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Publication numberUS20050210768 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/793,973
Publication dateSep 29, 2005
Filing dateMar 4, 2004
Priority dateMar 4, 2004
Publication number10793973, 793973, US 2005/0210768 A1, US 2005/210768 A1, US 20050210768 A1, US 20050210768A1, US 2005210768 A1, US 2005210768A1, US-A1-20050210768, US-A1-2005210768, US2005/0210768A1, US2005/210768A1, US20050210768 A1, US20050210768A1, US2005210768 A1, US2005210768A1
InventorsRobert Lawson
Original AssigneeLawson Robert C, Lawson Robert C Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for wall component drainage
US 20050210768 A1
Abstract
A pan flashing including a pitched pan configured to wrap around a bottom of the door or window on three sides defining a bottom surface thereof; a plurality of spaced wedges extending from the pitched pan providing a weight bearing support for a sill disposed thereover; a front flange projecting perpendicularly and downwardly from a front edge defining a fourth side, the flange being fluted for fluid communication with channels defined by the plurality of spaced wedges, thus allowing ventilation up through the flutes to the pitched pan residing under the door or window and allowing a place for the water to flow out of the pan; and a front wall coplanar with the front flange and extending upwardly and downwardly from the pan, the front wall providing an attachment means for securing to a vertical stud framing the door or window, when installed.
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Claims(22)
1. A pan flashing to prevent water from entering a building by wicking underneath a door or window comprising:
a pitched pan configured to wrap around a bottom of the door or window on three sides defining a bottom surface thereof, said pan having a substantially rectangular shape in plan;
a plurality of spaced wedges extending from said pitched pan, an exposed top surface of said plurality of spaced wedges corresponding to a horizontal plane and providing a weight bearing support for a sill disposed thereover;
a front flange projecting perpendicularly and downwardly from a front edge defining a fourth side of said rectangular shape, said flange being fluted for fluid communication with channels defined by said plurality of spaced wedges, thus allowing ventilation up through the flutes to said pitched pan residing under the door or window and allowing a place for the water to flow out of the pan; and
a front wall coplanar with said front flange and extending upwardly and downwardly from said pan, said front wall providing an attachment means for securing to a vertical stud framing the door or window, when installed.
2. The pan flashing of claim 1, wherein said three sides defining said pan extend no more than about ¾ of an inch from a bottom of said pan.
3. The pan flashing of claim 2, wherein lateral ends defining said front wall extend no more than about ¾ of an inch from said bottom of said pan.
4. The pan flashing of claim 1, wherein said front flange is one of fused and integrally molded to said fourth side of said pan.
5. The pan flashing of claim 1, wherein said plurality of spaced wedges are one of bonded and integrally molded with said pitched pan to form a pan portion with channels in fluid communication with fluted downward section of said front flange.
6. The pan flashing of claim 5, wherein said pan portion strong is enough to bear weight if incorporated under a door sill having said plurality of spaced wedges disposed with a frequency to give the strength needed to support weights in excess of 200 pounds crossing said door sill.
7. The pan flashing of claim 6, wherein said frequency includes disposing a ¼-inch width wedge having a ½ inch gap between contiguous wedges.
8. The pan flashing of claim 1, wherein two wedges wider than each of said plurality of spaced wedges are disposed on opposite sides of said plurality of spaced wedges.
9. The pan flashing of claim 8, wherein said two wedges are configured and positioned to provide the necessary strength to carry jambs disposed thereover.
10. The pan flashing of claim 1, wherein said front flange is configured to include moulding disposed thereover while retaining fluid communication therethrough to said channels.
11. The pan flashing of claim 1, wherein said flutes include spacers disposed on said front flange.
12. Flashing for installation underneath entry doors comprising:
a water impervious, generally rectangular bay portion having an interior pitched bottom for installation in a rough entry door opening of a building structure underneath an entry door;
a plurality of spaced wedges extending from said pitched bottom, an exposed top surface of said plurality of spaced wedges corresponding to a horizontal plane and providing a weight bearing support for a sill disposed thereover;
