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Publication numberUS20050224352 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/514,724
PCT numberPCT/CA2003/000669
Publication dateOct 13, 2005
Filing dateMay 6, 2003
Priority dateMay 24, 2002
Also published asEP1507588A1, US20030217923, US20060027456, US20090084679, WO2003099438A1
Publication number10514724, 514724, PCT/2003/669, PCT/CA/2003/000669, PCT/CA/2003/00669, PCT/CA/3/000669, PCT/CA/3/00669, PCT/CA2003/000669, PCT/CA2003/00669, PCT/CA2003000669, PCT/CA200300669, PCT/CA3/000669, PCT/CA3/00669, PCT/CA3000669, PCT/CA300669, US 2005/0224352 A1, US 2005/224352 A1, US 20050224352 A1, US 20050224352A1, US 2005224352 A1, US 2005224352A1, US-A1-20050224352, US-A1-2005224352, US2005/0224352A1, US2005/224352A1, US20050224352 A1, US20050224352A1, US2005224352 A1, US2005224352A1
InventorsD. Harrison, Abebaw Belay Jemere
Original AssigneeThe Governors Of The University Of Alberta
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus and method for trapping bead based reagents within microfluidic analysis systems
US 20050224352 A1
Abstract
The present invention provides an on-chip packed reactor bed design that allows for an effective exchange of packing materials such as beads at a miniaturized level. The present invention extends the function of microfluidic analysis systems to new applications including on-chip solid phase extraction (SPE) and on-chip capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The design can be further extended to include integrated packed bed immuno- or enzyme reactors. The system comprises two weirs (6, 7) in a channel to trap packing material (12). The packing material might be introduced through a side channel to the chamber formed between the two weirs (6, 7). A plug is positioned in the side channel to close it.
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Claims(16)
1. A microfluidic analysis system, comprising:
a) a substantially planar substrate having an upper surface;
b) at least one main channel formed into said upper surface, said main channel having a first main channel end and a second main channel end and a defined direction of flow in use;
c) a cover plate arranged over said planar substrate, said cover plate substantially closing off said channel from above;
d) a first weir formed across said main channel and between said first main channel end and said second main channel end, said first weir providing at least one flow gap to allow, in use, at least some fluid to flow past said first weir while trapping packing material having constituent particles that are generally larger than said flow gap;
e) a second weir located upstream from said first wier, said first weir and said second weir forming a chamber therebetween, said second weir providing at least one flow gap to allow, in use, at least some fluid to flow past said second weir while trapping said packing material within said chamber;
at least one side channel formed into said planar substrate, said side channel being connected at a first side channel end to said chamber, and at a second side channel end to a reservoir; and
g) a plug positioned within the side channel proximate the first side channel end.
2. The microfluidic analysis system claimed in claim 1, wherein said flow gaps comprise a generally uniform gap between said cover plate and the top of said weirs.
3. The microfluidic analysis system claimed in claim 1, wherein said flow gaps comprise a plurality of substantially vertical gaps in said weirs.
4. The microfluidic analysis system claimed in claim 1, wherein said system is formed entirely on a single microfluidic chip.
5. A microfluidic analysis system, comprising:
a) a substantially planar substrate having an upper surface;
b) at least one main channel formed into said upper surface, said main channel having a first main channel end and a second main channel end and a defined direction of flow in use;
c) a cover plate arranged over said planar substrate, said cover plate substantially closing off said main channel from above;
d) at least one chamber positioned in the main channel, said chamber trapping packing material within the chamber while allowing fluid to flow through the chamber in the defined direction of flow;
e) at least one side channel formed into said planar substrate, said side channel being connected at a first side channel end to said chamber, and at a second side channel end to a reservoir; and
f) a plug positioned within the side channel proximate the first side channel end.
6. The microfluidic analysis system claimed in claim 5, wherein said system is formed entirely on a single microfluidic chip.
7. A method of creating a packed reactor bed in a microfluidic analysis system comprising:
a) a substantially planar, non-conductive substrate having an upper surface;
b) at least one main channel formed into said upper surface, said main channel having a first main channel end and a second main channel end and a defined direction of flow in use;
c) a cover plate arranged over said planar substrate, said cover plate substantially closing off said main channel from above;
d) at least one chamber formed in the main channel, said chamber trapping packing material within the chamber while allowing fluid to flow past the chamber in the defined direction of flow; and
e) at least one side channel formed into said planar substrate, said side channel being connected at a first side channel end to said chamber, and at a second side channel end to a reservoir,
said method comprising the steps of:
(i) providing packing material in said reservoir;
(ii) providing a relatively low voltage at said first main channel end;
(iii) providing a relatively low voltage at said second main channel end; and
(iv) applying a relatively high voltage at said reservoir
(v) ramping the voltage from the relatively high voltage down to a second voltage until the chamber is sufficiently packed with packing material.
8. The method of creating a packed reactor bed as claimed in claim 7, wherein the relatively high voltage is at least 300V.
9. The method of creating a packed reactor bed as claimed in claim 7, wherein the relatively high voltage is approximately 1 kV.
10. The method of creating a packed reactor bed as claimed in claim 8, wherein the second voltage is between approximately 20V and 200V.
11. The method of creating a packed reactor bed as claimed in claim 7, further comprising forming a plug within the side channel proximate the first side channel end.
12. A method of creating a packed reactor bed in a microfluidic analysis system comprising:
a) a substantially planar, non-conductive substrate having an upper surface;
b) at least one main channel formed into said upper surface, said main channel having a first main channel end and a second main channel end and a defined direction of flow in use;
c) a cover plate arranged over said planar substrate, said cover plate substantially closing off said main channel from above;
d) at least one chamber formed in the main channel, said chamber trapping packing material within the chamber while allowing fluid to flow past the chamber in the defined direction of flow; and
e) at least one side channel formed into said planar substrate, said side channel being connected at a first side channel end to said chamber, and at a second side channel end to a reservoir,
said method comprising the steps of:
(i) packing the packing material into the chamber; and
(ii) forming a plug within the side channel proximate the first side channel end.
13. The method of creating a packed reactor bed as claimed in claim 12, wherein step (ii) comprises providing a monomer solution within the side channel proximate the first side channel end and polymerizing the solution.
14. A method of creating a packed reactor bed in a microfluidic analysis system, said method comprising the steps of:
a) providing packing material in a reservoir;
b) providing a relatively low voltage at a first main channel end;
c) providing a relatively low voltage at a second main channel end; and
d) applying a relatively high voltage at said reservoir until the chamber is sufficiently packed with packing material.
15. A method of creating a packed reactor bed in a microfluidic analysis system, the microfluidic analysis system having a chamber wherein the chamber includes at least one chamber entrance and at least one chamber exit, said method comprising the steps of:
a) packing packing material into the chamber; and
b) forming a plug at a chamber entrance.
16. A method of creating a packed reactor bed in a microfluidic analysis system, the microfluidic analysis system having a main channel, wherein the main channel has a first end and a second end, and wherein the main channel has at least one weir positioned between the first end and the second end, the method comprising the steps of:
a) packing packing material in the main channel between the weir and the first end and proximate the weir; and
b) forming a porous plug in the main channel between the packing material and the first end.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to microfluidic analysis systems, and more specifically to micro-Total Analysis Systems (μ-TAS), for performing liquid phase analysis at a miniaturized level.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Recent developments in the field of micro-Total Analysis Systems (μ-TAS) have led to systems that perform chemical reactions, separation and detection at a miniaturized level on a single microchip [see, for example, Harrison, D. J.; Fluri, K; Seiler, K.; Fan, Z.; Effenhauser, C. S.; and Manz, A, Science 1993, 261, 895-897. Harrison, D. J.; and van den Berg, E.; Eds., Micro Total Analysis Systems '98, Proceedings of the μTAS '98 Workshop (Kluwer: Dordrecht, 1998). Coyler, C. L.; Tang, T.; Chiem, N.; and Harrison, D. J., Electrophoresis 1997, 18, 1733-1741].

Most prior art microfluidic devices are based on conventional open tubular flow designs and solution phase reagents. While the functionality of these devices has continued to increase, one key feature that is presently lacking in these prior art devices is the ability to effectively incorporate on-chip packed reactor beds, for introduction of packing materials with immobilized reagents or stationary phases. While a few attempts have been made to employ packed reactor beds in some prior art designs, the difficulty of packing portions of a complex microfluidic manifold with packing material (such as microscopic beads) has so far hindered the effective utilization of these reagent delivery vehicles within microfluidic devices. (The difficulty of packing has been well recognized by practitioners in the field [see, for example, Ericson, C; Holm, J.; Ericson, T.; and Hjertén, S., Analytical Chemistry.)

In one prior art example, a packed bed chromatographic device with a bead trapping frit was fabricated in a silicon substrate [Ocvirk, G., Verpoorte, E., Manz, A, Grasserbauer, M., and Widmer, H. M. Analytical Methods and Instrumentation 1995, 2, 74-82]. However, the packing material in this prior art design could not be readily packed or exchanged, thus limiting its utility.

