate buffer at pH 9.6. After decanting unbound antigen, additional binding sites are blocked by incubating 100 l of 3% nonfat milk in wash buffer (PBS, 0.2% Tween 20, pH 7.4). After washing, duplicate serial two-fold dilutions of sera in PBS, Tween 20, 1% fetal bovine serum, are incubated for 1 hr, removed, wells are washed three times, and incubated with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG. After three washes, bound antibodies are detected with H2O2 and 2,2′-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonate) (Schwan, T. G., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92:2909-2913 (1985)) (ABTS®, Kirkegaard & Perry Labs., Gaithersburg, Md.) and A405 is quantified with a Molecular Devices, Corp. (Menlo Park, Calif.) Vmax™ plate reader. IgG levels twice the background level in serum from naive mice are assigned the minimum titer of 1:100.
  • [0000]
    Sodiumdodecylsulfate-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Immunoblotting
  • [0178]
    Using a single well format, total streptococcal protein extracts or recombinant streptococcal antigen are boiled in SDS/2-ME sample buffer before electrophoresis through 3% acrylamide stacking gels, and resolving gels of higher acrylamide concentration, typically 10-15% acrylamide monomer. Gels are electro-blotted to nitrocellulose membranes and lanes are probed with dilutions of antibody to be tested for reactivity with specific streptococcal antigens, followed by the appropriate secondary antibody-enzyme (horseradish peroxidase) conjugate. When it is desirable to confirm that the protein had transferred following electro-blotting, membranes are stained with Ponceau S. Immunoblot signals from bound antibodies are detected on x-ray film as chemiluninescence using ECL™ reagents (Amersham Corp., Arlington Heights, Ill.).
  • Example 3
  • [0000]
    Detection of Streptococcus mRNA Expression
  • [0179]
    Northern blot analysis is carried out using methods described by, among others, Sambrook et al., supra. to detect the expression of the S. pneumoniae nucleotide sequences of the present invention in animal tissues. A cDNA probe containing an entire nucleotide sequence shown in Table 1 is labeled with 32p using the rediprime™ DNA labeling system (Amersham Life Science), according to manufacturer's instructions. After labeling, the probe is purified using a CHROMA SPIN-100™ column (Clontech Laboratories, Inc.), according to manufacturer's protocol number PT1200-1. The purified labeled probe is then used to detect the expression of Streptococcus mRNA in an animal tissue sample.
  • [0180]
    Animal tissues, such as blood or spinal fluid, are examined with the labeled probe using ExpressHyb™ hybridization solution (Clontech) according to manufacturer's protocol number PT 1190-1. Following hybridization and washing, the blots are mounted and exposed to film at −70 C overnight, and films developed according to standard procedures.
  • [0181]
    It will be clear that the invention may be practiced otherwise than as particularly described in the foregoing description and examples.
  • [0182]
    Numerous modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings and, therefore, are within the scope of the appended claims.
  • [0183]
    The entire disclosure of all publications (including patents, patent applications, journal articles, laboratory manuals, books, or other documents) cited herein are hereby incorporated by reference.
    TABLE 1
    Description SEQ ID NO:
    SP001 nucleotide 1
    SP001 AMINO ACID 2
    SP004 nucleotide 3
    SP004 amino acid 4
    SP006 nucleotide 5
    SP006 amino acid 6
    SP007 nucleotide 7
    SP007 amino acid 8
    SP008 nucleotide 9
    SP008 amino acid 10
    SP009 nucleotide 11
    SP009 amino acid 12
    SP010 nucleotide 13
    SP010 amino acid 14
    SP011 nucleotide 15
    SP011 amino acid 16
    SP012 nucleotide 17
    SP012 nucleotide 18
    SP013 nucleotide 19
    SP013 amino acid 20
    SP014 nucleotide 21
    SP014 amino acid 22
    SP015 nucleotide 23
    SP015 amino acid 24
    SP016 nucleotide 25
    SP016 amino acid 26
    SP017 nucleotide 27
    SP017 amino acid 28
    SP019 nucleotide 29
    SP019 amino acid 30
    SP020 nucleotide 31
    SP020 amino acid 32
    SP021 nucleotide 33
    SP021 amino acid 34
    SP022 nucleotide 35
    SP022 amino acid 36
    SP023 nucleotide 37
    SP023 amino acid 38
    SP025 nucleotide 39
    SP025 amino acid 40
    SP028 nucleotide 41
    SP028 amino acid 42
    SP030 nucleotide 43
    SP030 amino acid 44
    SP031 nucleotide 45
    SP031 amino acid 46
    SP032 nucleotide 47
    SP032 amino acid 48
    SP033 nucleotide 49
    SP033 amino acid 50
    SP034 nucleotide 51
    SP034 amino acid 52
    SP035 nucleotide 53
    SP035 amino acid 54
    SP036 nucleotide 55
    SP036 amino acid 56
    SP038 nucleotide 57
    SP038 amino acid 58
    SP039 nucleotide 59
    SP039 amino acid 60
    SP040 nucleotide 61
    SP040 amino acid 62
    SP041 nucleotide 63
    SP041 amino acid 64
    SP042 nucleotide 65
    SP042 amino acid 66
    SP043 nucleotide 67
    SP043 amino acid 68
    SP044 nucleotide 69
    SP044 amino acid 70
    SP045 nucleotide 71
