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Publication numberUS20050252145 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/117,066
Publication dateNov 17, 2005
Filing dateApr 28, 2005
Priority dateApr 29, 2004
Also published asCN1946909A, EP1740783A1, WO2005108698A1
Publication number11117066, 117066, US 2005/0252145 A1, US 2005/252145 A1, US 20050252145 A1, US 20050252145A1, US 2005252145 A1, US 2005252145A1, US-A1-20050252145, US-A1-2005252145, US2005/0252145A1, US2005/252145A1, US20050252145 A1, US20050252145A1, US2005252145 A1, US2005252145A1
InventorsRobert MacDonald, William Dawson
Original AssigneeMacdonald Robert A, Dawson William B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall block system
US 20050252145 A1
Abstract
A system of blocks having a stacking block and a corner block configured to fit together in the construction of a wall. The blocks interlock with each other so that no mortar is required in the construction of a wall. Additional pin reinforcement can be added.
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Claims(25)
1. A block system for constructing a wall having a corner, the system comprising:
a plurality of stacking blocks having opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces, side surfaces and end surfaces together defining a block body, at least one of the top and bottom surfaces having a projection extending therefrom, the other of the top and bottom surfaces having a channel formed therein, the stacking blocks being configured to be stacked in courses to form a wall, such that a projection extending from a stacking block in a first course is received in a groove of a stacking block in an adjacent course; and
a plurality of corner blocks having opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block, side surfaces of the corner block and end surfaces of the corner block together defining a corner block body, the corner blocks being configured to be stacked in courses to form a corner of the wall, at least one of the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block having a recessed portion configured to receive a projection extending from a stacking block, the other of the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block being substantially smooth.
2. The block system of claim 1, wherein the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block each have a pinhole.
3. The block system of claim 2, wherein the corner blocks are configured such that, in forming the wall, a pinhole in a corner block in a first course receives a pin placed in a pinhole of a corner block in an adjacent course.
4. The block system according to claim 1, wherein the recessed portions on the stacking blocks are configured to form left-hand and right-hand wall blocks.
5. The block system according to claim 1, wherein the stacking block is a half-sized stacking block.
6. The block system according to claim 5, wherein, in forming the wall, the half-sized stacking block is configured to be used where the wall meets a vertical surface.
7. A block system for constructing a wall having a corner, the system comprising:
a plurality of stacking blocks having opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces, side surfaces and end surfaces together defining a block body, the top surface having a projection extending therefrom, the bottom surface having a channel formed therein, the stacking blocks being configured to be stacked in courses to form a wall such that a projection extending from a stacking block in a first course is received in a groove of a stacking block in an adjacent overlying course; and
a plurality of corner blocks having opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block, side surfaces of the corner block and end surfaces of the corner block together defining a corner block body, the corner blocks being configured to be stacked in courses to form a corner of the wall, the bottom surface of the corner block having a recessed portion configured to receive a projection extending from a stacking block, the top surface of the corner block being substantially smooth.
8. The block system of claim 7, wherein the corner block has a pinhole.
9. The block system of claim 8, wherein the corner blocks are configured such that, in forming the wall, the pinhole in a corner block in a first course receives a pin placed in the pinhole of a corner block in an adjacent course.
10. The block system according to claim 7, wherein the recessed portions on the corner blocks are configured to form left-hand and right-hand corner blocks.
11. The block system according to claim 7, wherein the stacking block is a half-sized stacking block.
12. The block system according to claim 11, wherein, in forming the wall, the half-sized stacking block is configured to be used where the wall meets a vertical surface.
13. A corner block comprising:
opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces, side surfaces and end surfaces together defining a block body, the corner block being configured to be stacked in courses to form a corner of a wall, at least one of the top and bottom surfaces having a recessed portion configured to receive a projection extending from a stacking block, the other of the top and bottom surfaces being substantially smooth;
