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Publication numberUS20050258596 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/988,387
Publication dateNov 24, 2005
Filing dateNov 12, 2004
Priority dateAug 30, 2002
Publication number10988387, 988387, US 2005/0258596 A1, US 2005/258596 A1, US 20050258596 A1, US 20050258596A1, US 2005258596 A1, US 2005258596A1, US-A1-20050258596, US-A1-2005258596, US2005/0258596A1, US2005/258596A1, US20050258596 A1, US20050258596A1, US2005258596 A1, US2005258596A1
InventorsDavid Such
Original AssigneeSuch David A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tickets with removable purchased value parts, chance game parts, and variable advertising within a set of tickets, redeemable toward goods or services offered by multiple merchants
US 20050258596 A1
Abstract
Ticket sets having a value part with a predetermined value and identification code. The tickets have a chance game part which is played for variable winnings identified by code. The value part is preferably removable to allow non-purchasers to participate in the chance game without cost, to meet gaming laws. The sets have variable frequency advertising messages from plural advertisers to meet varying budgets. A cooperative trading forum, such as a web site, allows purchasers to select from products or services from plural merchants and/or participate in an auction. The ticket values can be banked by registration so that a purchaser can aggregate or select different value entries associated with different tickets. Purchaser registration qualifies a purchaser for added incentives, such as a sweepstakes that is cooperatively funded by participating merchants. A checkout code may be provided that provides potential added discounts at checkout. Related methods are also described.
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Claims(59)
1. A set including a plurality of ticket formations, the plurality of individual ticket formations providing value and a game of chance, comprising:
at least one value part which indicates a predetermined value associated with the ticket formation;
at least one value identification code which distinguishes one value part from another value part;
at least one chance game formed on a chance game part or parts of the ticket formations, said at least one chance game having a game piece identification code which distinguishes one chance game from another chance game;
advertising messages provided on a plurality of ticket formations included in said set to advertise goods or services of participating advertisers who pay an advertising fee therefor which is dependent upon the participating advertisers' desired exposure frequency in said set;
wherein the plurality of ticket formations have at least one chance game having at least one game indicia which is hidden when distributed and then opened by an end user to reveal the at least one game indicia, said at least one game indicia being indicative of a winning condition or a non-winning condition of the at least one game indicia;
said advertising messages on a plurality of said ticket formations contained in said set being different from other advertising messages on ticket formations of the same set so as to provide advertising messages for a plurality of different participating advertisers which may vary between ticket formations of the set.
2. An apparatus according to claim 1 and wherein the advertising messages are presented within the set of ticket formations at an advertising message frequency which is variable by participating advertiser.
3. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein said at least one value identification code uniquely distinguishes said at least one value part.
4. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined monetary value amount.
5. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined value amount given in terms of credit points.
6. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined value amount given in terms of a predetermined credit amount programmed onto a programmable credit card.
7. A ticket formation according to claim 1 and further comprising a checkout savings code which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code.
8. A ticket formation according to claim 1 and further comprising a checkout savings code on the which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code, said checkout savings code being hidden until the ticket formation is used.
9. A ticket formation according to claim 1 and further comprising a checkout savings code on the ticket formation which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code.
10. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the ticket formation is divisible into at least one value part portion which can be detached from at least one chance game portion to allow the at least one value part portion to be removed for later use by a ticket purchaser while allowing the at least one chance game portion to be immediately redeemed for any chance game winnings, said at least one value identification code being presented on said at least value part portion.
11. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction.
12. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the ticket formation is made in a two ply construction.
13. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the ticket formation is made in a three ply construction.
14. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the ticket formation is made in a multiple ply construction.
15. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction having a preformed line of partition that allows th.
16. A ticket formation according to claim 1 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction.
17. A ticket formation system including multiple groups each having at least one set containing plural ticket formations, comprising:
said at least one set including a plurality of ticket formations, the plurality of ticket formations providing value and a game of chance, comprising:
at least one value part which indicates a predetermined value associated with the ticket formation;
at least one value identification code which distinguishes one value part from another value part;
at least one chance game formed on a chance game part or parts of the ticket formations, said at least one chance game having a game piece identification code which distinguishes one chance game from another chance game;
advertising messages provided on a plurality of ticket formations included in said set to advertise goods or services of participating advertisers who pay an advertising fee therefor which is dependent upon the participating advertisers' desired exposure frequency in said set;
wherein the plurality of ticket formations have at least one chance game having at least one game indicia which is hidden when distributed and then opened by an end user to reveal the at least one game indicia, said at least one game indicia being indicative of a winning condition or a non-winning condition of the at least one game indicia;
said advertising messages on a plurality of said ticket formations contained in said set being different from other advertising messages on ticket formations of the same set so as to provide advertising messages for a plurality of different participating advertisers which may vary between ticket formations of the set.
18. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein said at least one value identification code uniquely distinguishes said at least one value part.
19. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined monetary value amount.
20. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined value amount given in terms of credit points.
21. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined value amount given in terms of a predetermined credit amount programmed onto a programmable credit card.
22. A ticket formation according to claim 17 and further comprising a checkout savings code which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code.