an interior lip upwardly projecting at approximately 90 degrees integrally formed along one edge of said bay portion;
side lips upwardly projecting at approximately 90 degrees integrally formed along opposite edges of said bay portion and on opposite ends of said interior lip;
an exterior lip downwardly projecting at approximately 90 degrees integrally formed along the edge of said bay portion opposite said upwardly projecting interior lip and between said side lips, said exterior lip including lip end portions being integrally formed therewith and extending outwardly from each end thereof, said lip end portions also being integrally formed with an exterior edge of said lips in perpendicular relation thereto; and
a plurality of spacers intermediate said exterior lip and a kick plate disposed thereover, said plurality of spacers providing fluid communication between said pitched bottom between said plurality of wedges and an exterior surface defining said exterior lip,
whereby a waterproof entry door flashing is provided that extends underneath and completely surrounds a bottom surface of an entry door assembly preventing windblown water which penetrates through said entry door assembly from contacting the interior floor of said building structure and allows drainage thereof.
13. The entry door flashing of claim 12 wherein at least one of said interior lip and said upwardly projecting side lips is approximately three quarters of an inch.
14. The entry door flashing of claim 12 wherein the exterior lip downwardly projects at least about four inches.
15. The entry door flashing of claim 12 wherein the bay portion, upwardly extending interior flange, the upwardly extending side flanges, and the downwardly extending exterior lip are all integrally formed.
16. The door flashing of claim 15 wherein said flashing pan is molded.
17. The door flashing of claim 12 wherein said plurality of spacers include configuring said exterior lip with a fluted portion defining channels in fluid communication with said pitched bottom between said plurality of wedges.
18. A method of installing a water impervious, integrally formed entry wall component flashing including a generally rectangular bay portion having a pitched bottom, an interior edge, an exterior edge and side edges with an upwardly projecting lip at approximately 90 degrees along said interior edge, upwardly projecting lips at approximately 90 degrees along said end edges, a plurality of spaced wedges extending from the pitched bottom, and a downwardly projecting lip at approximately 90 degrees along said exterior edge, comprising:
forming a rough entry wall component opening having side jack studs, a header and one of a sill and a subflooring threshold with exterior sheathing therebelow in a building structure;
placing said flashing pan in said rough entry wall component opening juxtaposed to said sill or threshold, with said exterior lip juxtaposed to said exterior sheathing with said end lips being disposed juxtaposed to said jack studs;
overlapping felt sheathing over under or behind said upwardly projecting end lips;
placing a wall component assembly that includes one of a sill and a threshold connected to one end of a pair of jambs with a header connected to the other end of said jambs with at least one of a door and a window operatively mounted in said assembly, in said flashing pan;
securing the door and header in said rough opening; and
trimming said entry door whereby a water impervious means is provided for flowing water that has penetrated around the vertical edges and underneath the threshold of said door assembly to the exterior of said building structure.
19. The method of claim 18 wherein said entry wall component assembly includes at least two doors.
20. The method of claim 18 wherein said entry wall component assembly includes at least one door.
21. The method of claim 18 wherein said entry wall component assembly is a sliding-type door.
22. The method of claim 18 wherein said entry wall component assembly is one of:
a sliding-type window;
a crank out window;
a non-opening window;
a side light window;
a dryer vent;
a gas fireplace vent; and
any structure extending from an exterior wall.
Description
BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Water in the form of rainwater, ice, snow, or the like, penetrates in and around building wall components, e.g., windows and doors, and then migrates downwardly beneath the wall component resulting in high moisture in the wall interior. In traditional building construction where the walls are formed of a wood frame with an outer cladding of wood, brick or concrete, this moisture has created some problems, although the porosity of the cladding allows the moisture to escape. Also, openings in the exterior of the walls, either due to the nature of the materials used, or the addition of ventilation openings, have aided in moisture removal.

