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Publication numberUS20050215078 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/117,052
Publication dateSep 29, 2005
Filing dateApr 28, 2005
Priority dateJun 10, 2002
Also published asUS6580054, US6960739, US20030226830, US20030226832, US20050279740, US20070248126
Publication number11117052, 117052, US 2005/0215078 A1, US 2005/215078 A1, US 20050215078 A1, US 20050215078A1, US 2005215078 A1, US 2005215078A1, US-A1-20050215078, US-A1-2005215078, US2005/0215078A1, US2005/215078A1, US20050215078 A1, US20050215078A1, US2005215078 A1, US2005215078A1
InventorsKuo-ching Liu, Pei Hsien Fang, Dan Dere, Jenn Liu, Jih-Chuang Huang, Antonio Lucero, Scott Pinkham, Steven Oltrogge, Duane Middlebusher
Original AssigneeNew Wave Research
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Scribing sapphire substrates with a solid state UV laser
US 20050215078 A1
Abstract
A process and system scribe sapphire substrates, by performing the steps of mounting a sapphire substrate, carrying an array of integrated device die, on a stage such as a movable X-Y stage including a vacuum chuck; and directing UV pulses of laser energy directed at a surface of the sapphire substrate using a solid-state laser. The pulses of laser energy have a wavelength below about 560 nanometers, and preferably between about 150 in 560 nanometers. In addition, energy density, spot size, and pulse duration are established at levels sufficient to induce ablation of sapphire. Control of the system, such as by moving the stage with a stationary beam path for the pulses, causes the pulses to contact the sapphire substrate in a scribe pattern at a rate of motion causing overlap of successive pulses sufficient to cut scribe lines in the sapphire substrate.
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Claims(20)
1. A method for manufacturing die from a sapphire substrate, comprising;
mounting the sapphire substrate on a stage, the sapphire substrate having a top surface and a bottom surface, the bottom surface facing the stage;
coupling laser energy having a wavelength below about 560 nanometers, directly into the top surface of the sapphire substrate by absorption sufficient to induce ablation of sapphire at the top surface; and
causing the laser energy to impact the sapphire substrate in a scribe pattern to cut scribe lines in the sapphire substrate.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein said coupling includes directing pulses of laser energy at a surface of the sapphire substrate, the pulses having a peak power of less than about 10 GW/cm2, a spot size, and a repetition rate inducing non-linear absorption of the laser energy by the sapphire substrate.
3. The method of claim 1, including using a solid state laser to generate said laser energy.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein said wavelength is about 355 nanometers.
5. The method of claim 1, including using a Nd-doped solid state laser having a primary laser wavelength to generate said laser energy, and said wavelength of said laser energy is a fourth harmonic wavelength of said primary laser wavelength.
6. The method of claim 1, including separating die defined by the scribe pattern from the sapphire substrate.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein said coupling includes causing delivering a sequence of overlapping pulses of laser energy to the sapphire substrate.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the wavelength is between about 150 and 560 nanometers.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein said coupling includes causing delivering a sequence of overlapping pulses of laser energy to the sapphire substrate with a repetition rate between about 10 kHz and 50 kHz.
10. The method of claim 1, wherein said coupling includes causing delivering a sequence of overlapping pulses of laser energy to the sapphire substrate with a pulse duration between about 10 and 30 nanoseconds, and a spot size between about 5 and 25 microns.
11. The method of claim 1, including:
during said coupling, detecting edges of the sapphire substrate, and in response to detected edges, preventing said laser energy from being directed off of the substrate.
12. The method of claim 1, including:
placing the substrate on an adhesive tape prior to said coupling; and preventing said laser energy from directly impacting the adhesive tape.
13. The method of claim 1, wherein said coupling includes generating pulses of laser energy using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.
14. The method of claim 1, wherein said coupling includes generating pulses of laser energy using a Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein said coupling includes generating pulses of laser energy using a diode pumped, Q-switched solid state laser.
16. The method of claim 1, wherein the coupling includes providing laser energy with a spot size on the surface of the sapphire substrate between 5 and 15 microns.
17. The method of claim 1, wherein the substrate has an active surface and a back side, and including placing the active surface of the substrate on an adhesive tape, and mounting the substrate on the stage to couple the laser energy into the back side of the substrate.
18. The method of claim 1, wherein the substrate has an active surface and a back side, and including coupling the laser energy into the back side.
19. The method of claim 1, including moving the substrate relative to the laser energy along a scribe line in the scribe pattern at a rate greater than about 8 mm/sec while coupling sufficient laser energy into the sapphire substrate to cut the scribe line in one pass.
20. A method for manufacturing die from a sapphire substrate, comprising;
mounting the sapphire substrate on a stage, the sapphire substrate having a top surface and a bottom surface, the bottom surface facing the stage;
coupling pulses of laser energy having a wavelength below about 560 nanometers, directly into the top surface of the sapphire substrate by absorption sufficient to induce ablation of sapphire at the top surface, the pulses having a peak power of less than about 10 GW/cm2, a spot size less than about 25 microns, and a repetition rate greater than about 10 kHz, inducing non-linear absorption of the laser energy at or near the top surface of the sapphire substrate; and
causing the laser energy to impact the sapphire substrate in a scribe pattern to cut scribe lines in the sapphire substrate, including moving the substrate relative to the laser energy along a scribe line in the scribe pattern at a rate greater than about 8 mm/sec while coupling sufficient laser energy into the sapphire substrate to cut the scribe line in one pass.
Description
RELATED APPLICATION DATA