23. A ticket formation according to claim 17 and further comprising a checkout savings code on the which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code said checkout savings code being hidden until the ticket formation is used.
24. A ticket formation according to claim 17 and further comprising a checkout savings code on the ticket formation which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code.
25. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the ticket formation is divisible into at least one value part portion which can be detached from at least one chance game portion to allow the at least one value part portion to be removed for later use by a ticket purchaser while allowing the at least one chance game portion to be immediately redeemed for any chance game winnings, said at least one value identification code being presented on said at least value part portion.
26. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction.
27. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the ticket formation is made in a two ply construction.
28. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the ticket formation is made in a three ply construction.
29. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the ticket formation is made in a multiple ply construction.
30. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction having a preformed line of partition that allows the parts to be separated.
31. A ticket formation according to claim 17 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction.
32. A ticket formation providing value and a game of chance, comprising:
at least one value part which indicates a predetermined value associated with the ticket formation;
at least one value identification code which distinguishes one value part from another value part;
at least one chance game forming part of the ticket formation, said at least one chance game having a game piece identification code which distinguishes one chance game from another chance game;
at least one advertising message provided on the ticket formation to advertise the goods or services of at least one participating advertiser who pays an advertising fee therefor.
33. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein said at least one value identification code uniquely distinguishes said at least one value part.
34. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined monetary value amount.
35. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined value amount given in terms of credit points.
36. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the predetermined value of the at least one value part is a predetermined value amount given in terms of a predetermined credit amount programmed onto a programmable credit card.
37. A ticket formation according to claim 32 and further comprising a checkout savings code which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code.
38. A ticket formation according to claim 32 and further comprising a checkout savings code on the which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code, said checkout savings code being hidden until the ticket formation is used.
39. A ticket formation according to claim 32 and further comprising a checkout savings code on the ticket formation which may be used at the time the value part is utilized to obtain checkout value which may vary dependent upon the checkout savings code.
40. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the ticket formation is divisible into at least one value part portion which can be detached from at least one chance game portion to allow the at least one value part portion to be removed for later use by a ticket purchaser while allowing the at least one chance game portion to be immediately redeemed for any chance game winnings, said at least one value identification code being presented on said at least value part portion.
41. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction.
42. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the ticket formation is made in a two ply construction.
43. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the ticket formation is made in a three ply construction.
44. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the ticket formation is made in a multiple ply construction.
45. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction having a preformed line of partition that allows the parts to be divided.
46. A ticket formation according to claim 32 wherein the ticket formation is made in a single ply construction.
47. A method for dispensing and redeeming tickets from at least one ticket set, comprising:
selecting a plurality of tickets having:
at least one value part which indicates a predetermined value associated with the ticket;
at least one value identification code which distinguishes one value part from another value part;
at least one chance game forming part of the ticket, said at least one chance game having a game piece identification code which distinguishes one chance game from another chance game;
at least one advertising message provided on the ticket to advertise the goods or services of at least one participating advertiser who pays an advertising fee therefor;
distributing a plurality of said tickets to at least one ticket distributor said tickets having different advertising messages for tickets within a ticket set;
providing credit to the at least one ticket distributor based upon amount of advertising included on the tickets;
distributing tickets to ticket recipients;
offering products or services on a cooperative trading forum including products or services offered from a plurality of participating merchants;
redeeming one or more value part from one or more tickets via the cooperative trading forum to ticket recipients.
48. A method according to claim 47 wherein said distributing tickets comprises:
selling tickets to ticket purchasers who pay for the tickets with the value part included thereon;
distributing free tickets to ticket recipients with the value part removed.
49. A method according to claim 47 wherein the value parts do not expire.
50. A method according to claim 47 and further comprising banking value parts for use selectively or in an aggregated manner where multiple value part values may be used in a single transaction.
51. A method according to claim 47 and further comprising paying any winning chance game.
52. A method according to claim 47 and further comprising paying any winning chance game by a ticket distributor that sold the ticket.
53. A method according to claim 47 and further comprising registering value parts with a value bank account specific to a ticket purchaser.
54. A method according to claim 47 wherein the cooperative trading forum is at least one web site at which goods or services are offered.
55. A method according to claim 47 and further comprising registering value parts with a value bank account specific to a ticket purchaser;
and wherein the cooperative trading forum is at least one web site at which goods or services are offered in exchange for value parts banked to the ticket purchaser.
56. A method according to claim 47 and further comprising registering value parts with a value bank account specific to a ticket purchaser;
and wherein the cooperative trading forum is at least one web site at which goods or services are offered at auction in exchange for value parts banked to the ticket purchaser.
57. A method according to claim 47 wherein the value part of a ticket is indicated in points which are redeemable at the distributor which sold the ticket to a purchaser, said points being used as part or full credit toward goods or services offered by the distributor.
58. A method according to claim 47 wherein the value part of a ticket or tickets are used as partial payment.
59. A method according to claim 47 wherein the value part of a ticket or tickets are used as full payment.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED CASES

