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Publication numberUS20050229344 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/167,456
Publication dateOct 20, 2005
Filing dateJun 27, 2005
Priority dateJan 16, 2004
Publication number11167456, 167456, US 2005/0229344 A1, US 2005/229344 A1, US 20050229344 A1, US 20050229344A1, US 2005229344 A1, US 2005229344A1, US-A1-20050229344, US-A1-2005229344, US2005/0229344A1, US2005/229344A1, US20050229344 A1, US20050229344A1, US2005229344 A1, US2005229344A1
InventorsLisa Mittelstaedt, Brian Cartwright, Andrew Kilkenny, Sara Morales, Nicholas Pivonka
Original AssigneeLisa Mittelstaedt, Brian Cartwright, Andrew Kilkenny, Sara Morales, Nicholas Pivonka
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foaming cleaning pad
US 20050229344 A1
Abstract
A cleaning pad for use with a cleaning implement can be used to effectively clean surfaces, especially shower and bathroom surfaces. The cleaning pad has a scrubbing layer, an optional absorbent layer, and an attachment layer. The pad compressibility and the thickness of the attachment layer allows the pad to clean small crevices and generate sufficient foam. Examples of suitable cleaning implements include a hard surface floor mop, a carpet mop, an auto cleaning device, a toilet cleaning device, a bathroom cleaning device, and a shower cleaning device.
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Claims(20)
1. A cleaning implement comprising:
a. a handle; and
b. a removable cleaning pad comprising:
i. a substrate;
ii. a cleaning composition impregnated in said substrate;
iii. wherein said substrate comprises:
1. a scrubbing layer;
2. an optional intermediate absorbent layer; and
3. an attachment layer;
iv. wherein said attachment layer has a thickness from 0.2 to 1.5 inches; and
V. wherein said substrate has a compression of 50% to 90% at a load of 1000 g.
2. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said substrate has a compression of 60% to 90% at a load of 1000 g.
3. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said scrubbing layer comprises material selected from the group consisting of an apertured film, a meltblown web, a mesh of filaments, a polymeric bead mixture, a mineral binder layer, and combinations thereof.
4. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said attachment layer comprises greater than 40% of the thickness of the cleaning pad.
5. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said attachment layer comprises a dual density material.
6. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said attachment layer has a thickness of from 0.3 to 1.0 inches.
7. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said attachment layer has a bulk density less than 0.10 g/cc.
8. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said attachment layer comprises fibers having denier greater than 3.
9. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said attachment layer is attached to a fitment.
10. The cleaning implement of claim 1, wherein said substrate is substantially dry-to-the-touch.
11. A cleaning pad for attachment to a cleaning implement comprising:
a. a substrate;
b. a cleaning composition impregnated in said substrate;
c. wherein said substrate comprises:
i. a scrubbing layer;
ii. an optional intermediate absorbent layer; and
iii. an attachment layer;
d. wherein said attachment layer has a thickness from 0.2 to 1.5 inches; and
e. wherein said substrate has a compressibility of 50% to 90% at a load of 1000 g.
12. The cleaning implement of claim 11, wherein said scrubbing layer comprises material selected from the group consisting of an apertured film, a meltblown web, a mesh of filaments, a polymeric bead mixture, a mineral binder layer, and combinations thereof.
13. The cleaning implement of claim 11, wherein said attachment layer comprises greater than 40% of the thickness of the cleaning pad.
14. The cleaning implement of claim 11, wherein said attachment layer comprises a dual density material.
15. The cleaning implement of claim 11, wherein said attachment layer has a thickness of from 0.3 to 1.0 inches.
16. The cleaning implement of claim 11, wherein said attachment layer comprises fibers having denier greater than 3.
17. The cleaning implement of claim 11, wherein said attachment layer is attached to a fitment.
18. A cleaning pad for attachment to a cleaning implement comprising a substrate;
a. wherein said substrate comprises:
i. a scrubbing layer;
ii. an optional intermediate absorbent layer; and
iii. an attachment layer;
b. wherein said attachment layer has a thickness from 0.2 to 1.5 inches;
c. wherein said attachment layer is water permeable and comprises fibers having denier greater than 3; and
d. wherein said substrate has a compressibility of 50% to 90% at a load of 1000 g.
19. The cleaning implement of claim 18, wherein said attachment layer comprises greater than 50% of the total pad thickness and said scrubbing layer comprises less than 25% of the total pad thickness.
20. The cleaning implement of claim 18, wherein said attachment layer is attached to a fitment.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

The present application is a continuation-in-part of Co-pending application Ser. No. 10/836,303, which was filed Apr. 30, 2004, entitled “MULTILAYER CLEANING PAD”, which is a continuation-in-part of Co-pending application Ser. No. 10/758,722, which was filed Jan. 16, 2004, entitled “CLEANING COMPOSITION FOR DISPOSABLE CLEANING HEAD”, and both incorporated herein.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to devices for cleaning hard surfaces. The invention also relates to cleaning substrates, cleaning heads, cleaning pads, cleaning sponges and related systems for cleaning hard surfaces. The invention also relates to cleaning substrates, cleaning heads, cleaning pads, cleaning sponges and related systems for cleaning hard surfaces, wherein the cleaning substrates and related systems are impregnated with cleaning compositions. The invention also relates to a device for cleaning hard surfaces that contains an onboard vessel containing a cleaning composition. The invention also relates to a cleaning implement comprising a handle and and a cleaning substrate, cleaning head, cleaning pad, cleaning sponge and related systems for cleaning hard surfaces. The invention also relates to a device for cleaning toilet bowls and the like. The invention also relates to a device for showers and bathtubs and the like.