This application is a continuation of pending application Ser. No. 10/384,439, filed 6 Mar. 2003, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 10/208,484, filed 30 Jul. 2002, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,580,054, which application claims the benefit of Provisional Application No. 60/387,381, filed 10 Jun. 2002. This application is related to application Ser. No. 10/364,587 filed 11 Feb. 2003.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to systems and processes used in manufacturing integrated device die, such as integrated circuit and laser die, including diode laser die, formed on sapphire substrates. More particularly, the present invention provides for scribing sapphire substrates using solid state UV lasers, and separating the scribed sapphire substrate into die.

2. Description of Related Art

Sapphire Al2O3 is used as a substrate for a variety of devices. The sapphire is a hard material that is optically transmissive, electrically nonconducting and a good conductor of heat. It has become the preferred substrate material in manufacturing of laser diodes. In particular, blue laser diodes and other structures based on gallium nitride GaN and related materials are manufactured on sapphire substrates in large volume.

One bottleneck in manufacturing of die on sapphire substrates is the separation of the die from the substrate. Because sapphire is very hard, the typical process requires the use of a diamond tipped blade to scribe a pattern in the substrate. In one common method, the sapphire substrate having an array of semiconductor structures such as laser diodes formed thereon is placed on an adhesive known as “blue tape,” or “wafer tape.” A diamond blade is used to scribe the substrate. Mechanical stress is used to crack the substrate along scribe lines. The tape carrying the cracked substrate is then stretched to separate the die. A robotic pick and place machine is used to remove the individual die, having typical dimensions in a range of 200 to 500 microns on a side, from the tape.

One major bottleneck in the manufacturing of the die is the cutting process. The diamond blade requires the manufacturer to allocate a relatively wide scribe line, referred to as a “street,” (for example, 40 to 70 microns) on the substrate, reducing the number of die manufacturable on a single substrate. In addition, the diamond tip blade must be operated relatively slowly, requiring as much as 1 and a half hours for a 2 inch diameter substrate. Also, the diamond tips on the blade wear out and must be replaced often, as much as one blade per wafer. Replacement of the blades slows down the process of manufacturing. Also, the blades typically have multiple tips, which must be carefully and precisely aligned for proper cutting each time a new tip is brought on line, and each time a new blade is installed. Finally, the mechanical scribing process causes cracks, which can damage the die and reduce yields. Typical yields for this process have been reported to be about 70%.

It is desirable, therefore, to provide a system and method for scribing sapphire substrates in manufacturing die which is faster, easier to use, minimizes the number of consumable parts, allows for greater density and achieves greater yields than is available using current technologies. Further, it is desirable that such system be compact, safe to operate and low-cost.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a method and system for manufacturing integrated device die, such as diode laser die, from a sapphire substrate carrying an array of such integrated devices. Particularly, the present invention is suitable for manufacturing blue laser diodes based on gallium nitride structures. According to the present invention, greater density and greater yield are achieved, while also reducing the time required to separate the individual die from the substrate. Furthermore, the present invention is based on compact, low-cost machines, and otherwise reduces the overall manufacturing costs for such integrated device die.