wherein the stacking block has opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces of the stacking block, side surfaces of the stacking block and end surfaces of the stacking block together defining a stacking block body, at least one of the top and bottom surfaces of the stacking block having a projection extending therefrom, the other of the top and bottom surfaces of the stacking block having a channel formed therein, the stacking blocks being configured to be stacked in courses to form the wall, such that a projection extending from a stacking block in a first course is received in a groove of a stacking block in an adjacent course.
14. The corner block of claim 13, further having a pinhole.
15. The corner block of claim 14, wherein, in forming the wall, the pinhole in a corner block in a first course receives a pin placed in the pinhole of a corner block in an adjacent course.
16. The corner block according to claim 13, wherein the recessed portions on the corner blocks are configured to form left-hand and right-hand corner blocks.
17. A column comprising:
a plurality of corner blocks having opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block, side surfaces of the corner block and end surfaces of the corner block together defining a corner block body, the corner blocks being configured to be stacked in courses to form the column, at least one of the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block having a recessed portion configured to receive a projection extending from a stacking block, the other of the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block being substantially smooth; and
a plurality of stacking blocks having opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces of the stacking blocks, side surfaces of the stacking blocks and end surfaces of the stacking blocks together defining a stacking block body, at least one of the top and bottom surfaces of the stacking blocks having a projection extending therefrom, the other of the top and bottom surfaces of the stacking blocks having a channel formed therein, the stacking blocks being configured to be stacked in courses to form the column, such that a projection extending from a stacking block in a first course is received in a groove of a stacking block in a second course adjacent the first course;
wherein the first course has at least one first stacking block placed next to at least one first corner block; and
the second course has at least one second stacking block placed next to at least one second corner block, the second corner block is rotated about a vertical axis of the column relative to orientation of the first corner block, so that the recessed portion in the second corner block fits over the projection of the first stacking block.
18. The column of claim 17, wherein the second corner block is rotated 90 degrees about a vertical axis of the column relative to orientation of the first corner block.
19. The column of claim 17, wherein each corner block has a pinhole.
20. The column of claim 19, wherein the pinhole in a first corner block receives a pin placed in a pinhole of the second corner block.
21. A wall having a corner comprising:
a plurality of stacking blocks having opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces, side surfaces and end surfaces together defining a block body, at least one of the top and bottom surfaces having a projection extending therefrom, the other of the top and bottom surfaces having a channel formed therein; and
a plurality of corner blocks having opposed top and bottom surfaces, opposed first and second side surfaces and opposed first and second end surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block, side surfaces of the corner block and end surfaces of the corner block together defining a corner block body;
wherein the stacking blocks are configured to be stacked in courses to form the wall, such that a projection extending from a stacking block in a first course is received in a groove of a stacking block in an adjacent course; and
wherein the corner blocks are configured to be stacked in courses to form the corner of the wall, at least one of the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block having a recessed portion configured to receive a projection extending from a stacking block, the other of the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block being substantially smooth.
22. The wall having a corner according to claim 21, wherein the top and bottom surfaces of the corner block each have a pinhole.
23. The wall having a corner according to claim 22, wherein a pinhole in a corner block in a first course receives a pin placed in a pinhole of a corner block in an adjacent course.
24. The wall having a corner according to claim 21, wherein the stacking block is a half-sized stacking block.
25. The wall having a corner according to claim 24, wherein, in forming the wall, the half-sized stacking block is to be used where the wall meets a vertical surface.
Description

