Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20050236739 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/062,420
Publication dateOct 27, 2005
Filing dateFeb 22, 2005
Priority dateMar 11, 1999
Also published asDE60021909D1, DE60021909T2, EP1228401A1, EP1228401B1, US6334960, US6719915, US20010040145, US20120133078, WO2000054107A1, WO2000054107A9
Publication number062420, 11062420, US 2005/0236739 A1, US 2005/236739 A1, US 20050236739 A1, US 20050236739A1, US 2005236739 A1, US 2005236739A1, US-A1-20050236739, US-A1-2005236739, US2005/0236739A1, US2005/236739A1, US20050236739 A1, US20050236739A1, US2005236739 A1, US2005236739A1
InventorsCarlton Willson, Matthew Colburn
Original AssigneeBoard Of Regents, The University Of Texas System
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Step and flash imprint lithography
US 20050236739 A1
Abstract
A method of forming a relief image in a structure comprising a substrate and a transfer layer formed thereon comprises covering the transfer layer with a polymerizable fluid composition, and then contacting the polymerizable fluid composition with a mold having a relief structure formed therein such that the polymerizable fluid composition fills the relief structure in the mold. The polymerizable fluid composition is subjected to conditions to polymerize polymerizable fluid composition and form a solidified polymeric material therefrom on the transfer layer. The mold is then separated from the solid polymeric material such that a replica of the relief structure in the mold is formed in the solidified polymeric material; and the transfer layer and the solidified polymeric material are subjected to an environment to selectively etch the transfer layer relative to the solidified polymeric material such that a relief image is formed in the transfer layer.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(18)
1. A method of forming a layer on a surface, said method comprising:
flowing a polymerizable composition between said surface and a mold in contact with said polymerizable composition by providing said polymerizable composition with a viscosity in a range 0.01 to 100 centipoise at 250 Celsius so that said polymerizable composition conforms to a shape of said mold;
solidifying said polymerizable composition, defining a solidified composition; and
increasing a distance between said solidified composition and said mold.
2. The method as recited in claim 1 wherein flowing further includes providing said polymerizable composition with a viscosity in a range of 1 to 5 centipoise, inclusive, at 25 Celsius.
3. The method as recited in claim 1 wherein flowing further includes applying said polymerizable composition to said surface and placing said mold proximate to said polymerizable fluid composition.
4. The method as recited in claim 1 wherein flowing further includes applying said polymerizable composition to said surface and pressing a side of said mold into said polymerizable fluid composition, with said side including a plurality of trenches, with solidifying further including providing said solidified material with a pattern complementary to a shape of said side.
5. The method as recited in claim 1 wherein flowing further includes applying said polymerizable composition to said surface and pressing a side of said mold into said polymerizable fluid composition, with said side including a plurality of trenches, and solidifying further includes providing said solidified material with a pattern complementary to a shape of said side and further including providing a substrate having a transfer layer disposed thereon, with said transfer layer defining said surface, and transferring said pattern into said transfer layer.
6. The method as recited in claim 5 further including transferring said pattern into said substrate.
7. A method of forming a layer on a surface, said method comprising:
placing a mold proximate to a surface with a polymerizable composition being disposed therebetween, said mold having a side with a plurality of trenches formed therein;
flowing said polymerizable composition between said surface and said mold to have said polymerizable composition fill said trenches conforming to a shape of said side by providing said polymerizable composition with a viscosity in a range 0.01 to 100 centipoise at 250 Celsius;
solidifying said polymerizable composition, defining a solidified composition having a solidified shape complementary to said shape of said side; and
increasing a distance between said solidified composition and said mold.
8. The method as recited in claim 7 wherein flowing further includes providing said polymerizable composition with a viscosity in a range of 1 to 5 centipoise, inclusive, at 25 Celsius.
9. The method as recited in claim 7 wherein flowing further includes applying said polymerizable composition to said surface and pressing said side into said polymerizable fluid composition.
10. The method as recited in claim 7 wherein flowing further includes applying said polymerizable composition to said surface and pressing said side of said mold into said polymerizable fluid composition, and further including providing a substrate having a transfer layer disposed thereon, with said transfer layer defining said surface, and transferring said pattern into said transfer layer.
11. The method as recited in claim 10 further including transferring said pattern into said substrate.
12. A composition, comprising:
a polymerizable material having a viscosity in a range of 0.01 to 100 centipoise at 25 Celsius.
13. The composition as recited in claim 12 wherein said polymerizable material has a viscosity in a range of 1 to 5 centipoise, inclusive, at 25 Celsius.
14. The composition as recited in claim 12 wherein said polymerizable material further includes organosilicons.
15. The composition as recited in claim 12 wherein said polymerizable material further includes silicon-containing material in an amount greater than about 8 to 10 percent by weight.