2. Description of the Related Art

Numerous types of cleaning compositions, as well as holders for disposable cleaning pads, are known in the art. Illustrative are the compositions and apparatus disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,852,201, 4,523,347, 4,031,673, 3,413,673 and 3,383,158.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,292,567 to Foster discloses a buffing pad engaged with a buffing apparatus for buffing automoble bodies. U.S. patent application 2004/0128786 to Policicchio et al. discloses a cleaning implement with attached cleaning pad wherein the attachment wings are attached to grippers. U.S. patent application US2004/0226123 to Policicchio et al. discloses a cleaning pad for a mop with a liquid impervious attachment layer. U.S. Pat. No. 6,132,841 to Guthrie et al. describes a wiping device having a thermoplastic sheet with a plurality of capillaries and cavities, a backsheet, and an absorbent core. U.S. patent application 2004/0176002 to Siegwart describes a dry disposable cleansing implement having an inner layer and an outer exfoliating layer surrounding the inner layer. U.S. patent application 2003/0039804 to Burwell et al. describes a laminated personal care article having an apertured film layer laminated to an absorbent layer. U.S. patent application 2005/0054998 to Poccia et al. describes an absorbent article comprising a nonwoven with an apertured film secured to at least one surface.

Cleaning pads for attachment to a cleaning implement for cleaning hard surfaces generally have an exterior scrubbing layer, a thick absorbent layer, and a thin water impervious attachment layer. The reason for this may be because these pads are primarily designed to restrict the generation of foam and to absorb excess liquid. We have found that prior art cleaning pads do not have the thickness and compressibility to fit into tight spaces and to generate sufficient foam to clean both small crevices and large surfaces. By expanding the thickness of the attachment layer and restricting the size of the absorbent layer, the resulting cleaning pad can provide for increased foam generation and have the compressibility to clean in small crevices.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a device with a disposable cleaning pad that overcomes the disadvantages and shortcomings associated with prior art cleaning substrates, cleaning heads, cleaning pads, cleaning sponges and related systems for cleaning hard surfaces.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with the above objects and those that will be mentioned and will become apparent below, one aspect of the present invention comprises a cleaning implement comprising:

    • a. a handle; and
    • b. a removable cleaning pad comprising:
      • i. a substrate;
      • ii. a cleaning composition impregnated in said substrate;
      • iii. wherein said substrate comprises:
        • 1. a scrubbing layer;
        • 2. an optional intermediate absorbent layer; and
        • 3. an attachment layer;
      • iv. wherein said attachment layer has a thickness from 0.2 to 1.0 inches; and
      • v. wherein said substrate has a compression of 50% to 90% at a load of 1000 g.

In accordance with the above objects and those that will be mentioned and will become apparent below, another aspect of the present invention comprises a cleaning pad for attachment to a cleaning implement comprising:

    • a. a substrate;
    • b. a cleaning composition impregnated in said substrate;
    • c. wherein said substrate comprises:
      • i. a scrubbing layer;
      • ii. an optional intermediate absorbent layer; and
      • iii. an attachment layer;
    • d. wherein said attachment layer has a thickness from 0.2 to 1.0 inches; and
    • e. wherein said substrate has a compressibility of 50% to 90% at a load of 1000 g.

In accordance with the above objects and those that will be mentioned and will become apparent below, another aspect of the present invention comprises a cleaning pad for attachment to a cleaning implement comprising a substrate;

    • a. wherein said substrate comprises:
      • i. a scrubbing layer;
      • ii. an optional intermediate absorbent layer; and
      • iii. an attachment layer;
    • b. wherein said attachment layer has a thickness from 0.2 to 1.0 inches;
    • c. wherein said attachment layer is water permeable and comprises fibers having denier greater than 3; and
    • d. wherein said substrate has a compressibility of 50% to 90% at a load of 1000 g.

Further features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art in view of the detailed description of preferred embodiments below, when considered together with the attached claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Further features and advantages will become apparent from the following and more particular description of embodiments of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and in which like referenced characters generally refer to the same parts or elements throughout the views, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view of one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a side view of another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 3 is a side view of another embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Before describing the present invention in detail, it is to be understood that this invention is not limited to particularly exemplified systems or process parameters that may, of course, vary. It is also to be understood that the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments of the invention only, and is not intended to limit the scope of the invention in any manner.

All publications, patents and patent applications cited herein, whether supra or infra, are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety to the same extent as if each individual publication, patent or patent application was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.

It must be noted that, as used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an” and “the” include plural referents unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. Thus, for example, reference to “a surfactant” includes two or more such surfactants.

Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which the invention pertains. Although a number of methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can be used in the practice of the present invention, the preferred materials and methods are described herein.

As used herein, the term “x-y dimension” refers to the plane orthogonal to the thickness of the cleaning pad, or a component thereof. The x and y dimensions correspond to the length and width, respectively, of the cleaning pad or a pad component. In this context, the length of the pad is the longest dimension of the pad, and the width the shortest. In general, in use, a cleaning implement will be moved in a direction parallel to the y-dimension (or width) of the pad. Of course, the present invention is not limited to the use of cleaning pads having four sides. Other shapes, such as circular, elliptical, and the like, can also be used. When determining the width of the pad at any point in the z-dimension, it is understood that the pad is assessed according to its intended use. As used herein, the term “z-dimension” refers to the dimension orthogonal to the length and width of the cleaning pad of the present invention, or a component thereof. The z-dimension therefore corresponds to the thickness of the cleaning pad or a pad component.

The cleaning pad can be used as a disinfectant, sanitizer, and/or sterilizer. As used herein, the term “disinfect” shall mean the elimination of many or all pathogenic microorganisms on surfaces with the exception of bacterial endospores. As used herein, the term “sanitize” shall mean the reduction of contaminants in the inanimate environment to levels considered safe according to public health ordinance, or that reduces the bacterial population by significant numbers where public health requirements have not been established. An at least 99% reduction in bacterial population within a 24 hour time period is deemed “significant.” As used herein, the term “sterilize” shall mean the complete elimination or destruction of all forms of microbial life and which is authorized under the applicable regulatory laws to make legal claims as a “Sterilant” or to have sterilizing properties or qualities.

In the application, effective amounts are generally those amounts listed as the ranges or levels of ingredients in the descriptions, which follow hereto. Unless otherwise stated, amounts listed in percentage (“%'s”) are in weight percent (based on 100% active) of the cleaning composition alone, not accounting for the substrate weight. Each of the noted cleaner composition components and substrates is discussed in detail below.

As used herein, the term “substrate” is intended to include any material that is used to clean an article or a surface. Examples of cleaning substrates include, but are not limited to nonwovens, sponges, films and similar materials which can be attached to a cleaning implement, such as a floor mop, handle, or a hand held cleaning tool, such as a toilet cleaning device.