This is a continuation-in-part of pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/651,486, filed Aug. 29, 2003; which claimed priority based upon U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/407,595, filed Aug. 30, 2002. Priority under 35 U.S.C. §120 is claimed with regard to both such prior applications.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The technical field of this invention is gaming or other chance tickets having selectable variable advertising exposure and an inherent value component which may be used to purchase goods or services from a collection of products or services offered by a plurality of merchants or other providers.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Advertising is a highly utilized means for all types of businesses to promote themselves in the marketplace or marketplaces to which their goods and or services relate. Much of the money or other costs spent on advertising include advertising developmental costs, advertising production costs and advertising dissemination costs.

Advertising developmental costs are those associated with developing advertising materials. Advertising developmental costs may include internal costs incurred within the organization seeking to advertise (advertiser). These often include work done to define the type of advertising desired and the scope of advertising coverage. Advertising developmental costs may alternatively or also include external advertising developmental costs associated with having an outside advertising agency or similar advertising service which contracts to further develop or fully develop an advertising campaign.

Advertising production costs are those costs associated with printing advertising materials or producing broadcasted advertising messages. The production costs may or may not be charged by the advertising disseminator. This varies upon the type of advertising vehicle being used, such as print versus broadcast advertising and upon other considerations.

Advertising dissemination costs are the advertising costs associated with purchasing services for providing advertising exposure. Part of these costs may be is provided by an advertising agency which also serves the advertiser by defining the manner and type of advertising being used. The advertising dissemination costs are dependent upon the manner in which the advertising message is presented to the is public, such as printed advertising materials which are mailed or otherwise disseminated physically, or broadcasting of advertising messages via radio, television, internet or other broadcast media.

Either form of advertising is usually presented to the public in a fashion which increases costs incurred by the advertiser due to dissemination of the advertising message to a large number of people or organizations that have no interest in the goods or services being offered in the advertising message.

Examples of advertising dissemination costs include costs for having magazines, newspapers, or billboards present the printed message. Other examples include radio and or television broadcasting services which disseminate an advertising message or messages which have been developed by an advertiser or advertising agency.

All of these forms of advertising dissemination are costly, and there are only limited ways of directing the advertising to a targeted audience that is actually interested in spending money on the advertiser's goods and or services. This increases the advertiser's costs since advertisers must use advertising that is presented, sent or broadcast to many people and businesses in a hope that some are interested. However, most people or businesses receiving the advertising message are not interested and the costs associated with dissemination of the message to these disinterested audience members is effectively a waste of the advertiser's resources.

Currently an advertiser is relatively limited in its ability to target or tailor advertising to a specific interested audience. Current attempts to target a more selected or receptive audience are by selecting the form of the advertising, such as magazines, newspapers, billboards, radio or television). Another way in which an advertiser attempts to select a more receptive and interested audience is by using a particular publication, location of billboard, or by choosing a broadcast organization that tends to draw an audience that is interested in the advertiser's product or service. Needless to say, this approach is very limited in its ability to target an audience that is actually interested in purchasing the advertiser's goods or services. Thus, the typical advertiser is spending considerably more on advertising costs due to the diffuse nature of most modes of advertising. This may be fine for the newspaper, magazine or broadcast organization that disseminates or otherwise helps in producing the message because they sell greater amounts of advertising services and increase their revenue. However, all advertisers wish to minimize advertising costs while increasing the effectiveness in generating responses by interested purchasers for the advertiser's goods or services.

In view of the high costs associated with advertising there has been and continues to be a long-felt need for advertising materials and methods that have increased appeal and interest to an interested potential consumer and which provide lower costs per effective response from a consumer of the advertised good or services.

Another problem associated with advertising by some or all organizations is the need to have an advertising vehicle and associated methods that allow more flexibility to tailor advertising costs dependent upon the size and nature of the advertiser. For example, many businesses cannot afford broadcast, magazine or newspaper advertising because the circulation is effectively predetermined by the circulation or listening audience size previously developed by the advertising dissemination organization. Large circulation publications like Time™ or Newsweek™ have developed vast circulation audiences to increase revenues from advertising. An organization that has only local or regional consumer appeal cannot in many cases justify the high costs of using such publications.

In an attempt to address the above problem some publications have different editions that include services directed toward exposure audiences that are for only a regional edition. This allows at least some of the advertising to be sold at a lower cost to advertisers having a smaller advertising budget. However, this approach is still very limited because of production costs and similar considerations of producing different editions of the publications.

In a similar fashion the broadcast advertising disseminating organizations have also provided more than one level of exposure, such as nationwide versus local broadcast advertising. Again, this approach is restricted by the broadcasting organization's ability to limit dissemination to selected areas or groups dependent upon the type of audience they have developed and the ability to present different broadcast editions. Nationwide television broadcast advertising is very expensive and the next level down is to purchase regional broadcasting (where available) or station-by-station advertising by selected local broadcasters.

Local broadcasting is however more costly to setup and coordinate for the given broadcast audience population. At some point the costs associated with using a number of local broadcasters may justify national broadcasting instead. For example; an organization that wants to approach certain audiences may be forced to chose between nationwide advertising where such nationwide advertising is not economically justified on the basis of the number of interested potential consumers. The other option of using plural local broadcasters may not address the proper audiences cost effectively.

Thus there is a continuing need for advertising that can be more cost effectively tailored to the advertiser's budget while also not requiring excessive advertising costs due to lack of effective choices for tailoring the size of audience and targeting an interested group of prospective purchasers. Accordingly, there has also been a long-felt need to have more flexibility in providing advertising circulation options so that a variety of different types and sizes of advertisers can be accommodated by providing tailored circulation levels in line with the advertising budget of the vast number of different types and sizes of organizations wanting to advertise. In the past many advertisers have been forced to choose between limited options which are either too costly or too limited in circulation or audience size.

