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Publication numberUS20050183317 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/997,419
Publication dateAug 25, 2005
Filing dateNov 23, 2004
Priority dateFeb 9, 2004
Publication number10997419, 997419, US 2005/0183317 A1, US 2005/183317 A1, US 20050183317 A1, US 20050183317A1, US 2005183317 A1, US 2005183317A1, US-A1-20050183317, US-A1-2005183317, US2005/0183317A1, US2005/183317A1, US20050183317 A1, US20050183317A1, US2005183317 A1, US2005183317A1
InventorsJames Finn
Original AssigneeRock River Arms, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Trigger guard on firearm
US 20050183317 A1
Abstract
A firearm includes a receiver further including a trigger and a trigger guard. The trigger guard comprises a first end and a second end. The first end is configured to mount to a first arm and a second arm of the receiver and is further configured so that a portion of the trigger guard extends below the first and second arm. The second end is configured to mount to a third and forth arm of the receiver. The first end and the second end extend at angles so as to provide additional room for the user's finger in the enclosure surrounding the trigger.
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Claims(14)
1. A receiver for a firearm including a trigger, a grip, and a magazine well, the receiver comprising
a first arm and a second arm positioned between the grip and the trigger;
a third arm and a fourth arm positioned between the trigger and the magazine well; and
a trigger guard having a first end and a second end, the first end connecting to the first arm and the second arm, and the second end connecting to the third and fourth arms, and wherein a portion of the first end extends below the first arm and the second arm.
2. The receiver of claim 1, wherein the trigger guard further comprises a middle portion, the middle portion providing a transition between the first end and the second end.
3. The firearm of claim 2, wherein the first end of the trigger guard extends at a angle approximately tangential to an inside edge of the first and second arm and the second end extends at an angle approximately tangential to an inside edge of the third and fourth arms.
4. The firearm of claim 2, wherein the middle portion provides a flat transition between the first end and the second end of the trigger guard.
5. A method of protecting a finger of a user while operating a firearm, comprising:
providing a trigger guard, the trigger guard comprising:
a first end, the first end configured to mount to a first and second arm of a receiver, wherein a portion of the first end extends below the first arm and the second arm;
a second end, the second configured to mount to a third and a fourth arm of the receiver;
installing the trigger guard on the receiver, wherein the extension of the first end of the trigger guard below the first arm and the second arm in operation prevents the user from rubbing the user's finger on the first and second arm.
6. A trigger guard for use on a firearm having a first arm, a second arm and third arm and a fourth arm, the trigger guard comprising:
a first end, the first end configured to mount via a retaining pin to the first and second arms, the first end further configured to extend below the first and second arms;
a second end, the second end configured to mount to the third and fourth arms; and
a middle portion, the middle portion configured to provide a transition between the first end and the second end.
7. The trigger guard of claim 6, wherein the middle portion of the trigger guard includes a horizontal portion.
8. The trigger guard of claim 6, wherein the trigger guard is nonlinear.
9. The trigger guard of claim 6, wherein the first end has a top edge and the middle portion has a bottom edge, the top edge of the first end being at least 0.3 inches above the bottom edge of the middle portion.
10. The trigger guard of claim 9, wherein the top edge of the first end is at least 0.6 inches above the bottom edge of the middle portion.
11. A trigger guard for use on a firearm having a first arm, a second arm and third arm and a fourth arm, the trigger guard comprising:
a first end, the first end configured to mount to the first and second arms, the first end further configured to extend from the first and second arm at an angle approximately tangential to the profile of the first and second arm;
a second end, the second end configured to mount to the third and fourth arms, the second end further configured to extend from the third and fourth arm at an angle approximately tangential to the profile of the third and fourth arms; and
a middle portion, the middle portion configured to provide a transition between the first end and the second end.
12. The trigger guard of claim 11, wherein the first end comprises a top edge and a bottom edge, the top edge being at least 0.3 inches from bottom edge.
13. The trigger guard of claim 12, wherein the middle portion has a top edge and a bottom edge, the top edge of the middle portion being at least 0.09 inches from the bottom edge of the middle portion.
14. The trigger guard of claim 13, wherein the distance between the top edge of the first end is at least 0.5 inches from the bottom edge of the middle portion.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims benefit to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/542,905 filed Feb. 9, 2004.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to the field of firearms, more specifically to a trigger guard on a firearm.