As used herein, “film” refers to a polymer film including flat nonporous films, and porous films such as microporous, nanoporous, closed or open celled, breathable films, or apertured films.

As used herein, “wiping” refers to any shearing action that the substrate undergoes while in contact with a target surface. This includes hand or body motion, substrate-implement motion over a surface, or any perturbation of the substrate via energy sources such as ultrasound, mechanical vibration, electromagnetism, and so forth.

As used herein, the term “fiber” includes both staple fibers, i.e., fibers which have a defined length between about 2 and about 20 mm, fibers longer than staple fiber but are not continuous, and continuous fibers, which are sometimes called “continuous filaments” or simply “filaments”. The method in which the fiber is prepared will determine if the fiber is a staple fiber or a continuous filament.

As used herein, the terms “nonwoven” or “nonwoven web” means a web having a structure of individual fibers or threads which are interlaid, but not in an identifiable manner as in a knitted web. Nonwoven webs have been formed from many processes, such as, for example, meltblowing processes, spunbonding processes, and bonded carded web processes. The basis weight of nonwoven webs is usually expressed in ounces of material per square yard (osy) or grams per square meter (gsm) and the fiber diameters useful are usually expressed in microns, or in the case of staple fibers, denier. It is noted that to convert from osy to gsm, multiply osy by 33.91.

As used herein, the term “bulk density” refers to the weight of a material per unit of volume and is generally expressed in units of mass per unit bulk volume (e.g., grams per cubic centimeter).

The term “cleaning composition”, as used herein, is meant to mean and include a cleaning formulation having at least one surfactant.

The term “surfactant”, as used herein, is meant to mean and include a substance or compound that reduces surface tension when dissolved in water or water solutions, or that reduces interfacial tension between two liquids, or between a liquid and a solid. The term “surfactant” thus includes anionic, nonionic and/or amphoteric agents.

Cleaning Implement Drawings

FIG. 1 illustrates a cleaning implement having a handle 10, a cleaning head 12, and a joint 11 attaching the handle 10 to the cleaning head 12. The cleaning head 12 attaches to a removable cleaning pad 13. The removable cleaning pad 13 may have a scrubbing layer on the bottom surface 15 and an attachment layer on the top surface 14. The thickness of the cleaning pad 13 is measured from top surface 14 to bottom surface 15.

FIG. 2 illustrates a cleaning implement having a handle 20 and a cleaning head 21. A cleaning pad 23 is attached to a fitment 22. The fitment 22 removeably attaches to the cleaning head 21.

FIG. 3 illustrates another embodiment of the inventive cleaning device.

Cleaning Implement

In an embodiment of the invention, the cleaning implement comprises the tool assembly disclosed in Co-pending application Ser. No. 10/678,033, entitled “Cleaning Tool with Gripping Assembly for a Disposable Scrubbing Head”, filed Sep. 30, 2003.

In another embodiment of the invention, the cleaning implement comprises the tool assembly disclosed in Co-pending application Ser. No. 10/602,478, entitled “Cleaning Tool with Gripping Assembly for a Disposable Scrubbing Head”, filed Jun. 23, 2003.

In another embodiment of the invention, the cleaning implement comprises the tool assembly disclosed in Co-pending application Ser. No. 10/766,179, entitled “Interchangeable Tool Heads”, filed Jan. 27, 2004.

In another embodiment of the invention, the cleaning implement comprises the tool assembly disclosed in Co-pending application Ser. No. 10/817,606, entitled “Ergonomic Cleaning Pad”, filed Apr. 1, 2004.

In another embodiment of the invention, the cleaning implement comprises an elongated shaft having a handle portion on one end thereof. The tool assembly further includes a gripping mechanism that is mounted to the shaft to engage the removable cleaning pad. Examples of suitable cleaning implements are found in US2003/0070246 to Cavalheiro; US2005/0060827 to James et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,455,705 to Graham; U.S. Pat. No. 5,003,659 to Paepke; U.S. Pat. No. 6,485,212 to Bomgaars et al.; U.S. Pat. No. 6,290,781 to Brouillet, Jr.; U.S. Pat. No. 5,862,565 to Lundstedt; U.S. Pat. No. 5,419,015 to Garcia; U.S. Pat. No. 5,140,717 to Castagliola; U.S. Pat. No. 6,611,986 to Seals; US2002/0007527 to Hart; and U.S. Pat. No. 6,094,771 to Egolf et al. The cleaning implement may have a hook, hole, magnetic means, canister or other means to allow the cleaning implement to be conveniently stored when not in use.

Cleaning Pad Attachment

The cleaning implement holding the removable cleaning pad may have a cleaning head with an attachment means or the attachment means may be an integral part of the handle of the cleaning implement or may be removably attached to the end of the handle. The cleaning pad may be attached by a friction fit means, by a clamping means, by a threaded screw means, by hook and loop attachment or by any other suitable attachment means. The cleaning pad may have a rigid or flexible plastic or metal fitment for attachment to the cleaning implement or the cleaning pad may be directly attached to the cleaning implement.

Cleaning Pad Substrate

A wide variety of materials can be used as the cleaning pad substrate. The substrate should have sufficient wet strength, abrasivity, loft and porosity. Examples of suitable substrates include, nonwoven substrates, wovens substrates, hydroentangled substrates, foams and sponges. Methods of making nonwovens are well known in the art. Generally, these nonwovens can be made by air-laying, water-buying, meltblowing, coforming, spunbonding, or carding processes in which the fibers or filaments are first cut to desired lengths from long strands, passed into a water or air stream, and then deposited onto a screen through which the fiber-laden air or water is passed. The air-laying process is described in U.S. patent application 2003/0036741 to Abba et al. and U.S. patent application 2003/0118825 to Melius et al. The resulting layer, regardless of its method of production or composition, is then subjected to at least one of several types of bonding operations to anchor the individual fibers together to form a self-sustaining substrate. In the present invention the nonwoven substrate can be prepared by a variety of processes including, but not limited to, air-entanglement, hydroentanglement, thermal bonding, and combinations of these processes. Any of these substrates may be water-insoluble, water-dispersible, or water-soluble.