    SP045 nucleotide 72
    SP046 nucleotide 73
    SP046 amino acid 74
    SP048 nucleotide 75
    SP048 amino acid 76
    SP049 nucleotide 77
    SP049 amino acid 78
    SP050 nucleotide 79
    SP050 amino acid 80
    SP051 nucleotide 81
    SP051 amino acid 82
    SP052 nucleotide 83
    SP052 amino acid 84
    SP053 nucleotide 85
    SP053 amino acid 86
    SP054 nucleotide 87
    SP054 amino acid 88
    SP055 nucleotide 89
    SP055 amino acid 90
    SP056 nucleotide 91
    SP056 amino acid 92
    SP057 nucleotide 93
    SP057 amino acid 94
    SP058 nucleotide 95
    SP058 amino acid 96
    SP059 nucleotide 97
    SP059 amino acid 98
    SP060 nucleotide 99
    SP060 amino acid 100
    SP062 nucleotide 101
    SP062 amino acid 102
    SP063 nucleotide 103
    SP063 amino acid 104
    SP064 nucleotide 105
    SP064 amino acid 106
    SP065 nucleotide 107
    SP065 amino acid 108
    SP067 nucleotide 109
    SP067 amino acid 110
    SP068 nucleotide 111
    SP068 amino acid 112
    SP069 nucleotide 113
    SP069 amino acid 114
    SP070 nucleotide 115
    SP070 amino acid 116
    SP071 nucleotide 117
    SP071 amino acid 118
    SP072 nucleotide 119
    SP072 amino acid 120
    SP073 nucleotide 121
    SP073 amino acid 122
    SP074 nucleotide 123
    SP074 amino acid 124
    SP075 nucleotide 125
    SP075 amino acid 126
    SP076 nucleotide 127
    SP076 amino acid 128
    SP077 nucleotide 129
    SP077 amino acid 130
    SP078 nucleotide 131
    SP078 amino acid 132
    SP079 nucleotide 133
    SP079 amino acid 134
    SP080 nucleotide 135
    SP080 amino acid 136
    SP081 nucleotide 137
    SP081 amino acid 138
    SP082 nucleotide 139
    SP082 amino acid 140
    SP083 nucleotide 141
    SP083 amino acid 142
    SP084 nucleotide 143
    SP084 amino acid 144
    SP085 nucleotide 145
    SP085 amino acid 146
    SP086 nucleotide 147
    SP086 amino acid 148
    SP087 nucleotide 149
    SP087 amino acid 150
    SP088 nucleotide 151
    SP088 amino acid 152
    SP089 nucleotide 153
    SP089 amino acid 154
    SP090 nucleotide 155
    SP090 amino acid 156
    SP091 nucleotide 157
    SP091 amino acid 158
    SP092 nucleotide 159
    SP092 amino acid 160
    SP093 nucleotide 161
    SPO93 amino acid 162
    SP094 nucleotide 163
    SP094 amino acid 164
    SP095 nucleotide 165
    SP095 amino acid 166
    SP096 nucleotide 167
    SP096 amino acid 168
    SP097 nucleotide 169
    SP097 amino acid 170
    SP098 nucleotide 171
    SP098 amino acid 172
    SP099 nucleotide 173
    SP099 amino acid 174
    SP100 nucleotide 175
    SP100 amino acid 176
    SP101 nucleotide 177
    SP101 amino acid 178
    SP102 nucleotide 179
    SP102 amino acid 180
    SP103 nucleotide 181
    SP103 amino acid 182
    SP105 nucleotide 183
    SP105 amino acid 184
    SP106 nucleotide 185
    SP106 amino acid 186
    SP107 nucleotide 187
    SP107 amino acid 188
    SP108 nucleotide 189
    SP108 amino acid 190
    SP109 nucleotide 191
    SP109 amino acid 192
    SP110 nucleotide 193
    SP110 amino acid 194
    SP111 nucleotide 195
    SP111 amino acid 196
    SP0112 nucleotide 197
    SP0112 amino acid 198
    SP113 nucleotide 199
    SP113 amino acid 200
    SP114 nucleotide 201
    SP114 amino acid 202
    SP115 nucleotide 203
    SP115 amino acid 204
    SP117 nucleotide 205
    SP117 amino acid 206
    SP118 nucleotide 207
    SP118 amino acid 208
    SP119 nucleotide 209
    SP119 amino acid 210
    SP120 nucleotide 211
    SP120 amino acid 212
    SP121 nucleotide 213
    SP121 amino acid 214
    SP122 nucleotide 215
    SP122 amino acid 216
    SP123 nucleotide 217
    SP123 amino acid 218
    SP124 amino acid 219
    SP124 amino acid 220
    SP125 nucleotide 221
    SP125 amino acid 222
    SP126 nucleotide 223
    SP126 amino acid 224
    SP127 nucleotide 225
    SP127 amino acid 226
  • [0184]
    TABLE 2
    S. pneumoniae Antigenic Epitopes
    Sp001
    Lys-1 to Ile-10; Leu-13 to Lys-32; Arg-41 to Ile-
    51; Ser-85 to Glu-97; Ala-159 to His-168; Val-309
    to Thr-318; Val-341 to Asn-352; Asn-415 to Met-
    430; Phe-454 to Asn-464; Ser-573 to Gly-591; Asn-
    597 to Thr-641; and Asn-644 to Ala-664.
    SP004
    Thr-9 to Thr-24; Ile-29 to Ala-48; Thr-49 to Val-
    56; Val-286 to Val-312; Pro-316 to Glu-344; Val-
    345 to Ile-367; Gln-368 to Val-399; Ser-400 to
    Glu-431; Asn-436 to Ala-457; Ile-467 to Ala-498;
    and Thr-499 to Glu-540.
    SP006
    Glu-1 to Lys-13; Pro-24 to Gly-36; Val-104 to Thr-
    112; Ala-118 to Asn-130; Trp-137 to Ala-146; Ser-
    151 to Ile-159; Ile-181 to Leu-188; and Pro-194 to
    Tyr-202.
    SP007
    Gly-1 to Asn-7; Tyr-24 to Gln-34; His-47 to Phe-
    55; Ser-60 to Ala-67; Ala-122 to Leu-129; Leu-221
    to Lys-230; Val-236 to Phe-256; and Asp-271 to
    Gly-283; and Leu-291 to Asp-297.
    SP008
    Leu-4 to Lys-17; Gln-24 to Leu-32; Asp-60 to Ser-
    66; Ser-70 to Asp-76; Ala-276 to Lys-283; Asn-304
    to Lys-311; and Thr-429 to Pro-437.
    SP009
    Thr-4 to Glu-11; Leu-50 to Asp-60; Ile-102 to Trp-
    123; and Ser-138 to Ile-157.
    SP010
    Phe-34 to Gly-41; Asp-44 to Lys-50; Leu-172 to
    Val-186; Leu-191 to Val-198; Ser-202 to Ile-209;
    and Val-213 to Leu-221.