16. The composition as recited in claim 12 wherein said polymerizable composition further includes silicon-containing materials selected from a set of materials consisting essentially of silanes, silyl ethers, silyl esters, functionalized siloxanes, silsesquioxanes.
17. The composition as recited in claim 12 wherein said polymerizable material further includes components selected from a set consisting essentially of epoxy groups, ketene acetyl groups, acrylate groups and methacrylate groups.
18. The composition as recited in claim 12 wherein said polymerizable material further includes an initiator component to facilitate solidification of said polymerizable material in response to predetermined radiation.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    The present application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/978,285, filed Oct. 29, 2004, which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/806,051, filed Mar. 22, 2004, which is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/908,765, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,719,915, which is a continuation patent application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/266,663, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,334,960, all having Carlton Grant Willson and Matthew Earl Colburn listed as inventors.
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • [0002]
    The U.S. Government has a paid-up license in this invention and the right in limited circumstances to require the patent owner to license others on reasonable terms as provided for by the terms of MDA-972-97-3-0007 awarded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    The invention generally relates to using lithography techniques in fabricating various microstructures.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    There is currently a strong trend toward fabricating small structures and downsizing existing structures, which is commonly referred to as microfabrication. One area in which microfabrication has had a sizeable impact is in the microelectronic area. In particular, the downsizing of microelectronic structures has generally allowed the structures to be less expensive, have higher performance, exhibit reduced power consumption, and contain more components for a given dimension relative to conventional electronic devices. Although microfabrication has been widely active in the electronics industry, it has also been applied to other applications, such as biotechnology, optics, mechanical systems, sensing devices, and reactors.
  • [0005]
    Lithographic techniques are often employed in device microfabrication. See S. Wolf et al., Silicon Processing for the VLSI Era, Volume 1-Process Technology, (1986), pp. 407-413. Using microcircuit fabrication as an example, photoresist materials are applied to a substrate. Next, the resist layer is selectively exposed to a form of radiation. An exposure tool and mask are often used to affect the desired selective exposure. Patterns in the resist are formed when the substrate undergoes a subsequent “developing” step. The areas of resist remaining after development protect the substrate regions which they cover. Locations from which resist has been removed can be subjected to a variety of additive (e.g., lift-off) or subtractive (e.g., etching) processes that transfer the pattern onto the substrate surface.
  • [0006]
    There is a current move toward developing photolithography techniques that may allow for forming microscale devices with small features. Whiteside et al., Agnew. Chem. Int. Ed., 1998, 37, pp. 550-575 propose various techniques. One proposed technique involves the self-assembly of monolayers. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) typically form spontaneously by chemisorption and self-organization of functionalized, long-chain organic molecules onto the surfaces of appropriate substrates. SAMs are usually prepared by immersing a substrate in a solution containing a ligand that is reactive toward the surface, or by exposing the substrate to a vapor of the reactive species. The self-assembly of monolayers is potentially advantageous in that ordered structures may form rapidly.
  • [0007]
    An imprint lithography process that teaches producing nanostructures with 10 nm feature sizes is proposed by Chou et al., Microelectronic Engineering, 35, (1995), pp. 237-240. In particular, Chou et al. teach pressing a mold having nanostructures formed therein into a thin resist cast that is present on the surface of a substrate. The resist cast is designed to conform to the mold shape. The mold is then removed from the resist cast and the substrate having the resist cast present thereon is etched such that the mold pattern is transferred to the substrate.
  • [0008]
    Chou et al. teach using (poly)methyl methacrylate for the resist cast. The use of this material, however, may be disadvantageous in that it is potentially difficult to form some structures in varying pattern densities. Moreover, it is perceived that the etch selectivity may be potentially undesirable for common microelectronic device processing.
  • [0009]
    In view of the above, there is a need in the art for an imprint lithography process that allows for the formation of nanostructures having high resolution for a wide range of pattern densities. It would be particularly desirable if the nanostructures could be formed in a more efficient manner relative to prior art processes.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0010]
    The present invention addresses the potential problems of the prior art, and in one aspect provides a method of forming a relief image in a structure that comprises a substrate and a transfer layer formed thereon. The method applies to forming structures with nanoscale patterns. The method comprises covering the transfer layer with a polymerizable fluid composition; contacting the polymerizable fluid composition with a mold having a relief structure formed therein such that the polymerizable fluid composition fills the relief structure in the mold; subjecting the polymerizable fluid composition to conditions to polymerize the polymerizable fluid composition and to form a solidified polymeric material therefrom on the transfer layer; separating the mold from the solidified polymeric material such that a replica of the relief structure in the mold is formed in the solidified polymeric material; and finally subjecting the transfer layer and the solidified polymeric material to an environment that allows for the selective etching of the transfer layer relative to the solidified polymeric material such that a relief image is formed in the transfer layer.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0011]
    FIGS. 1A through 1D illustrate a method for forming a relief structure in a substrate in accordance with the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0012]
    The present invention now will be described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings and specification in which preferred embodiments of the invention are shown. This invention may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein. Rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete, and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art. In the drawings, the thickness of layers and regions are exaggerated for clarity. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout. It will also be understood that when a layer is referred to as being “on” another layer or substrate, it can be directly on the other layer or substrate, or intervening layers may also be present.