Several authors have also described the difficulties associated with reproducibly fabricating frits for retaining packing material in conventional capillaries [Boughtflower, R. J.; Underwood, T.; Paterson, C. J. Chromatographia 1995, 40, 329-335. Van den Bosch, S. E.; Heemstra, S.; Kraak, J. C.; Poppe, H. J. Chromatogr. A 1996, 755, 165-177. Colon, L. A; Reynolds, K. J.; Alicea-Maldonado, R.; Fermier, A M. Electrophoresis 1997, 18, 2162-2174. Majors, R. E. LC-GC 1998, 16, 96-110.]. The frits used in conventional systems are prepared using time and labor-intensive procedures, the most commonly used method involving the use of pure silica gel, wetted down with aqueous sodium silicate. The frit is made by first tapping a capillary end into a paste made from silica and aqueous sodium silicate. The resulting plug of silica is then heated to make a frit. Current construction methods do not produce high yields of useable frits.

Furthermore, using frits produced by prior art methods of construction often leads to the formation of undesirable bubbles. [Altria, K. D.; Smith, N. W.; and Turnbull, C. H., Chromatographia, 46 (1997) 664. Majors, R. E., LC-GC, 16 (1998) 96.] Bubbles cause discontinuity within a column, hindering solution flow and ultimately preventing separation from occurring. The bubbles are thought to arise from a change in electro osmotic flow (EOF) velocity caused by moving from a bead trapping frit into an open capillary. The formation of bubbles, which have been observed to increase at higher voltages, also limits the amount of voltage that can be applied across the capillary, thereby limiting column length, separation efficiency, and speed of analysis.

Developing a functional on-chip packed reactor bed design which overcomes the limitations in the prior art would significantly enhance the range of the microfluidic toolbox and extend the number of applications of such devices.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Generally, the present invention provides an on-chip packed reactor bed design using one or more weir structures that allow for an effective exchange of packing materials (beads for example) at a miniaturized level. The present invention extends the function of microfluidic analysis systems to new applications. For example, the packed reactor bed formed according to the present invention allows on-chip solid phase extraction (SPE) and on-chip capillary electrochromatography (CEC), as explained in detail further below. The design can be further extended to include, for example, integrated packed bed immuno- or enzyme reactors.

As well, the present invention is directed towards improved packing and bed stabilization procedures. The beds of the present invention can be used to perform capillary electrochromatography (CEC), through the choice of appropriate solvent elution strength. The CEC performance of the beds show improved separation efficiency when using the new bed stabilization procedures.

More specifically, the present invention provides a microfluidic analysis system. The system includes a substantially planar substrate having an upper surface and at least one main channel formed into said upper surface, the main channel having a first main channel end and a second main channel end and a defined direction of flow in use. The system also includes a cover plate arranged over the planar substrate, the cover plate substantially closing off the channel from above. A first weir is formed across the main channel and between the first main channel end and the second main channel end. The first weir provides at least one flow gap to allow, in use, at least some fluid to flow past the first weir while trapping packing material having constituent particles that are generally larger than the flow gap. A second weir is located upstream from the first weir, and the first weir and second weir form a chamber between them. The second weir provides at least one flow gap to allow, in use, at least some fluid to flow past the second weir while trapping said packing material within the chamber. The system also includes at least one side channel formed into the planar substrate, the side channel being connected at a first side channel end to the chamber, and at a second side channel end to a reservoir. A plug is positioned within the side channel proximate the first side channel end.

In another aspect, the invention is also directed towards a microfluidic analysis system. The system includes a substantially planar substrate having an upper surface and at least one main channel formed into the upper surface, the main channel having a first main channel end and a second main channel end and a defined direction of flow in use. A cover plate is arranged over the planar substrate, the cover plate substantially closing off the main channel from above. At least one chamber is positioned in the main channel, the chamber trapping packing material within the chamber while allowing fluid to flow through the chamber in the defined direction of flow. The system also includes at least one side channel formed into the planar substrate, the side channel being connected at a first side channel end to the chamber, and at a second side channel end to a reservoir. A plug is positioned within the side channel proximate the first side channel end.

In another aspect, the invention is directed towards a method of creating a packed reactor bed in a microfluidic analysis system. The system includes a substantially planar, non-conductive substrate having an upper surface and at least one main channel formed into said upper surface, the main channel having a first main channel end and a second main channel end and a defined direction of flow in use. The system also includes a cover plate arranged over said planar substrate, the cover plate substantially closing off the main channel from above. At least one chamber is positioned in the main channel, the chamber trapping packing material within the chamber while allowing fluid to flow through the chamber in the defined direction of flow. The system also includes at least one side channel formed into the planar substrate, the side channel being connected at a first side channel end to the chamber, and at a second side channel end to a reservoir. The method of the invention includes the steps of:

    • (i) providing packing material in said reservoir;
    • (ii) providing a relatively low voltage at said first main channel end;
    • (iii) providing a relatively low voltage at said second main channel end; and
    • (iv) applying a relatively high voltage at said reservoir until the chamber is sufficiently packed with packing material.

Yet a further aspect of the invention is directed towards a method of creating a packed reactor bed in a microfluidic analysis system. The system includes a substantially planar, non-conductive substrate having an upper surface and at least one main channel formed into said upper surface, the main channel having a first main channel end and a second main channel end and a defined direction of flow in use. The system also includes a cover plate arranged over said planar substrate, the cover plate substantially closing off the main channel from above. At least one chamber is formed in the main channel, the chamber trapping packing material within the chamber while allowing fluid to flow through the chamber in the defined direction of flow. The system also includes at least one side channel formed into the planar substrate, the side channel being connected at a first side channel end to the chamber, and at a second side channel end to a reservoir. The method of the invention includes the steps of:

    • (i) packing the packing material into the chamber; and
    • (ii) forming a plug within the side channel proximate the first side channel end.
BRIEF-DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a better understanding of the present invention, and by way of example, reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings, which show preferred embodiments of the present invention in which:

FIG. 1A shows a top plan view of a microfluidic device according to the present invention;

FIG. 1B shows an enlarged perspective view of a chamber in which packing materials (such as beads) are trapped;

FIG. 2A shows a cross-sectional view of the chamber shown in FIG. 1B taken along line A-A, and further shows packing material (beads) which are packed into the chamber and which are retained by a cover plate;

FIGS. 2B and 2C show a side view and end view, respectively, of an alternative embodiment of a weir according to the present invention;

FIG. 3A shows an initial stage of packing material (beads) being packed into the chamber shown in FIGS. 1B and 2A;

FIG. 3B shows the chamber of FIG. 3A after it has been completely filled with packing material (beads);

FIG. 4A shows an early stage of preconcentration of a 1.0 nM BODIPY solution at the weir/bed interface near the top of FIG. 4A;

FIG. 4B shows a later stage of preconcentration of a 1.0 nM BODIPY solution at the weir/bed interface near the top of FIG. 4B;

FIG. 5 shows a plot of fluorescence intensity vs. time, showing fluorescence of a first 1.0 nM BODIPY sample during loading, followed by a buffer flush, and then preconcentrated BODIPY during elution with acetonitrile (ACN);

FIG. 6 shows an electrochromatogram of BODIPY and fluorescein, showing different steps of the separation including load, flush, and elution;

FIGS. 7A-7D show electrochromatograms of BODIPY and fluorescein with different concentrations of acetonitrile in the mobile phase, specifically at: (a) 30%; (b) 22%; (c) 15%; and (d) 10%;

FIG. 8A-8C show top plan views of alternative embodiments of a microfluidic device according to the present invention;

FIG. 8D shows top schematic view of an alternative embodiment of a microfluidic device having a substantially symmetric connection between the side channel and the chamber, according to the present invention;

FIG. 9 shows a top plan view of a microfluidic device according to the present invention having multiple packed chambers;

FIG. 10 shows a schematic view of a microfluidic device according to the present invention being used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer;

FIG. 11 shows a graph plotting the fluorescence intensity of theophylline against time, as it saturates a packed bed;

FIG. 12 shows theophylline being eluted from packed bed in a relatively narrow band;

FIG. 13 shows each successive trial resulting in lower light generated from the CL reaction; and

FIG. 14 shows an electrochromatogram obtained for CEC separation of a mixture of BODIPY and acridine orange.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As explained above, the present invention is designed to provide a convenient system and method of trapping packing materials (such as beads) on-chip, and of effectively packing and unpacking the trapping zones, to provide a functional on-chip packed reactor bed which significantly extends the number of applications of microfluidic analysis devices.

One such extended application facilitated by the present invention is on-chip sample preconcentration by solid phase extraction (SPE). In microfluidic analysis, SPE is often required to overcome detection limit problems, or to eliminate a potential interferent. To date, preconcentration within microchips has been performed by sample stacking using “isoelectric focusing” [Jacobson, S. C. and Ramsey, M. Electrophoresis 1995, 16, 481-486]. Advantageously, unlike sample stacking, SPE can be made selective for a particular analyte and does not require precise control of buffer concentrations. For SPE the amount of preconcentration is limited by the preconcentration time, which makes it more flexible than sample stacking. The SPE of an analyte can be beneficial not only for analyte preconcentration, but also for removing other impurities or changing solvent conditions. While the coupling of SPE with microfluidic devices has been accomplished [Figeys, D. and Aebersold, R. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 3721-3727], the SPE component in these prior art devices have been made in a capillary or similar cartridge external to the chip, thus resulting in a more complex and more expensive system. The present invention is designed to overcome this prior art limitation by facilitating an on-chip SPE component.

As realized by the present inventors, an integrated, on-chip SPE component is ultimately easier to manufacture, does not require low dead volume coupling to the chip, and eliminates sample handling losses or contamination problems arising from the off-chip sample manipulation required in the prior art. It is anticipated that routine incorporation of SPE onto a chip, as facilitated by the present invention, will reduce problems with on-chip detection limits and will improve the range of sample preparation steps which can be integrated.