In more modern construction, however, there is a trend toward the use of cladding materials that result in a building that is as air tight as possible. These materials include, for example, exterior insulation and finish systems (EIFS), insulated brick, polyethylene sheeting, and polyvinyl siding. With these non-porous cladding materials, moisture entering the wall interior may be trapped, creating a highly moist environment that causes the wood frame components of the building to rot, and metal components to rust or corrode. In addition, the moist environment is a breeding ground for wood consuming insects, causing further decay. This problem is accelerated in hot and humid environments.

Attempts have been made to prevent entry of water into the building wall interior by sealing or caulking entry points in and around wall components as the primary defense against water intrusion, or by installing flashing around the wall components to divert the water, discussed more fully below. These attempts have not been completely successful. Sealants are not only difficult to properly install, but tend to separate from the wall component or wall due to climatic conditions, building movement, the surface type, or chemical reactions. Flashing is also difficult to install and may tend to hold the water against the wall component, accelerating the decay.

The use of sealants and flashing is also limited to the attempted minimization of water collection in building walls in new construction, and the further collection in existing structures. These materials are of no value in addressing the problem of water that has already entered a building wall interior. Thus, with solutions presented in the prior art, water still enters the wall interior, and the problem is further compounded by the prevention of any evaporation of the water already in the wall interior.

The problem of water penetration has prevented the full use of new building cladding materials, and has resulted in many buildings with rotting framing structures, requiring extensive and expensive retrofitting. Thus, there is a great need for an apparatus and method to prevent water from entering the wall interior of a building at wall components, and for the removal of water that has already collected within the wall interior. As used herein, the term “water” refers to both liquid and airborne forms of water, while moisture is intended to refer to the water carried by the air in a humid environment.

In particular, there has always been a problem with exterior doors and preventing moisture from being blown under and around exterior doors.

The above is particularly true where porch overhangs or other structures are lacking. Also, in open areas even with a porch overhang or other covering structure, rain can be driven almost horizontally against the entry door. This is particularly true in coastal areas where storms are quite often accompanied by very strong winds.

The result of water ingressing under the entry doors not only causes the underside of the interior floor and the surface of the sub floor to become wet, but over a period of time can cause the flooring to rot as well as the floor joist and doorjamb. This prevents the owner from seeing any water until there is significant damage to the building. When this happens, very expensive repairs must be made. Once this is accomplished and a new door installed, the process starts all over with the floor becoming wet and rot setting in.

Whenever someone installs a door or window there is a chance for water to enter the structure. When it rains, water can splash off the exterior steps or deck, wick under the sill of the door and get under the flooring inside the structure. With the water between the sub floor and the flooring, it can do substantial damage ruining the flooring in front of, and anything just below, the door or window. As discussed above, the repeated entry of water into the structure will eventually cause substantial dry rot. The oldest and most durable method used for preventing water from running under a door or window is pan flashing.

Pan flashing is a physical barrier that prevents the entry of water into a structure. The installer will bend and fold lead or aluminum in a very specific manor to make a pan. The lead or aluminum can tear easily, making this process somewhat delicate. Once installed, the interior finishing construction exposes the pan to a number of potential hazards that can, and often do, tear it. If the integrity of the pan is compromised, the water is able to enter the structure. If everything works properly with the pan, the doorsill sits in a pan of water eventually causing it to rot. The problems and inconvenience of pan flashing has caused the majority of installers to try alterative methods, most notably caulk.

The advent of caulk has caused as many problems as it has solved as described above. To keep the water out of the structure, the caulk seal at the base of the door must be continuous. The areas to be caulked can be difficult to access and, as such, are prone to having gaps in the bead of caulk. To compensate for the potential for gaps in the caulk, the installer uses a large volume of caulk, which causes problems with the interior and exterior finishing construction. Interior and exterior finishing carpenters tend to trim the excess caulk in order to finish the structure, which can introduce gaps in the caulk allowing water to enter the structure. In the long term, the constant motion of the doorsill and the sub floor due to seasonal temperature and humidity fluctuations puts a lot of stress on the caulk. This stress, coupled with the tendency of the caulk to dry out over time, will cause gaps in the caulk allowing water to enter the structure. Thus, a product that will resolve all the problems affiliated with both pan flashing and caulking is desired.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The above discussed and other drawbacks and deficiencies are overcome or alleviated by a pan flashing to prevent water from entering a building by wicking underneath a door or window. In an exemplary embodiment, the pan flashing includes a pitched pan configured to wrap around a bottom of the door or window on three sides defining a bottom surface thereof, the pan having a substantially rectangular shape in plan; a plurality of spaced wedges extending from the pitched pan, an exposed top surface of the plurality of spaced wedges corresponding to a horizontal plane and providing a weight bearing support for a sill disposed thereover; a front flange projecting perpendicularly and downwardly from a front edge defining a fourth side of the rectangular shape, the flange being fluted for fluid communication with channels defined by the plurality of spaced wedges, thus allowing ventilation up through the flutes to the pitched pan residing under the door or window and allowing a place for the water to flow out of the pan; and a front wall coplanar with the front flange and extending upwardly and downwardly from the pan, the front wall providing an attachment means for securing to a vertical stud framing the door or window, when installed.