2. Description of Related Art

Referring to FIG. 1, a typical configuration of a receiver system for a firearm is shown and includes a grip 20 that is mounted to a receiver 10. The grip is mounted to the receiver so that the user can hold the grip with a thumb and three fingers while resting a trigger finger on a trigger.

As shown in FIG. 1, the receiver has downwardly extending arms that are used to mount a trigger guard 25 and to form an enclosure for the trigger. Specifically, a first and a second arm 11, 12 extend down between the grip 20 and the trigger 15 and extend below the end of the trigger. A third and fourth arm 31, 32 extend between the trigger 15 and a magazine well 50 that is configured to receive a magazine. The third and fourth arm 31, 32 also extend below the trigger. The arms 11, 12, 31, 32 in combination with the trigger guard 25 form the enclosure that surrounds and protects the trigger.

As can be appreciated, it is undesirable to inadvertently actuate the trigger. The trigger guard 25 extends between the ends of the first and second arms and the ends of the third and fourth arms to inhibit the inadvertent actuation of the trigger. In particular, a first end of the trigger guard 25 is rotatably mounted to the first and second arms 11, 12 via a pin 52. A second end of the trigger guard 25 is connected to the third and fourth arms 31, 32 via a retaining detent 40. In operation, the detent can be actuated so as to allow the trigger guard to be rotated from a horizontal position (i.e., a closed position) to a more vertical position (i.e., an open position).

While the trigger guard is used to prevent the inadvertent actuation of the trigger, the known trigger guard is not suitable when the user is wearing gloves, such as during cold weather conditions. Under these circumstances, it is necessary to move the trigger guard to the open position so that the user can actuate the trigger while wearing thick gloves and the like. A significant drawback with having the trigger guard in the open position is that the trigger is more susceptible to unintended actuation and therefore unintended firing of the firearm. It would be therefore be desirable to provide a trigger guard that remains in the closed position and that allows the user to actuate the trigger while wearing gloves without increasing the likelihood of an unintentional actuation of the trigger.

Other problems and drawbacks exist with respect to known trigger guards. For example, certain ergonomic aspects of the pistol grip connection to the lower receiver are not ideal. As previously mentioned, the first and second arms 11, 12 are used to support the pin 52 that is used to rotatably mount the trigger guard 25 in place. As illustrated by FIG. 1, these arms extend below the trigger guard. Thus, the user's finger tends to rub on the ends of the first and second arms. Depending on the finish of the arms, the first and second arms can have edges or burrs that can wear and cause abrasions on or even cut the user's finger.

In an effort to overcome this problem, two basic methods have been used. The first method modifies the grip with a grip cover. A portion of the grip cover extends over the arms 11, 12 so that the portion of the two arms that would normally rub on the user's finger is shielded from contact. In this manner, contact with the two arms is prevented. However, with this configuration, the trigger guard cannot be opened, which may be necessary with known trigger guards when a user is wearing thick gloves.

The second method uses a plastic plug to fill in the gap between trigger guard 25 and the arms 11, 12. The plastic plug reduces the occurrence of abrasions, but like the grip cover, prevents the opening of the trigger guard. Thus, a firearm using the known trigger guard and using either of the two described methods is less desirable for a user who is operating the firearm in cold weather conditions where gloves are required. It would therefore be beneficial to provide a solution that reduces abrasions to the finger of the user while enabling use of the firearm with the trigger guard in a closed position and when the user is wearing gloves.