Another common limitation or fault with most or all prior forms of advertising is that the recipient of the advertising message of a particular advertiser is usually bundled with a large number of other messages from other advertisers. For example, most or all newspapers present advertising or advertising supplements that include advertising messages from numerous advertisers in a single publication or broadcast. Thus a recipient of the advertising must wade through this bundle of advertising messages from plural advertisers in an attempt to find a message of interest to that particular recipient. In some cases the number of different advertising messages are so numerous that the recipient easily is tired of the hunt for an interesting message applicable to the recipient. Thus, the volume of messages concurrently presented to the recipient work to reduce the effectiveness associated with any particular message from a particular advertiser. This demonstrates that the circulation exposure being paid for by the advertiser is diluted, and the effectiveness of the message is diminished compared to the high costs being paid.

The above problems compound upon themselves, particularly when circulation audience size and absence of effective targeted publications or broadcasters do not exist for an advertiser interested in purchasing advertising. Thus, there are often potential advertisers that cannot find an effective and efficient manner of advertising which justifies the use of their limited advertising budgets. These considerations underscore the need for advertising that is interesting to the prospective customer, is efficient in directing the advertising message to potentially interested customers, is presented in a manner that has undiluted impact on the recipient, and has the ability to provide advertising that can easily be tailored to the advertiser's budget. Despite the billions of dollars spent on advertising each year, these problems have not heretofore been adequately addressed.

Games of chance have always been of attraction for entertainment. For many years chance tickets have been produced in various forms. One common form of chance ticket is known as a pull-tab. A pull-tab has one or more reveal areas which can be peeled or otherwise opened to reveal a symbol or set of symbols. A symbol set may have one or more symbols. The symbol set may be a winning symbol set or a non-winning symbol set.

Other chance tickets include scratch-off tickets or “scratch-offs”. Scratch-off chance tickets have one or more symbols or symbol sets that are revealed by scratching off a coating that is opaque and prevents viewing by the purchaser of other end user.

Another form of chance tickets are folded tickets. The folded tickets are typically soft and opened after removing a seal or band. The end user cannot see the symbol set or sets provided on the chance ticket because of the folded configuration.

Chance tickets are frequently regulated by statute. In some jurisdictions they cannot be sold. In others there are various requirements and or limitations. In general, chance tickets can be sold only in states permitting the legal sale of these products. The types of chance ticket products which can be sold may vary by jurisdiction. Regulations also often control the licensing of manufacturers, distributors, taverns, bingo halls, and fraternal clubs which may utilize or distribute chance tickets.

Pull-tab tickets often display a menu of cash prizes, which are won by the players holding a combination of symbols that match the winning symbol sets indicated in the menu determining a winning game piece or ticket. The menu describing the winning from non-winning symbols or symbol sets is usually included on either the front or back of the ticket. Typically the pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded tickets are sold for a dollar amount such as $1.00, $0.50, or $0.25.

Presently, there are twenty-six states that issue a license to manufacturers and distributors to sell pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded tickets to licensed taverns, bingo halls and fraternal clubs, which in turn sell this product to the general public. The licensed taverns, bingo halls and fraternal clubs sell pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded tickets to make a predetermined profit associated with the sale of a predetermined number of chance tickets that make up a ticket set. After selling all the pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded tickets in the entire game or ticket set, then the predetermined maximum profit can be realized. If the entire set is not sold, then the profit will typically diminish. If the ticket set is distributed with the distributor bearing risk of paying part or all of the winnings, then profit depends on which tickets are sold and redeemed for prize earnings.

In some areas the licensed distribution of chance tickets to taverns, bingo halls, and fraternal clubs may be associated with either a charitable organization or represent a charity or charitable organization. This may be due to custom or law.

Pull-tabs and scratch-offs are also used in some state lottery games. Scratch-off games are primarily used in state lottery games and typically sold for $1.00 per game piece.

Scratch-off games are also widely used as promotional games in fast food or retail businesses. In these instances the game pieces are distributed to the general public without charge.

Chance ticket games in the past have been used and are still used by a limited number of individual bingo halls and fraternal clubs which often have large volumes of usage. Some have been printed to advertise their individual bingo games or clubs' information on one side of the tickets.

Chance ticket games have also been used as a vehicle to offer discount coupons on various products or services and can only be used for discounts from a single advertiser. Chance tickets used in this fashion are frequently not sold as a gambling device, but instead, are given as a complementary item. The winning tickets are usually associated with small prizes.

Chance tickets have also been sold for value and been provided with an associated coupon or special offer. Such are used in the commercial promotional marketplace. These tickets display a menu of cash prizes to be won on one side, just as the gambling pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded tickets used in the gambling marketplace. These pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded tickets are then sold to the public as coupons, typically providing a percentage discount on the goods or services being offered.

Chance tickets also have legitimate use in the general business world as promotional games to build in-store traffic, promote products, or as business or product sweepstake games. However, the pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded tickets are not sold, but distributed “free” to the general public. Pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded ticket games are also used in all types of businesses as employee incentives to improve the overall bottom line and performance of the company.