The present invention provides a process including mounting a sapphire substrate, carrying an array of integrated devices, on a stage such as a movable X-Y stage including a vacuum chuck. Next, pulses of laser energy are directed at a surface of the sapphire substrate using a solid-state laser. The pulses of laser energy have a wavelength below about 560 nanometers, and preferably between about 150 and 560 nanometers. In addition, energy density, spot size, and pulse duration are established at levels sufficient to induce ablation of sapphire. Control of the system, such as by moving the stage with a stationary beam path for the pulses, causes the pulses to contact the sapphire substrate in a scribe pattern at a rate of motion causing overlap of successive pulses sufficient to cut scribe lines in the sapphire substrate.

Embodiments of the present invention produce laser pulses having an energy density between about 10 and 100 joules per square centimeter, a pulse duration between about 10 and 30 nanoseconds, and a spot size between about 5 and 25 microns. The repetition rate for the pulses is greater than 5 kHz, and preferably ranges from about 10 kHz to 50 kHz or higher. The stage is moved at a rate of motion causing overlap of the pulses in the amount of 50 to 99 percent. By controlling the pulse rate, the rate of motion of the stage, and the energy density, the depth of the scribe line can be precisely controlled. In embodiments of the invention, the scribe lines are cut to a depth of about one-half the thickness, or more, of the sapphire substrate, so that for an 80 micron thick substrate, the scribe line is cut to a depth in the range of about 35 microns to, for example, 60 microns, and more preferably greater than 40 microns.

In embodiments of the present invention, the solid-state laser comprises a diode pumped, Q-switched, Nd:YVO4 laser, including harmonic frequency generators such as nonlinear crystals like LBO, so that output of the laser is provided at one of the second, third, fourth and fifth harmonic frequencies of the 1064 nanometer line produced by the neodymium doped, solid-state laser. In particular systems, the third harmonic frequency of about 355 nanometers is provided. In other embodiments, the solid-state laser comprises a Q-switched, Nd:YAG laser, operating to provide one of the harmonic frequencies as output.

In embodiments of the invention, the method includes detecting edges of the sapphire substrate while directing pulses at the substrate in the scribe pattern. In response to detected edges, the system prevents the pulses of radiation from being directed off of the substrate.

Embodiments of the present invention direct the pulses of radiation at the backside of the substrate. This prevents damage potentially caused by heat from reaching the active integrated device die structures. Furthermore, it prevents debris from the ablation process from contaminating the integrated devices on the die.

Thus, embodiments of the invention include placing the top surface of the substrate on an adhesive tape prior to scribing, mounting the substrate with the adhesive tape on the stage, moving the substrate under conditions causing ablation of the sapphire in a scribe pattern on the backside of the substrate, and detecting edges of the substrate during the scribing process to prevent the pulses of radiation from impacting the adhesive tape.

The die defined by a scribe pattern are separated from the sapphire substrate, by mechanically cracking the substrate along the scribe lines, and using a pick and place robot or other technology known in the art. In one embodiment, the sapphire substrate is placed on an adhesive tape prior to scribing, and after scribing the substrate is rolled or otherwise mechanically manipulated to break the substrate along scribe lines in the scribe pattern. The separated die remain adhered to the adhesive tape, until separated using the pick and place robot, or other technology.

Embodiments of the invention further provide for controlling polarization of the laser pulses with respect to direction of scribe lines in the scribe pattern. The polarization is controlled so that the grooves are more uniform for scribe lines parallel to different axes. Uniformity can be improved by random or circular polarization of the pulses in some embodiments. More preferably, polarization of the pulse is controlled so that the polarization is linear and parallel to the scribe line being cut. It is found that the quality of the groove being formed is more V-shaped with parallel polarization, and more U-shaped with polarization that is not aligned. V-shaped grooves are preferred for more uniform and predictable breaking of the substrate during separation of the die. Embodiments of the invention provide for control of the polarization using a laser with an adjustable polarizer, such as a half wave plate, in the optical path.