  • [0013]
    In one aspect, the invention relates to at least one method of forming a relief image in a structure comprising a substrate and a transfer layer formed thereon. The method comprises covering the transfer layer with a polymerizable fluid composition. The polymerizable fluid composition is then contacted by a mold having a relief structure formed therein such that the polymerizable fluid composition fills the relief structures in the mold. The polymerizable fluid composition is then subjected to conditions so as to polymerize the polymerizable fluid composition and to form a solidified polymeric material therefrom on the transfer layer. Stated differently, the polymerizable fluid composition becomes chemically crosslinked or cured so as to form a thermoset material (i.e., solidified polymeric material). The mold is then separated from the solidified polymeric material such that a replica of the relief structure in the mold is formed in the solidified polymeric material. The transfer layer and the solidified polymeric material are then subjected to an environment such that the transfer layer is selectively etched relative to the solidified polymeric material. As a result, a relief image is formed in the transfer layer. The method of the invention is advantageous in that a number of devices may be fabricated therefrom utilizing processes known to one skilled in the art, such as, but not limited to, microelectronic devices, information storage devices, printed wiring boards, flat panel displays, micromachines, and charge couple devices.
  • [0014]
    The substrate used in the above invention may comprise a number of different materials, such as, but not limited to, silicon, plastics, gallium arsenide, mercury telluride, and composites thereof. The transfer layers are formed from materials known in the art, such as, for example, thermoset polymers, thermoplastic polymers, polyepoxies, polyamides, polyurethanes, polycarbonates, polyesters, and combinations thereof. The transfer layer is fabricated in such a manner so as to possess a continuous, smooth, relatively defect-free surface that may exhibit excellent adhesion to the polymerizable fluid. As appreciated by one skilled in the art, the term “transfer layer” refers to a layer containing material that may be etched so as to transfer an image to the underlying substrate from the polymerizable fluid composition as described in detail herein.
  • [0015]
    The polymerizable fluid composition that is polymerized and solidified in accordance with the methods of the invention typically comprises a polymerizable material, a diluent, and other materials employed in polymerizable fluids, such as, but not limited to, to initiators and other materials. Polymerizable (or crosslinkable) materials which may be used in the methods of the invention preferably encompass various silicon-containing materials that are often present themselves in the forms of polymers. The silicon-containing materials include, but are not limited to, silanes, silyl ethers, silyl esters, functionalized siloxanes, silsesquioxanes, and mixtures thereof. Silicon-containing materials which are employed preferably are organosilicons. The silicon-containing materials preferably contain the element silicon in an amount greater than about 8 percent based on the weight of the polymerizable fluid composition, and more preferably greater than about 10 weight percent.
  • [0016]
    The polymers which may be present in the polymerizable fluid composition preferably include various reactive pendant groups. Examples of pendant groups include, but are not limited to, epoxy groups, ketene acetyl groups, acrylate groups, methacrylate groups, and combinations of the above. Although not wishing to be bound by any theory, it is believed that the polymerizable fluid composition may react accordingly to a variety of reaction mechanisms, such as, but not limited to, acid catalysis, free radical catalysis, or 2+2 photocycloaddition.
  • [0017]
    The mold used in the methods of the invention may be formed from various conventional methods. Typically, the materials are selected such that the mold is transparent which allows the polymerizable fluid composition covered by the mold to be exposed to an external radiation source. For example, the mold may comprise materials, such as, but not limited to, quartz, silicon, organic polymers, siloxanes polymers, borosilicate glass, fluorocarbon polymers, metal, and combinations of the above. Preferably, the mold comprises quartz. To facilitate release of the mold from the solid polymeric material, the mold may be treated with a surface modifying agent. Surface modifying agents which may be employed include those which are known in the art. An example of a surface modifying agent is a fluorocarbon silylating agent. These surface modifying agents or release materials my be applied, for example, from plasma sources, a Chemical Vapor Deposition method (CVD), such as analogs of paralene, or a treatment involving a solution.
  • [0018]
    It should be appreciated that one skilled in the art may select the substrate, the mold, the polymerizable fluid composition, the surface modifying agent, as well as any other materials, such that the method of the invention optimally functions according to the specific needs of the end user.