    Sp011
    Asn-2 to Thr-10; Asp-87 to Ala-102; Tyr-125 to
    Glu-132; Thr-181 to Tyr-189; Arg-217 to Thr-232;
    Asn-257 to Lys-264; Pro-271 to Ser-278; Tyr-317 to
    Ala-325; Glu-327 to Pro-337; and Thr-374 to Val-
    381.
    SP012
    Gly-1 to Lys-19; Phe-34 to Tyr-41; Leu-109 to Lys-
    126; and Leu-231 to Glu-247.
    SP013
    Ala-1 to Lys-12; Ile-42 to Pro-53; Leu-138 to Lys-
    146; Ile-205 to Lys-217; Ser-235 to Ile-251; and
    Ser-261 to Tyr-272.
    SP014
    Gly-1 to Val-16; Leu-35 to Leu-44; Asp-73 to Asp-
    81; Ile-83 to Asp-92; Glu-145 to Ile-153; Phe-188
    to Asn-196; Ser-208 to Phe-215; Ile-224 to Leu-
    231; and Asn-235 to Ala-243.
    SP015
    Ser-1 to Pro-16; Asn-78 to Glu-88; Ala-100 to Val-
    108; Ala-122 to Thr-129; Thr-131 to Ser-137; Leu-
    201 to Ser-220; and Gly-242 to Val-251.
    SP016
    Gly-1 to Glu-20; Thr-30 to Val-38; Gln-94 to Asn-
    105; Lys-173 to Pro-182; Gly-189 to Arg-197; Ser-
    207 to Val-224; Pro-288 to Leu-298; Ala-327 to
    Ala-342; and Ser-391 to Ala-402.
    SP017
    Ser-1 to Thr-12; Ala-36 to Tyr-45; Gln-48 to Ile-
    54; Lys-59 to Lys-76; Tyr-113 to Leu-138; and Phe-
    212 to Asp-219.
    SP019
    Val-97 to Glu-117; Asp-163 to Leu-169; Thr-182 to
    Thr-191; and Lys-241 to Ser-250.
    SP020
    Asn-18 to Lys-25; Thr-47 to Glu-60; Trp-75 to Val-
    84; Gly-102 to Val-110; Pro-122 to Ala-131; and
    Glu-250 to Pro-258.
    SP021
    Ser1 to Asp-8; Val-44 to Asp-54; Ala-117 to Val-
    125; Thr-165 to Thr-173; and Glu-180 to Pro-189.
    SP022
    Phe-5 to Lys-13; Thr-20 to Ser-36; Glu-59 to Lys-
    81; Tyr-85 to Gly-93; Trp-94 to Trp-101; and Thr-
    195 to Trp-208.
    SP023
    Gln-45 to Glu-59; Asp-69 to Pro-85; Lys-111 to
    Asn-121; Pro-218 to Ala-228; and Glu-250 to Asn-
    281.
    SP025
    Gln-14 to Thr-20; Gly-27 to Phe-33; Gly-63 to Glu-
    71; and Ile-93 to Phe-102.
    SP028
    Asp-171 to Pro-179; Tyr-340 to Glu-350; Pro-455 to
    Tyr-463; and Asp-474 to Pro-480.
    SP030
    Leu-22 to Leu-37; Trp-81 to Ala-90; Phe-101 to
    Ala-106; Thr-124 to Tyr-130; and Asn-138 to Glu-
    144.
    SP031
    Asp-8 to Val-16; Gly-27 to Thr-35; Gly-178 to Asp-
    195; Thr-200 to Asp209; Trp-218 to Leu-224; and
    Lys-226 to Asp-241.
    SP032
    Ser-9 to Asp-28; Phe-31 to Val-40; Gly-42 to Arg-
    50; Ile-52 to Leu-60; Asp-174 to Phe-186; Leu-324
    to Met-333; and Thr-340 to Asn-347.
    SP033
    Gln-2 to Ile-13; Phe-46 to Ile-53; and Asp-104 to
    Thr-121.
    SP034
    Glu-36 to Gly-43; Ala-188 to Asp-196; Trp-313 to
    Gly-320; and Leu-323 to Leu-329.
    SP035
    Arg-19 to Asp-36; Asp-47 to Val-57; Asn-134 to
    Thr-143; Asp-187 to Arg-196; and Glu-222 to Ser-
    230.
    SP036
    Arg-10 to Arg-17; Lys-29 to Ser-39; Ser-140 to
    Ala-153; Arg-158 to Tyr-169; Asp-175 to Ala-183;
    Gly-216 to Asn-236; Ala-261 to Leu-270; Arg-282 to
    Phe-291; and Thr-297 to Ala-305; Pro-342 to Gln-
    362; Phe-455 to Asp-463; His-497 to Thr-511; Ala-
    521 to Gly-529; Ile-537 to Val-546; Ile-556 to
    Ala-568; Pro-581 to Ser-595; Glu-670 to Ala-685;
    Ser-696 to Ala-705 and Leu-782 to Ser-791.
    SP038
    Glu-61 to Pro-69; Phe-107 to Ala-115; Leu-130 to
    Tyr-141; Ala-229 to Glu-237; Ser-282 to Asn-287;
    Ala-330 to Glu-338; and Tyr-387 to Glu-393.
    SP039
    Ser-28 to Asp-35; Pro-88 to Pro-96; Leu-125 to
    Arg-135; Phe-149 to Leu-157; Gln-246 to Val-254;
    Ala-357 to Thr-362; Gly-402 to Lys-411; and Leu-
    440 to Pro-448.
    SP040
    Thr-21 to Ile-30; His-54 to Gln-68; Arg-103 to
    Leu-117; and Thr-127 to Leu-136.
    SP041
    Gly-36 to Asp-49; Leu-121 to Val-128; and Ala-186
    to Ile-196.
    SP042
    Gly-11 to Arg-19; Ile-23 to Lys-31; His-145 to
    Asn-151; Gln-159 to Asp-166; Ile-175 to Asp-181;
    Gly-213 to Tyr-225; Ile-283 to Val-291; Pro-329 to
    Glu-364; Arg-372 to Ser-386; Thr-421 to Phe-430;
    Leu-445 to Val-453; Ile-486 to Ala-497; Asp-524 to
    Ala-535; His-662 to Gly-674; and His-679 to Gln-
    702.