SUMMARY OF SOME EMBODIMENTS

Our invention includes versions which may introduce chance tickets such as pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded ticket gaming pieces as a vehicle for all types of general advertising by any type of business or organization for all types of services and products.

Our invention involves chance tickets sold in game sets which involve the sale of advertising space. Rates for such advertising space may be charged based on the circulation exposure desired by the advertiser. The advertising would be custom fit to each business, organization or institution acting as an advertiser.

A further extension of the invention places all advertisers in a web-based mall to provide further benefits to the advertiser for an advertisement feature having web-based mall advertising connection.

The advertising space rate would be charged based on the circulation exposure desired and this may vary in frequency within a game ticket set to accommodate the individual desires and budgets of each advertiser.

Advertisers will be able to advertise nationally or regionally wherever our chance ticket products are sold. Typical ticket sets consist of 150 to 12,000 individual tickets. Greater numbers are also possible. Thus, the advertisers additionally have the opportunity to select the frequency or ratio their message can be presented to the public within the game unit as well as selecting a game with ticket sets that provide different numbers of tickets.

The invention offers more flexibility than traditional advertising opportunities and at far less cost. In some forms, the invention automatically guarantees a more focused, less distracting method of conveying the advertisers' message compared to other common forms of advertising, such as newspapers or magazines. The advertiser's message will have more impact because of the subtle recreational type environment. In addition, the production methods may include producing the chance ticket sets using a program which provides a complete turnkey advertising program.

Depending on the game set and program, various methods of tracking the results of the advertisers' message or messages may be possible. Thus, the invention offers small businesses with a meager advertising budget an opportunity to have advertising exposure and performance feedback previously enjoyed by only those advertisers with large budgets.

Additionally, advertisers using this program may have the opportunity 3 to: (1) advertise on a web-based mall; (2) advertisers would be included in a promotional game web site; (3) access to a “pin number” registry for both web and telephone dial-in; (4) advertising would be tied to in-store pull-tabs, scratch-offs or soft folded ticket games; (5) advertisers would participate in cooperatively funding a national grand prize; (6) advertisers can partake in a variety of kiosk programs; and (7) participate in a unique co-op media campaign.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Preferred forms or embodiments of the inventions are explained and characterized herein, often with reference to the accompanying drawings. The drawings also serve as part of the disclosure of the inventions of the current application. Such drawings are briefly described below.

FIG. 1 shows pull-tab front side.

FIG. 2 shows the back or opened side of the pull-tab of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 shows the front side of a scratch-off chance ticket.

FIG. 4 shows an opened soft folded chance ticket.

FIG. 5 shows the folded chance ticket of FIG. 4 in the closed condition.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing a five window pull-tab chance ticket.

FIG. 7 is a front view of a pull-tab having a purchase price.

FIG. 8 is a rear view of the pull-tab of FIG. 7 with revealed areas open and three symbol sets shown, each having multiple symbols.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing another form of pull-tab.

FIG. 10 shows the front side of one preferred scratch-off chance ticket according to the invention.

FIG. 11 shows the rear or reverse side of the chance ticket of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 shows the front side of a pull-tab according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 13A shows the rear or reverse opening side of the pull-tab of FIG. 12 with the reveal areas intact in a closed or unopened condition.

FIG. 13B shows the opening side of the pull-tab shown in FIGS. 12 and 13A with the reveal areas opened into an opened condition.

FIG. 14 an attraction and explanation poster which announces and advertises the game being offered and played.

FIG. 15 shows a scratch-off one-ply ticket according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 16 is a front view of a two-ply ticket showing the outside of the first ply according to another form of the invention.

FIG. 17 is a rear view of the two-ply ticket of FIG. 16 showing the outside of the second ply.

FIG. 18 is a diagrammatic rear perspective view of the two-ply ticket of FIG. 16 with the second ply having a window which has been partially opened to also show the inside of the first ply.

FIG. 19 is a view similar to FIG. 18 with the second ply window opened more fully.

FIG. 20 is a view showing the inside face of the second ply window, portion removed from remaining parts of the ticket shown in FIGS. 16-19.

FIG. 21 is a front view of another embodiment ticket according to the invention which has a three-ply construction.

FIG. 22 is a rear view of the ticket shown in FIG. 21 showing the outside surface of the third ply.

FIG. 23A is diagrammatic perspective rear view showing a rear window of the third ply in an open condition to reveal the inside surface of the third ply.

FIG. 23B is a view similar to FIG. 23A with a second ply peeled upwardly to show the inside of the second ply and the inside surface of the first ply.

FIG. 24 is a view of another configuration of three-ply ticket showing a check-out savings code that may provide additional discounts of variable amounts when a ticket purchaser is completing a purchase transaction from the cooperative trading forum (e.g. web based mall).

FIG. 25 is a block diagram showing various parts of a preferred system according to this invention.

FIG. 26 is another block diagram showing additional parts of the system 3 of FIG. 25.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Introductory Note

The readers of this document should understand that the embodiments described herein may rely on terminology used in any section of this document and other terms readily apparent from the drawings and language common therefor. This document is premised upon using one or more terms with one embodiment that may also apply to other embodiments for similar structures, functions, features and aspects of the invention. Wording used in the claims is also descriptive of the invention and the text of the claims is incorporated by reference into the description entirely in the form of the claims as originally filed. Terminology used with one, some or all embodiments may be used for describing and defining the technology and exclusive rights associated herewith.