  • [0019]
    The methods of the invention will now be described in greater detail to the accompanying drawings in which a preferred embodiment of the invention is shown. FIG. 1A illustrates a step-by-step sequence for carrying out the method of the invention. A structure 30 is present which includes a substrate 10 having a transfer layer 20 positioned thereon. As shown, a mold 40 is aligned over transfer layer 20 such that a gap 50 is formed between mold 40 and transfer layer 20. Mold 40 has a nanoscale relief structure formed therein having an aspect ratio preferably ranging from about 0.1 to about 10, and more preferably from about 0.5 to about 2. Specifically, the relief structures in mold 40 preferably have a width w1 ranging from about 10 nm to about 5000 μm. The relief structures are separated from each other by a distance d1, preferably ranging from about 10 nm to about 5000 μm.
  • [0020]
    A polymerizable fluid composition 60 then contacts transfer layer 20 and mold 40 so as to fill gap 50 therebetween, as shown in FIG. 1B. Polymerizable fluid composition 60 may have a low viscosity such that it may fill gap 50 in an efficient manner. Preferably, the viscosity of polymerizable fluid composition 60 ranges from about 0.01 cps to about 1000 cps measured at 25 C., and more preferably from about 0.01 cps to about 1 cps measured at this same temperature.
  • [0021]
    Referring now to FIG. 1C, mold 40 is then moved closer to transfer layer 20 to expel excess polymerizable fluid composition 60 such that edges 41 a through 41 f of mold 40 come into contact with transfer layer 20. Polymerizable fluid composition 60 is then exposed to conditions to sufficiently polymerize the fluid. Preferably, polymerizable fluid composition 60 is exposed to radiation sufficient to polymerize the fluid composition and to form a solidified polymeric material, represented by 70 in FIG. 1C. More specifically, polymerizable fluid composition 60 is exposed to ultraviolet light, although other means for polymerizing the fluid may be employed, such as, for example, heat or other forms of radiation. The selection of a method of initiating the polymerization of the fluid composition is known to one skilled in the art, and typically depends on the specific application which is desired.
  • [0022]
    Mold 40 then leaves solidified polymeric material 70 on transfer layer 20, as shown in FIG. 1D. Transfer layer 20 is then selectively etched relative to solidified polymeric material 70 such that a relief image 80 corresponding to the image in mold 40 is formed in transfer layer 20. The etching step is depicted in FIG. 1C. The etching selectivity of transfer layer 20 relative to solidified polymeric material 70 preferably ranges from about 1.5 to about 100. As an example, the selective etching or the ion milling may be carried out by subjecting transfer layer 20 and solidified polymeric material 70 to an environment, such as, but not limited to, an argon ion stream, an oxygen-containing plasma, a reactive ion etching gas, a halogen-containing gas, a sulfur dioxide-containing gas, and combinations of the above.
  • [0023]
    Residual material, denoted as 90, which may be in the form of (1) a portion of polymerizable fluid composition 60; (2) a portion of solidified polymeric material 70; or (3) combinations of (1) and (2) might be present in the gaps within in relief image 80. The method of the invention therefore may further comprise the step of subjecting residual material 90 to conditions such that residual material 90 is removed (e.g., a clean-up etch). The clean-up etch may be carried out using known techniques. Additionally, it should be appreciated that this step may be carried out during various stages of the method of the invention. For example, the removal of the residual material may be carried out prior to the step of subjecting the transfer layer and the solidified polymeric material to an environment wherein the transfer layer is selectively etched relative to the solidified polymeric material. Various environments may be employed during the clean-up etch, such as, for example, argon ion milling, fluorine-containing plasma, reactive ion etch gas, and combinations thereof.