This application claims the benefit of provisional application Ser. No. 60/566,554, filed Apr. 29, 2004, the contents of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

A system of wall blocks is described. In particular, modular wall blocks used to construct walls and other structures having corners are described.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Modular blocks used to build walls, columns, pillars and other structures are known in the art. Such blocks can be installed without special skill and are desirable because they are a convenient size to handle and have low installation costs. However, current modular block systems have numerous disadvantages. For example, these blocks typically must be used with masonry mortar to improve the structural integrity of a wall. Further, it is difficult to form structurally sound corners, columns or pilasters with such blocks.

The look of weathered natural stone is very appealing for walls, columns and other structures. The art provides several methods to produce concrete blocks having an appearance that to varying degrees mimics the look of natural stone. One well known method is to split the block during the manufacturing process so that the front face of the block has a fractured concrete surface that looks like a natural split rock. In another commonly used method, blocks are individually formed in a mold and the surfaces are textured by removal of the mold. Another method is to form the blocks in pairs and to split the block, resulting in a roughened surface. Additional machine texturing processes can also be applied. Blocks produced in this way can be used to construct free-standing walls and walls having sharp corners (i.e., 90 degree angles) with a natural appearance on all exposed sides.

A need in this art remains for a block system that is easy to install and can be used to construct mortarless and sturdy walls, wall corners, fences, columns, pillars, pilasters and other structures having the desired appearance.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention is a system of blocks comprising a stacking block and a corner block configured to fit together in the construction of a wall. The blocks interlock with each other so that no mortar is required in the construction of a wall. Additional pin reinforcement can be added.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a stacking block according to this invention.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the stacking block of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 3A and 3B are end views of the stacking block of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 4A and 4B are top and end views, respectively, of a stacking block pair as formed in a mold.

FIGS. 5A and 5B are perspective and top views, respectively, of an alternate stacking block of this invention.

FIGS. 6A and 6B are perspective and top views, respectively, of an alternate stacking block of this invention.

FIG. 7A is a bottom perspective view of a corner block according to this invention, FIG. 7B is a bottom view, FIG. 7C is a top perspective view of the corner block with the recessed area and pinhole shown in phantom and FIG. 7D is a top view.

FIG. 8A is a bottom perspective view of a corner block according to this invention, FIG. 8B is a top perspective view of the corner block with the recessed area and pinhole shown in phantom, FIG. 8C is a bottom view, and FIG. 8D is a top view.

FIGS. 9A and 9B are top and side views, respectively, of the corner blocks of FIGS. 7 and 8 after they are removed from a mold.

FIGS. 10A to 10C are perspective views of portions of a column, a corner of a wall, and a wall respectively, constructed from the stacking and corner blocks of this invention.

FIGS. 11A and 11B are perspective views of stacking block pairs, and FIGS. 11C and 11D are perspective views of portions of walls using the stacking block pairs.

FIG. 12 is an end view of two sets of stacking blocks after they are removed from their molds.

FIG. 13A is a perspective view of a capping block and FIGS. 13B and 13C are end views of a stacking block with a capping layer.

FIGS. 14A to 14D are end views of capping layers.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In this application, “upper” and “lower” refer to the placement of a block when a structure is built. The lower or bottom surface of blocks is the surface that faces the ground.

The blocks of this invention may be made of a rugged, weather resistant material, such as concrete. Other suitable materials include plastic, reinforced fibers such as fiberglass, wood, metal and stone. Rather than being formed of a solid mass of material, the blocks may be hollow. This is an advantage in saving materials and in handling the block. Such hollow shell blocks can be formed of urethane or concrete and by casting techniques.

The surface of the blocks may be smooth or may have a roughened appearance, such as that of natural stone. The blocks are formed in molds and various textures can be formed on the surface, as is known in the art.

The blocks of this invention have interlocking elements or projections to hold the blocks in place and to eliminate the need for mortar when the blocks are stacked on each other. In conventionally manufactured blocks, the height of blocks tends to vary somewhat and that variation is counteracted by using mortar to level out rows and stacks of blocks. The preferred blocks for use in this invention are formed on end (rather than on a side) which permits the blocks to be formed with great precision, thus allowing blocks to interlock without mortar. Suitable (and preferred) stacking blocks are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,176,049 (Crant et al.), hereby incorporated herein by reference. The stacking blocks have opposing top and bottom surfaces that have corresponding channels and projections so that the blocks interlock when stacked. The stacking blocks of this invention may have various dimensions.

This invention is a block system incorporating two different types of blocks: a stacking block and a corner block. Each of these blocks comes in two forms, a right handed block and a left handed block, that are used in alternating courses during construction of a wall as will be described in more detail hereafter. The first type of block, the stacking block, has a projection on the top surface that interlocks with corresponding grooves on the bottom surface of an overlying block. This block may have various dimensions. The stacking block is provided in full and half sizes, and each are provided in right and left handed versions. The block is configured so that blocks can stack together evenly. The second type of block, the corner block, is a rectangular block having a recessed area configured to interlock with the stacking block.

Stacking blocks which are positioned adjacent corner blocks are provided with projections that have at least one recessed portion so that a stacking block on one side of a corner can accommodate the bottom surface of an overlying stacking block on the other side of the corner in a manner that will be described more fully hereafter. The corner block also is provided with a pinhole for use with a pin connection system as described more fully hereafter.