Additionally, the first layer and the second layer, as well as additional layers, when present, can be bonded to one another in order to maintain the integrity of the article. The layers can be heat spot bonded together or using heat generated by ultrasonic sound waves. The bonding may be arranged such that geometric shapes and patterns, e.g. diamonds, circles, squares, etc. are created on the exterior surfaces of the layers and the resulting article.

The cleaning substrates can be provided dry, pre-moistened, or impregnated with cleaning composition, but dry-to-the-touch. In one aspect, dry cleaning substrates can be provided with dry or substantially dry cleaning or disinfecting agents coated on or in the multicomponent multilobal fiber layer. In addition, the cleaning substrates can be provided in a pre-moistened and/or saturated condition. The wet cleaning substrates can be maintained over time in a sealable container such as, for example, within a bucket with an attachable lid, sealable plastic pouches or bags, canisters, jars, tubs and so forth. Desirably the wet, stacked cleaning substrates are maintained in a resealable container. The use of a resealable container is particularly desirable when using volatile liquid compositions since substantial amounts of liquid can evaporate while using the first substrates thereby leaving the remaining substrates with little or no liquid. Exemplary resealable containers and dispensers include, but are not limited to, those described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,171,047 to Doyle et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,353,480 to McFadyen, U.S. Pat. No. 4,778,048 to Kaspar et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,741,944 to Jackson et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,595,786 to McBride et al.; the entire contents of each of the aforesaid references are incorporated herein by reference. The cleaning substrates can be incorporated or oriented in the container as desired and/or folded as desired in order to improve ease of use or removal as is known in the art. The cleaning substrates of the present invention can be provided in a kit form, wherein a plurality of cleaning substrates and a cleaning tool are provided in a single package.

Exterior Scrubbing Layer

The exterior scrubbing layer can be an apertured film. One example of an apertured film is a formed film. Examples of formed films are Tredegar formed films, described, for example, in US2004/0019340 to McBride and US2004/0002688 to Thomas et al. Additional apertured films are described in PCT App. W003/018305 to Burwell et al., U.S. patent application 2004/122396 to Maldonado et al., U.S. patent application 2003/0171730 to Kelly, U.S. Pat. No. 4,629,643 to Curro, U.S. patent application 2005/0064136 to Turner, U.S. Pat. No. 6,610,904 to Thomas, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,700,036 to Thomas.

The exterior scrubbing layer can be a nonwoven meltblown web as disclosed in U.S. patent application 2004/0111817 to Chen et al. The exterior scrubbing layer can be a mesh or scrim of filaments or ribbons as disclosed in U.S. patent application 2003/0028985 to Prodoehl et al. and U.S. patent application 2003/0162684 to Huyhn et al. The exterior scrubbing layer can be a polymeric bead mixture as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,213,588 to Wong et al. and U.S. patent application 2003/0228813 to Johnson et al. The exterior scrubbing layer can be a mineral binder layer such as an aluminosilicate/latex acrylic binder as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,299,520 to Cheyne III.

Absorbent Layer

The absorbent layer may be comprised of substrates with high holding capacity or large void space, for example, urethane foam, cellulose foam, melamine foam, airlaid pulp, needlepunched substrate, or through-air bonded substrate. The absorbent layer may be comprised of dense substrates with high capacities, for example, spunlace PET/pulp, spunlace PP/pulp, spunlace PE/pulp, spunbond PP, spunbond PET, spunbond bicomponent fiber, meltblown PP, meltblown PET, and SMS (spunbond/meltblown/spunbond).

The absorbent layer may also be a layer with controlled release, for example, formed films or substrates with gradient densities. Gradient density substrates can be formed from multiple layers ultrasonically or adhesively laminated together. These substrates could be formed using meltblown, spunbond, or SMS (spunbond/meltblown/spunbond). Formed films may be used with the cones pointing out in order to control the fluid rate in for dilution, and not the fluid flow out. An example of formed films is Tredegar formed films, described, for example, in US2004/0019340 to McBride and US2004/0002688 to Thomas et al. The films may also be needle-punched. Superabsorbent films containing polyethylene of other hydrophobic material would also allow controlled release.

The absorbent layer may also incorporate dissolvable films, such as PVA film. The PVA film may gradually dissolve to allow access to the cleaning composition. Multiple layers of PVA may allow release over time of subsequent cleaning compositions. The absorbent layer may also contain granules of slowly hydrating substances dispersed in a open structure, for example, an airlaid substrate. Slowly hydrating substances may be composed of superabsorbent polymer, starches, polypeptides, acrylates, gel-forming materials, or other such materials.

Suitable absorbent layers may be prepared by carded/chemically or resin bonded, air laid chemically bonded, carded thermally bonded, airlaid thermally bonded, carded spunlaced or hydroentangled, wet laid chemically bonded, wet laid spunlaced or hydroentangled, meltblown, spunbonded, apertured, needle punched, and any combinations of processes thereof. The absorbent layer may be a coform nonwoven web as described in U.S. patent application 2003/0211802. Additional suitable absorbent cores are described in U.S. patent application 2003/0028985 to Prodoehl et al. The absorbent layer can also comprise a HIPE-derived hydrophilic, polymeric foam. Such foams and methods for their preparation are described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,550,167 to DesMarais and U.S. Pat. No. 5,563,179 to Stone et al. The absorbent may also contain superabsorbent materials. A wide variety of high absorbency materials (also known as superabsorbent materials) are known to those skilled in the art. See, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,076,663 to Masuda et al, U.S. Pat. No. 4,286,082 to Tsubakimoto et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,062,817 to Westerman, and U.S. Pat. No. 4,340,706 to Obayashi et al.

Examples of suitable absorbent layers include, 100% cellulose Wadding Grade 1804 from Little Rapids Corporation, 100% polypropylene needlepunch material NB 701-2.8-W/R from American Non-wovens Corporation, a blend of cellulosic and synthetic fibres-Hydraspun 8579 from Ahlstrom Fibre Composites, and &0% Viscose/30% PES Code 9881 from PGI Nonwovens Polymer Corp. Another useful substrate is manufactured by Jacob Holm-Lidro Rough. It is a composition material comprising a 65/35 viscose rayon/polyester hydroentangled spunlace layer with a hydroenlongated bonded polyeser scribbly layer. Still another useful substrate is manufactured by Texel “TI”. It is a composite material manufactured from a layer of coarse fiber 100% polypropylene needlepunch, an absorbent cellulose core and a fine fiber polyester layer needlepunched together. The polypropylene layer can range from 1.5 to 3.5 oz/sq. yd.