Two-Ply Pull Tab

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is shown a pull-tab chance ticket 20 having a front side 21 that includes a menu or schedule 22. The menu or schedule may include a game name 23 and a chance ticket price 24.

Pull-tab 20 has a laminated upper and lower layers of material such that until torn apart by removing a tab 26, the indicia 27 may include various symbols, such as picture symbols 28 or numbers 29. Alternatively the indicia may be provide as a blank devoid of symbols or particular colors or other indicators of a winning versus non-winning condition of the symbol set behind each window or reveal area. Pull-tab 20 represents a prior art or conventional pull-tab.

Scratch-Off Chance Ticket

FIG. 3 shows a prior art or conventional scratch-off chance ticket 40. Scratch-off ticket 40 has coating areas 41 which cover reveal areas having the game symbols or indicia (not shown in FIG. 3). The coating layers are removed by scratching to reveal the indicia. Otherwise, the reveal areas remain concealed until removed by the end user.

Soft Folded Ticket

FIGS. 4 and 5 show a conventional or prior art soft folded ticket 50. The soft folded ticket uses a wrapper or band which secures the ticket in a closed condition for distribution. The band is broken and the ticket unfolded to reveal and make the game indicia visible, as shown in FIG. 4.

As shown, the indicia includes a number set 52, 53. The indicia number set is used to identify the number or numbers used to determine a winning condition from non-winning condition, such as by matching hidden numbers covered by coating layers 54.

The pull-tabs, scratch-offs, soft folded tickets or other chance tickets may be of any suitable size or shape. Preferably they are made for handling by humans.

Multiple Window Pull Tab Ticket

FIG. 6 shows a pull-tab ticket 60 in perspective from the opening side 61. The front side 62 has a front side similar to that shown in FIG. 1. The opening or rear side 61 is provided with five reveal areas 65 which may be peeled or otherwise opened as indicated in FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 shows a conventional or prior art design having a message 66, such as advertising a bingo parlor. All tickets in a ticket set or group of ticket sets were provided with similar advertising.

Multiple Window Pull Tab Ticket with Advertising

FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 show another prior art pull-tab 70 having features similar to those described above. The opening side is provided with an advertisement 71 which is the same for all tickets in a ticket set, game or group of ticket sets. The advertising in this pull-tab comprises a coupon which entitles the holder to some free offering.

Scratch-Off Ticket with Variable Advertising

FIGS. 10 and 11 show a scratch-off chance ticket 100 according to the invention. Ticket 100 has a front face or side 101 shown in FIG. 10 and a rear face or side 102 shown in FIG. 11.

The front side includes a trademark section 103 used to identify the producer of the game and ticket. The front side may also include a game name identifier 105 used to indicate to the user what type of scratch-off game is being offered or played. A price indicator 106 is further included where the game being played uses tickets for which a purchase price or coupon charge is being made.

The front side 101 also includes at least one symbol set area 107. As shown, the ticket 100 includes four symbol set areas. The symbol set areas are provided with overlaying coatings or layers 108 that hide the symbol sets from view during distribution and until the user plays the game by scratching off the coatings 108.

FIG. 11 shows the reverse or back side 102. Back side 102 includes a rules section 110. The rules section 110 may also be provided with the winning symbols set information 111. The text of the rules and winning symbol sets is diagrammatically depicted by X's in FIG. 11.

FIG. 11 also shows a paid advertising space 120. The paid advertising space or area 120 carries a message 121 which can be according to the desires or design of the advertiser paying for the advertising space.

In accordance with the invention the ticket 100 is part of a ticket set having a plurality of tickets included therein. Typical sizes for the ticket sets are 500-12,000 chance tickets per ticket set. The ticket set according to the invention do not contain the same advertising message 121 for all tickets of the ticket set as is the case with prior art technology. Instead, it includes advertising messages from a plurality of advertisers. The advertisers may include various messages which are different. The messages may appear in different frequencies or amounts of tickets per ticket set as desired by the advertiser or offered by the producer of the tickets. This allows the advertising costs to be matched with the amount the advertiser wants to spend and be integrated into a matrix of advertisers who participate in the ticket set to the degree desired.

Additionally, the invention can include groups of ticket sets that are tailored to the geographic area or marketing area to which they are best distributed. For example, an advertiser may choose tickets which are to be distributed in specific cities, states, nations, or other geographical area. The areas may be continuous or discontinuous. The advertiser may choose or otherwise participate in distribution of tickets according to market areas, such as to gasoline stations, grocery stores, or other market defined segments that appeal to the advertisers. They can also participate to the extent and degree desired with one or multiple advertising messages included in a set or group of sets. A game may include a single set or group of sets.

Pull-Tab with Multiple Variable Advertising Areas

FIGS. 12, 13A and 13B show a preferred pull-tab 150 according to another embodiment of this invention. Pull-tab 150 includes a front face or side 151 and rear or opening side 152.