In another exemplary embodiment, flashing for installation underneath entry doors is disclosed. The entry door flashing includes a water impervious, generally rectangular bay portion having an interior pitched bottom for installation in a rough entry door opening of a building structure underneath an entry door; a plurality of spaced wedges extending from the pitched bottom, an exposed top surface of the plurality of spaced wedges corresponding to a horizontal plane and providing a weight bearing support for a sill disposed thereover; an interior lip upwardly projecting at approximately 90 degrees integrally formed along one edge of the bay portion; side lips upwardly projecting at approximately 90 degrees integrally formed along opposite edges of the bay portion and on opposite ends of the interior lip; an exterior lip downwardly projecting at approximately 90 degrees integrally formed along the edge of the bay portion opposite the upwardly projecting interior lip and between the side lips, the exterior lip including lip end portions being integrally formed therewith and extending outwardly from each end thereof, the lip end portions also being integrally formed with an exterior edge of the lips in perpendicular relation thereto; and a plurality of spacers intermediate the exterior lip and a kick plate disposed thereover, the plurality of spacers providing fluid communication between the pitched bottom between the plurality of wedges and an exterior surface defining the exterior lip, whereby a waterproof entry door flashing is provided that extends underneath and completely surrounds a bottom surface of an entry door assembly preventing windblown water which penetrates through the entry door assembly from contacting the interior floor of the building structure and allows drainage thereof.

In yet another exemplary embodiment, a method of installing a water impervious, integrally formed entry wall component flashing including a generally rectangular bay portion having a pitched bottom, an interior edge, an exterior edge and side edges with an upwardly projecting lip at approximately 90 degrees along the interior edge, upwardly projecting lips at approximately 90 degrees along the end edges, a plurality of spaced wedges extending from the pitched bottom, and a downwardly projecting lip at approximately 90 degrees along the exterior edge is disclosed. The method includes forming a rough entry wall component opening having side jack studs, a header and one of a sill and a subflooring threshold with exterior sheathing therebelow in a building structure; placing the flashing pan in the rough entry wall component opening juxtaposed to the sill or threshold, with the exterior lip juxtaposed to the exterior sheathing with the end lips being disposed juxtaposed to the jack studs; overlapping felt sheathing over under or behind the upwardly projecting end lips; placing a wall component assembly that includes one of a sill and a threshold connected to one end of a pair of jambs with a header connected to the other end of the jambs with at least one of a door and a window operatively mounted in the assembly, in the flashing pan; securing the door and header in the rough opening; and trimming the entry door whereby a water impervious means is provided for flowing water that has penetrated around the vertical edges and underneath the threshold of the door assembly to the exterior of the building structure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Referring to the exemplary drawings wherein like elements are numbered alike in the several Figures:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a molded pan in accordance with an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the molded pan installed in the rough entry door opening of a building structure;

FIG. 3 is a front perspective view of an entry door or window assembly installed and trimmed out;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged partial perspective view of the molded pan of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a partial top plan view of the molded pan of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 6 is a partial perspective view of a kick plate portion of the molded pan of FIG. 1 for use in other applications in accordance with an exemplary alternative embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring now to FIGS. 1-3, a one-piece entry door flashing pan in accordance with an exemplary embodiment, indicated generally at 10, is preferably molded in a single piece and can be composed of any suitable material such as plastic or the like. Also, the pan 10 can be manufactured by joining a plurality of separately formed components. For example, a pan portion can be formed of an extruded base section and an injection molded upper section forming three side walls, while a lip extending from the base section opposite the three side walls can also be extruded. Since the selection of materials of this type are well known to those skilled in the art, further detailed discussion of this portion of the same is not deemed necessary. Furthermore, it will be noted that although an entry door flashing pan is described in conjunction with a hinged door in an exemplary embodiment, entry door flashing pan 10 may be employed with a sliding door, window or other building wall component other than an entry door.

The entry door pan 10 includes rectangular-shaped bay portion 11 that is approximately the same length as various standard rough entry door openings, including custom entry openings. Bay portion 11 includes a width approximately as wide as the door jamb of an entry door assembly with room for disposing insulation on either side if desired.

An upwardly projecting interior lip 12 is integrally formed along the rear edge of bay portion 11. This lip is preferably no longer than about three quarters of an inch high which is the normal thickness of interior flooring.

Upwardly projecting side or jamb lips 13 are integrally formed on the ends of the bay portion and the ends of interior lip 12. These side lips are preferably no longer than about three quarters of an inch high. In an exemplary embodiment, lips 12 and 13 rise up from the floor approximately three quarters of an inch and are solid continuous pieces.