The present invention is directed at overcoming these and other known problems with firearms and the known trigger guards used on these firearms.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a firearm having a receiver system that includes a trigger guard of the invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the trigger guard defines a first end and a second end. The first end is configured to mount to a first arm and a second arm extending from the receiver system via a retaining pin. The second end of the trigger guard is configured to mount to a third arm and a fourth arm also extending from the receiver system via a detent. The trigger guard of the invention is configured so that a portion of the first end extends below the first and the second arm so as to minimize abrasive contact between the user's fingers and the first and the second arms.

In another aspect of the invention, the first end of the trigger guard extends from the retaining pin in a downward angled direction. The second end of the trigger guard also extends from the detent in a downward angled direction. The trigger guard is configured so that a middle portion provides a transition between the first end and the second end. In this exemplary embodiment, the trigger guard forms a larger enclosure around the trigger thereby permitting a user to operate the firearm when wearing thick gloves.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention is illustrated by way of example and not limited in the accompanying figures in which like reference numerals indicate similar elements and in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a partial isometric view of a firearm and the receiver including the known trigger guard.

FIG. 2 a illustrates a partial side view of the firearm, receiver and trigger guard of FIG. 1 with the trigger guard shown in the closed position.

FIG. 2 b illustrates a partial side view of the firearm, receiver and trigger guard of FIG. 1 with the trigger guard shown in the open position.

FIG. 3 a illustrates a side view of the known trigger guard.

FIG. 3 b illustrates an isometric view of the known trigger guard.

FIG. 4 a illustrates a partial isometric view of an embodiment of the firearm and receiver of the present invention, including a trigger guard.

FIG. 4 b illustrates a partial side view of the embodiment depicted in FIG. 4 a.

FIG. 5 a illustrates a side view of an embodiment of a trigger guard according to the present invention.

FIG. 5 b illustrates an isometric view of the embodiment depicted in FIG. 5 a.

Before the embodiments of the invention are explained in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and the arrangement of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or being carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology used herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The use of “including” and “comprising” and variations thereof is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and equivalents thereof as well as additional items and equivalents thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIGS. 1-3 b depict the prior art trigger guard. FIG. 1 illustrates a partial isometric view of a firearm 8 and depicts how a receiver 10 supports an arm 11 and an arm 12, both of which extend downwardly from the receiver and between a trigger 15 and a grip 20. A trigger guard 25 is shown with a first end 26 rotatably mounted to the arms 11 and 12. A second end 27 is mounted to an arm 31 and an arm 32. The arms 31 and 32 extend downwardly from the receiver 10 and between the magazine well 50 and the trigger 15. The magazine well is the portion of the receiver configured to accept a magazine. The first end 26 of the trigger guard 25 is retained by a pin 52 and the second end 27 is retained by a detent 40. The arms 11, 12, 31, 32 and trigger guard 25 form an enclosure for the trigger 15 to protect the trigger from inadvertent actuation.

As can be appreciated, the profile of the first arm 11 and second arm 12 are shaped like a partial “C” facing to the right. The profile of the third arm 31 and fourth arm 32 is shaped like a partial “C” facing to the left. Thus, the combination of the first and second arms 11, 12 with the third and fourth arms 31, 32 partially encapsulates the trigger 15 in a circular shaped enclosure that is truncated at the top and bottom.

FIG. 1 also illustrates a problem of the prior art, namely the extension of the arms 11 and 12 past the trigger guard 25. As can be appreciated, the ends of the arms 11 and 12 can rub on the user's fingers during use of the firearm.

FIGS. 2 a and 2 b illustrate a side view of the receiver 10 with the trigger guard 25 in the closed and open position, respectively. FIGS. 3 a-3 b illustrate an isometric and a side view of the trigger guard 25 of the prior art. As depicted in these figures, the prior art trigger guard 25 has generally a flat, planar shaped portion 30. The trigger guard 25 also has at its ends 26, 27, openings or holes 28, 29 that are used to mount the trigger guard 25 to the arms 11, 12, 31, 32 of the receiver 10, as described above.