Another extended application facilitated by the present invention is on-chip capillary electrochromatography (CEC). CEC has recently received significant attention due to the fact that it combines the separation power of both liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. To date the difficulty associated with packing chromatographic material within devices has focused most previous chromatographic efforts upon prior art open channel methods [Manz. A, Miyahara, Y., Miura, J., Watanabe, Y., Miyagi and H. Sato, K., Sens. Actuators 1990, B1, 249-255; Jacobson, S. C., Hergenroder, R., Koutny, L. B. and Ramsey, J. M. Anal. Chem. 1994, 66, 2369-2373; Kutter, J. P., Jacobson, S. C., Matsubara, N. and Ramsey, J. M. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 3291-3297; He, B., Tait, N. and Regnier, F. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 3790-3797].

In the prior art, open channel method devices with channel widths of 2 μm or less were required to improve mobile-phase transfer in open columns leading to other practical considerations such as clogging and a short path length for detection. There were also problems with the reproducibility and the cost of stationary phase coating in such structures.

As realized by the inventors, on-chip packed bed chromatography according to the present invention has the benefit of providing low mobile-phase mass transfer, and makes available a wide variety of stationary phases. In this case, the use of an off-chip prepared stationary phase offers the advantage that it eliminates the need for coating the chip and allows for optimization of the stationary phase preparation.

Yet another extended application facilitated by the present invention is providing on-chip bead-based immunoassay and enzyme based assays. These applications are described further below.

EXAMPLE

To illustrate the present invention by way of example, the inventors conducted a series of experiments, which are described here.

Chip Design

FIGS. 1A and 1B show a microfluidic device 10 as used in these experiments. The device 10 comprises a main channel 11 formed into the top surface of a substrate 8, and the main channel 11 is separated by a chamber 4, also formed into the substrate 8. Two branches of the main channel 11, as separated by the chamber 4, are further identified as main reservoirs 1 and 2. The chamber 4 is connected to a packing material reservoir 3 by a narrow side channel 5. The packing material reservoir and the narrow side channel 5 are also formed into the substrate 8. FIG. 1B shows an enlarged image of the chamber 4 obtained with a scanning electron microscope (Jeol X-Vision JSM6301FXV, Peabody, Mass.).

The chamber 4 is formed by providing two weirs 6, 7 formed across the main channel 11 at a relatively narrow portion of the main channel 11 (FIG. 1A). As can be seen from FIG. 1B, the weirs 6, 7 are not as high as the main channel 11 is deep, so that some fluid is allowed to flow over the weirs 6, 7 as explained below. The device 10 was prepared in Corning 0211 glass by the Alberta Microelectronic Corporation (Edmonton, AB), using known chemical etching procedures [Fan, Z H.; Harrison, D. J. Anal. Chem. 1994, 66, 177-184].

It is noted that this substrate material is non-conductive, but if other than electrokinetic forces are being used (as detailed further below), then the substrate material may be semiconducting or conducting. Two photomasks were required to create device 10: a first photomask was used to etch the tops of the weirs 6, 7 to a depth of approximately 1 μm; and a second photomask was used to etch the channels 5, 11 to a depth of approximately 10 μm.

FIG. 2A shows a cross-sectional view of the weirs 6, 7 which are not as high as the channel 11 (main reservoirs 1, 2) is deep, and thus small flow gaps 14, 15 are provided between the top of the weirs 6, 7 and a cover plate 9 (not shown in FIG. 1A or 1B) which is placed on top of the substrate 8, thereby closing off the chamber 4, channels 5, 11 and reservoirs 1, 2, 3. As can be seen in FIG. 2A the beads 12 are generally larger than the flow gaps 14, 15 and therefore cannot escape from the chamber 4.

FIGS. 2B and 2C show a side view and an end view, respectively, of an alternative embodiment of a weir 6′ in which substantially vertical notches 6″ are provided so that the weir 6′ provides less flow impedence. The vertical notches 6″ should be narrow enough that no beads can pass through them (i.e. they should be at least about 10% smaller than the smallest bead diameter).

Solutions and Reagents

Various solutions and reagents were used in these experiments. Acetonitrile (BDH, Toronto, ON) was filtered through a 0.45 μm Nylon-6,6 filter (Altech, Deerfield, Ill.) prior to use. Otherwise, the acetonitrile was used as received, with no added electrolyte. Also, 50 mM potassium phosphate (pH 7.0) and ammonium acetate (pH 8.5) buffers were prepared in ultra-pure water (Millipore Canada, Mississauga, ON). A 1:1 (v/v) mixture of acetonitrile and buffer was prepared. A stock solution of 0.10 mM, 4,4-difluoro 1,3,5,7,8 penta methyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene, BODIPY 493/503 (Molecular Probes, Eugene, Oreg.) was prepared in HPLC grade methanol (Fisher, Fair Lawn, N.J.). A 1 mM stock solution of fluorescein di-sodium salt (Sigma) was prepared in phosphate buffer. Both stock solutions were then diluted in the 50 mM phosphate and 50 mM ammonium acetate buffers to give 1.0 μM solutions, which were then diluted to 1,0 nM. This 1.0 nM solution served as the sample for preconcentration and electrochromatography. All aqueous (buffer and sample) solutions were filtered through a cellulose acetate syringe filter (0.2 μm pore size) (Nalgene, Rochester, N.Y.) prior to use.

Packing Material

One suitable packing material used in these experiments comprised a reverse-phase chromatographic stationary resin. The resin was Spherisorb ODS1 (Phase Separations, Flintshire, UK), a porous C-18 resin whose particles ranged from 1.5 to 4.0 μm in diameter, as determined by scanning electron microscopy (ODS beads 12). A slurry of approximately 0.003 g/mL of ODS1 was prepared in acetonitrile. This slurry was used to supply the packing material reservoir 3, to subsequently pack the chamber 4.

Certain solvent and additive combinations were found to help the packing material stay in the packed chambers. For example, if ODS beads are introduced in acetonitrile they flow readily, while subsequently switching to an aqueous or predominately aqueous solvent causes the beads to aggregate and become trapped within the chamber. With ODS beads up to 30% acetonitrile could be present in the aqueous solution without disrupting the aggregation observed to the point of de-stabilizing the packed bed. Up to 50% acetonitrile could be present with only modest loss in aggregation and weak destabilization of the bed.

As another example protein G or protein A coated beads formed aggregates in aqueous solution, which made it hard to introduce them into the trapping zone. However, the addition of a neutral surfactant such as Tween 20 or Brij 35 (both are trademarks) prevented such aggregation and allowed the beads to be introduced. Conversely, subsequent removal of the surfactant from the aqueous solvent resulted in aggregation and enhanced stability of the trapped bed.

The following trend was observed: when using non-polar or partially non-polar bead phases (for example, ODS and protein coated beads) lowering the surface tension of the solvent from that of water or buffered water, by the addition of organic additives such as organic solvents or surfactants, reduced the tendency to aggregate. Conversely reducing or eliminating materials with lower surface tension from aqueous solution increased the tendency to lock the beads in place on the bed, creating a “solvent lock” method to enhance bead trapping within these devices. Other organic solvents other than acetonitrile, miscible with water may also be used for these purposes, such as methanol, ethanol, dimethylsulfoxide, propylene carbonate, etc. Charged surfactants may also be used instead of neutral surfactants, so long as they are compatible with the proteins that may be present on the beads or in the sample.

Magnetic beads used for magnetic packing may comprise protein “A” coated beads: composition 36-40% magnetite dispersed within a copolymer matrix consisting of styrene and divinyl benzene (Prozyme, California). Also, oligo (dT)25 coated beads may be used for the isolation of mRNA. The beads have an even dispersion of magnetic material (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) through out the bead. The beads are coated with a polystyrene which encases the magnetic material (Dynal, Oslo, Norway).

It has also been found that forming a plug in the side channel 5 to restrict the backflow of beads from the chamber 4 into the side channel 5, results in improved performance of the packed bead beds. In order to immobilize the packed beads in the chamber 4, a monomer is introduced to the side channel 5 and polymerized in situ.

The monomer solution may be prepared by dissolving 200 μl of a mixture of a monomoer such as EDMA (described below) and a free radical initiator such as AIBN (described below) (2 wt % AIBN per weight of EDMA) in 800 μl of a porogenic (pore forming) ternary solvent mixture (10 wt % H2O, 40 wt % 1,4-butanediol, and 50 wt % 1-propanol), and stored at 4° C. [Gabriela, S. C.; Remcho, V. T. Anal. Chem. 2000, 72, 3605-3610. Peters, E. C.; Petro, M.; Svec, F.; Frechet, M. J. Anal. Chem. 1997, 69, 3646-3649.3. The mixture may be purged with N2 for 15 minutes to remove dissolved O2. Ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) and 2,2′-azo-bis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) (Sigma-Aldrich Chemical Co., Milwaukee, Wis.), and reagent grade 1-propanol and 1,4-butanediol (Calcdon Laboratories Ltd. Georgetown, ON and Eastman Organic Chemicals, Rochester, N.Y.) may be used as received.

A sufficient amount of the monomer solution (about 20 μl was found to be effective) is placed in reservoir 3 and suction is applied to reservoir 1 for about 2 minutes, while reservoir 2 is filled with water. Suction should be stopped before the monomer solution reaches the bed of packed beads. As will be understood, the duration of suction required for a specific pump and chip design may be determined through testing and observation.