    SP043
    Lys-2 to Asp-12; Val-58 to Asn-68; Ser-87 to Asp-
    95; and Asp-102 to Lys-117.
    SP044
    Gln-3 to Lys-11; Asp-37 to Tyr-52; Glu-171 to Leu-
    191; His-234 to Asn-247; and Asn-283 to Ala-291.
    SP045
    Tyr-52 to Ile-63; Asp-212 to Gln-227; Ser-315 to
    Thr-332; Leu-345 to Phe-354; Asp-362 to Val-370;
    Thr-518 to Asn-539; Ala-545 to Lys-559; and Val-
    601 to Pro-610.
    SP046
    Gln-9 to Ala-18; Glu-179 to Lys-186; Lys-264 to
    Glu-271; Gly-304 to Glu-17; Ser-503 to Asn-511;
    Asn-546 to Thr-553; and Asn-584 to Asp-591.
    SP048
    Tyr-4 to Asp-25; Lys-33 to Val-70; Asp-151 to Thr-
    170; Asp-222 to Val-257; Thr-290 to Phe-301; and
    Gly-357 to Val-367.
    SP049
    Ala-23 to Arg-37; Tyr-85 to Gln-95; Glu-106 to
    Ile-118; Arg-131 to ILE-144; Gly-150 to Ser-162;
    and Ala-209 to Asp-218.
    SP050
    Asp-95 to Glu-113; Gly-220 to Gly-228; Asn-284 to
    Glu-295; Thr-298 to Val-315.
    SP051
    Lys-16 to Glu-50; Lys-57 to Asn-104; Ser-158 to
    Trp-173; Asp-265 to Pro-279; Val-368 to Tyr-386;
    Glu-420 to Ile-454; Pro-476 to Ile-516; Phe-561
    to Gly-581; Thr-606 to Gly-664; and Glu-676 to
    Val-696.
    SP052
    Asn-41 to Tyr-60; Phe-80 to Glu-103; Ala-117 to
    Val-139; Ile-142 to Leu-155; Val-190 to Lys-212;
    Glu-276 to Phe-283; Arg-290 to Ser-299; Leu-328 to
    Val-351; Gly-358 to Thr-388; Glu-472 to Ala-483;
    Val-533 to Asn-561; Asp-595 to Val-606; Glu-609 to
    Val-620; Glu-672 to Ser 691.
    SP053
    Ala-62 to Val-101; Thr-147 to Leu-174; Lys-204 to
    Val-216; Gln-228 to Val-262; Ser-277 to Gly-297;
    Thr-341 to Glyn-368; Thr-385 to Ala-409; Thr-414
    to Ser-453; Asn-461 to Leu-490; Glu-576 to Thr-
    625; Gly-630 to Arg-639; and Asp-720 to Leu-740.
    SP054
    Glu-7 to Val-28; and Tyr-33 to Glu-44.
    SP055
    Pro-3 to Val-18; Thr-21 to Lys-53; Val-84 to Lys-
    99; Ile-162 to Val-172; and Val-204 to Ser 241.
    SP056
    Val-34 to Tyr-41; Leu-47 to Glu-55; and Pro-57 to
    Gln-66.
    SP057
    Asp-1 to Val-25; Pro-29 to Ile-80; Asn-96 to Val-
    145; and Pro-150 to Glu-172.
    SP058
    Ala-64 to Thr-70; Leu-82 to His-138; and Val-228
    to Asn-236.
    SP059
    Val-10 to Thr-24; Ser-76 to Pro-102; Ser-109 to
    Ile-119; Ser-124 to Val-130; Thr-186 to Ile-194;
    and Asn-234 to Ser-243.
    SP060
    Leu-70 to Arg-76; and Val-79 to Ile-88.
    SP062
    Glu-14 to Lys-28; Ser-32 to Lys-46; and Glu-66 to
    Thr-74.
    SP063
    Ile-10 to Val-25; Val-30 to Thr-40; Asp-44 to Pro-
    54; Asn-57 to Val-63; Pro-71 to Val-100; and Thr-
    105 to Thr-116.
    SP064
    Pro-12 to Leu-32; Val-40 to Leu-68; Asp-95 to Ala-
    125; Ser-164 to Glu-184; Ser-314 to Glu-346; Asn-
    382 to Val-393; Leu-463 to Gln-498; Asn-534 to
    Lys-548; and Lys-557 to Gly-605.
    SP065
    Asn-2 to Ile-12; Ala-39 to Thr-61; and His-135 to
    Ala-155.
    SP067
    Gly-1 to Thr-13; Asp-203 to Asn-218; and Gly-240
    to Asp-253.
    SP068
    Ser-2 to Ser-12; Val-17 to Gln-26; and Lys-54 to
    Cys-67.
    SP069
    Ser-32 to Thr-41; Pro-66 to Glu-80; Thr-110 to
    Val-122; and Val-147 to Thr-180.
    SP070
    Lys-6 to Tyr-16; Gln-19 to Ile-27; Arg-50 to Ala-
    58; Leu-112 to Val-128; Ile-151 to Asn-167; Leu-
    305 to Phe-321.
    SP071
    Gln-92 to Asn-158; Gln-171 to Gln-188; Val-204 to
    Val-240; Thr-247 to Ala-273; Glu-279 to Thr-338;
    Pro-345 to Glu-368; Asn-483 to Lys-539; Val-552 to
    Ala-568; Glu-575 to Ser-591; Ser-621 to Gly-640;
    Gln-742 to Gly-758.
    SP072
    Val-68 to Tyr-81; Tyr-86 to Val-121; Leu-127 to
    Gly-140; Gly-144 to Ala-155; Gln-168 to Val-185;
    Asp-210 to Try-241; Glu-246 to Thr-269; Lys-275 to
    Tyr-295; Gly-303 to Pro-320; Arg-327 to Ile-335;
    Thr-338 to Thr-364; Tyr-478 to Phe-495; and Tyr-
    499 to Arg-521.
    SP073
    Glu-37 to Val-45; Glu-55 to Val-68; Thr-104 to
    Thr-119; Ile-127 to Tyr-135; Asn-220 to Ile-232;
    Thr-237 to Ala-250; Ser-253 to Ala-263; Glu-284 to
    Ile-297; and Met-438 to Asn-455.