The block system of this invention may take various forms. In its most basic form the system includes left and right stacking blocks as shown in FIGS. 4A and 4B and left and right corner blocks as shown in FIGS. 7A and 8A, respectively. Alternatively, the left and right stacking blocks can be combined into a single stacking block that incorporates two recesses (i.e., the right and left-handed recesses) into the top projection of the block. A wall or column can be constructed with this basic system using either left or right stacking blocks randomly to form the wall or column except at positions adjacent corner blocks where right and left stacking blocks would be used in alternate courses as described hereafter. Corner portions of the wall or column can be formed by using alternating left and right corner blocks, also as described hereafter.

The system may additionally include another block embodiment, a half sized stacking block as shown in FIGS. 6A and 6B. This half-sized stacking block is used, for example, where a wall meets a vertical surface in order to maintain an offset running bond pattern of blocks in the wall.

The system may additionally include double wide stacker blocks as shown in FIGS. 11 to 12, which are used as foundation blocks and/or to construct pilasters in the wall as will be described more fully hereafter.

FIGS. 1 to 4 illustrate the stacking blocks of this invention. Block 100 a has opposing top and bottom surfaces 104 and 105, opposing side surfaces 106 and 107, and opposing end surfaces 102 and 103. The distance between end surfaces 102 and 103 defines the length of the block. The distance between the side surfaces defines the width, and the distance between the top and bottom defines the thickness of the block. Through the center of the block along the length is core 108 through which is a longitudinal axis. Top surface 104 has channels/grooves 110 a and 112 a adjacent each side surface defining a raised portion therebetween. Channel 110 a has additional recess 111 a. The bottom surface has projections 114 adjacent each side surface. When stacked, the projections on the bottom surface of a block fit in the channels in the top surface of an underlying block. Thus, these blocks interlock. The interlocking eliminates any need for mortar to join the stacked hollow blocks 100 a together.

It is to be understood that the designations “top” or “bottom” is arbitrary and that the blocks could be stacked in the opposite orientation.

Block edges may be chamfered or beveled to provide an attractive appearance, and preferably the edge formed by the channel or groove in the top surface with the side surface is chamfered.

FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate how the blocks appear after they are molded and removed from the mold. It is convenient to mold the blocks in mirror image pairs, that is, block 100 a is shown at left, and block 100 b is shown at right. The blocks are identical except for the location of recessed area 111 a/b.

The stacking blocks are conveniently formed in pairs 120, with groove 125 along the top surface, as FIGS. 4A and 4B show. The block pair is split along groove 125 to form a single block. Splitting the block pair in this manner forms a roughened surface of the split-apart side surfaces. The roughened surface is a desirable appearance for walls and corners where the side of the block will be seen.

FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate another embodiment of the block. Block 200 is similar to blocks 100 a and 100 b, but there are two recesses contiguous with the channels on the top of the block. Thus, this block could be used with either the right handed or left handed corner block, as described further below. Block 200 has opposing top and bottom surfaces 204 and 205, opposing side surfaces 206 and 207, and opposing end surfaces 202 and 203. The distance between end surfaces 202 and 203 defines the length of the block. The distance between the side surfaces defines the width, and the distance between the top and bottom defines the thickness. Through the center of the block along the length is core 208. The top surface has channels or grooves 210 adjacent each side surface defining a raised portion therebetween and each channel has additional recess 211. The bottom surface has projections 214 adjacent each side surface. These blocks may stack together with blocks 100 a/b and with corner blocks when constructing a wall, as described further below.

The stacking blocks can be made in any desired dimension, however, a convenient and attractive size for these blocks is about 6 inches (15.2 cm) wide and high, and 8 inches (20.3 cm) long. The core is about 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) in diameter. The channels and the projections are about 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide.

Stacking block 300 shown in FIGS. 6A and 6B is a “half block”, that is, having the same width as block 100 a, but about half the length (about 4 inches (10.2 cm)). This is a convenient size to use when forming a corner structure with the full-length stacking blocks and corner blocks. The half block allows the wall to be constructed with an offset running bond pattern from course to course while maintaining a vertical end to adjoin the vertical surface as shown in FIG. 10C. Block 300 has opposing top and bottom surfaces 304 and 305, opposing side surfaces 306 and 307, and opposing end surfaces 302 and 303. The distance between end surfaces 302 and 303 defines the length of the block. The distance between the side surfaces defines the width, and the distance between the top and bottom defines the thickness of the block. Through the center of the block along the length is core 308 through which is a longitudinal axis. The top surface has channels or grooves 310 adjacent each side surface defining a raised portion therebetween. The bottom surface has projections 314 adjacent each side surface. These blocks stack together with blocks 100 a/b and with corner blocks when constructing a wall, as described further below.