The chip 10 is then sealed, for example by using an organic solvent resistant tape, to prevent evaporation. The monomer solution is then polymerized or cured. For example, the chip may be heated in an oven at 60° C. for 24 h. Alternatively, photopolymerization of the solution may be effected.

After curing, the device 10 is then unsealed. An organic solvent may then be added to reservoir 3 and pulled towards reservoir 2 using suction, followed by an aqueous flush of the bead introduction channel 5.

A number of monomer mixtures may be used to form the plug in addition to the one described above. Several mixtures are described in S. Ngola, Y. Fitschenko, W.-Y. Choi, T. J. Sheppodd, Analytical Chemistry 2001, vol 73, pp 849-856, and in J.-R. Chen, M. T. Dulay, R. N. Zare, F. Svec, E. Peters, Analytical Chemistry 2000, vol 72, pp 1224-1227. Non-porous polymer forming agents may also be used. For example epoxy forming cements such as Aralydyne (trade name) and others may be introduced into the side channel 5 by pressure, and then allowed to cure at room or elevated temperature. In this case a subsequent rinse of the side channel 5 is not undertaken.

As will be understood, by polymerizing the solution, a plug may be formed in the side channel 5 to restrict the backflow of beads from the chamber 4 into the side channel 5. For certain applications in which the bed of beads is used repeatedly (for example, typical CEC applications), this technique of creating a polymer plug in the side channel 5 may be advantageous. However, for applications in which the bed of beads is replaced frequently (often in SPE applications), the polymer plug may not be desirable.

Instrumentation

Various instruments were used in conducting the present experiments. As these instruments and their operation are well known to those skilled in the art, only a brief description is provided, and the instruments are not shown in the figures.

A power supply and relay system used to control the electrophoretic voltages necessary for bead packing and all liquid handling on-chip has been described previously [Fluri, K., Fitzpatrick, G., Chiem, N. and Harrison, D. J. Anal. Chem. 1996, 68, 4285-4290]. LabVIEW programs (National Instruments, Austin, Tex.), were written for computer control of the voltage system and for data acquisition.

A laser-induced fluorescence detection system used in this experiment consisted of a 488 nm argon ion laser (Uniphase, San Jose, Calif.), operated at 4.0 mW, and associated focusing optics [Manz. A., Miyahara, Y., Miura, J., Watanabe, Y., Miyagi, H. and Sato, K. Sens. Actuators 1990, B1, 249-255] (Melles Griot, Irvine, Calif.). Fluorescence emitted from the BODIPY sample (as described above) was collected by a 25×, 0.35 NA microscope objective (Leitz Wetzlar, Germany). The images were observed with a SONY CCD-IRIS camera. Alternatively a 530 nm emission filter and a photo multiplier tube (PMT) (R1477, Hamamatsu, Bridgewater, N.J.) were used as a detector positioned so that the narrow channel 5 between the chamber 4 and packing material reservoir 3 could be monitored. Data were collected from the section of main channel 11 just next to the chamber 4. The weir 6 was just out of the field of view. The PMT was biased at 530 V while the PMT signal was amplified, filtered (25 Hz Butterworth) and sampled at a frequency of 50 Hz.

The fluorescence of the buffer, acetonitrile, and 1.0 nM BODIPY in both buffer and acetonitrile was measured using a Shimadzu RF-5301PC Spectrofluorophotometer.

While specific models and manufacturers have been provided for various instrumentation described above, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that any suitable, functional equivalent may be used.

Chip Operation

Referring back to FIGS. 1A and 1B, the narrow side channel 5 leading into the chamber 4 from packing material reservoir 3 was used to direct stationary phase packing material into the chamber 4 using electrokinetic pumping [Yan, C., U.S. Pat. No. 5,453,163, 1995; Knox, J. H. and Grant, I. H. Chromatographia 1991, 32, 317-328]. As mentioned above, the substrate 8 is non-conductive, which allows packing of the beads 12 using the electrokinetic pumping method.

First Packing Procedure

In a first packing procedure, the device 10 was not conditioned with any aqueous solutions prior to use. The chamber 4, channels 5, 11, and reservoirs 1, 2, 3 were first filled with an organic solvent such as acetonitrile. The chamber 4 was then packed with ODS beads 12 (FIG. 2) by replacing the solvent in the packing material reservoir 3 with the ODS/acetonitrile slurry (described above), and then applying positive high voltage at the packing material reservoir 3 while holding main reservoirs 1 and 2 at ground. The voltage applied at the packing material reservoir 3 was ramped from 200 V to 800 V over approximately 5 minutes to effect packing of the chamber 4.

Once the chamber 4 was packed, a step gradient was performed to introduce aqueous solution to the main channel 11 and the ODS beads 12 in the chamber 4. A 1:1 (v/v) mixture of acetonitrile and buffer was placed in reservoirs 1 and 2. Acetonitrile replaced the slurry in packing material reservoir 3. A voltage was then applied to main reservoir 1 and was ramped from 200 V to 800 V, with the packing material reservoir 3 biased at 400 V and the main reservoir 2 grounded.

After 2 to 5 min at 800 V, the acetonitrile/buffer mixture in reservoirs 1 and 2 was replaced with buffer, and the same voltage program repeated. The chamber 4 was monitored visually to ensure that the acetonitrile was completely replaced by buffer and that the packing material (beads 12) did not shift or unpack during this procedure. (The beads 12 could be seen to agglomerate as the acetonitrile was expelled, and the index of refraction change at the water/acetonitrile interface was clearly visible.) The experiments conducted are described in further detail below.

The first packing procedure discussed above is particularly effective for a device 10 having the side channel 5 having an asymmetric connection to the chamber 4 via a chamber mouth 4A.

Second Packing Procedure

However, an alternate second packing procedure of the present invention was found to be effective for both a device 10 having an asymmetric connection between the side channel 5 and the chamber 4, as well as for a device having a generally symmetric connection. FIG. 8D illustrates an alternative device 10′ having such a generally symmetric connection between the side channel 5 and the chamber 4. As can be seen, the chamber mouth 4A′ is positioned roughly equidistant from the weirs 6, 7.

In the second packing procedure, the chamber 4, channels 5, 11 and reservoirs 1, 2, 3 were flushed with an organic solvent such as acetonitrile prior to use. The organic solvent in reservoir 3 was then replaced with an ODS-bead slurry and a positive and relatively high voltage (200 V-2 kV, with approximately 1 kV being preferred) was initially applied to the bead reservoir 3, while reservoirs 1 and 2 were grounded (or otherwise provided with a relatively low voltage). A bed or column of 200 μm in length was typically packed in 15-20 seconds, and the voltage applied to the bead reservoir 3 was ramped down to 20-200 V during the last 5-10 seconds of packing. For longer beds, the packing time and the length of time spent ramping down the voltage can increase to several minutes. For beds of 5-10 mm, the packing time may be as long as 30-40 minutes.

Typically, the amount of time ramping down the voltage applied to the bead reservoir 3 is between approximately 1/4 to 1/2 of the total packing time. The rate of ramping down is generally slower for longer beds. As well, for beds of approximately 2-10 mm in length, the voltage ramping down time is a larger proportion of the total packing time than for shorter bed lengths.

It has been found that this second packing procedure generally results in improved packing of the beads in comparison to the first packing procedure, particularly as the column length between the weirs 6, 7 increases beyond 1 mm.

Once the chamber and a good portion of the bead introduction channel were packed with beads, the organic solvent in reservoirs 1 and 2, and the excess slurry in reservoir 3, were replaced with an aqueous buffer. The voltage in reservoir 2 was then ramped from 200 V to 800 V over about 1 minute, with the reservoir 3 biased at approximately 400 V and the reservoir 1 grounded.

Column Preparation

It has been found that voids often form in the packed bed when CEC or SPE were carried out repeatedly with certain solvent compositions, such as >50% acetonitrile, in the buffer. Such voids can alter peak shape and significantly decrease bed efficiency.

In SPE it is common to replace the beads frequently to avoid the build up of contaminants, so the formation of voids over time is not a problem. However, CEC columns are often used repeatedly.

In applications in which the column is to be used repeatedly, the use of a physical plug, formed by polymerization, to trap the packed beads within the chamber 4, was found to reduce the formation of voids. These beds showed improved stability, longer lifetime and better performance. Solvents containing up to 100% acetonitrile could be pumped across the weir, with no loss of packed particles into the bead introduction channel 5. Such immobilized beds could be reused numerous times without void formation.

The combination of the use of voltage ramping down during bed loading as described in the second packing procedure, above, in conjunction with the polymerization entrapment procedure allowed the use of a chamber 4 constructed with a symmetric chamber mouth 4A′ (FIG. 8D). By using these techniques during packing, the backflow of beads into the side channel 5 was avoided. The symmetric chamber 4 could be completely packed within 15-20 s. These techniques also extend the usefulness of the weir-based beds significantly, by extending the bed's operational lifetime for CEC, improving the plate numbers achieved (as discussed below), and increasing the range of bed geometries that may be packed.

Experimental Results and Discussion

In order to conduct the experiments, it was necessary to pack the chamber 4 with packing material (beads 12), as shown in FIG. 2A.