    SP074
    Gly-2 to Ala-12; Gly-96 to Ile-110; and Thr-220 to
    Phe-239.
    SP075
    Phe-33 to Tyr-42; Gln-93 to Gly-102; and Val-196
    to Asp-211.
    SP076
    Ser-64 to Leu-76; and Phe-81 to Ala-101.
    SP077
    Asp-1 to Glu-12; Tyr-26 to Val-36; and Val-51 to
    Try-62.
    SP078
    Ala-193 to Ile-208; Tyr-266 to Asn-275; Glu-356 to
    Leu-369; Ala-411 to Gly-422; Ser-437 to Pro-464;
    Thr-492 to Glu-534; and Glu-571 to Gln-508.
    SP079
    Gly-11 to Leu-20; Lys-39 to Leu-48; Leu-72 to Val-
    85; Asn-147 to Ser-158; Ile-178 to Asp-187; Tyr-
    189 to Gln-201; and Leu-203 to Ala-216
    SP080
    Ser-2 to Glu-12; Gln-42 to Ala-51; Ala-116 to Ser-
    127; Phe-131 to Asp-143; and Ile-159 to Ile-171.
    SP081
    Gln-2 to Leu-9; Gln-49 to Cys-57; Ile-108 to Val-
    131; Gly-134 to Leu-145; and Trp-154 to Cys 162.
    SP082
    Ile-101 to Ser-187; Gly-191 to Asn-221; Arg-225 to
    Arg-236; Tyr-239 to Leu-255; and Gly-259 to Arg-
    268.
    SP083
    Ser-28 to Asp-70.
    SP084
    Leu-42 to Gln-66; Thr-69 to Lys-81; Glu-83 to Arg-
    92; and Gly-98 to Asn-110.
    SP085
    Gln-2 to Val-22; and Ser-45 to Glu-51.
    SP086
    Leu-18 to Gln-65; and Lys-72 to Val-83.
    SP087
    Ser-45 to Leu-53; and Thr-S5 to Gln-63
    SP088
    Pro-8 to Ile-16; Leu-25 to Trp-33; Tyr-35 to Gln-
    43; Leu-51 to Val-59; Val-59 to Arg-67; Thr-55 to
    Tyr-63; Asn-85 to Gly-93; Thr-107 to Leu-115; Leu-
    115 to Trp-123; Ala-121 to Thr-129; Tyr-153 to
    Ala-161; His-176 to Gly-184; Tyr-194 to Ala-202;
    Ala-217 to Gly-225; and Asn-85 to Gly-93.
    SP089
    Trp-43 to Ala-51; Gln-68 to Phe-76; Val-93 to Gln-
    101; Phe-106 to Phe-114; Lys-117 to Lys-125; Trp-
    148 to Phe-156; Glu-168 to Gln-176; Ile-193 to
    Tyr-201; Lys-203 to Lys-211; Glu-212 to Gln-220;
    Ile-237 to Tyr-245; Lys-247 to Lys-255; Glu-256 to
    Gln-264; Met-275 to Gly-283; Lys-286 to Gly-294;
    Trp-292 to Glu-300; Asp-289 to Thr-297; Tyr-315 to
    Ser-323; Asp-334 to Lys-342; Pro-371 to Arg-379;
    Arg-485 to Asn-493; Lys-527 to Arg-535; Phe-537 to
    Met-545; and Tyr-549 to Glu-557.
    SP090
    Phe-2 to Gln-10; Gln-13 to Lys-21; Tyr-19 to Glu-
    27; Tyr-39 to Met-47; Pro-65 to Leu-73; Tyr-121 to
    His-129; Lys-147 to Ile-155; Gly-161 to Lys-169;
    Gly-218 to Trp-226; Asp-230 to Thr-238; Tyr-249 to
    Ala-257; and Ala-272 to Gly-280.
    SP091
    Ser-19 to Ser-27; Asn-25 to Thr-33; Val-51 to Gln-
    59; Asn-75 to Asn-83; Ile-103 to Trp-111; Tyr-113
    to Ala-121; Leu-175 to Asn-183; Glu-185 to Trp-
    193; Ala-203 to Tyr-211; Val-250 to Phe-258; Asn-
    260 to Thr-268; Ser-278 to Asp-286; Tyr-305 to
    Leu-313; Asn-316 to Gly-324; Asn-374 to Asp-382;
    Asn-441 to Gly-449; and Ser-454 to Gln-462.
    SP092
    Arg-95 to Glu-103; Ala-216 to Val-224; Leu-338 to
    Glu-346; Pro-350 to Ala-358; Pro-359 to Ala-367;
    Pro-368 to Ala-376; Pro-377 to Ala-385; Pro-386 to
    Ala-394; Pro-395 to Ala-403; Pro-350 to Ala-358;
    Gln-414 to Lys-422; Pro-421 to Asn-429; Trp-465 to
    Tyr-473; Phe-487 to Tyr-495; Asn-517 to Gly-525;
    Trp-586 to Tyr-594; Phe-608 to Tyr-616; and Asp-
    630 to Gly-638.
    SP093
    Gln-30 to Ile-38; Gln-52 to Val-60; Ala-108 to
    His-116; Tyr-133 to Glu-141; Tyr-192 to Ala-200;
    and Phe-207 to Ser-215.
    SP094
    Ala-87 to Val-95; Leu-110 to Cys-118; Gln-133 to
    Leu-141; Ser-185 to Leu-193; Ile-195 to Gly-203;
    Asp-206 to Gln-214; Ser-211 to Gly-219; Ile-241 to
    Thr-249.
    SP095
    Arg-1 to Gln-9; Phe-7 to Asn-15; Thr-21 to Asn-30;
    Leu-46 to Phe-54; and Ser-72 to Met-80.
    SP096
    Gly-29 to Ile-37; Glu-52 to Ser-60; and Leu-64 to
    Gly-72.
    SP097
    Ala-11 to Thr-19; Glu-53 to Glu-61; Ser-91 to Lys-
    99; Thr-123 to Gln-131; and Gly-209 to Lys-217.