The invention also provides a system for scribing sapphire which comprises a solid-state laser, as described above, a stage adapted to support and move a sapphire substrate, optics directing pulses to impact of sapphire substrate mounted on the stage, an edge detection system which detects edges of substrate mounted on the stage during movement of the stage, and a control system. The control system in embodiments of the invention comprises a computer system coupled to the solid-state laser, the stage, and the edge detection system. The computer is responsive to the edge detection system and parameters set by users to cause the pulses to impact of the sapphire substrate in a scribe pattern at a rate of motion causing overlap of successive pulses sufficient to cut scribe lines in the sapphire substrate. Embodiments of the invention also include a debris exhaust system coupled with the stage.

Embodiments of the invention include a user interface with logic to set up the scribe pattern, and the operational parameters including pulse repetition rate, stage velocity and energy levels to establish scribe depth, scribe speed and other characteristics of the process.

Other aspects and advantages of the present invention can be seen on review of the drawings, the detailed description and the claims, which follow.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a simplified block diagram of a sapphire scribing system according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a compact, portable sapphire scribing system according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a simplified block diagram including the laser system and optics for the sapphire scribing system of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a simplified diagram of components of the edge detection system according to the present invention.

FIG. 5 illustrates the overlapping of successive pulses during the cutting of a scribe line.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the stage and debris exhaust system of the sapphire scribing system according to the present invention.

FIG. 7 illustrates a scribe pattern on a sapphire substrate including an array of integrated laser diodes for cutting into die according to the present invention.

FIGS. 8A-8C show a relationship between polarization of laser pulses and scribe line scribing direction for uniform V-shaped grooves.

FIGS. 9-16 are photographs showing experimental results of the scribing process of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A detailed description of embodiments of the present invention is provided with reference to FIGS. 1 through 8A-8C, and experimental results are shown in FIGS. 9-16.

FIG. 1 is a simplified block diagram of a sapphire scribing system according to the present invention. In the embodiment shown, a diode pumped, solid-state laser 10 generates high-density UV and close-to-UV pulses at a repetition rate in the kHz range. In preferred systems, the laser comprises a Q-switched Nd:YVO4 medium delivering third harmonic output as the stream of laser pulses at a repetition rate greater than 10 kHz, with a pulse duration of about 40 nanoseconds. The pulses are provided using an optical delivery system 11 and turning mirror 12 to an ultraviolet objective lens 13, which focuses the pulses on a sapphire substrate 14. The substrate 14 is supported on a vacuum chuck and X/Y stage 15. Preferably, the wafer is supported face down on an adhesive wafer tape. A gas debris removing system 16 cooperates with a gas exhaust system and vacuum 17 to remove debris generated by the ablation of the sapphire substrate.

A visible light source 18 and a turning mirror 19 deliver white light through the objective lens 13 to the sapphire substrate 14. The edge detection electronics 20 is responsive to light reflected via the objective lens 13 and turning mirror 21 to detect edges of the substrate and prevent pulses of UV radiation from being directed off of the substrate onto the backing wafer tape or elsewhere. A camera 22 such as a charge coupled device camera is focused on the wafer 14 and used to generate an image for information processing and monitoring. Computer 23 is coupled to the controllable components of the system, and causes the delivery of the pulses, movement of the stage 15 and controls other characteristics of the system to scribe the substrate in a scribe pattern.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a sapphire substrate scribing system in one embodiment of the invention. The diode pumped solid-state laser is compact and low-cost so that it is efficiently mounted on a cart as illustrated. The computer and other system electronics are contained on the cart. The computer keyboard 50 is mounted on a keyboard tray, which slides in and out of the cart. A flat-panel display 51 is mounted on a swivel base, so that it may be folded in during movement and storage of the cart. The system includes a microscope 52, which enables viewing of the wafer during the cutting process. Images generated by the camera 22, and graphical user interface tools and other display constructs are presented to the user using the display 51.