The narrow side channel 5 shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B was made to be about 30 μm wide to supply packing material (beads 12) to the chamber 4. A sample could then be delivered from reservoir 2 (the inlet channel), across the chamber 4 and on towards main reservoir 1 (the outlet channel). The volume of the chamber 4 was 330 pL, while the volume of the outlet and inlet channels was 1.5×10−7 L and 4.1×10−8 L, respectively. The main channel 11 had much lower flow resistance than the side channel 5, in spite of the weirs 6, 7, given their relatively wide widths (580 μm, tapering to 300 μm at the weirs) in comparison to the width of the narrow channel 5 (30 μm). The relative flow resistance in the device 10 was manipulated by the selection of the width dimensions for these channels 5, 11 in order to encourage flow between main reservoirs 1 and 2, rather than into the narrow bead introduction side channel 5 during sample loading and elution.

Reverse phase ODS beads 12 (as described previously) were used in the SPE device because of their extensive use for the chromatography of proteins, peptides and tryptic digests [Seifar, R. M.; Kok, W. T.; Kraak, J. C.; and Poppe, H. Chromatographia, 1997, 46, 131-136. Yan, C.; Dadoo, R.; Zhao, H.; Zare, R. N.; and Rakestraw, D. J,. Anal. Chem. 1995, 67, 2026-2029.] as well as other applications of SPE and CEC (Nielsen, R. G.; Riggin, R. M.; Rickard, E. C. J. Chromatogr. 1989, 480, 393-401. Hancock, W. S.; Chloupek, R. C.; Kirkland, J. J.; Snyder, L. R. J. Chromatogr. A 1994, 686, 31-43.]. Electrokinetic packing of conventional capillaries has been described previously, [Yan, C.; U.S. Pat. No. 5,453,163, 1995. Knox, J. H.; Grant, I. H. Chromatographia 1991, 32, 317-328.], and the inventors have adapted the method for the present invention.

As briefly explained earlier, the packing procedure involved applying a positive voltage (ramped from 200-800V) to the packing material reservoir 3, while grounding main reservoirs 1 and 2. The applied voltage induced EOF to flow down the bead channel, carrying the beads into the cavity. An organic solvent was required to suspend the chromatographic beads 12 to prevent them from aggregating and plugging the narrow side channel 5. Studies have shown that capillaries filled with acetonitrile exhibit substantial electroosmotic flow [Wright, P. B.; Lister, A. S.; Dorsey, J. G. Anal. Chem. 1997, 69, 3251-3259. Lister, A. S.; Dorsey, J. G.; Burton, D. E. J. High Resol. Chromatogr. 1997, 20, 523-528. Schwer, C.; Kenndler, E. Anal. Chem. 1991, 63, 1801-1807. Salimi-Moosavi, H.; Cassidy, R. M. Anal. Chem. 1995, 67, 1067-1073.].

As shown in FIG. 3A, at the early stages of packing, the beads 12 entering the chamber 4 contacted the weirs 6, 7 on either side of the chamber 4. As explained earlier, the beads 12 are unable to traverse the weirs 6, 7 because the distance from the top of the weirs 6, 7 to the bottom of the cover plate 9 (approximately 1.0 μm) is less than the diameter of the individual particles of the ODS beads 12 (approximately 1.5-4.0 μm).

As shown in FIG. 3B, the chamber 4 continued to pack until it was entirely filled with chromatographic material. As discussed earlier, the difficulties associated with reproducibly fabricating frits for retaining packing material is well known. Importantly, the weir design used in the present invention circumvented this problem, and the electrokinetic packing of the beads provided an even distribution of beads throughout the chamber with no observable voids. In fact, the use of weir structures may ultimately eliminate the need for on column frit fabrication.

The weir design of the present invention allows electric fields to be applied across the trapping zone formed by two weirs, when filled with beads, in a range as high as 20,000 to 80,000 V/cm without bubble formation at the weir. Separations performed in devices with these weirs can use electric fields at least as high as 15,000 V/cm. The power dissipated across a weir can be as high as 3-7 W/m without the formation of bubbles. In contrast frits formed in conventional columns have at the best been reported to form bubbles at power dissipations above 0.6 W/m, and electric fields in the range of 150-600 V/cm are the best that have been reported without bubble formation.

It is possible to couple an external capillary to a chip and allow the weir to be used as the trapping element for the beads packed within the external electrochromatography capillary. This can be accomplished using a low dead volume coupling, such as described by Bings et al. (N. H. Bings, C. Wang, C. D. Skinner, C. L. Colyer, P. Thibeault, D. J. Harrison, Anal. Chem. 71 (1999) 3292-3296.) In this way the chip based weir can replace the frits normally formed within external capillaries, and allow higher electric fields to be used, improving speed and separation efficiency.

(It is noted here that it was also possible to pack the cavity by applying a vacuum at main reservoirs 1 and 2, although this was less convenient when electrokinetic flow was used for sample loading and elution.)

If for some reason the beads 12 did not pack as tightly as was desirable (as shown in FIGS. 3A and 3B) they were removed from the chamber 4 by simply reversing the voltages, and the packing procedure was then repeated. It is noted that once an aqueous solution was introduced to the chamber 4, the reverse-phase beads 12 tended to aggregate and were more difficult to remove. However, subsequent removal was accomplished by flushing the aqueous solution out with acetonitrile, using either EOF or vacuum, or a combination of the two. Advantageously, the ability to effectively remove the beads 12 from chamber 4 allowed used chromatographic beads to be refreshed, or a more applicable material to be substituted.

Significantly, a device 10 utilizing a hook structure 13 at the chamber entrance (FIGS. 1B and 3A) yielded the most favorable results in packing when using the first packing procedure, enabling the chamber 4 to be packed and remain so after removal or alteration of voltages or vacuum. As seen from the figures, the side channel 5 connects to the chamber 4 via a chamber mouth 4A in an asymmetric fashion, relative to the weirs 6, 7. Also, the hook structure 13 preferably obstructs direct line-of-sight entry of packing material from the side channel 5 into the chamber 4. Rather, the hook structure 13 forces packing material to enter the chamber 4 indirectly via the chamber mouth 4A.

As explained earlier, during the packing step, the packing material reservoir 3 has a positive bias applied with reservoirs 1 and 2 grounded. The inventors believe that the hooked structure 13 causes electric field lines to follow a curved pathway into the cavity. Consequently, as the chromatographic beads 12 follow the electric field lines into the chamber mouth 4A they appear to be “sprayed” as if from a snow blower (FIG. 3A), to become uniformly packed.

During the packing procedure the chamber 4 filled only to the beginning of the hook structure 13 (see FIG. 3B). Once filled, the beads were observed to flow down the sides and up the middle of the narrow side channel 5 (toward packing material reservoir 3) mimicking the solvent back flow generated in a closed electrophoretic system [Shaw, D. J. Introduction to Colloid and Surface Chemistry, 3rd ed. Butterworths: London, 1980.]. In such a closed system, EOF is directed along the walls until it reaches the end of the chamber, where pressure causes the solution to reverse direction and flow back up the center of the bead introduction channel.

A key aspect of the hooked structure as shown is the asymmetric entrance into the trapping zone, which allows for better packing when using the first packing procedure discussed above. A symmetric entrance means the entering beads can go to both weirs equally, which tends to lead to uneven or difficult packing when the first packing procedure is used. However, the use of the second packing procedure described herein reduces this problem significantly. An asymmetric structure allows the beads to pack preferentially at one end of the trapping zone first and then build up in one direction from that location. The key role of the hook structure is to prevent line-of sight outflow from the trapping zone during use of the packed bed.

Chambers constructed without an asymmetry in the entrance were not observed to pack as well as asymmetric entry designs when using the first packing procedure. In these cases, packing material tended to fill the corners furthest from the entrance, but no additional material would enter the chamber. The inventors believe that, due to its symmetric design, this type of chamber exhibits solvent back flow, after it has filled to a certain extent. That is, the partially filled chamber may resemble a closed or restricted system. Such an occurrence would preclude the filling of the symmetric chamber with beads and is consistent with previously observed behavior, as explained by Shaw. Such behavior may account for the ability to fill symmetric structures on some occasions but less readily on others. In contrast, an asymmetric design, with or without a hook structure 13 guarding the entrance is less likely to experience back flow directly into the narrow bead introduction channel 5.

As noted above, the combination of downward voltage ramping using the second packing procedure coupled with the polymerization entrapment procedure allowed the use of a device 10′ having a chamber 4 with a generally symmetric chamber mouth 4A′ at the chamber end of the side channel 5 (FIG. 8D).

By actively ramping down the voltage during packing, the backflow of beads into the side channel 5 (whether or not the chamber mouth 4A, 4A′ was symmetric) was significantly reduced. The chamber 4 of the device 10, 10′ could be completely packed within 15-20 s.

Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) On-Chip

As explained earlier, the present invention allows applications of microfluidic analysis systems to be extended. One such extension is facilitating SPE directly on-chip. Preconcentration is a valuable tool that can be used to enhance the sensitivity of microfluidic devices. To determine the ability of a packed SPE bed constructed on a microchip to preconcentrate an analyte, the inventors concentrated a 1.0 nM solution of BODIPY reagent from 50 mM phosphate buffer. Solution conditions utilized were similar to those used for protein and peptide analysis in HPLC-CE systems. [Bushey, M. M.; Jorgenson, J. W. Anal. Chem. 1990, 62, 978-984. Castagnola, M.; Cassiano, L.; Rabino, R.; Rossetti, D. V. J. Chromatogr. 1991, 572, 51-58.] The BODIPY reagent, when diluted in aqueous buffer, exhibits a high affinity for ODS material and is an excellent fluorophore. The preconcentration and elution of the BODIPY reagent was carried out in four steps: equilibration of the SPE bed with buffer; sample introduction; buffer flush; and elution of analyte.