FIGS. 7 to 9 show corner block 500 a/b. This block is rectangular in shape having a recessed area on the bottom of the block configured to fit with the stacking blocks of this invention. The corner block is provided in both left and right hand versions, that is, mirror images. FIGS. 7A to 7D show the right-hand block 500 a and FIGS. 8A to 8D show the left hand block 500 b. Block 500 a/b has opposing top and bottom surfaces 504 a/b and 505 a/b, opposing side surfaces 506 a/b and 507 a/b, and opposing end surfaces 502 a/b and 503 a/b. The distance between end surfaces 502 a/b and 503 a/b defines the length of the block. The distance between the side surfaces defines the width, and the distance between the top and bottom defines the thickness of the block. Bottom 505 a/b of the block is provided with recessed area 515 a/b, configured so that a portion of the top surface of a stacking block fits in it. FIGS. 7C and 8B show the bottom of the block in phantom.

Pinhole 513 a/b, shown in phantom in FIGS. 7A and 8B, extends through the thickness of the block and is configured to receive pin 90, as indicated in FIG. 10A. Pin 90 comprises shank 91 and head 92. Head 92 extends above the top surface of the block and fits into the pinhole of an overlying block. Thus, the pinhole has a diameter at the bottom of the block sufficient to receive the head of a pin that has been placed in the pinhole of an underlying block. A preferred means of attaching blocks of adjacent courses together is a pin having a head portion, however, it is to be understood that a cylindrical element such as a rod, having a desired length, can be used to attach two or more blocks together.

FIGS. 9A and 9B show set 520 of corner blocks after removal from a mold. FIG. 9B shows pinholes 513 a and 513 b in phantom in the side view of the block. It is convenient to form the blocks four at a time, and in mirror image pairs. Cleavage planes 525 and 527 are provided along which the blocks are split. Typically, a roughened surface is formed when the blocks are split.

FIG. 10A shows column 900 constructed with blocks 100 a and 500 b of this invention, and illustrates how the blocks fit together. For example, a first corner block 500 b is placed next to stacking blocks 100 a in the bottom course of blocks. In the second course of blocks, corner block 500 b is rotated 90 degrees and placed over a portion of one stacking block and a portion of the first corner block. The recess in the second corner block fits over the exposed top surface of the stacking block. The pinholes in the first and second corner blocks are coincident, so that a pin can be installed, further locking courses of blocks together.

A portion of wall 910 is shown in FIG. 10B, which also illustrates that blocks having no recesses in the top of the block can be used to construct a wall. To stack blocks evenly at corners, corner blocks 500 a/b and the stacking blocks (i.e., 100 a/b, 200, and 300) are used together to form the corners.

FIG. 10C shows wall 920 and illustrates the use of half blocks 300 and blocks 100 a/b to form a running bond pattern.

FIGS. 11A to 11D illustrate double block units and how these units are used to form pilasters and/or strengthen a wall. For the sake of simplicity in the drawing, blocks having no recesses are shown in the drawings; however, it is to be understood that any stacking block discussed above can be used to form a wall or a pilaster.

The blocks are molded in pairs. As discussed above, block splitting forms a desirable surface appearance. Occasionally, it is convenient to use block pairs that are not split for reinforcement of a wall and/or formation of a pilaster. FIG. 11A shows a block pair 420 that can be split at cleavage plane 425 to form blocks 400. These blocks are similar to block 100 a/b, except they have no recess corresponding to recess 11 a/b, for example. FIG. 11B illustrates block pair 120 with its cleavage plane 125. FIG. 11C illustrates how wall 930 can be formed by stacking double block units along with single blocks (in this case, blocks 400 and units 420). This provides for reinforcement of the wall and increases its structural integrity. FIG. 11D shows free-standing wall 940 comprising blocks 400 and units 420. Wall 940 has a lower course comprising double block units 420. These units are placed on base layer 490, and then the wall is constructed of both single blocks 400 and double block units 420. Stacking units 420 on each other forms a pilaster and has the appearance of a column. The pilasters stiffen the wall structure, making it resistant to being overturned by wind. The number and frequency of pilasters in a wall is determined by a structural analysis based upon the geometry of the wall, its weight, and the forces acting to overturn the wall.