Attachment Layer

The attachment layer may be a single or dual density high-loft polyester substrate, for example HK KW 40 from Ahlsrom, having a density of 0.37 to 0.51 oz/sq. ft. The cleaning substrate may be a single layer or multiple layers. The attachment layer may be comprised of a variety of fiber types, for example, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyester, bicomponent, or multicomponent fibers. The attachment layer may be formed from a variety of processes, for example, carded and thermal bond, carded and spray bond, needling, or a combination of these and other processes. The attachment layer may be comprised of fibers of a variety of thicknesses, including fibers of 1.5 denier or greater, or fibers of 3 denier or greater, or fibers of 5 denier or greater, or fibers of 12 denier or greater. The attachment layer may be comprised of fibers of different thickness, for example, fibers of less than 2 denier and 3 denier or greater, fibers of less than 2 denier and 6 denier or greater, fibers of about 3 denier and fibers of about 6 denier or greater, fibers of about 3 denier and fibers of about 12 denier or greater. The attachment layer may have a thickness (Twing Albert) of about 0.20 inches, of about 0.25 inches, of about 0.30 inches, or of about 0.35 inches or higher. The attachment layer may have a basis weight of greater than 90 gsm, or greater than 100 gsm, or greater than 110 gsm, or greater than 120 gsm, or greater than 130 gsm, or greater than 140 gsm. The attachment layer may have a basis weight of between 90 and 150 gsm, or between 90 and 140 gsm, or between 90 and 130 gsm, or between 90 and 120 gsm, or between 100 and 150 gsm, or between 100 and 140 gsm, or between 100 and 130 gsm, or between 100 and 120 gsm, or between 110 and 150 gsm, or between 110 and 140 gsm, or between 110 and 130 gsm, or between 110 and 120 gsm, or between 120 and 150 gsm, or between 120 and 140 gsm, or between 120 and 130 gsm. The attachment layer thickness may be from 0.2 to 2 inches or from 0.4 to 1 inch or from 0.4 to 0.8 inch.

Laminate Process

Processes for forming a nonwoven apertured film composite is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,733,628 to Pelkie, PCT App. WO2004/058121 to Cree, PCT App. WO2004/060664 to Maldonando, and U.S. Pat. No. 4,995,950 to Merz. Other lamination processes are described in U.S. patent application 2003/016684 to Huyhn. The cleaning substrate of this invention may be a multilayer laminate and may be formed by a number of different techniques including but not limited to using adhesive, needle punching, ultrasonic bonding, thermal calendering and through-air bonding. Such a multilayer laminate may be an embodiment wherein some of the layers are spunbond and some meltblown such as a spunbond/meltblown/spunbond (SMS) laminate as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,041,203 to Brock et al. and U.S. Pat. No. 5, 169,706 to Collier, et al., each hereby incorporated by reference. The SMS laminate may be made by sequentially depositing onto a moving conveyor belt or forming wire first a spunbond web layer, then a meltblown web layer and last another spunbond layer and then bonding the laminate in a manner described above. Alternatively, the three web layers may be made individually, collected in rolls and combined in a separate bonding step.

Cleaning Pad Properties

The cleaning pad may show minimal migration of the cleaning composition during storage. The cleaning pad may comprise 100% thermoplastic fibers or 100% of the same thermoplastic fiber type in order to allow the more convenient bonding of layers. The cleaning pad may also comprise some non-thermoplastic fibers, such as cellulosic fibers. The cleaning pad should allow the cleaning composition to be used up after use on one to two tasks, for example one to two showers. One example of an indication of no more cleaning composition is the absence of foam. However, the consumer normally desires lots of foam to ensure that there is adequate cleaning performance. The combination of adequate attachment layer thickness and pad compressibility allows quick foam generation, good foam mileage, and sudden foam exhaustion. The pad should have a compression of 50 to 90%, or from 60 to 90%.

The cleaning pad should not be so thick that the consumer considers the pad not to be disposable. The pad may have a basis weight greater than about 200 gsm, or greater than 250 gsm, or greater than 300 gsm, or greater that 400 gsm. The pad may have a bulk density less than 0.15 g/cc, or less than 0.10 g/cc, or less than 0.08 g/cc. The bulk density was measured under a load of 0.25 psi for a 2 inch diameter sample.

Cleaning composition

In one embodiment, the cleaning device comprises a cleaning pad that is impregnated with a cleaning composition and is ‘wet-to-the-touch’. In another embodiment, the cleaning device comprises a cleaning pad that is impregnated with a cleaning composition that is ‘dry-to-the-touch’. By ‘dry-to-the-touch’, it is meant that the substrate is free of water or other solvents in an amount that would make them feel damp or wet-to-the-touch as compared to the touch of a wet substrate, for example a wet cleaning wipe. In another embodiment, the cleaning device contains a removable attached vessel containing a cleaning composition and the cleaning substrate is free of the cleaning composition.

The cleaning composition may contain one or more surfactants selected from anionic, nonionic, cationic, ampholytic, amphoteric and zwitterionic surfactants and mixtures thereof. A typical listing of anionic, nonionic, ampholytic, and zwitterionic classes, and species of these surfactants, is given in U.S. Pat. No. 3,929,678 to Laughlin and Heuring. A list of suitable cationic surfactants is given in U.S. Pat. No. 4,259,217 to Murphy. Where present, ampholytic, amphotenic and zwitteronic surfactants are generally used in combination with one or more anionic and/or nonionic surfactants. The surfactants may be present at a level of from about 0% to 90%, or from about 0.001% to 50%, or from about 0.01% to 25% by weight.