Following rinsing of the packed bed with phosphate buffer, a solution of 1.0 nM BODIPY was placed in main reservoir 1, and +200 V was applied for 2 minutes, with main reservoir 2 grounded. The EOF (0.2 mm/sec, 1.2×10−9 L/sec) flowed towards reservoir 2, carrying the BODIPY onto the SPE bed during the loading step.

As shown in FIG. 4A, fluorescence of the adsorbed BODIPY occurred initially at the first few layers of beads 12 only (near the top of the Figure). FIG. 4B shows the SPE bed after 1.5 minutes, with a total of 1.4×10−16 moles of BODIPY reagent loaded on the bed (assuming complete capture of the dye). No sample breakthrough was observed with BODIPY, due to its high affinity for the ODS material. In fact, visual observation indicated that after concentrating 1.0 n M BODIPY solution for two minutes only 5% of the physical volume of the SPE bed was utilized suggesting that the capacity of the 330 pL bed was about 2.8×10−15 moles of analyte.

A buffer wash step was used after loading to wash sample remaining within the channel 11 onto the bed (in chamber 4). The solutions in reservoirs 1 and 2 were then replaced with acetonitrile, and the dye was eluted with solvent moving in the same direction as the initial loading step (or by reversal of the potential gradient during the elution step, it could be directed back towards the original sample reservoir). Both procedures work well, but the latter was more convenient for our testing.

FIG. 5 shows graphically the 3-step preconcentration experiment for a 1.0 nM BODIPY sample following bed equilibration. The 90 second loading step showed an increase in signal as the fluorescent sample passed by the detector positioned as shown in FIG. 1A. This was followed by a 60-second rinse step. Acetonitrile was then used to elute the BODIPY reagent off the bed in the opposite direction to which it was loaded, eliminating the need for detector repositioning. The BODIPY reagent eluted in a relatively narrow 3-second band following a 90-second preconcentration step exhibiting a many fold concentration increase compared to the original sample. The fluorescence of the BODIPY (1.0 nM) reagent was tested in both buffer and acetonitrile and did not show a significant difference in intensity for either of the solvents. The preconcentration factor (P.F.) can be estimated using equation (1): P . F . = V i V f = t pre · f buff t elute · f elute ( 1 )
where Vi is the volume of buffer containing analyte and Vf is the volume of acetonitrile containing analyte. The volume Vi is the product of the preconcentration time (tpre, sec.) and the electroosmotic flow of the sample being concentrated (fbuff, L/sec.) while Vf is the product of width of the eluted analyte peak (telute, sec.) and the flow rate of the eluting solvent felute (L/sec). For this case, the analyte was preconcentrated by a factor of at least 100 times. After sufficient concentration the BODIPY is easily observed visually on the SPE bed.

Different sample loading times were utilized to increase the amount of preconcentration. In the experiments, preconcentration times ranging from 120-532 seconds were studied yielding preconcentration factors of 80-500. Peak area (rsd 3-11%) plotted versus preconcentration time yielded a linear relationship (r2=0.9993) over the studied conditions.

Capillary Electrochromatography (CEC) On-Chip

As explained earlier, another application facilitated by the present invention is on-chip capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Reversed phase mode CEC was performed on a chamber 4 packed with octadecyl silane beads 12 equilibrated with buffer. Due to the lack of an injector within the chip design, the samples were loaded onto the front of the chromatographic bed in 50 mM ammonium acetate buffer, pH 8.5 (see “Solutions and Reagents,” above).

Both compounds were totally retained under these conditions, as indicated by a lack of analyte signal in the loading and flush steps. The loading step functioned to both introduce the sample and preconcentrate the retained analytes at the front of the bed [Swartz, M. E.; Merion, M.; J. Chromatogr, 1993, 632, 209-213.] FIG. 6 shows the three steps involved in the CEC separation of BODIPY and fluorescein with a mobile phase composition of 30% acetonitrile/70% aqueous 50 mM ammonium acetate. Once the mixed mobile phase reaches the bed, both compounds begin to undergo chromatography and are eluted from the bed.

The compounds are completely eluted and separated in less than 20 sec on less than 200 μm of chromatographic bed, yielding a plate height of 2 μm (N=100 plates or 500 000 plates/m) for the fluorescein peak. Under these conditions, the fluorescein is eluted prior to the BODIPY reagent. Peaks were identified by comparing retention times of the standards with those of the mixture. At pH 8.5 fluorescein possesses a net (−2) charge while BODIPY is neutral. In a normal CZE separation the electrophoretic mobility of fluorescein would oppose the EOF, causing the BODIPY to elute prior to fluoroscein. In this case the elution order of the two components is reversed, indicating an interaction between the analytes and the stationary phase. The BODIPY being more hydrophobic has a higher affinity for the chromatographic material than does fluoroscein causing the BODIPY to be retained more and eluted later.

Finally, FIGS. 7A-7D shows the CEC separation of BODIPY and fluorescein utilizing mobile phases with different concentrations of acetonitrile. It was observed that the increased acetonitrile concentration lowers the polarity of the mobile phase, decreasing the amount of time required for the BODIPY to elute. The elution time for fluorescein does not change, indicating little to no chromatographic retention except at low % acetonitrile. Decreasing the acetonitrile concentration provides baseline resolution, but leads to more extensive band broadening.

Our present results are comparable to that reported for open tubular CEC on a chip [Jacobson, S. C., Hergenröder, R., Koutny, L. B., Ramsey, J. M. Anal. Chem. 1994, 66, 2369-2373. Kutter, J. P.; Jacobson, S. C.; Matsubara, N.; Ramsey, J. M. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 3291-3297. He, B., Tait, N., Regnier, F. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 3790-3797.].

Immunoassay Using Bead-based Reagents

Immunoassay on beads, or immunosorbent assays involves placing either an antibody or antigen on the surface of the bead. As a solution containing an antigen passes over the beads, the antigen specifically binds the antibody. In this way the specificity of the antigen for the antibody is utilized to separate it from other species in solution. Later the solution conditions are changed so that the antibody or antigen is eluted from the beads and is detected as either complex or the free antibody. The development of immunosorbent assays on chip is attractive because of the small amounts of reagents that are consumed. In addition microchips offer very fast analysis times compared to conventional methods performed in micro titer plates or in syringes packed with immuno-beads. Immunosorbent assays on-chip also provide lower concentration detection limits than solution phase immunoassays on-chip. Making the development of bead based immunoassay on-chip important.

Beads that have specific enzymes linked to them are packed into the chamber created by the two weirs. The use of beads is preferential because of the increased surface area of the beads as opposed surface area of the channel walls. The higher surface area leads to a greater capacity and more efficient trapping of the analyte. The weirs form a well-defined chamber for the immunoassay beads to pack.

The inventors have demonstrated bead-based immunoassay on chip for the enzyme theoplylline. In the experiment magnetic beads coated with protein A are packed within the chamber of the chip. Later the antibody (antitheophylline) is flowed across the bed in a 1 mM tricine buffer pH 8.0. When the antitheophylline flows through the packed bed the antibody binds to the protein A The antitheophylline was passed over the bed for several minutes to ensure that the bed is saturated with antibody. A buffer washing step was then utilized to remove the remaining unbound antibody from the chamber and channels.

The bed was then saturated with fluorescently labeled theophylline (diluted from a kit) by flowing it through the bed where it binds to the antitheophylline. The point at which the bed was saturated was determined by monitoring fluorescence below the bed and determining the point where the breakthrough curve plateaus. Following breakthrough the theophylline solution is washed from the device using a buffer flush step.

A chaotropic agent is then added to elute the theophylline from the bed as either free protein or theophylline/anitibody complex. Chaotropic agents can be of various types, however in this example a mixture of 90% acetone/10% tricine buffer was used. Once the chaotropic agent reaches the packed bed the theophylline is eluted in a relatively narrow band.

Although normally under these circumstances a competitive assay would be performed, the direct assay demonstrates the ability of the chamber on the weir device to act as an immunoassay bed.

Enzyme Reactor Beds

There have been several methods developed for immobilizing enzymes onto solid supports like beads. Once immobilized the enzyme beads can be packed into beds to perform chemical reactions on solutions as they are flowed through them. Normally a solution containing a substrate is passed through the bed. When the substrate comes in contact with the enzyme the enzyme reacts with the substrate to yield a product. The product resulting from the reaction of the immobilized enzyme and substrate can be later used as a method of detection or in other synthetic processes. This example illustrates the use of the immobilized enzyme horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) on porous silica beads (5 μm diameter). These results show that enzymes, once immobilized onto beads, can be trapped/packed into the weir device, where they are still active and can be used as an enzyme reactor bed.

XOD and HRP were immobilized onto Nucleosil 1000-5 silica beads (Machrey-Nagel, Germany) that had been silanized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, by crosslinking with gluteraldehyde (Sigma). The immobilization of enzymes on glass beads has been described previously and is known by practitioners of the art. All studies were performed using 50 mM boric acid adjusted with 1 M NaOH to pH 9.

The immobilization of HRP and XOD was performed to demonstrate two principals. First was the ability to pack the enzyme immobilized beads within the weir device and then second was to demonstrate that the enzyme was still active and could be utilized to catalyze reactions once packed. To show each of these principals a chemiluminescent reaction was performed using the weir device.