Turning now to FIG. 4 a, one embodiment of the present invention is shown. The present invention includes a firearm 80 including a receiver 100 having a grip 200 that is mounted to the receiver 100. The firearm 80 also includes a magazine well 160 and a trigger 150 extending downwardly from the receiver 100. Also extending downwardly from the receiver 100 are arms 110 and 112 that are positioned between the trigger 150 and the grip 200. In addition, arms 131 and 132 extend downwardly from the receiver 100 and are located between the trigger 150 and the magazine well 160. The arms 110, 112, 131, and 132 form part of the enclosure that surrounds the trigger 150. As shown, the arms define an arcuate shape that gives the enclosure a shape that is generally circular.

A trigger guard 125 of the invention is configured so that a first end 126 is mounted to the arms 110 and 112 through the use of a pin 152, and a second end 127 that is mounted to the arms 131 and 132 through the use of a detent 140. The trigger guard 125 is retained by the pin 152 and the detent 140 and may be selectively rotated about the pin 152. Other techniques for mounting the trigger guard 125 are possible and may be used with the invention. With the trigger guard 125 of the invention, additional space is provided around the trigger 150 so that a user wearing gloves can better actuate the trigger 150 without having to rotate the trigger guard 125 about the pin 152 to an open position, and without having to remove the gloves. That is, the trigger guard 125 when connected to the arms 110, 112, 131 and 132 forms a larger enclosure around the trigger to permit the user to actuate the trigger 150 even while wearing thick gloves.

FIG. 4 b illustrates a side view of the embodiment show in FIG. 4 a. As illustrated, a portion 116 of the first end 126 of the trigger guard 125 is configured to extend below the arms 110, 112. The extension of the first end 126 below the arm 110 helps the user avoid rubbing his or her finger on the ends of the arms 110, 112. The surface of the trigger guard 125 is preferably smooth so that abrasions and cuts on the user's finger can be avoided. Also, the portion 116 of the first end 126 of the trigger guard 125 will extend below the arms 110 and 112 a sufficient distance so as to prevent inadvertent contact between the user's finger and the arms 110 and 112.

As further illustrated in FIG. 4 b, the arms 110, 112 are configured to provide a curvature for the enclosure 148 that surrounds the trigger 150. As depicted, the trigger guard 125 extends from the arms 110 and 112 at an angle that is approximately tangential to the arc or curvature defined by the arms 110 and 112. That is, the contour of the trigger guard 125 closely matches the contour of the arms 110, 112. This transition between the arms 110 and 112 and the trigger guard 125 provides a relatively smooth transition from the arms 110, 112 to the trigger guard 125.

Similarly, the arms 131, 132 also provide a curvature for the enclosure 148 that surrounds the trigger 150. The second end 127 of the trigger guard 125 extends from arms 131 and 132 at an angle that is approximately tangential to the arc or curvature of the arms 131 and 132. Thus, a smooth transition from the arms 131, 132 to the trigger guard 125 is being provided. It will be appreciated that the smooth transition is useful in preventing chaffing to the user's finger when the user moves the trigger finger in the enclosure 148.

As depicted, the first end 126 of the trigger guard 125 extends at a first angle from the arms 110 and 112 to a middle portion 130. The second end 127 extends from the arms 131 and 132 at a second angle to the middle portion 130. It is preferable that the trigger guard 125 provide a transition between the first and second angle so that abrupt changes in the profile of the trigger guard 125 are avoided. As depicted, middle portion 130 has a horizontal section that provides a transition between the first end 126 and the second end 127. Other profiles are possible but preferably the middle section 130 will provide a smooth transition between the first end 126 and the second end 127 so as to reduce the occurrence of an edge that might potentially damage the user's finger during operation of the firearm. When installed on the firearm, the configuration of the trigger guard 125 creates a larger enclosure around the trigger 150.