  • [0024]
    In the drawings and specification, there have been disclosed typical preferred embodiments of the invention, and although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for the purposes of limitation. The scope of the invention being set forth in the following claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3810874 *Sep 8, 1970May 14, 1974Minnesota Mining & MfgPolymers prepared from poly(perfluoro-alkylene oxide) compounds
US4512848 *Feb 6, 1984Apr 23, 1985Exxon Research And Engineering Co.Procedure for fabrication of microstructures over large areas using physical replication
US4614667 *Nov 12, 1985Sep 30, 1986Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyComposite low surface energy liner of perfluoropolyether
US4617238 *Aug 7, 1985Oct 14, 1986General Electric CompanyVinyloxy-functional organopolysiloxane compositions
US4731155 *Apr 15, 1987Mar 15, 1988General Electric CompanyProcess for forming a lithographic mask
US4826943 *Jul 27, 1987May 2, 1989Oki Electric Industry Co., Ltd.Negative resist material
US4931351 *Jul 13, 1989Jun 5, 1990Eastman Kodak CompanyBilayer lithographic process
US4959252 *Oct 10, 1989Sep 25, 1990Rhone-Poulenc ChimieHighly oriented thermotropic optical disc member
US5028366 *Jan 12, 1988Jul 2, 1991Air Products And Chemicals, Inc.Water based mold release compositions for making molded polyurethane foam
US5110514 *May 1, 1989May 5, 1992Soane Technologies, Inc.Controlled casting of a shrinkable material
US5126006 *May 31, 1991Jun 30, 1992International Business Machines Corp.Plural level chip masking
US5206983 *Jun 24, 1991May 4, 1993Wisconsin Alumni Research FoundationMethod of manufacturing micromechanical devices
US5240550 *Sep 10, 1991Aug 31, 1993U.S. Philips Corp.Method of forming at least one groove in a substrate layer
US5242711 *Aug 16, 1991Sep 7, 1993Rockwell International Corp.Nucleation control of diamond films by microlithographic patterning
US5259926 *Sep 24, 1992Nov 9, 1993Hitachi, Ltd.Method of manufacturing a thin-film pattern on a substrate
US5318870 *Jul 31, 1992Jun 7, 1994Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyMethod of patterning a phenolic polymer film without photoactive additive through exposure to high energy radiation below 225 nm with subsequent organometallic treatment and the associated imaged article
US5331020 *Aug 16, 1993Jul 19, 1994Dow Corning LimitedOrganosilicon compounds and compositions containing them
US5425848 *Mar 15, 1994Jun 20, 1995U.S. Philips CorporationMethod of providing a patterned relief of cured photoresist on a flat substrate surface and device for carrying out such a method
US5439766 *Nov 13, 1992Aug 8, 1995International Business Machines CorporationComposition for photo imaging
US5480047 *May 12, 1994Jan 2, 1996Sharp Kabushiki KaishaMethod for forming a fine resist pattern
US5512131 *Oct 4, 1993Apr 30, 1996President And Fellows Of Harvard CollegeFormation of microstamped patterns on surfaces and derivative articles
US5527662 *Jan 24, 1994Jun 18, 1996Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Process for forming fine pattern
US5542978 *Jun 10, 1994Aug 6, 1996Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc.Apparatus for applying a surfactant to mold surfaces
US5545367 *May 27, 1993Aug 13, 1996Soane Technologies, Inc.Rapid prototype three dimensional stereolithography
US5594042 *Aug 17, 1994Jan 14, 1997Dow Corning CorporationRadiation curable compositions containing vinyl ether functional polyorganosiloxanes
US5601641 *Dec 15, 1995Feb 11, 1997Tse Industries, Inc.Mold release composition with polybutadiene and method of coating a mold core
US5629095 *May 18, 1995May 13, 1997Dow Corning CorporationRadiation curable compositions containing vinyl ether functional polysiloxanes and methods for the preparation
US5669303 *Mar 4, 1996Sep 23, 1997MotorolaApparatus and method for stamping a surface
US5725788 *Mar 4, 1996Mar 10, 1998MotorolaApparatus and method for patterning a surface
US5772905 *Nov 15, 1995Jun 30, 1998Regents Of The University Of MinnesotaNanoimprint lithography
US5776748 *Jun 6, 1996Jul 7, 1998President And Fellows Of Harvard CollegeMethod of formation of microstamped patterns on plates for adhesion of cells and other biological materials, devices and uses therefor
US5820769 *May 24, 1995Oct 13, 1998Regents Of The University Of MinnesotaMethod for making magnetic storage having discrete elements with quantized magnetic moments
US5861467 *May 18, 1993Jan 19, 1999Dow Corning CorporationRadiation curable siloxane compositions containing vinyl ether functionality and methods for their preparation
US5888650 *Jun 3, 1996Mar 30, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyTemperature-responsive adhesive article
US5895263 *Dec 19, 1996Apr 20, 1999International Business Machines CorporationProcess for manufacture of integrated circuit device
US5948470 *Apr 22, 1998Sep 7, 1999Harrison; ChristopherMethod of nanoscale patterning and products made thereby
US5956216 *Dec 10, 1996Sep 21, 1999Regents Of The University Of MinnesotaMagnetic storage having discrete elements with quantized magnetic moments