A downwardly projecting exterior lip or flange 14 is integrally formed along the front edge of bay portion 11. This exterior lip 14 extends outwardly beyond side or jamb lips 13, as indicated at 14′, and then extends back to the top edge thereof so that such lip is integral with the front edge of the bay portion and the front end of the side lips 13 as can clearly be seen in FIG. 1. Exterior lip 14 extends well beyond a rough opening preventing water from entering from either side of the doorjamb. In an exemplary embodiment, exterior lip 14 includes a predrilled hole for nailing the assembly to the exterior of the building. Exterior lip extends downwardly about four to about ten inches. In an exemplary embodiment, exterior lip 14 extends about eight inches corresponding to a rise up to the threshold.

The rough entry door opening 15 is formed from a 2×4 jack stud 16 on either side thereof with felt or other building wrap material applied thereover and extending down to bay portion 11 on either side outside of side lips 13 as can clearly be seen in FIG. 2. It will be recognized by one skilled in the art that the rough entry opening 15 is not within the pan or bay portion 11, and that only the door sill is in the pan.

The flashing pan 10 rests on the threshold rough opening 18 of the building structure with the downwardly projecting exterior lip 14 lying juxtaposed to the finished exterior sheathing veneer or the like 19.

Referring to FIG. 3, the door assembly, indicated generally at 20, includes a threshold 21 connected to a pair of door jambs 22 which in turn are connected a header 23. The door or doors 24 are either hingedly connected to the door jamb or jambs, or track mounted if the assembly is for sliding doors such as sliding glass doors. Although FIG. 3 is described with reference to sliding glass doors, one skilled in the pertinent art will readily recognize that door or doors 24 is optionally a window or windows 24 in a casement window as illustrated or arranged to slide up and down with reference to FIG. 3.

Entry door assemblies come in standard widths and the flashing pans of the present invention would also come in the same widths. Once the pan has been placed in the rough opening 15 as described above, the entry door assembly 20 is simply placed in the bay portion 11 of the one-piece entry door flashing pan 10 and is secured in such rough opening by a standard installation connector made into the jambs and header as the manufacturers of door assemblies specify. No connectors or fasteners are used to hold the threshold in place since it is connected to the lower portion of the door jambs.

Once the entry door assembly 20 is in place, the flashing pan 10 of the present invention cannot move inwardly because of the exterior lip 14, cannot move outwardly because of the interior lip 12 and cannot move sideways because the same lies juxtaposed to the jack studs 16.

Once the entry door assembly is in place, the same can be trimmed out in the normal manner. Finally, the threshold trim or kick plate 25 is mounted on the outside of exterior lip 14 and is secured to the threshold 21 of the door assembly 20. A plurality of vertical grooves or slots 26 are configured in lip 14 so water can escape harmlessly from the pan to the exterior of the building.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, flashing pan 10 is described more fully herein. Bay portion 11 is pitched to force water to flow out of the pan via gravity and prevent sill 21 from rotting. More specifically, flashing pan 10, which is advantageously formed by molding, comprises a base 30 having a horizontally extending lower surface 31 and a sloping downwardly and outwardly upper surface 33. Base 30 has a substantially rectangular shape in plan. Horizontally extending lower surface 31 of base 30 lies directly on threshold rough opening 18.

Lip or front flange 14 projects perpendicularly and downwardly from a front edge of base 30. Front flange 14 is integrally formed with base 30 and abuts against finished exterior sheathing veneer or the like 19. The latter extends from under base 30 and is disposed on a building wall 12.

In order to keep the door or window level 24, wedges 28 are bonded or integrally formed on a pitched bottom 30 defining bay portion 11. Each wedge 28 is preferably, but not limited to, a solid ¼-inch wide wedge disposed on the pitched bottom 30 of the pan every ½-inch. At the two bottom opposing sides defining bay portion 11 of the pan corresponding with lips 14′, an oversized wedge 32 is disposed therein to support the door and window jambs 22. Wedges 28, 32 are configured to follow a contour of pitched bottom 30 on one side 36 or the top side thereof, while an opposite side 38 or bottom side as illustrated, is configured to lie in a substantially level horizontal plane.

Wedges 28, 32 are not movable and appear with a frequency including, but not limited to, ¼-inch width wedge flowed by ½ inch gap extending a length defining bay portion 11 of pan 10. The two wider wedges 32 are disposed on opposite sides thereof. The wedge structure or configuration of wedges 28, 32 give the strength needed to support normal weights crossing the doorsill. In particular, wider wedges 32 provide the necessary strength to carry jambs 16 disposed thereover. In an exemplary alternative embodiment, wedges 28 and 32 are optionally solid rectangles configured to support a weight of the door and any traffic across the door sill.