FIG. 5 a illustrates a side view of an embodiment of the trigger guard 125 of the present invention. The first side 126 of the trigger guard 125 has a hole 128 configured to mount to the arms 110 and 112 via the pin 152. The second side 127 has a hole 129 configured to mount to the arms 131 and 132 via the detent 140. As stated, the trigger guard 125 has a middle portion 130 that joins the first side 126 and the second side 127. In an exemplary embodiment, the trigger guard 125 defines an interior wall 118 that is contoured and provides a smooth interior surface.

The dimensions of the trigger guard 125 are configured so that the distance between the first hole 128 and the second hole 129 is about the same as the distance between the similar holes on the prior art trigger guard 25 (i.e., about 1.8 inches). Thus, the trigger guard 125 is configured to allow retrofitting of the trigger guard 125 to an existing firearm that currently uses the prior art trigger guard.

As depicted in FIG. 5 a, the first end 126 of the trigger guard 125 has a top edge 251 and a bottom edge 252. In an exemplary embodiment, the distance between the top edge 251 and the bottom edge 252 is about 0.34 inches. The middle portion 130 has a top edge 253 and a bottom edge 254. In an exemplary embodiment, the distance between the top edge 253 and the bottom edge 254 is about 0.1 inches. As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, the described dimensions are merely illustrative and other shapes, configurations and dimensions of the trigger guard are possible. In an embodiment, the distance between the top edge 251 and the bottom edge 252 will be sufficient so that when the trigger guard 125 is installed, the user's finger will not rub on the arms 110 and 112. In addition, it is preferable to avoid extending the bottom edge 252 too far below the arms 110, 112 because it is desirable to allow the user's trigger finger to easily reach the trigger 150 while holding onto the grip 200 with the other fingers.

In an exemplary embodiment, the distance between the top edge 252 and the bottom edge 254 is about 0.63 inches. Other dimensions are possible. Reducing the distance between the top edge 252 and the bottom edge 254 decreases the enclosure around the trigger and thus decreases the space for the user's finger and makes operating the firearm more difficult with gloves. Increasing the distance between the top edge 252 and bottom edge 254, however, can have the effect of creating an undesirable visual appearance.

The trigger guard 125 is preferably made of an extruded metal such as aluminum. Naturally, manufacturing methods other than extruding the trigger guard are possible as are other materials. In alternative embodiment, the material can be made of a plastic, composite or ceramic material having suitable strength and wear characteristics.

FIG. 5 b depicts an isometric view of an embodiment of a trigger guard 125 of the present invention. As depicted, the trigger guard defines opposing sides 171, 172. In an exemplary embodiment, the distance between these two sides, which is the width of the trigger guard 125, is approximately 0.43 inches, or approximately the same width as the prior art trigger guard 25.

Variations and modifications of the foregoing are within the scope of the present invention. It should be understood that the invention disclosed and defined herein extends to all alternative combinations of two or more of the individual features mentioned or evident from the text and/or drawings. All of these different combinations constitute various alternative aspects of the present invention. The embodiments described herein explain the best modes known for practicing the invention and will enable others skilled in the art to utilize the invention. The claims are to be construed to include alternative embodiments to the extent permitted by the prior art.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8342075 *Mar 13, 2012Jan 1, 2013Gomez Jesus SReceiver for an autoloading firearm
US8656622Oct 14, 2008Feb 25, 2014Ashbury International Group, Inc.Tactical firearm systems and methods of manufacturing same
US20140230297 *Oct 17, 2013Aug 21, 2014Rock River Arms, Inc.Firearm
WO2010108897A1 *Mar 22, 2010Sep 30, 2010Michele BussuFirearm provided with removable trigger
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/72
International ClassificationF41A19/11
Cooperative ClassificationF41A19/11
European ClassificationF41A19/11