FIG. 12 illustrates two sets of stacking blocks 450 that have been removed from a four-block mold and shows how the block sets can stack together. They can be split into single or double blocks along cleavage planes 452, 454, and 456. The choice of cleavage plane is determined by which appearance is desired for the blocks. For example, outer surfaces 433 are smooth in comparison to the roughened surfaces formed by splitting block pairs. Single blocks and two and three block sets can be formed by splitting block set 450 as desired. Similar to that described above for FIG. 11D in which two blocks units are used, three or four block units can be used to form pilasters in a wall.

FIGS. 13A shows capping block 80 a and FIG. 13B shows stacking block 100 a/b with capping block 80 a. Recessed area 84 a is sized to accommodate the stacking block. The capping block fits over top 104 a/b of the block and has sides 87 a coincident with sides 106/107 of the block. FIG. 13C shows a different style of capping block 80 b, as it has edge or overhang 87 b that extends beyond the sides of the block.

FIGS. 14A to 14D show various styles of capping blocks 802 a to 802 d, each of which have recessed areas 804 a to 804 d, respectively, to fit over underlying blocks. The capping blocks provide a finished appearance to a fence, pilaster, column or wall. Capping blocks may be provided in various lengths, typically of a size convenient to handle. Typically, in construction of a wall, several capping blocks will be used to form a capping layer across the top of the wall. At the end of the wall, where the end of the capping block would be seen, the capping block has a finished surface, that is, it is closed at one end. The style of capping layer is a matter of design choice. The capping layers may be made of any material, including wood, concrete, and polymeric materials.

Although particular embodiments have been disclosed herein in detail, this has been done for purposes of illustration only, and is not intended to be limiting with respect to the scope of the claims. In particular, it is contemplated that various substitutions, alterations and modifications may be made to the invention without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the claims. For instance, the choice of materials or variations in the shape or angles at which some of the surfaces intersect are believed to be a matter of routine for a person of ordinary skill in the art with knowledge of the embodiments disclosed herein.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7971407May 21, 2008Jul 5, 2011Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc.Wall block and wall block system for constructing walls
US8234828Jun 23, 2008Aug 7, 2012Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcVeneers for walls, retaining walls, retaining wall blocks, and the like
US8251607 *Jan 15, 2008Aug 28, 2012Ecs Solutions, LlcSystem and apparatus of fluid storage using paver blocks
US8366343Jun 17, 2011Feb 5, 2013Ecs Solutions, LlcApparatus for fluid storage using paver blocks
US8464491Nov 23, 2009Jun 18, 2013Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcColumn block system
US8511024Aug 31, 2009Aug 20, 2013Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcVeneers for walls, retaining walls and the like
US8656678Sep 29, 2010Feb 25, 2014Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcWall blocks, veneer panels for wall blocks and method of constructing walls
US20140083041 *Sep 25, 2013Mar 27, 2014Kyle FairchildFaux brick and faux brick system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/606, 52/607, 52/603
International ClassificationE04B2/32, E04B2/08, E04B2/18, E04B2/46, E04C2/04, E04C1/39, E04B2/16, E04B2/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2002/0263, E04B2/16, E04B2002/0245, E04B2002/026, E04B2002/0217, E04C1/395, E04B2002/0206
European ClassificationE04C1/39B, E04B2/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 13, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: KEYSTONE RETAINING WALL SYSTEMS, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MACDONALD, ROBERT A.;DAWSON, WILLIAM B.;REEL/FRAME:016517/0900
Effective date: 20050613
Jan 3, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS ADMINISTRA
Free format text: NOTICE OF GRANT OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KEYSTONE RETAINING WALL SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:016963/0979
Effective date: 20041207
Feb 3, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: KEYSTONE RETAINING WALL SYSTEMS, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: TERMINATION OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENTS;ASSIGNOR:WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT;REEL/FRAME:017118/0040
Effective date: 20060131
Mar 8, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS ADMINISTRA
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