Generally, embodiments of the present invention are provided as a semi-automatic turnkey system using a tabletop laser system and computer mounted on a cart. The system provides for manual loading and unloading of wafers. However, the invention contemplates automated wafer loading and unloading systems as well. Representative systems are adapted to receive two inch sapphire wafers with die sizes, for example in the range of 250 microns by 250 microns. Smaller and larger die sizes are readily handled. The wafer thickness ranges from about 80 to 200 microns, for typical laser diode die, and is mounted face down on a 6.5 inch wafer metal frame using adhesive wafer tape. The wafer metal frame is manually placed on the stage and secured using a vacuum chuck. Manual alignment of the wafer is possible using manual stage controls. Software controlled scribe patterns are implemented with computer control of the wafer stage, and controllable speed in the X- and Y-directions. The system includes a class one laser system which generate spot sizes less than 20 microns in operational conditions. A groove is cut, preferably about 40 microns deep, and more preferably greater than about ½ thickness of the sapphire substrate. Nitrogen gas is used by the debris removing jet, and evacuated using an exhaust pump. Throughput of the representative system is about 1/2 hour per wafer, or greater. No damage is caused to the wafer tape because of the edge detection process, supporting greater yield in the die separation process.

The X/Y stage in one preferred system has a maximum speed of 100 mm per second, and a travel range of greater than 100 mm by 75 mm. The resolution of the stage alignment process is about one micron. The accuracy over four inches of travel range is less than 4 microns. Repeatability of scribe lines provides for deviation of less than three microns. The flatness of the stage is less than 1.5 microns deviation per inch. No rotation is required in some embodiments. The vacuum chuck is at least 2.5 inches in diameter, on a six inch platform, for holding a two inch wafer during alignment and scribing.

The laser system in a preferred embodiment is a Q-switched, diode pumped, third harmonic Nd:YVO4 providing an output at 355 nanometers wavelength. The laser provides one watt output power at 20 kHz, and higher, electro-optically Q-switched output using first pulse suppression. The pulses have a TEM00 intensity profile with 10 to 15 micron, or smaller, diameter at 1/e2 peak magnitude spot size on the target surface. The laser pulse duration is about 40 nanoseconds, or less and more preferably between about 30 and 10 nanoseconds, for example about 16 nanoseconds. It is linearly polarized with external rotation control of a half wave plate up to 45 degrees for alignment with the crystalline structure of the sapphire for good and uniform coupling of energy into the sapphire.

The computer system allows for automated control of the laser and stage movement for defined cutting patterns, which can be set up using the computer. A wafer map and cutting definition function allows setup of the scribe pattern including rotation control of the stage. Video overlay shows live video of the sample within a software-controlled window to facilitate set up and monitoring of the process. Control for the cutting parameters including laser energy, repetition rate and stage speed are provided via the user interface, giving the operator precise control over the depth and quality of the scribing process. A pattern alignment function allows the cutting pattern to be moved in the X-, Y- and orthogonal directions to match the actual wafer location during setup.

FIG. 3 is a basic layout of optical path for one embodiment of the scribing system according to the present invention. The optical path includes a laser 50, optics delivering the output of the laser to a substrate 74 on the vacuum chuck 75 mounted on an X-stage 76 and Y-stage 77. The laser includes a resonant cavity defined by high reflector 51 and output coupler 59. A beam expander 52, laser medium rod 53, cylindrical lens 54, diode array 55, thin film polarizer 56, thin film polarizer 57, and electro-optic Q-switch 58 are included. The diode array is operated to pump the rod 53 to induce resonance at the 1064 nm line for Nd:YVO4. The output beam is directed to turning mirror 60 and turning mirror 61 through spherical focal lens 62 through nonlinear crystal 63. The nonlinear crystal 63 produces a second harmonic and passes the second harmonic along with the primary line through spherical focal lens 64 to a second nonlinear crystal 65. The second nonlinear crystal produces a third harmonic output, among others, which is delivered to turning mirror/filter 66 and turning mirror/filter 67 and half lambda wave plate 68. The wave plate 68 is motorized and acts as a controllable polarizer for the output beam. The wave plate 68 is used to align the polarization of the output beam with respect to the scribing direction to make a grooves cut by the laser pulses uniform in the X- and Y-directions. The third harmonic output, at a wavelength of about 355 nanometers, is delivered to optics including turning mirror 69, beam expander 70, turning mirror 71, turning mirror 72 and objective 73 to the sapphire substrate 74. The objective lens 73 is a 20X lens in this embodiment.