The ability to pack immobilized enzymes allows different methods of detection to be used for certain analytes. For example the luminol chemiluminescence (CL) reaction can be used for very sensitive determinations when only small amounts of analyte are available or when labeling reactions are otherwise difficult to perform. CL reactions are unique in that they do not require a light source simplifying the detection scheme. The chemiluminescence reaction catalyzed by HRP is shown below.
Luminol+H2O2+HRP(Light(425 nm)+other products
Beads immobilized with HRP were packed into the weir device and a solution containing the reagents for the reaction passed through the bed. The immobilized HRP was found to catalyze the chemiluminescent reaction when a solution of H2O2 (100 (M) and luminol (10 mM) was flowed over a bed that had been packed with beads containing immobilized HRP. Light generated from the reaction was detected downstream from the enzyme bed.

However, it was noticed that with each successive trial the light generated from the CL reaction was lower than in the previous trial. This is probably caused by a decrease in the activity of the enzyme with each successive run. These results evidence the advantage of a method of removing the exhausted beads and replacing them with fresh ones, such as discussed for the replacement of ODS beads within the weir device.

Packed Column CEC On-Chip

Further evaluation of the CEC behavior of these 200-μm long beds is reported here, providing further information about performance relative to our preliminary report. Two neutral dyes were used, in order to base performance evaluations on strictly electrochromatographic separation mechanisms. Analysis of a peptide was also performed using trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and acetonitrile as the eluent, to test the CEC performance under the acidic conditions preferred for peptide separations on surfaces with silanol residues [Wehr, C. T.; Correia, L.; Abbott, S. R. J. Chromatogra. Sci. 1982, 20, 114-119; Strausbauch, M A; Landers, J. P.; Wettstein, P. J. Anal. Chem. 1996, 68, 306-314.]. These separations were evaluated in beds prepared using the polymerization entrapment method, demonstrating improved performance relative to the use of the “solvent lock” method. These results were obtained with a device 10′ having a symmetric channel mouth 4A′ configuration (FIG. 8D) using the second packing procedure described herein in combination with use of the polymer plug also described herein.

FIG. 14 shows a typical electrochromatogram obtained for CEC separation of a mixture of BODIPY and acridine orange. Following a buffer flush step, the reservoir solution was changed to 40% acetonitrile/60% 5 mM ammonium acetate buffer, and +800 V was applied from reservoir 2 to 1, to effect an isocratic elution with a flow rate determined to be 0.37 μL/min. BODIPY was eluted before acridine orange. Since both BODIPY and acridine orange are neutral at pH 8.3, their separation is entirely due to their differential sorption with the ODS phase. The peaks showed a resolution of 1.6 in less than 10 s. The RSD in retention time was <0.5% for each compound. The RSD for peak heights and peak areas were 3-4% (n=4). Theoretical plate numbers (N) were obtained using the equation,
N=5.54(t rc /W 1/2)2
where trc is the corrected retention time and W1/2 is the peak width at half height. The observed retention time must be corrected for the length of time (6.0 s) required for the elution buffer to reach the packed bed. The inventors estimate about 420,000 plates/m (N=84 plates, H=2.4 μm) for the acridine orange peak. The early eluting BODIPY peak showed N=23 (115,000 plates/m) and H=8.7 μm. The detection zone was about 50 μm long, corresponding to a plate height contribution of about 1 μm. These results are comparable to other values reported for CEC on-chip [Jacobson, C. S.; Hergeneroder, R.; Koutny, L. B., Ramsey, J. M. Anal. Chem. 1994, 66, 2369-2373. Kutter, J. P.; Jacobson, C. S.; Matsubara, N.; Ramsey, J. M. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 3291-3297. Ceriofti, L.; de Rooij, N. F.; Verpoorte, E. Anal. Chem. 2002, 74, 639-647. He, B.; Tait, N.; Regnier, F. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 3790-3797.].

The reduced plate height (plate height divided by particle diameter) corrected for off column band broadening was about 1. Various researchers have reported reduced plate heights in the range 1-2, and theory predicts a minimum value of just less than 1. The inventors conclude that the fluid dynamics within the bed gives good flow behavior, and uniform flow velocity across the bed cross-section.

ALTERNATIVE EMBODIMENTS

While a two weir embodiment of the design according to the present invention has been described above, other embodiments are also possible. For example, it is possible to implement a single weir design to form an on-chip reactor bead (i.e. not having a second weir 6 located upstream in the main channel 11). Specifically, by providing a downstream weir 7 formed across the main channel and providing pressure only in a downstream direction (i.e. from main reservoir 2 and side channel 5 to main reservoir 1), it has been observed that packing can be achieved against the downstream weir 7.

Further, a side channel is not always necessary in this case, as an aliquot of the beads may be introduced from the upstream main channel reservoir. A chamber for the beads is then formed, defined by the downstream weir and the upstream leading edge of the bead bed. However, it is noted that a single weir design may result in the formation of a ragged leading edge for the packed bed that reduces separation efficiency when used for SPE or CEC. Additionally, the high back pressure associated with a long bed of small beads limited the length of the pack to about 4-6 mm. A high pressure fitting for the microchip would allow high pressure pumping and allow somewhat greater lengths.

However, once the pressure is released and a sample is introduced there is a tendency for voids to develop in the column, or for the column to become completely unstable. The use of a porous polymer plug at the end of the leading edge will eliminate the problem of instability in the bed during use as well as difficulties with the formation of a ragged edge.

The porous polymer plug may be formed from the same monomer reagents as discussed above, using a slightly different procedure. After packing the bed the monomer mixture is delivered by pressure or electrokinetic flow to the leading edge of the bed. The time required to reach the edge is evaluated experimentally. The monomer is then polymerized by photolysis.

An ultraviolet light source such as a mercury lamp or a 325 nm He;Cd laser may be used to initiate the polymerization. A mask is placed over the chip at the leading edge of the bed to define the region in which the plug will form. The chip substrate or cover material must be sufficiently transparent to ultraviolet radiation to allow polymerization to occur. Appropriate materials include quartz, but, for example, at 325 nm borosilicate glasses and some polymer substrates may be used. Excess beads upstream of the plug, as well as excess monomer, is then flushed out of the device by passing an organic solvent in a direction from the weir towards the plug. The bead chamber is then defined by the downstream weir and the upstream porous polymer plug.

Other types of forces may also be used to create a packed bed using a single weir design. For example, it was also possible to achieve a limited degree of packing (to a length of a few millimeters) using electrokinetic forces, directed only in a downstream direction (i.e. from main reservoir 2 and packing material reservoir 3, to main reservoir 1). By using the second packing procedure described herein, the length of the polymer plug may be increased.

Another variant is possible, in which no side channel is present, and only a single weir is used. In this case the use of packing procedure 1 creates beds of 0.2 to about 1 mm in length, but voids tend to form in the bed during subsequent use, or they may become completely unstable.

A variation on the second packing procedure can be used to increase the length of the bed. An aliquot of beads is introduced into the upstream main channel, and electrokinetic pumping is induced by applying a high voltage to the upstream main channel reservoir and a low voltage to the downstream main channel reservoir. The upstream voltage is then ramped down to a lower value during the packing. For typical upstream voltages ranging from 200-2000 V, the downstream voltage would be around zero. The high voltage is ramped down to 20-200 V during packing. The length of time the voltages are applied depend upon the initial value, and the length of column to be made. For example starting for 10-15 s at 800 V, the voltage would be ramped down towards 100 V for a period of 5-500 s. The bed would then be stabilized for use by introducing a porous polymer plug at the leading edge of the bed as described immediately above.

In addition to varying the number of weirs, it is also possible to provide more than one inlet or outlet to a chamber, as shown in alternative embodiments of the present invention in FIGS. 8A-8C.

In FIG. 8A, a chamber 4 is formed between two weirs 6, 7. Two side channels 5 a, 5 b are provided to serve as an inlet or outlet to the chamber 4. As shown in FIG. 8A, the side channels 5 a, 5 b may be offset relative to each other to better facilitate packing of the chamber. A second side channel is added to allow the beads to be flushed out to waste at the other end of the trapping zone, or to allow the flushing agent to be delivered from an alternate reservoir. The latter design can prevent used beads from contaminating the fresh bead stream, and/or prevent sample and sample waste solutions from being directed into the trapping zone during flushing.

As shown in FIG. 8B the side channel in this design may have one or more optional branches 5 c, to allow the side channel 5 b to be flushed of beads, or to allow beads being flushed out of the trapping zone to be directed, for example, into a waste reservoir instead of into the packing material reservoir 3 (not shown).

Another embodiment is shown in FIG. 8C, in which a side channel weir 16 is provided near the entrance of a third side channel 5 d to the chamber 4, to allow fluid flow without passage of beads. This “weired” side channel 5 d may be used, for example, to release pressure build up in the chamber 4 during loading of the beads, particularly when the length of the chamber 4 (as measured between the weirs 6, 7) is greater than 4-6 mm.

In all three embodiments shown in FIGS. 8A-8C, the side channel entrance into the chamber 4 may be modified to include a hook or similar shape, as described earlier, in order to prevent direct “line-of-sight” flow from a side channel into the chamber 4, or vice versa. As explained earlier, this entrance modification serves to spray the beads into the trapping zone in order to assist packing, and to reduce the tendency of the beads to exit from the chamber 4 during later use.