Suitable organic solvents include, but are not limited to, C1-6 alkanols, C1-6 diols, C1-6 alkyl ethers of alkylene glycols, C3-24 alkylene glycol ethers, polyalkylene glycols, short chain carboxylic acids, short chain esters, isoparafinic hydrocarbons, mineral spirits, alkylaromatics, terpenes, terpene derivatives, terpenoids, terpenoid derivatives, formaldehyde, and pyrrolidones. Alkanols include, but are not limited to, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, butanol, pentanol, and hexanol, and isomers thereof. Diols include, but are not limited to, methylene, ethylene, propylene and butylene glycols. Alkylene glycol ethers include, but are not limited to, ethylene glycol monopropyl ether, ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, ethylene glycol monohexyl ether, diethylene glycol monopropyl ether, diethylene glycol monobutyl ether, diethylene glycol monohexyl ether, propylene glycol methyl ether, propylene glycol ethyl ether, propylene glycol n-propyl ether, propylene glycol monobutyl ether, propylene glycol t-butyl ether, di- or tri-polypropylene glycol methyl or ethyl or propyl or butyl ether, acetate and propionate esters of glycol ethers. Short chain carboxylic acids include, but are not limited to, acetic acid, glycolic acid, lactic acid and propionic acid. Short chain esters include, but are not limited to, glycol acetate, and cyclic or linear volatile methylsiloxanes. Water insoluble solvents such as isoparafinic hydrocarbons, mineral spirits, alkylaromatics, terpenoids, terpenoid derivatives, terpenes, and terpenes derivatives can be mixed with a water-soluble solvent when employed.

Examples of organic solvent having a vapor pressure less than 0.1 mm Hg (20 C.) include, but are not limited to, dipropylene glycol n-propyl ether, dipropylene glycol t-butyl ether, dipropylene glycol n-butyl ether, tripropylene glycol methyl ether, tripropylene glycol n-butyl ether, diethylene glycol propyl ether, diethylene glycol butyl ether, dipropylene glycol methyl ether acetate, diethylene glycol ethyl ether acetate, and diethylene glycol butyl ether acetate (all available from ARCO Chemical Company). The solvents are present at a level of from 0 to 10%, or from 0.01% to 10%, or from 1% to 4% by weight.

The cleaning compositions optionally contain one or more of the following adjuncts: stain and soil repellants, lubricants, odor control agents, perfumes, fragrances and fragrance release agents, and bleaching agents. Other adjuncts include, but are not limited to, acids, electrolytes, dyes and/or colorants, solubilizing materials, stabilizers, thickeners, defoamers, hydrotropes, cloud point modifiers, preservatives, and other polymers. The solubilizing materials, when used, include, but are not limited to, hydrotropes (e.g. water soluble salts of low molecular weight organic acids such as the sodium and/or potassium salts of toluene, cumene, and xylene sulfonic acid). The acids, when used, include, but are not limited to, organic hydroxy acids, citric acids, keto acid, and the like. Electrolytes, when used, include, calcium, sodium and potassium chloride. Thickeners, when used, include, but are not limited to, polyacrylic acid, xanthan gum, calcium carbonate, aluminum oxide, alginates, guar gum, methyl, ethyl, clays, and/or propyl hydroxycelluloses. Defoamers, when used, include, but are not limited to, silicones, aminosilicones, silicone blends, and/or silicone/hydrocarbon blends. Bleaching agents, when used, include, but are not limited to, peracids, hypohalite sources, hydrogen peroxide, and/or sources of hydrogen peroxide.

Preservatives, when used, include, but are not limited to, mildewstat or bacteriostat, methyl, ethyl and propyl parabens, short chain organic acids (e.g. acetic, lactic and/or glycolic acids), bisguanidine compounds (e.g. Dantagard and/or Glydant) and/or short chain alcohols (e.g. ethanol and/or IPA). The mildewstat or bacteriostat includes, but is not limited to, mildewstats (including non-isothiazolone compounds) include Kathon GC, a 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, KATHON ICP, a 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, and a blend thereof, and KATHON 886, a 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, all available from Rohm and Haas Company; BRONOPOL, a 2-bromo-2-nitropropane 1,3 diol, from Boots Company Ltd., PROXEL CRL, a propyl-p-hydroxybenzoate, from ICI PLC; NIPASOL M, an o-phenyl-phenol, Na+ salt, from Nipa Laboratories Ltd., DOWICIDE A, a 1,2-Benzoisothiazolin-3-one, from Dow Chemical Co., and IRGASAN DP 200, a 2,4,4′-trichloro-2-hydroxydiphenylether, from Ciba-Geigy A.G.

The cleaning pad optionally contain an antimicrobial agent including quaternary ammonium compounds and phenolics. Non-limiting examples of these quaternary compounds include benzalkonium chlorides and/or substituted benzalkonium chlorides, di(C6-C14)alkyl di short chain (C1-4 alkyl and/or hydroxyalkl) quaternaryammonium salts, N-(3-chloroallyl)hexaminium chlorides, benzethonium chloride, methylbenzethonium chloride, and cetylpyridinium chloride. Other quaternary compounds include the group consisting of dialkyldimethyl ammonium chlorides, alkyl dimethylbenzylammonium chlorides, dialkylmethyl-benzylammonium chlorides, and mixtures thereof. Biguanide antimicrobial actives including, but not limited to polyhexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride, p-chlorophenyl biguanide; 4-chlorobenzhydryl biguanide, halogenated hexidine such as, but not limited to, chlorhexidine (1,1′-hexamethylene-bis-5-(4-chlorophenyl biguanide) and its salts are also in this class.

Suitable antimicrobial organocarboxylic acids include citric acid, lactic acid, glycolic acid, gluconic acid, glucoheptonic acid, malic acid, malonic acid, glutaric acid, succinic acid, adipic acid, formic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid, propanoic acid, benzoic acid, phthalic acid, and mixtures thereof. Other suitable organocarboxylic acids include low molecular weight polymeric organocarboxylic acids (molecular weight average (Mw), below about 60,000 atomic mass units) such as poly(acrylic acid) and poly(maleic) acid homopolymers and copolymers. Examples include Goodrite K-7058 available from BF Goodrich Speciality Chemicals, and Belclene 901 available from FMC Corporation.