Rod 53 in one preferred system is a Nd: YVO4 solid-state laser medium. This material allows for shorter pulse durations and higher Q-switch repetition rates than other suitable materials, such as Nd:YAG or Nd:YLF. However, other solid-state laser media, including without limitation, Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, and other media suitable for generation of ultraviolet and close-to-ultraviolet pulses at high repetition rates, are utilized in some embodiments. Preferred output wavelengths for the solid-state Nd-based media includes the second, third, fourth and fifth harmonics of the infrared 1064 nm line, within a range of about 560 nanometers to about 150 nm. Higher wavelengths into the visible range may not be as efficient for ablation of sapphire, while wavelengths below 150 nm require an evacuated optical path for efficient operation.

FIG. 4 illustrates the edge detection system used in preferred embodiments of the present invention. The system includes a white light source 81 which provides light through turning mirror 82 and objective lens 84 to the sapphire substrate 85 on wafer tape 86, or other mounting media. Reflected light passes through objective lens 84, turning mirror 83, turning mirror 82 and is deflected by turning mirror 87 through a spherical focal lens 88 to a photodetector 89. The photodetector 89 is coupled with the computer system, and its output indicates edge detection. The edge of the wafer is detected based on the significant difference of light contrast between the wafer surface 85 and the wafer tape 86 or other low reflectivity materials on which the wafer is mounted. The computer system stops the motion of the stage upon receipt of the edge detection signal, preventing laser pulses from being directed off the side of the stage.

FIG. 5 illustrates the overlapping of laser spots according to the present invention. At high repetition rates, as the stage moves the wafer, pulses emitted by the laser system overlap. Thus, a first pulse 90 is overlapped by a second pulse 91 which in turn is overlapped by second pulse 92 and so on. The amount of overlap determines in part the depth of the scribe lines. For a repetition rate about 10 kHz and stage speeds are between 2.5 mm/sec and 5.0 mm/sec, the overlap can easily be controlled in a range of about 50 to 99 percent. The overlap can be obtained by the following example calculation:
Laser spot size˜10 micron, diameter
Stage speed ˜2.5 mm/sec

Then there is a (10 micron/(2.5 mm/sec)=4.0×10−3 sec overlap on a single spot 10 microns in diameter. The number of pulses that overlap the spot (shot density) is then (10000 pulses per sec)×(4×10−3 sec)=40. A shot density of 40 is equal to an overlap of 97.25%.

FIG. 6 provides a perspective of the stage 100, objective lens 101 and debris removal jet 102 in one embodiment of the invention. The stage 100 includes a vacuum chuck 103 centered on a movable plate 104. A movable plate 104 includes manual adjustment knob 105 for the Y-direction and a similar adjustment knob (not shown) for the X-direction. Also, the movement of the stage is automatically controllable. The jet 102 is arranged to deliver air or nitrogen gas into the region of the ablation in order to remove debris. A vacuum (not shown) withdraws the gas with the debris from the region of the wafer.

In a representative system, the repetition rate is controllable within a range of 20 to 50 kHz, with a stage speed ranging up to 8 to 10 mm per second. Other combinations of repetition rate and stage speed will be developed according to the needs of a particular implementation.

FIG. 7 shows a magnified view of an active surface of a sapphire substrate having an array of laser diodes formed thereon. Spaces, or streets, about 80 microns wide are left between the individual laser diodes to allow room for scribing. However, the white dots should not be cut so the effective street width is less. In FIG. 7, grooves (dark lines within the streets) are machined having a width of 10-15 microns, on the top surface for perspective of the relative widths. In a preferred system, the backside of the wafer is scribed. In a typical system according to the prior art, the streets must be wide enough to accommodate diamond tipped blades. In these prior art systems, such streets have been between at least 40 wide. With the system of the present invention with a spot size in the range of 10 microns, and the precision available, the streets can be reduced to 20 or 30 microns in width or less. This significantly increases the density of devices that can be made on a single substrate and improves throughput in manufacturing process for the die.

As described above, a representative system is based on a Nd: YVO4 or Nd:YAG laser medium operated at its third harmonic wavelength of 355 nanometers. Theoretically there is very little absorption at this wavelength in a sapphire crystal. However, under a very high intensity flux of laser light, greater than a GigaWatt per cm squared, for example, it is believed that non-linear absorption occurs causing the coupling of the laser energy into the sapphire material. This coupling with sufficient energy density causes ablation of sapphire. In addition, the laser pulses are highly overlapped during processing as described. The advantages of overlapping the laser pulses during micro-machining include not only improving the smoothness of the machined groove, but also enhancing the laser coupling efficiency into the sapphire material.