Loading of beads with more than one side channel, as shown in FIGS. 8A-8C, is performed in a manner similar to that for a single side channel, two weir design, (as described above) except that a potential must also be applied to the additional side channels to prevent flow into those side channels when using electrokinetic loading. During removal of the beads a voltage may be applied to a second side channel (e.g. side channel 5 b in FIG. 8A) to drive beads out of the trapping zone or chamber 4, applying voltage potentials such as those used with the single side channel design but adjusted for the potential drop in the additional side channel. As will be appreciated, the direction of flow during the flushing step can be controlled by the polarity of the applied voltage.

When using pressure driven flow to load beads, a back pressure must be applied to the additional side channels during loading, or else the reservoirs attached to the additional side channels may be temporarily sealed. When flushing the beads from the chamber 4, a pressure may be applied to the bead supply channel 5 a to flush beads out of one or more additional side channels.

When performing SPE or CEC using a multiple side channel design and electrokinetic forces, a voltage may be applied to the additional side channels to prevent leakage of sample or beads out of the trapping zone and into the side channels, substantially in the same manner as described for a single side channel in the trapping zone. When using pressure driven pumping, the side channels may a have enough positive pressure applied to eliminate flow into the side channel, or else the reservoirs attached to the respective side channels can be temporarily sealed.

Dimension Guidelines

While the theoretical limits of various dimensions of a microfluidic device designed according to the present invention are not known, the inventors have adopted some general guidelines for practical purposes, which are discussed below.

It is thought that the length of the trapping zone may range anywhere from about 10 μm up to about 200 cm (using a coiled or serpentine path if necessary to allow for incorporation of such a length within the confines of a single device wafer). The trapping zone length required will be dependent upon the application and will also be limited by the forces which may be applied to achieve packing and unpacking. For example, on-chip CEC would require relatively long trapping zones, with a preferred upper limit of about 5 cm.

As to the depth of the trapping zone, sample and waste channels, a practical range is estimated to be about 400 μm to 0.25 μm. More preferably, the upper limit should be about 100 μm and the lower limit should be about 10% larger than the particle depth at a minimum.

Also, in order to reduce the likelihood of clogging, the bead delivery and bead waste channels (side channels 5, 5 a-5 d) preferably should be at least about 3 times deeper and three times wider than the bead diameter.

The maximum dimensions of the side channels 5, 5 a-5 d are also dependant upon the relative flow resistances required (i.e. the flow resistance of the side channel versus the main channel and the weirs, so as to minimize side channel backflow during use). Generally speaking, the flow resistance of the side channels should be higher than the flow resistance of weirs to minimize the backflow problem.

The accompanying tables provide information on the calculated effect of channel and weir dimensions on the volumetric flow rates out of the trapping zone, as a function of flow channel depth, weir depth and side channel length using pressure driven flow.

In the tables below, what is called channel W is element 1 in FIG. 1A; what is called channel C is called element 5 in FIG. 1A; and what is called channel C′ is element 3 in FIG. 1A

Correlation to
Width Length
20 μm Deep
Element 1 Channel W 600 6,500
Weir 280 variable
Element 5 Channel C 50 variable
Element 3 Channel C′ 600 3,500
10 μm Deep
Element 1 Channel W 580 6,500
Weir 280 variable

The volumetric flow rates were estimated using the Navier-Stokes equation for a rectangular channel cross section and Perry's tabulated values of the effect of channel shape. The flow resistance of a channel with half width a and half depth b is given by equation 2:
ΔP/U=hL/abN  (2)
where ΔP is the pressure drop along a channel segment of length L, U is the average linear flow velocity, h is the viscosity, and N is a form factor dependent upon the cross sectional ratio b/a (b<a). The factor N may be estimated from solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation for pressure driven, parabolic flow, and was tabulated by Perry in Chemical Engineer's Handbook, (3rd edition, 1950) pp 387. The goal in device design is to make the resistance of the side channel, C in the Tables, higher than the resistance of the weir and the following flow channel W, so that flow across the weir is favoured. When flow elements are in series the fluid resistance given by the right hand side of equation 1 for each segment can be added in the manner that the resistance of series electrical impedances can be added. When fluid elements are in parallel the inverse of their fluid resistance can be added to obtain the inverse of the total impedance, as is done for parallel electrical resistances. The volumetric flow rate, Q, through a channel or a combination of channels is then given by equation 3.
Q=abΔP/Rf  (3)

Where Rf is the resistance to fluid flow defined by the right hand side of equation 1, combined together for all channel segments as discussed above. The ratio, r, of volumetric flow rate across the weir, QW versus into the side channel, QC, r=QW/QC, should be large to ensure the percent of solution flowing across the weir, %QW=1/(1+r), is high. This can be accomplished by using a long narrow side channel compared to a wide main channel, by increasing the depth of the weir relative to the depth of the other channels, by decreasing the depth of the side channel relative to the main channel, etc, as indicated by several calculations presented in the Tables.

TABLE
Volumetric Flow Ratios for 10 and 20 μm Deep Designs
Channel Channel C Weir Weir Volumetric
depth Length Depth Length ratio r % Qw
20 μm 15,000 3 20 12.58 92.6
25,000 20.85 95.4
15,000 10 18.75 94.9
20 μm 15,000 1 20 0.687 41.1
25,000 1.16 53.6
15,000 10 1.37 57.8
10 μm 15,000 3 40 38.9 97.5
25,000 63.7 98.5
15,000 30 41.7 97.7
10 μm 15,000 1 40 4.14 80.5
25,000 6.87 87.3
15,000 30 5.83 84.3

TABLE
Fixed Device Dimensions for Calculations with a Given Etch Depth
Width Length
20 μm Deep
Channel W 600 6,500
Weir 280 variable
Channel C 50 variable
Channel C′ 600 3,500
10 μm Deep
Channel W 580 6,500
Weir 280 variable
Channel C 30 variable
Channel C′ 580 3,500

Integrated Analytical Procedures

It will be appreciated that the various features of the present invention as described above may be utilized in a more complex microfluidic design.

FIG. 9 shows a multiple weir and multiple side channel design, generally referred to by reference numeral 20, in which several trapping zones are integrated, each serving a different function.

As an illustrative example, in a first trapping zone 25, formed between weirs 6 a and 6 b, beads loaded with an antibody to a specific protein are introduced via side channel 24 (and exit via side channel 26). A cell lysate or serum sample or other protein source is directed from a sample reservoir (not shown) and loaded into the chip via sample inlet 21 and entrance channel 38 (the sample is removed at sample outlet 22 and an eluent inlet 23 is also provided at the entrance channel. The sample is then passed into the antibody bead bed in trapping zone 25 to isolate a specific protein, while the effluent is directed towards waste outlet 27.

A chaotropic elution agent, such as an acetonitrile, water mix, is then introduced (eluent inlet 23) to elute the protein from the column and deliver it to the next trapping zone 30 (formed between weirs 6 c and 6 d) where it is digested by a protease enzyme immobilized on beads loaded into the zone 30 (via side channels 29, 31). The effluent at this stage would be directed towards waste outlet 32. After sufficient reaction time, a buffer is delivered (elution inlet 28, running buffer 28 a, waste from bed 25) to flush the protein digest from the bed and into the next trapping zone 35 (formed between weirs 6 e and 6 f) with effluent delivered to waste outlet 39.

The third trapping zone 35 contains a solid phase extraction material (packed and unpacked via side channels 34, 36), allowing concentration of the digest peptides onto the bed in zone 35. An elution solvent, such as a methanol/aqueous mixture or acetonitrile/aqueous mixture is then introduced (elution inlet 33, running buffer 33 a) to deliver (exit channel 37, waste 39, or collection 40) a concentrated protein digest to another location on the chip for final analysis.

Packed Bed Chip to Electrospray Mass Spectrometry Interface

Packed bed flow channels may, according to the present invention, be interfaced to a mass spectrometer via an electrospray coupler 41, as illustrated in FIG. 10. The packed bed 4 may perform an enzyme digestion of a protein, affinity purification and pre-concentration of a specific chemical or protein, solid phase extraction concentration enhancement, or capillary electrochromatographic separation, or any combination of these and other steps, prior to electrospray introduction in to a mass spectrometer. The chip to electrospray interface may be made using any method that provides a less than 100 nL dead volume, preferably less than 1 nL and most preferably less than 100 pL dead volume at the coupling region. A method such as that described by Wang et al, or Karger can be used to create the interface [Bings, N. H.; Wang, C.; Skinner, C. D.; Colyer, C. L.; Thibeault, P.; Harrison, D. J. Anal Chem. 71 (1999) 3292-3296. Zhang, B.; Liu, H.; Karger, B. L.; Foret, F. Anal. Chem 71 (1999) 3258-3264].

While the present invention has been described by reference to various preferred embodiments, it will be understood that obvious changes may be made and equivalents substituted without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention which is set out in the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US20130149217 *Dec 13, 2012Jun 13, 2013Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Cell capturing filter having high aspect ratio
WO2009108260A2Jan 21, 2009Sep 3, 2009Microchip Biotechnologies, Inc.Universal sample preparation system and use in an integrated analysis system
Classifications
U.S. Classification204/451, 204/601
International ClassificationB01J19/00, G01N30/28, C12M1/00, G01N30/56, G01N30/60, G01N37/00, G01N27/447
Cooperative ClassificationB01L2300/041, B01L2200/0678, G01N2030/285, G01N30/6095, B01L2400/0415, G01N2030/565, G01N30/56
European ClassificationG01N30/56
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 24, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: THE GOVERNORS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA, CANADA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HARRISON, D. JED;JEMERE, ABEBAW BELAY;REEL/FRAME:016655/0143
Effective date: 20041116