US5965237 *Oct 20, 1997Oct 12, 1999Novartis AgMicrostructure device
US6046056 *Dec 6, 1996Apr 4, 2000Caliper Technologies CorporationHigh throughput screening assay systems in microscale fluidic devices
US6074827 *Feb 5, 1998Jun 13, 2000Aclara Biosciences, Inc.Microfluidic method for nucleic acid purification and processing
US6117708 *Feb 5, 1998Sep 12, 2000Micron Technology, Inc.Use of residual organic compounds to facilitate gate break on a carrier substrate for a semiconductor device
US6132632 *Sep 11, 1997Oct 17, 2000International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for achieving etch rate uniformity in a reactive ion etcher
US6133396 *Jan 9, 1998Oct 17, 2000The Regents Of The University Of MichiganHighly processable hyperbranched polymer precursors to controlled chemical and phase purity fully dense SiC
US6168845 *Jan 19, 1999Jan 2, 2001International Business Machines CorporationPatterned magnetic media and method of making the same using selective oxidation
US6180239 *Jul 8, 1996Jan 30, 2001President And Fellows Of Harvard CollegeMicrocontact printing on surfaces and derivative articles
US6190929 *Jul 23, 1999Feb 20, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Methods of forming semiconductor devices and methods of forming field emission displays
US6204343 *Dec 11, 1996Mar 20, 20013M Innovative Properties CompanyRoom temperature curable resin
US6218316 *Oct 22, 1998Apr 17, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Planarization of non-planar surfaces in device fabrication
US6274294 *Feb 3, 1999Aug 14, 2001Electroformed Stents, Inc.Cylindrical photolithography exposure process and apparatus
US6304364 *Jun 11, 1997Oct 16, 2001President & Fellows Of Harvard CollegeElastomeric light valves
US6309580 *Jun 30, 1998Oct 30, 2001Regents Of The University Of MinnesotaRelease surfaces, particularly for use in nanoimprint lithography
US6334960 *Mar 11, 1999Jan 1, 2002Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemStep and flash imprint lithography
US6344105 *Jun 30, 1999Feb 5, 2002Lam Research CorporationTechniques for improving etch rate uniformity
US6355198 *Jan 8, 1998Mar 12, 2002President And Fellows Of Harvard CollegeMethod of forming articles including waveguides via capillary micromolding and microtransfer molding
US6391217 *Dec 22, 2000May 21, 2002University Of MassachusettsMethods and apparatus for forming submicron patterns on films
US6468642 *Dec 2, 1998Oct 22, 2002N.V. Bekaert S.A.Fluorine-doped diamond-like coatings
US6503914 *Oct 23, 2000Jan 7, 2003Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemThienopyrimidine-based inhibitors of the Src family
US6517977 *Mar 28, 2001Feb 11, 2003Motorola, Inc.Lithographic template and method of formation and use
US6517995 *Mar 14, 2000Feb 11, 2003Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyFabrication of finely featured devices by liquid embossing
US6518168 *Aug 16, 1996Feb 11, 2003President And Fellows Of Harvard CollegeSelf-assembled monolayer directed patterning of surfaces
US6518189 *Oct 29, 1999Feb 11, 2003Regents Of The University Of MinnesotaMethod and apparatus for high density nanostructures
US6541356 *May 21, 2001Apr 1, 2003International Business Machines CorporationUltimate SIMOX
US6544594 *Mar 6, 2002Apr 8, 2003Nano-Tex, LlcWater-repellent and soil-resistant finish for textiles
US6565776 *Jun 12, 2000May 20, 2003Bausch & Lomb IncorporatedLens molds with protective coatings for production of contact lenses and other ophthalmic products
US6580172 *Mar 21, 2002Jun 17, 2003Motorola, Inc.Lithographic template and method of formation and use
US6696220 *Oct 12, 2001Feb 24, 2004Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemTemplate for room temperature, low pressure micro-and nano-imprint lithography
US6713238 *Oct 8, 1999Mar 30, 2004Stephen Y. ChouMicroscale patterning and articles formed thereby
US6719915 *Jul 19, 2001Apr 13, 2004Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemStep and flash imprint lithography
US6721529 *Sep 21, 2001Apr 13, 2004Nexpress Solutions LlcRelease agent donor member having fluorocarbon thermoplastic random copolymer overcoat
US6737489 *May 21, 2001May 18, 20043M Innovative Properties CompanyPolymers containing perfluorovinyl ethers and applications for such polymers
US6774183 *Apr 27, 2000Aug 10, 2004Bostik, Inc.Copolyesters having improved retained adhesion
US6776094 *Oct 1, 1998Aug 17, 2004President & Fellows Of Harvard CollegeKit For Microcontact Printing
US6790905 *Oct 9, 2001Sep 14, 2004E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyHighly repellent carpet protectants
US6802870 *Dec 3, 2003Oct 12, 20043M Innovative Properties CompanyMethod for imparting soil and stain resistance to carpet
US6809356 *Nov 21, 2002Oct 26, 2004Regents Of The University Of MinnesotaMethod and apparatus for high density nanostructures
US20020042027 *Sep 24, 2001Apr 11, 2002Chou Stephen Y.Microscale patterning and articles formed thereby
US20020132482 *May 7, 2002Sep 19, 2002Chou Stephen Y.Fluid pressure imprint lithography