Suitable peroxide antimicrobials for use herein include percarbonates, persilicates, persulphates such as monopersulfate, perborates and peroxyacids such as diperoxy dodecandioic acid (DPDA), magnesium perphthalic acid and mixtures thereof. Suitable antimicrobial essential oils to be used herein include, but are not limited to, thymol (present for example in thyme, ajowan), eugenol (present for example in cinnamon and clove), menthol (present for example in mint), geraniol (present for example in geranium and rose, citronella), verbenone (present for example in vervain), eucalyptol and pinocarvone (present in eucalyptus), cedrol (present for example in cedar), anethol (present for example in anise), carvacrol, hinokitiol, berberine, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid, methyl salicylic acid, methyl salycilate, terpineol, limonene and mixtures thereof. Preferred actives of essential oils to be used herein are thymol, eugenol, verbenone, eucalyptol, terpineol, cinnamic acid, methyl salicylic acid, limonene, geraniol or mixtures thereof. Other suitable disinfecting materials for use herein include chlorine-type bleaches, such as sodium and calcium hypochlorite.

A variety of builders or buffers can be used and they include, but are not limited to, phosphate-silicate compounds, zeolites, alkali metal, ammonium and substituted ammonium polyacetates, trialkali salts of nitrilotriacetic acid, carboxylates, polycarboxylates, carbonates, bicarbonates, polyphosphates, aminopolycarboxylates, polyhydroxysulfonates, and starch derivatives. Builders or buffers can also include polyacetates and polycarboxylates. The polyacetate and polycarboxylate compounds include, but are not limited to, sodium, potassium, lithium, ammonium, and substituted ammonium salts of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, ethylenediamine triacetic acid, ethylenediamine tetrapropionic acid, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, oxydisuccinic acid, iminodisuccinic acid, mellitic acid, polyacrylic acid or polymethacrylic acid and copolymers, benzene polycarboxylic acids, gluconic acid, sulfamic acid, oxalic acid, phosphoric acid, phosphonic acid, organic phosphonic acids, acetic acid, and citric acid. These builders or buffers can also exist either partially or totally in the hydrogen ion form.

The builder agent can include sodium and/or potassium salts of EDTA and substituted ammonium salts. The substituted ammonium salts include, but are not limited to, ammonium salts of methylamine, dimethylamine, butylamine, butylenediamine, propylamine, triethylamine, trimethylamine, monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine, isopropanolamine, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and propanolamine.

Buffering and pH adjusting agents, when used, include, but are not limited to, organic acids, mineral acids, alkali metal and alkaline earth salts of silicate, metasilicate, polysilicate, borate, hydroxide, carbonate, carbamate, phosphate, polyphosphate, pyrophosphates, triphosphates, tetraphosphates, ammonia, hydroxide, monoethanolamine, monopropanolamine, diethanolamine, dipropanolamine, triethanolamine, 2-amino-2methylpropanol, tri(hydroxymethyl)amino methane (TRIS), 2-amino-2-ethyl-1,3-propanediol, 2-amino-2-methyl-propanol, 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanol, disodium glutamate, N-methyl diethanolarnide, 2-dimethylamino-2-methylpropanol (DMAMP), 1,3-bis(methylamine)-cyclohexane, 1,3-diamino-propanol N,N′-tetra-methyl-1,3-diamino-2-propanol, N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine(bicine), N-tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl glycine(tricine), ammonium carbamate, citric acid, acetic acid. Mixtures of any of the above are also acceptable. Useful inorganic buffers/alkalinity sources include ammonia, the alkali metal carbonates and alkali metal phosphates, e.g., sodium carbonate, sodium polyphosphate. For additional buffers see WO 95/07971, which is incorporated herein by reference. Other pH adjusting agents include sodium or potassium hydroxide. When employed, the builder, buffer, or pH adjusting agent comprises at least about 0.001% and typically about 0.01-5% of the cleaning composition.

Effervescence

The cleaning pad may comprise effervescent actives. Suitable for this purpose are C2-20 organic mono- and poly-carboxylic acids such as alpha- and beta-hydroxycarboxylic acids; C2-20 organophosphorus acids such as phytic acid; C2-20 organosulfur acids such as toluene sulfonic acid; and peroxides such as hydrogen peroxide or materials that generate hydrogen peroxide in solution. Typical hydroxycarboxylic acids include adipic, glutaric, succinic, tartaric, malic, maleic, lactic, salicylic and citric acids as well as acid forming lactones such as gluconolactone and gluccrolactone. A suitable acid is citric acid. Also suitable as acid material may be encapsulated acids. Typical encapsulating material may include water-soluble synthetic or natural polymers such as polyacrylates (e.g. encapsulating polyacrylic acid), cellulosic gums, polyurethane and polyoxyalkylene polymers. By the term “acid” is meant any substance which when dissolved in deionized water at 1% concentration will have a pH of less than 7. These acids may also have a pH of less than 6.5 or less than 5. These acids may be at 25 C. in solid form, i.e. having melting points greater than 25 C. Concentrations of the acid should range from about 0.5 to about 80%, or from about 10 to about 65%, or from about 20 to about 45% by weight of the total composition.

Another component of the effervescent materials may be a alkaline material. The alkaline material may a substance that can generate a gas such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen or oxygen, i.e. effervesce, when contacted with water and the acidic material. Suitable alkaline materials are anhydrous salts of carbonates and bicarbonates, alkaline peroxides (e.g. sodium perborate and sodium percarbonate) and azides (e.g. sodium azide). An example of the alkaline material is sodium or potassium bicarbonate. Amounts of the alkaline material may range from about 1 to about 80%, or from about 5 to about 49%, or from about 15 to about 40%, or from about 25 to about 35% by weight of the total composition.

When the cleaning composition comprises effervescent materials, then the composition may comprise no more than 5%, or no more than 3.5%, or no more than 1% water by weight of the total composition. Water of hydration is not considered to be water for purposes of this calculation. However, water of hydration may be preferred or eliminated. The combined amount of acidic and alkaline materials may be greater than 1.5%, or from about 40 to about 95%, or from about 60 to about 80% by weight of the total composition.

Water

Since the composition is an aqueous composition, water can be, along with the solvent, a predominant ingredient. The water should be present at a level of less than 99.9%, more preferably less than about 99%, and most preferably, less than about 98%. Deionized water is preferred. Where the cleaning composition is concentrated, the water may be present in the composition at a concentration of less than about 85 wt. %.