    SP098
    Thr-3 to Ser-11; Gly-38 to Phe-46; Tyr-175 to Asn-
    183; Met-187 to Cys-195; Gln-197 to Leu-205; Tyr-
    307 to Gln-315; Gly-318 to Tyr-326; Asn-348 to
    Val-356; Lys-377 to Pro-385; and Leu-415 to Val-
    423.
    SP099
    Arg-19 to Gly-27; Asp-76 to Ser-84; Val-90 to Lys-
    98; Phe-165 to Val-173; Leu-237 to Pro-245.
    SP100
    His-111 to Gln-119; Ser-141 to His-149; Asp-154 to
    Ser-162; Gln-158 to Gln-166; Asp-154 to Gln-166;
    Lys-180 to Gln-188; and Ser-206 to Gln-214.
    SP101
    Glu-23 to Glu-31; Glu-40 to Val-48; Gln-50 to Ser-
    58; Thr-61 to Ile-69; Leu-82 to Ile-90; Ala-108 to
    Leu-116; Gln-121 to Pro-129; and Leu-130 to Thr-
    138.
    SP102
    Asp-32 to His-40; Arg-48 to Lys-56; and Asp-102 to
    Thr-110.
    SP103
    Arg-5 to Gln-13; Gln-22 to Leu-30; Arg-151 to Gln-
    159; Arg-167 to Gln-175; Pro-189 to Glu-197; Gly-
    207 to Leu-215; Ser-219 to Gln-227; Ser-233 to
    Ser-241; Pro-255 to Asp-264; Lys-272 to Gly-280;
    Ser-318 to Val-326; Thr-341 to Asp-351; Asn-356 to
    Thr-364; Val-370 to Tyr-378; Ile-379 to Gln-387;
    and Met-435 to Tyr-443.
    SP105
    Asn-28 to Pro-36; Thr-77 to Phe-85; Arg-88 to Val-
    96; Gly-107 to Phe-115; Asp-169 to Asp-177; His-
    248 to Ser-256; and Ser-274 to Ala-282.
    SP106
    Val-10 to Thr-18; Ile-62 to Tyr-70; Ile-71 to Pro-
    79; Lys-86 to Gln-94; Lys-100 to Thr-108; Phe-132
    to Leu-140; and Asp-145 to Arg-153.
    SP107
    Asp-33 to Val-41; and Arg-63 to Gln-71.
    SP108
    Lys-9 to Gln-17; Leu-44 to Ser-52; Ser-63 to Phe-
    71; Tyr-109 to Ser-117; Ile-183 to Ile-191; Pro-
    194 to Leu-202; Gly-257 to Gln-265; Ala-323 to
    Thr-331; and Leu-381 to Tyr-389.
    SP109
    Asn-2 to Gln-10; Ala-65 to Lys-73; Leu-76 to Glu-
    84; Thr-111 to Asp-119; Gln-116 to Tyr-124; Tyr-
    130 to Val-138; Asp-173 to Gly-181; Asp-196 to
    Ser-204; Asn-231 to Ser-239; Phe-252 to Ser-260;
    Phe-270 to Tyr-278; Val-291 to His-299; Asp-306 to
    Leu-314; and Pro-327 to Gly-335.
    SP110
    Ser-8 to Glu-16; Ile-37 to Val-45; Ala-107 to Val-
    115; and Gly-122 to Thr-130.
    SP111
    Asp-19 to Glu-28; Leu-43 to Ala-51; Asn-102 to
    Phe-110; Gln-133 to Ser-141; Phe-162 to Asp-170;
    Tyr-194 to Met-202; and Asp-273 to Ser-281.
    SP112
    Asp-3 to Gln-11; Gly-21 to Ile-29; Ala-46 to Arg-
    54; Arg-98 to Arg-106; Thr-114 to Val-122; Gln-133
    to Asn-141; and Leu-223 to Thr-231.
    SP113
    Asn-19 to Gly-27; Arg-54 to Ser-62; Val-69 to Gln-
    77; Ser-117 to Asn-125; Gly-164 to Leu-172; Tyr-
    193 to Ser-201; Cys-303 to Phe-311; His-315 to
    Ile-323; Arg-341 to Cys-349; Ile-347 to Ser-355;
    Arg-403 to Phe-4111; Gln-484 to Pro-492; Ser-499
    to Leu-507; Ile-541 to Thr-549 Asn-622 to Ile-630;
    and Glu-645 to Gly-653.
    SP114
    Gly-17 to Leu-25; His-40 to Gln-48; Arg-49 to Arg-
    57; Ile-65 to Pro-73; Asn-101 to Asp-111; Gly-128
    to Cys-136; Phe-183 to Thr-191; and Pro-268 to
    Ile-276.
    SP115
    Met-8 to Ser-16; Tyr-24 to Leu-32; Cys-68 to Leu-
    76; Ser-100 to Pro-108; Thr-193 to Thr-201; Gly-
    238 to Pro-250; Thr-280 to Phe-288; Pro-303 to
    Asn-312; Trp-319 to Leu-328; Leu-335 to Leu-344;
    Lys-395 to Ala-403; Asn-416 to Gln-424; Tyr-430 to
    Ser-438; Val-448 to Leu-456; Leu-460 to Thr-468;
    Pro-502 to Thr-510; Lys-515 to Ile-524; Gln-523 to
    His-532; Tyr-535 to Thr-543; Ser-559 to Pro-567;
    Thr-572 to Asn-580; Val-594 to Arg-602; Arg-603 to
    Asn-611; Thr-620 to Trp-628; and Tyr-644 to Arg-
    653.
    SP117
    Ala-6 to Gly-14; Ile-19 to Thr-27; Thr-99 to Leu-
    107; Ser-117 to Asp-125; His-131 to Val-139; Ile-
    193 to Gly-201; and Val-241 to Gln-249.
    SP118
    Ser-8 to Trp-23; His-46 to Ala-54; Asn-93 to Gly-
    101; Val-100 to Ser-108; Arg-155 to Asp-163; and
    His-192 to Leu-200.
    SP119
    Tyr-46 to Lys-54; Ser-93 to Ser-101; Trp-108 to
    Asn-116; Val-121 to Glu-129; and Tyr-131 to Gln-
    139.