Lip 14 extends from a leading edge 40 of pitched bottom 30 at an angle of about 90 degrees down the outside of the structure and is fused or integrally molded to the exterior portion of the two sides or lips 14′ of the pan.

Wedges 28, 32 create flutes by the alternating spaces 34 formed between wedges 28, 32 and continue to lip 14 via grooves or slots 26 formed thereon. Alternating spaces 34 formed between contiguous wedges 28, 32 define channels that are in fluid communication with grooves or slots 26 defined in lip 14 that provide a place for the water to flow out of the pan. In addition, spaces 34 in fluid communication with corresponding grooves 26 act as ventilation openings to facilitate reduction of moisture content within the wall interior.

In an alternative exemplary embodiment, it is contemplated that spaces 34 can be defined by solid triangles that are in direct contact with the floor or are optionally defined by a “membrane” of a similar thickness to lips 12 and 13 making an underside of the pan look like a top of the pan, only reversed. Alternatively, spaces 34 are optionally defined by a combination of the two above configurations.

The fluting of lip 14 greatly facilitates the removal of the water from the bay portion 11 of pan 10 and allows for airflow behind the exterior kick plate 25 disposed thereover, decreasing the chances of rot.

In an alternative exemplary embodiment with reference to FIG. 6, a fluted portion 100 of pan 10 is illustrated. It will be recognized by one skilled in the pertinent art that fluted portion 100 includes lip 14 separated from pan 10 illustrated in FIG. 1 for use in other applications, e.g., for placement between a building and the starting plate of a deck that holds the joist of the deck. In fact, any place that could use air circulation to prevent rot could benefit from fluted portion 100. Fluted portion includes grooves 126 defined by raised ribs 150 extending a length defining a height of fluted portion 100 as illustrated in FIG. 6. In an exemplary embodiment as shown, each rib 150 includes ¼-inch width followed by a ½ inch gap between contiguous ribs 150. However, other configurations and dimensions are contemplated as suitable for the desired end purpose, including, but not limited to, evenly spaced corrugated ribs or unevenly spaced triangular ribs, for example. Furthermore, such configurations and dimensions are contemplated for use with molded flashing pan 10 as suitable for the desired end purpose.

From the above it can be seen that the present invention provides a visually unseen means for preventing water from ingressing into the interior of a building under and around the entry door or doors, including windows. The watertight integrity is maintained by having the flashing pan integrally formed without openings therein. Furthermore, an exemplary embodiment in accordance with the present invention is contemplated for use in any structure extending from an exterior wall, including but not limited to, a sliding-type window, a crank out window, a non-opening window, a side light window, a dryer vent; and a gas fireplace vent.

The present invention is also simple to install and is highly efficient in accomplishing the desired results.

The present invention can, of course, be carried out in other specific ways than those herein set forth without departing from the spirit and essential characteristics of such invention. The present embodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, and all changes coming within the meaning and equivalency range of the appended claims are intended to be embraced therein.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7591106 *May 27, 2004Sep 22, 2009Marvin Lumber And Cedar CompanyFlashing assembly
US7775004 *Mar 20, 2007Aug 17, 2010Allen L RossSill flashing and associated method
US7797884 *Feb 26, 2008Sep 21, 2010L. Ross AllenFlexible flashings for windows, doors, and the like
US7877945 *Jan 26, 2006Feb 1, 2011Marvin Lumber And Cedar CompanyFlashing assembly with cross channels and method for same
US7930860 *Jul 2, 2008Apr 26, 2011Nichiha CorporationWindow drain
US7941980 *Jul 2, 2008May 17, 2011Nichiha CorporationWindow drain
US8065839 *Sep 11, 2009Nov 29, 2011Marvin Lumber And Cedar CompanyFlashing assembly
US8336268 *Feb 2, 2010Dec 25, 2012Delaquis Daniel N JFloor drainage system for a building and assembly therefor
US8418420Mar 17, 2011Apr 16, 2013Nichiha CorporationWindow drain
US20110185657 *Feb 2, 2010Aug 4, 2011Delaquis Daniel N JFloor drainage system for a building and assembly therefor
US20120266968 *Dec 17, 2010Oct 25, 2012Hanspeter BlochElevator system having a shaft-side extinguishing water drain system
WO2008094900A1 *Jan 29, 2008Aug 7, 2008Dow Global Technologies IncFlashing for the sill of a window or door opening
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/97
International ClassificationE06B1/70, E04D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationE06B1/70
European ClassificationE06B1/70