FIG. 12 shows the front side 151. Front side 151 is provided with a game name section 153 which indicates the name or other indicia by which the distributor and end user may identify the game being offered or played. As shown, front side 151 also includes a winning symbol set schedule 154 that includes a plurality of winning symbol sets. As shown each symbol set is comprised of multiple symbols, but may have a single symbol or indicia to indicate the winning versus non-winning tickets and symbol set areas.

FIG. 12 further shows that the chance ticket 150 has on front face 151 a serial number indicia 156 which is used to identify the ticket set. Alternatively, the serial number indicia may uniquely identify each ticket. Furthermore, the serial number indicia may provide information indicating both the ticket set and uniquely identify each ticket.

FIG. 12 also shows a form number indicia 157 that may be used to indicate the particular form of the game being played. This may also be used as a group identifier which applies to a single or multiple ticket sets. The ticket also preferably includes an indication of how many winners there are for each type of winning symbol sets. The prizes or awards made will typically vary depending upon the particular features of the winning symbol set.

FIG. 13A shows the opening side or face 152. Opening side 152 is provided with one or more advertising areas. As shown, side 152 is provided with advertising area or space number one 161 and advertising space number two 162. Advertising space 161 is of different size than space 162 to provide added flexibility for meeting the demand and budget limitations of advertisers seeking advertising on chance tickets according to this invention.

FIG. 13B shows in greater clarity that the opening side has three symbol set areas 173 which are covered by tabs 174. Tabs 174 are peeled or otherwise opened by the end user. The symbol sets may include a single symbol or multiple symbols that match or otherwise combine to provide greater combinations for determining the odds of winning versus not winning.

The advertising spaces 161 and 162 may be paid for by the same or a different advertiser. More flexibly, various tickets within a ticket set may be paid for by multiple advertisers who have a similar or dissimilar frequency of appearance of the advertiser's desired message or messages.

Action Board or Poster

FIG. 14 describes an attraction and explanation poster 200 which announces and advertises the game being offered and played. It is usually placed in vicinity to where the chance tickets are being sold. It may also serve to compliment employee or in-store reward programs advertised via the invention. The poster also depicts the total number of winners contained in the ticket game set and the individual number of winners based on each tier contained in the ticket game set.

As shown, the poster 200 includes a game name section 253 used to indicate the game. Winning symbol sets are indicated in the menu or winning definition area 223. Winning frequencies of any particular winning symbol set may be indicated by winning symbol frequency indicators 225. Poster 200 also includes a point indication column 230 which may include points associated with particular winning symbol sets. These points may be used for various secondary games or in a fashion which earns awards or credits toward prizes, merchandise or monetary awards. A total number of winners indicator 234 may be included to indicate the total number of symbol sets which are winning symbol sets from the total number of tickets included in a set or game.

In one version the invention may include an apparatus forming a set of chance tickets, comprising: wherein said set of chance tickets including a plurality of chance tickets each chance ticket having at least one symbol set which is hidden when distributed by a distributor and then opened by an end user to reveal the at least one symbol set, said at least one symbol set including at least one symbol that is indicative of a winning condition or a non-winning condition of the symbol set; said at least one advertising section thereon; said at least one advertising section on multiple chance tickets of said set of chance tickets being different from other chance tickets of the same set so as to provide advertisements for a plurality of different advertisers which may vary from chance ticket to chance ticket at an advertisement frequency specific to each advertiser.

An invention as indicated in the prior paragraph wherein the advertisement frequency of advertisements for each advertiser is variable by advertiser.

A system forming multiple groups of chance tickets, each group of chance tickets including at least one set of chance tickets, comprising: wherein said set of chance tickets including a plurality of chance tickets each chance ticket having at least one symbol set which is hidden when distributed by a distributor and then opened by an end user to reveal the at least one symbol set, said at least one symbol set including at least one symbol that is indicative of a winning condition or a non-winning condition of the symbol set; said set of chance tickets including individual chance tickets a majority of which include at least one advertising section thereon; said at least one advertising section on multiple chance tickets of said set of chance tickets being different from other chance tickets of the same set so as to provide advertisements for a plurality of different advertisers which may vary from chance ticket to chance ticket at an advertisement frequency specific to each advertiser; and wherein at least two groups of chance tickets are adapted to provide advertising which is different by geographical area of ticket distribution.

An invention as indicated in the prior paragraph wherein the advertisement frequency of advertisements for each advertiser is variable by advertiser.

One-Ply Scratch-Off Ticket Having Value Part and Game Part

FIG. 15 shows another novel ticket or ticket formation 300 incorporating further aspects according to the inventions hereof. Ticket 300 is a single ply scratch-off type ticket. Ticket 300 preferably has two parts 301 and 302. The first or game part 301 is shown as a scratch-off game having a symbol set or other indicia 305 which are hidden by a covering 306. Covering 306 is removed by an end user or purchaser.

FIG. 15 also shows a game identification code 308 which may be of various forms. In some forms the identification code 308 has an indication of the ticket set and specific ticket serial number which distinguishes the ticket, preferably in a manner which is unique or sufficiently unique to allow identification for purposes indicated in this document.

Ticket 300 also advantageously includes a game name or trademark 309 which further helps identify the game and producer of the game.