    SP120
    Ala-57 to Lys-65; Leu-68 to Glu-76; Thr-103 to
    Tyr-116; Tyr-122 to Val-130; His-163 to Gly-173;
    Asp-188 to Ser-196; Ser-222 to Ser-231; Phe-244 to
    Ser-252; Pro-262 to Tyr-270; Val-283 to His-291;
    and Asp-298 to Leu-306.
    SP121
    Ser-3 to Ala-11; Asp-13 to Leu-21; Ser-36 to Val-
    44; and Gln-136 to Met-144.
    SP122
    Asn-28 to Lys-36; Glu-39 to Thr-50; Val-54 to Lys-
    62; Asn-106 to Leu-114; Phe-159 to Gly-167; Asn-
    172 to Arg-180; Glu-199 to Asn-207; Lys-230 to
    His-241; Asn-252 to Gly-263; Met-278 to Ala-287;
    Thr-346 to Asp-354; Lys-362 to Thr-370; Asp-392 to
    Asn-405; Asp-411 to Ala-424; Gly-434 to Gly-443;
    Tyr-484 to Glu-492; Ile-511 to Leu-519; Asn-524 to
    Asp-538; Glu-552 to Ile-567; Val-605 to Lys-613;
    Phe-697 to Ala-705; Phe-722 to Leu-730; Leu-753 to
    Leu-761; Asp-787 to Gln-795; Leu-858 to Asn-866;
    Ala-892 to Thr-901; Gly-903 to Ile-913; Ile-921 to
    Asn-931; Asn-938 to Pro-951; Gly-960 to Lys-970;
    Leu-977 to Asp-985; and Leu-988 to Pro-996.
    SP123
    Val-4 to Asn-12; Glu-47 to Leu-55; Lys-89 to Glu-
    100; Ser-165 to Thr-173; Lys-234 to Val-242; Ser-
    258 to Ser-266; Glu-284 to Asn-292; Tyr-327 to
    Leu-335; Tyr-457 to Thr-465; Tyr-493 to Glu-501;
    Thr-506 to Tyr-514; Lys-517 to Thr-525; Asn-532 to
    Gly-540; and Arg-556 to Glu-564.
    SP124
    rg-16 to Glu-24; Gln-52 to Arg-60; Asn-69 to Tyr-
    77; Glu-121 to Asn-129; Ala-134 to Val-142; Thr-
    151 to Ala-159; Asn-164 to Glu-172; His-181 to
    His-189; Thr-210 to Ala-218; Ser-244 to Val-252;
    Phe-287 to Tyr-297; Ser-312 to Thr-323; His-433 to
    Tyr-441; Ser-445 to Asn-453; Asn-469 to Thr-477;
    Asn-501 to Asn-509; Gln-536 to Ala-547; and Gln-
    608 to Asp-621.
    SP125
    Ser-9 to Asp-21; Ala-28 to Leu-36; Asn-49 to Phe-
    57; Val-137 to Arg-145; Asn-155 to Leu-163; Glu-
    183 to Asp-191; Gly-202 to Tyr-210; Pro-221 to
    Asp-229; Phe-263 to Ala-271; Phe-300 to Gln-308;
    Asp-313 to Glu-321; Asn-324 to Asp-332; Ile-346 to
    Asn-354; Asp-362 to Lys-370; Met-402 to Gly-410;
    Gly-437 to Gly-445; Ser-471 to Glu-483; Gly-529 to
    Asp-537; Gln-555 to Val-563; and Leu-579 to Lys-
    587.
    SP126
    Leu-22 to Thr-30; Val-65 to Leu-73; and Thr-75 to
    Asp-83.
    SP127
    Glu-2 to Ala-12; Asp-28 to Thr-36; Val-105 to Thr-
    113; Lys-121 to Thr-129; Trp-138 to Pro-146; Ser-
    152 to Ile-160; Lys-180 to Asp-188; Leu-194 to
    Asn-202; and Gly-228 to Thr-236.
  • [0185]
    TABLE 3
    S. pneumoniae ORF Cloning Primers
    Primer Name SEQ ID NO: RE
    SP001A 227 Bam HI
    SP001B 228 Sal I
    SP004A 229 Bam HI
    SP004B 230 Sal I
    SP006A 231 Bam HI
    SP006B 232 Hind III
    SP007A 233 Bam HI
    SP007B 234 Hind III
    SP008A 235 Bgl II
    SP008B 236 Hind III
    SP009A 237 Bam HI
    SP009B 238 Hind III
    SP010A 239 Bam HI
    SP010B 240 Hind III
    SP011A 241 Bgl II
    SP011B 242 Pst I
    SP012A 243 Bam HI
    SP012B 244 Pst I
    SP013A 245 Bam HI
    SP013B 246 Hind III
    SP014A 247 Bgl II
    SP014B 248 Pst I
    SP015A 249 Bam HI
    SP015B 250 Pst I
    SP016A 251 Bam HI
    SP016B 252 Hind III
    SP017A 253 Bam HI
    SP017B 254 Hind III
    SP019A 255 Bam HI
    SP019B 256 Hind III
    SP020A 257 Bam HI
    SP020B 258 Hind III
    SP021A 259 Bam HI
    SP021B 260 Hind III
    SP022A 261 Bam HI
    SP022B 262 Hind III
    SP023A 263 Bam HI
    SP023B 264 Hind III
    SP025A 265 Bam HI
    SP025B 266 Sal I
    SP028A 267 Bam HI
    SP028B 268 Pst I
    SP030A 269 Bam HI
    SP030B 270 Hind III
    SP031A 271 Bam HI
    SP031B 272 Hind III
    SP032A 273 Bam HI
    SP032B 274 Pst I
    SP033A 275 Bgl II
    SP033B 276 Hind III
    SP034A 277 Bam HI
    SP034B 278 Hind III
    SP035A 279 Bam HI
    SP035B 280 Hind III
    SP036A 281 Bam HI
    SP036B 282 Hind III
    SP038A 283 Bam HI
    SP038B 284 Xho I
    SP039A 285 Bam HI
    SP039B 286 Hind III
    SP040A 287 Bam HI
    SP040B 288 Hind III
    SP041A 289 Bam HI
    SP041B 290 Hind III
    SP042A 291 Bam HI
    SP042B 292 Hind III
    SP043A 293 Bam HI