US20030034329 *Sep 16, 2002Feb 20, 2003Chou Stephen Y.Lithographic method for molding pattern with nanoscale depth
US20030080471 *Sep 16, 2002May 1, 2003Chou Stephen Y.Lithographic method for molding pattern with nanoscale features
US20030080472 *Sep 16, 2002May 1, 2003Chou Stephen Y.Lithographic method with bonded release layer for molding small patterns
US20040007799 *Jul 11, 2002Jan 15, 2004Choi Byung JinFormation of discontinuous films during an imprint lithography process
US20040008334 *Jul 11, 2002Jan 15, 2004Sreenivasan Sidlgata V.Step and repeat imprint lithography systems
US20040009673 *Jul 11, 2002Jan 15, 2004Sreenivasan Sidlgata V.Method and system for imprint lithography using an electric field
US20040021254 *Aug 1, 2002Feb 5, 2004Sreenivasan Sidlgata V.Alignment methods for imprint lithography
US20040021866 *Aug 1, 2002Feb 5, 2004Watts Michael P.C.Scatterometry alignment for imprint lithography
US20040022888 *Aug 1, 2002Feb 5, 2004Sreenivasan Sidlgata V.Alignment systems for imprint lithography
US20040036201 *May 27, 2003Feb 26, 2004Princeton UniversityMethods and apparatus of field-induced pressure imprint lithography
US20040046271 *Sep 5, 2002Mar 11, 2004Watts Michael P.C.Functional patterning material for imprint lithography processes
US20040046288 *Mar 17, 2003Mar 11, 2004Chou Stephen Y.Laset assisted direct imprint lithography
US20040065252 *Oct 4, 2002Apr 8, 2004Sreenivasan Sidlgata V.Method of forming a layer on a substrate to facilitate fabrication of metrology standards
US20040110856 *Dec 4, 2002Jun 10, 2004Young Jung GunPolymer solution for nanoimprint lithography to reduce imprint temperature and pressure
US20040118809 *Dec 9, 2003Jun 24, 2004Chou Stephen Y.Microscale patterning and articles formed thereby
US20040124566 *Jul 11, 2002Jul 1, 2004Sreenivasan Sidlgata V.Step and repeat imprint lithography processes
US20040131718 *Aug 8, 2003Jul 8, 2004Princeton UniversityLithographic apparatus for fluid pressure imprint lithography
US20040137734 *Nov 12, 2003Jul 15, 2004Princeton UniversityCompositions and processes for nanoimprinting
US20040156108 *Dec 10, 2003Aug 12, 2004Chou Stephen Y.Articles comprising nanoscale patterns with reduced edge roughness and methods of making same
US20040170770 *Feb 27, 2003Sep 2, 2004Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method to reduce adhesion between a polymerizable layer and a substrate employing a fluorine-containing layer
US20040192041 *Jun 19, 2003Sep 30, 2004Jun-Ho JeongUV nanoimprint lithography process using elementwise embossed stamp and selectively additive pressurization
US20040197843 *Jul 25, 2002Oct 7, 2004Chou Stephen Y.Nanochannel arrays and their preparation and use for high throughput macromolecular analysis
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7307118 *Feb 28, 2005Dec 11, 2007Molecular Imprints, Inc.Composition to reduce adhesion between a conformable region and a mold
US7670529Nov 30, 2006Mar 2, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method and system for double-sided patterning of substrates
US7670530Jan 19, 2007Mar 2, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Patterning substrates employing multiple chucks
US7691313Nov 30, 2006Apr 6, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method for expelling gas positioned between a substrate and a mold
US7708926Feb 5, 2008May 4, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Capillary imprinting technique
US7759407Jul 22, 2005Jul 20, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Composition for adhering materials together
US7837921Oct 5, 2005Nov 23, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method of providing desirable wetting and release characteristics between a mold and a polymerizable composition
US7906058Dec 16, 2005Mar 15, 2011Molecular Imprints, Inc.Bifurcated contact printing technique
US7939131Aug 16, 2004May 10, 2011Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method to provide a layer with uniform etch characteristics
US7981481Dec 8, 2006Jul 19, 2011Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method for controlling distribution of fluid components on a body
US8012395May 12, 2009Sep 6, 2011Molecular Imprints, Inc.Template having alignment marks formed of contrast material
US8097539 *Jan 8, 2009Jan 17, 2012Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaImprint mask manufacturing method for nanoimprinting
US8119052Oct 31, 2008Feb 21, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Drop pattern generation for imprint lithography
US8142702Jun 16, 2008Mar 27, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Solvent-assisted layer formation for imprint lithography
US8142703Dec 17, 2008Mar 27, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Imprint lithography method
US8142850Mar 28, 2007Mar 27, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Patterning a plurality of fields on a substrate to compensate for differing evaporation times
US8152511Mar 13, 2009Apr 10, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Composition to reduce adhesion between a conformable region and a mold