Package

The packaging for the cleaning implement and cleaning pads can be less than 15 inches in width and 10.5 inches in height. The packaging for the cleaning pads can be from 5-10 inches in width and less than 10.5 inches in height. Suitable packaging includes an individual or multiple (containing several up to 10 pads) flexible pouch, such as one based on polyethylene. The pouch can be laminated, for instance with polyethylene terephthalate. The pouch can include a zipper or slider to allow the consumer easy access to the cleaning pads. Suitable packaging includes a thermoformed clamshell, for example out of polypropylene with a cardboard sleeve. Suitable packaging includes a tub with a lid, for example from thermoformed or injection molded polyethylene.

Method of Use

The cleaning pad can be used for cleaning, disinfectancy, or sanitization on inanimate, household surfaces, including floors, counter tops, furniture, windows, walls, and automobiles. Other surfaces include stainless steel, chrome, and shower enclosures. The cleaning pad can be packaged individually or together in canisters, tubs, etc. The cleaning pad can be used with the hand, or as part of a cleaning implement attached to a tool or motorized tool, such as one having a handle. Examples of tools using a pad include U.S. Pat. No.6,611,986 to Seals, WO00/71012 to Belt et al., U.S. patent application 2002/0129835 to Pieroni and Foley, and WO00/27271 to Policicchio et al.

EXAMPLES

The cleaning pad may be a laminate comprising a scrubbing layer, an interior absorbent layer, and an attachment layer or the absorbent layer may be absent. Examples of suitable pads and layers are given below.

The exterior scrubbing layer may be composed of 100% thermoplastic fibers, or may have minor amounts of other fibers. An example of the exterior scrubbing layer is given in Table I.

TABLE I
Basis weight 100 gsm
Fiber type Polypropylene
Fiber size 3.12 denier
Process Carded and needled
MD tensile and elongation 7655 g/in and 130%
CD tensile and elongation 3250 g/in and 150%
Supplier Texel - Buff 0100

The interior absorbent layer may be entirely spunbond thermoplastic, for example polypropylene. An example of a hydrophilic interior absorbent layer and its properties is given in Table II. An interior layer of greater than three layers may have superior absorbent properties to an interior layer of the same basis weight with fewer layers. An interior layer of greater than five layers may have superior absorbent properties to an interior layer of the same basis weight with fewer layers.

TABLE II
Basis weight 520 gsm
Fiber type Polypropylene
Fiber size 2.5 denier
Process Composite of 2 thermal bonded layer and 8
spunbonded layers ultrasonically bonded
MD tensile >25,000 g/in
CD tensile and elongation 13836 g/in and 106%
Supplier BBA Nonwovens - 30062

Examples of suitable attachment layers are given in Table III.

TABLE III
Fiber
Basis Thickness, thickness,
Supplier/Grade weight, gsm Process in denier
PGI/FB185 142 Carded, thermal 0.266 3 and 12
bonded PE/PET
bicomponent
Carlee/P3.60 122 Carded, thermal 0.327 3 and 6
bonded PET
Fybon/ 119 Carded, cross lap 0.214 15
thermal bond PE
and PET

TABLE III
Fiber
Basis Thickness, thickness,
Supplier/Grade weight, gsm Process in denier
Union 102 Carded, thermal 0.500 3 and 12
Wadding/ bonded with
3613688 needling PET
Filtration 112 Carded with spray 0.755 3 and 12
Group /VL- bond PET
WT3.3
Filtration 136 Carded with spray 1.500 6 and 12
Group /VL-04 bond PET

Compression

The substrate sample (5 in.5 in.) is measured for initial thickness in inches. Weight (1000 g) is applied to the sample and that sample is compressed for 10 seconds. The thickness of the compressed sample is measured. The compressed thickness is divided by the original thickness and the result given in percent compression. The samples were measured for compression and the results are given in Table IV.

TABLE IV
Thickness under
Sample Initial thickness, in. 1000 g % Compression
Sample A 0.5480 0.4690 86%
Sample B 0.8785 0.6075 69%

Sample A is a three-layer composite of an apertured film scrubbing layer, a spunbond PP absorbent layer, and a carded PET attachment layer of thickness 0.40 inches. Sample B is a dual density high-loft polyester attachment layer of thickness 0.78 inches with an aluminosilicate/latex binder scrubbing layer and no absorbent layer.

Examples of suitable cleaning compositions are provided in Table V. The cleaning compositions can be loaded on the cleaning substrate in a ratio by weight of from about 0.2 to 4.0 of cleaning composition to cleaning substrate.

TABLE V
Composition A Composition B Composition C
Alkyl 2.0 13.8
polyglycosidea
Alcohol 10.2
ethoxylateb
Sodium dodecyl 0.5 2.6
diphenyloxide
disulfonatec
Sodium lauryl 4.5 2.6 2.5
sulfated
Glycolic acid 8.1
Citric acid 1.5
Lactic acid 4.0
Sulfamic acid 1.0
Isopropanol 0.5
Dipropylene 2.0
glycol n-butyl
ethere
d-limonene 0.5
Blue Dye 0.006 0.006
Fragrance 1.5 1.00
Water balance balance balance
pH 2.2

aAPG 325N  from Cognis

bAlfonic 1012-5  from Vista Chemical

cDowfax 2A1  from Dow Chemical

dStepanol WAC  from Stepan Chemical

eDowanol DPnB  from Dow Chemical

Without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention, one of ordinary skill can make various changes and modifications to the invention to adapt it to various usages and conditions. As such, these changes and modifications are properly, equitably, and intended to be, within the full range of equivalence of the following claims.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8343908Jul 12, 2007Jan 1, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Foaming hand sponge with color change indicator
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/104.94, 15/210.1, 15/228
International ClassificationA47L13/17, B08B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB08B3/08, A61K8/731, A61K8/0208, B08B1/00, C11D3/2086, A61K2800/5426, A61L2202/17, A61L2/186, C11D3/042, A01N37/36, A61Q5/02, C11D17/049, A61Q5/12, A61K8/737, A01N59/02
European ClassificationA61K8/73C, C11D17/04F, A61Q5/02, A61K8/73R, A61K8/02C, B08B3/08, A61L2/18P, C11D3/20E5, A61Q5/12, B08B1/00, C11D3/04A, A01N37/36, A01N59/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 30, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: THE CLOROX COMPANY, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MITTLESTAEDT, LISA;CARTWRIGHT, BRIAN;KILKENNY, ANDREW;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:017151/0634
Effective date: 20050624