    SP043B 294 Hind III
    SP044A 295 Bam HI
    SP044B 296 Hind III
    SP045A 297 Bam HI
    SP045B 298 Sal I
    SP046A 299 Bam HI
    SP046B 300 Pst I
    SP048A 301 Bam HI
    SP048B 302 Hind III
    SP049A 303 Bam HI
    SP049B 304 Hind III
    SP050A 305 Bam HI
    SP050B 306 Hind III
    SP051A 307 Bam HI
    SP051B 308 Sal I
    SP052A 309 Bam HI
    SP052B 310 Hind III
    SP053A 311 Bam HI
    SP053B 312 Sal I
    SP054A 313 Bam HI
    SP054B 314 Hind III
    SP055A 315 Bam HI
    SP055B 316 Hind III
    SP056A 317 Bam HI
    SP056B 318 Hind III
    SP057A 319 Bam HI
    SP057B 320 Hind III
    SP058A 321 Bam HI
    SP058B 322 Sal I
    SP059A 323 Bam HI
    SP059B 324 Pst I
    SP060A 325 Bam HI
    SP060B 326 Hind III
    SP062A 327 Bam HI
    SP062B 328 Pst I
    SP063A 329 Bam HI
    SP063B 330 Hind III
    SP064A 331 Bam HI
    SP064B 332 Pst I
    SP065A 333 Bam HI
    SP065B 334 Hind III
    SP067A 335 Bam HI
    SP067B 336 Sal I
    SP068A 337 Bam HI
    SP068B 338 Sal I
    SP069A 339 Bam HI
    SP069B 340 Hind III
    SP070A 341 Bam HI
    SP070B 342 Hind III
    SP071A 343 Bgl II
    SP071B 344 Hind III
    SP072A 345 Bgl II
    SP072B 346 Hind III
    SP073A 347 Sal I
    SP073B 348 Hind III
    SP074A 349 Bam HI
    SP074B 350 Pst I
    SP075A 351 Bam HI
    SP075B 352 Hind III
    SP076A 353 Bam HI
    SP076B 354 Hind III
    SP077A 355 Bgl II
    SP077B 356 Hind III
    SP078A 357 Bam HI
    SP078B 358 Sal I
    SP079A 359 Bam HI
    SP079B 360 Pst I
    SP080A 361 Bam HI
    SP080B 362 Hind III
    SP081A 363 Bam HI
    SP081B 364 Hind III
    SP082A 365 Bam HI
    SP082B 366 Hind III
    SP083A 367 Bam HI
    SP083B 368 Bgl II
    SP084A 369 Bam HI
    SP084B 370 Hind III
    SP085A 371 Bam HI
    SP085B 372 Hind III
    SP086A 373 Bam HI
    SP086B 374 Hind III
    SP087A 375 Bam HI
    SP087B 376 Hind III
    SP088A 377 Bam HI
    SP088B 378 Hind III
    SP089A 379 Bam HI
    SP089B 380 Pst I
    SP090A 381 Bam HI
    SP090B 382 Pst I
    SP091A 383 Bam HI
    SP091B 384 Hind III
    SP092A 385 Bgl II
    SP092B 386 Hind III
    SP093A 387 Bam HI
    SP093B 388 Hind III
    SP094A 389 Bam HI
    SP094B 390 Hind III
    SP095A 391 Bam HI
    SP095B 392 Hind III
    SP096A 393 Bam HI
    SP096B 394 Hind III
    SP097A 395 Bam HI
    SP097B 396 Hind III
    SP098A 397 Bam HI
    SP098B 398 Hind III
    SP099A 399 Bam HI
    SP099B 400 Hind III
    SP100A 401 Bam HI
    SP100B 402 Pst I
    SP101A 403 Bam HI
    SP101B 404 Hind III
    SP102A 405 Bam HI
    SP102B 406 Hind III
    SP103A 407 Sal I
    SP103B 408 Pst I
    SP105A 409 Bam HI
    SP105B 410 Hind III
    SP106A 411 Sal I
    SP106B 412 Hind III
    SP107A 413 Bam HI
    SP107B 414 Hind III
    SP108A 415 Bam HI
    SP108B 416 Hind III
    SP109A 417 Bam HI
    SP109B 418 Hind III
    SP110A 419 Bam HI
    SP110B 420 Hind III
    SP111A 421 Bam HI
    SP111B 422 Hind III
    SP112A 423 Sal I
    SP112B 424 Hind III
    SP113A 425 Bam HI
    SP113B 426 Hind III
    SP114A 427 Bam HI
    SP114B 428 Hind III
    SP115A 429 Bam HI
    SP115B 430 Hind III
    SP117A 431 Bam HI
    SP117B 432 Sal I
    SP118A 433 Sal I
    SP118B 434 Pst I
    SP119A 435 Bam HI
    SP119B 436 Hind III
    SP120A 437 Bam HI
    SP120B 438 Hind III
    SP121A 439 Bam HI
    SP121B 440 Hind III
    SP122A 441 Bam HI
    SP122B 442 Sal I
    SP123A 443 Bam HI
    SP123B 444 Hind III
    SP124A 445 Bam HI
    SP124B 446 Sal I
    SP125A 447 Bam HI
    SP125B 448 Sal I
    SP126A 449 Bam HI
    SP126B 450 Hind III
    SP127A 451 Bam HI
    SP127B 452 Hind III
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Classifications
U.S. Classification435/6.15, 536/23.7, 530/395, 435/252.3, 435/69.3, 435/320.1
International ClassificationG01N33/569, C12N5/10, C12N15/09, C12N1/21, C12Q1/68, C07K16/12, A01K67/027, C12P21/02, C12N5/00, A61P31/04, C12N1/19, C12N15/31, G01N33/53, G01N33/50, C12N5/18, A61K39/09, C12N1/15, G06F17/30, A61K48/00, A61K38/00, A61K39/00, C07K14/315
Cooperative ClassificationC07K14/315, C07K14/3156, A61K38/00, A61K39/00
European ClassificationC07K14/315B, C07K14/315