FIGS. 8A-8C illustrate control of linear polarization of the laser pulses with respect to the scribing direction on the sapphire substrate. The half wave plate 69 described above with respect to FIG. 3 is used to control polarization of the pulses in order to optimize the coupling of laser energy to the sapphire, and the uniformity of the grooves in the X- and Y-directions.

FIGS. 8A-8C illustrate control of linear polarization of the laser pulses with respect to the scribing direction on the sapphire substrate. The half wave plate 68 described above with respect to FIG. 3 is used to control polarization of the pulses in order to optimize the coupling of laser energy to the sapphire, and the uniformity of the grooves in the X- and Y-directions.

FIG. 8B illustrates the layout of FIG. 8A, with like components having the same reference numbers. In FIG. 8B, half wave plate 203 is rotated 45 degrees relative to the position of FIG. 8A. The rotation of the half wave plate 203 causes the polarization of the pulses to rotate 90 degrees as indicated by arrow 208, extending for this example into the paper. The pulses proceed through focus lens 205 maintaining their polarization as indicated by arrow 210. The polarization 210 is aligned with the machining direction of a scribe line 211 parallel with a X-axis.

FIG. 8C illustrates laser polarization direction relative to the cutting or machining direction of the scribe line. Thus, a scribe line 215 consists of the sequence of overlapping pulses aligned in a cutting direction 216. The laser polarization direction 217 in the preferred system is parallel with the cutting direction 216. The alignment of polarization parallel with the cutting direction is found to produce uniform V-shaped grooves. The V-shaped grooves allow for more uniform separation of the die than can be achieved with grooves that are more U-shaped, or that are less uniform.

Two important requirements for the sapphire scribing system are the throughput and the cutting depth of the wafer. The cutting depth of sapphire is dependent on the overlap and the energy density. It is required, typically, to cut at least half way through the wafer. In one available Nd:YAG laser embodiment, a 10 kHz repetition rate and maximum energy density 40 j/cm2 are achieved, and used for scribing according to the present invention. FIGS. 9-16 are photographs of experimental results of the scribing process using this Nd:YAG embodiment, showing the depth and V-shape of the grooves that can be achieved in representative systems. The figures show cross-sections of sample sapphire wafers having thicknesses of about 80 microns, with laser cut grooves more than half the thickness of the wafer. In these examples, an energy density is controlled in a range of about 22.5 to 40.0 j/cm2, and a stage speed in a range of about 2.5 to 5.0 mm/sec.

The energy density and stage speed for FIGS. 8 to 15 are as follows:

    • FIG. 9: 22.5 j/cm2/2.5 mm/sec
    • FIG. 10: 30.0 j/cm2/2.5 mm/sec
    • FIG. 11: 40.0 j/cm2/2.5 mm/sec
    • FIG. 12: 40.0 j/cm2/3.0 mm/sec
    • FIG. 13: 40.0 j/cm2/3.5 mm/sec
    • FIG. 14: 40.0 j/cm2/4.0 mm/sec
    • FIG. 15: 40.0 j/cm2/4.5 mm/sec
    • FIG. 16: 40.0 j/cm2/5.0 mm/sec

It can be seen from the FIGS. 9 to 16 that the cutting depth is larger than half wafer thickness for the stage speed between 2.5 mm/sec and 5 mm/sec. A sapphire scribing system using a Nd: YVO4 medium operates readily at 20 to 50 kHz, and a maximum energy density can be 45˜50 j/cm2. To keep the same cutting depth and increase the throughput, the stage speed can be increased to 8˜10 mm/sec, for this system.