US8187515Mar 31, 2009May 29, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Large area roll-to-roll imprint lithography
US8211214Feb 5, 2008Jul 3, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Single phase fluid imprint lithography method
US8215946Oct 20, 2009Jul 10, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Imprint lithography system and method
US8268220Oct 15, 2010Sep 18, 2012Molecular Imprints, Inc.Imprint lithography method
US8361371Feb 6, 2009Jan 29, 2013Molecular Imprints, Inc.Extrusion reduction in imprint lithography
US8502171Dec 15, 2011Aug 6, 2013Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaMask manufacturing device
US8512797Oct 16, 2009Aug 20, 2013Molecular Imprints, Inc.Drop pattern generation with edge weighting
US8557351Jul 22, 2005Oct 15, 2013Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method for adhering materials together
US8586126Oct 15, 2009Nov 19, 2013Molecular Imprints, Inc.Robust optimization to generate drop patterns in imprint lithography which are tolerant of variations in drop volume and drop placement
US8637587Sep 7, 2011Jan 28, 2014Molecular Imprints, Inc.Release agent partition control in imprint lithography
US8647554Jul 13, 2010Feb 11, 2014Molecular Imprints, Inc.Residual layer thickness measurement and correction
US8653483Feb 15, 2013Feb 18, 2014Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaMask manufacturing device
US8658537 *Feb 15, 2013Feb 25, 2014Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaMask manufacturing method for nanoimprinting
US8808808Apr 12, 2007Aug 19, 2014Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method for imprint lithography utilizing an adhesion primer layer
US8945444Dec 3, 2008Feb 3, 2015Canon Nanotechnologies, Inc.High throughput imprint based on contact line motion tracking control
US9223202Jul 9, 2007Dec 29, 2015Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemMethod of automatic fluid dispensing for imprint lithography processes
US20050270312 *Jun 2, 2005Dec 8, 2005Molecular Imprints, Inc.Fluid dispensing and drop-on-demand dispensing for nano-scale manufacturing
US20070017631 *Jul 22, 2005Jan 25, 2007Molecular Imprints, Inc.Method for adhering materials together
US20070231981 *Mar 28, 2007Oct 4, 2007Molecular Imprints, Inc.Patterning a Plurality of Fields on a Substrate to Compensate for Differing Evaporation Times
US20080174046 *Feb 5, 2008Jul 24, 2008Molecular Imprints Inc.Capillary Imprinting Technique
US20080308971 *Jun 16, 2008Dec 18, 2008Molecular Imprints, Inc.Solvent-Assisted Layer Formation for Imprint Lithography
US20090014917 *Jul 9, 2008Jan 15, 2009Molecular Imprints, Inc.Drop Pattern Generation for Imprint Lithography
US20090115110 *Oct 31, 2008May 7, 2009Molecular Imprints, Inc.Drop Pattern Generation for Imprint Lithography
US20090140445 *Dec 3, 2008Jun 4, 2009Molecular ImprintsHigh Throughput Imprint Based on Contact Line Motion Tracking Control
US20090200710 *Feb 6, 2009Aug 13, 2009Molecular Imprints, Inc.Extrusion reduction in imprint lithography
US20090243153 *Mar 31, 2009Oct 1, 2009Molecular Imprints, Inc.Large Area Roll-To-Roll Imprint Lithography
US20090272875 *Mar 13, 2009Nov 5, 2009Molecular Imprints, Inc.Composition to Reduce Adhesion Between a Conformable Region and a Mold
US20100003830 *Jan 8, 2009Jan 7, 2010Masamitsu ItohImprint mask manufacturing method, imprint mask manufacturing device, and semiconductor device manufacturing method
US20100098859 *Oct 16, 2009Apr 22, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Drop Pattern Generation with Edge Weighting
US20100109195 *Nov 4, 2009May 6, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Release agent partition control in imprint lithography
US20100112220 *Oct 29, 2009May 6, 2010Molecular Imprints, Inc.Dispense system set-up and characterization
US20110031651 *Oct 15, 2010Feb 10, 2011Molecular Imprints, Inc.Desirable wetting and release between an imprint lithography mold and a polymerizable composition
US20110215503 *May 12, 2011Sep 8, 2011Molecular Imprints, Inc.Reducing Adhesion between a Conformable Region and a Mold
CN102508408A *Oct 27, 2011Jun 20, 2012无锡英普林纳米科技有限公司Dual-solidification nanoimprint lithography transporting layer material
CN103378231A *Apr 23, 2013Oct 30, 2013奈米晶光电股份有限公司Method for production of selective growth masks using imprint lithography
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/327
International ClassificationG03F7/038, H01L21/3065, H01L21/027, H01L21/30, B81C1/00, H01L21/302, H05K3/06, G03F7/00, B29C31/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S977/897, Y10S977/887, H05K3/061, B29C43/003, B29C2043/025, B82Y40/00, G03F7/0002, B82Y10/00, B29C43/021
European ClassificationB29C43/00B, B82Y10/00, B82Y40/00, G03F7/00A, B29C43/02B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 2, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: BOARD OF REGENTS, THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SYSTEM,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:COLBURN, MATTHEW E;WILLSON, CARLTON GRANT;REEL/FRAME:016338/0814;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050209 TO 20050214