In one embodiment, computer software is provided to engineers and operators for managing scribing operations as a step in manufacturing of laser diode die. The software operates at two levels in this example, designated an engineering interface and an operator interface. At the engineering interface level, the engineer has the ability to control the following:

    • Fire the laser
    • Change the rep rate
    • Change power (from 0 to 100%)
    • Adjust the coax light
    • Continuous, burst or single shot firing
    • Create reference point (two point for XY, and three points for XYZ)
    • Ability to re-coordinate: Save, recreate and move a map on a different wafer to coincide with previously determined reference points.
    • Create wafer map: which controls the following
      • Manipulate wafer map by changing horizontal and vertical spacing
      • Size of the wafer scribe pattern
      • Explode scribe pattern to individual lines: Take a wafer and make it into several individual lines
      • Translate or rotate patterns
      • Laser setting: which controls the following:
        • Speed of the stage
        • Rep rate
        • Polarization
        • Laser power (0-100%)
        • Number of passes
        • Depth of passes
    • Explode lines: which controls the following
      • Move each line individually
      • Change all setting individually
      • Translate or rotate lines individually
      • Ability to save and recall
      • Stop and begin at the beginning of any line
    • Ability to turn ON and OFF the vacuum and nitrogen air
    • Calibrate the edge detection

With the operator interface, the user will control the following:

    • Vacuum control (Load the wafer mechanism)
    • Place a new map from the tools library
    • Ability to rotate the map
    • Run the system
    • Abort if needed

The present invention provides a process for manufacturing laser diode die, and other integrated device die, formed on sapphire substrates. Procedures according to embodiments of the invention include the following:

    • 1) laying out and forming laser diodes in an array on an active surface of a sapphire substrate, with individual laser diodes separated by streets having a width less than 40 microns, and preferably around 25 microns or less;
    • 2) placing the sapphire wafer with the active surface facing down on wafer tape on a metal frame;
    • 2) placing the taped wafer with a metal frame on the vacuum chuck of the wafer stage, and turning on the vacuum to secure the wafer and tape to the stage;
    • 3) moving the wafer to a home position by controlling the stage
    • 4) automatically, or semi-automatically, aligning the wafer position to coordinates established by the computer setup;
    • 5) setting up a scribe pattern based on wafer and die size and layout parameters;
    • 6) automatically, or semi-automatically, setting up the lighting levels for edge detection;
    • 7) setting up stage speed, laser polarization and laser power for the required cutting depth;
    • 8) turning on the debris removing system;
    • 9) starting the process of laser scribing based on the scribing pattern on one line parallel to one axis;
    • 10) continuing the process on other lines and axes, while controlling polarization, until the wafer is finished;
    • 11) causing the stage to return to an exit position, turn off the vacuum, and removing the wafer from the chuck;
    • 12) cleaning wafer with high-speed air or other gas jet to remove laser machining induced debris;
    • 13) applying mechanical pressure to break the wafer along the scribe lines; and
    • 14) stretch the wafer tape for separation and transport using a pick and place system to other mounting apparatus.

The procedures outlined above are carried out using the systems described above, or similar systems.

Accordingly, the present invention provides a significantly improved scribing process and system for use with sapphire substrates. The process and system are low-cost, high yield, and high throughput compared to prior art sapphire scribing technologies.

While the present invention is disclosed by reference to the preferred embodiments and examples detailed above, it is to be understood that these examples are intended in an illustrative rather than in a limiting sense. It is contemplated that modifications and combinations will readily occur to those skilled in the art, which modifications and combinations will be within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7970039 *Feb 23, 2005Jun 28, 2011Powerlase Ltd.Laser apparatus
US8033011 *Aug 7, 2008Oct 11, 2011Win Semiconductors Corp.Method for mounting a thinned semiconductor wafer on a carrier substrate
WO2010080595A2 *Dec 18, 2009Jul 15, 2010Applied Materials, Inc.Illumination methods and systems for laser scribe detection and alignment in thin film solar cell fabrication
Classifications
U.S. Classification438/795, 257/E21.599, 438/106
International ClassificationB23K26/08, H01S3/00, B23K101/40, B23K26/00, B23K26/03, B23K26/38, B23K26/40, B28D5/00, B23K26/06, H01L21/477, H01L21/324, H01L21/78, H01S5/323, H01S5/02, H01L33/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01L33/0095, B23K26/03, H01S5/0201, B23K26/063, H01L21/78, B23K2201/40, B23K26/367, B28D5/0011, B23K26/4075, B23K26/073, H01S5/32341, B23K26/4045, H01S5/0213, B23K26/032
European ClassificationB23K26/40B11B, B23K26/03, B23K26/073, B23K26/03B, B23K26/40B7E, B23K26/36E2, B28D5/00B1, B23K26/06B4