FIG. 15 further shows that the value part 302 has a price indicator 311 which are preferably easy prices to use, such as $1.00, $0.50, $0.25 or other suitable ticket price. The price is a minimum value which is provided to the purchaser for use in purchasing or toward a purchase price of a good or service being offered on a co-operative trading forum, which is typically a web site mall. The web site mall offers goods and services from various participating merchants which may be advertisers, or which may be merchants who are not advertisers. The operation and manner of use is described in greater detail below. Although the purchase price is the minimum value received, it is alternatively possible for the value of the value part to be greater, such as from one to five times the purchase price. This provides the purchaser real value since the purchaser not only gets the value but also may get more value than what was paid. Additionally, the purchaser may win at the game part and realize winnings, such as instant winnings, paid at the place of purchase from which the ticket was bought. Since the value received does not expire or diminish there is value at least equal to the purchase price, plus the entertainment and potential value associated with winning the game part of ticket 300.

As illustrated, the value part further includes a variable advertising section 313 which may be printed or otherwise produced with an advertising message. Although shown on the value part 302, the advertising may include multiple messages at various locations upon the ticket 300. The advertising message or messages may vary from ticket to ticket within a set of tickets or within groups of sets of tickets. This allows the advertiser paying for the exposure to select a desired frequency of their advertising message. The advertising messages of a particular advertiser may also vary from one ticket to another ticket. The advertiser pays the sponsor or organizer for the amount of advertising desired.

The advertising message may for a particular advertiser only appear on one or more tickets within a set of tickets or group or groups containing one or more sets of tickets. This allows multiple advertisers to participate in the tickets contained therein at an exposure frequency that is desired and consistent with the advertiser's budget.

FIG. 15 further shows that the value part of ticket 300 also includes a value part identification (i.d.) code 315. The code used may be of various forms. In some forms the identification code 315 has an indication of the ticket set and specific ticket serial number which distinguishes the ticket, preferably in a manner which is unique or sufficiently unique to allow identification for purposes indicated in this document. In particular the value part code 315 may be registered in a saving account for the particular user or holder of the value part code.

Another noteworthy feature is a line of weakness 320 which may be in the form of a perforated or scored line that allows the ticket 300 to be partitioned into pieces. The pieces are preferably the value part 302 and the game part 301. This construction is advantageous in that the distributor or seller of the ticket 300 may remove the value part 302 in certain situations. For example, in some states games of chance must be open to play by anyone whether they have paid for the game play or not. The regulations vary from state to state and no attempt will be made to specifically define the various rules and limitations that may be provided by law or according to the organizer's business and game rules. By removing the value part prior to distribution to a free recipient, the free recipient does not receive the value associated with the value part. A purchaser of the ticket does receive the value part which acts as a value voucher, and the value can be saved in hand or in a value saving account, as described further below.

This ability allows the distributor of the tickets to prevent value that purchasers are paying for from being freely given to those only entitled to playing the game part 301 in a chance game. Whether a ticket is purchased or given free, the holder of the game part removes the game indicia 305. If the indicia is a winning symbol, set of symbols or other indicia, then the holder of the game part is entitled to an award. Typically the award is an instant award made at the place of distribution. Other modes of distribution can also be used, such as by redemption to the organizer of the ticket program, or at authorized redemption centers willing to redeem the winning game parts and then send the winning game parts to the organizer for repayment.

Two-Ply Ticket Formation

FIGS. 16-20 illustrate a preferred form of two-ply pull-tab ticket 400 according to the inventions. Ticket 400 has a front which is the outside surface 401 of the first ply 410. Surface 401 advantageously has rules and general information about winning symbol sets or other indicia. It may also have variable advertising, but such is not illustrated in FIGS. 16-20.

FIG. 16 also shows a serial number 402 which serves to distinguish and preferably uniquely identify the ticket. It can be of various forms as explained above in connection with ticket 300. As shown, the ticket identification code 402 is upon the game part 422 of ticket 400 and is used to identify the ticket. In most jurisdictions the ticket identification is either presented in two parts or has two parts. One part identifies the set of tickets and the other part identifies the particular time. FIG. 16 shows a serial number 402 which is a combined ticket identification code that includes a part identifying the set and a second part identifying the particular ticket.

FIG. 17 shows the back 429 of ticket 400 which also is the outside surface 424 of the second ply 420. Second ply 420 preferably has perforations or other lines of weakness 421 which allow a window cover 422 to be opened, as best shown in FIGS. 18-20. The window cover 422 may be completely removed as indicated by FIG. 20. This allows separation of the game part from the value part of the ticket 400.

The outside surface 424 of the second ply 420 is advantageously provided with a purchase price indicator 423. As shown, it is also provided with rules, directions 425 a and/or other information (generally 425) which are generically indicated by X's.

A suitable interior surface is also provided with a value part identification code or registration number 426. This is used to distinguish or uniquely identify the value piece 410 so that the value piece can be redeemed, registered or otherwise identified as needed in the procedures and methods described herein. For example, the value piece identification code 426 may be used to register the value award made by the value piece 410.

As shown, the inside face 428 of the window cover 422 is provided with game indicia 432 which are shown as three matching symbols forming a winning symbol set. The inside face also has a winning amount 433 which as illustrated shows $250. This may be the actual winning amount for the symbol set shown, or an amount of the maximum winning symbol set. If the latter, then the menu or rules shown on either outside face 424 or inside face 427 indicate whether the symbol set 432 is winning or losing and the amount paid for any winning combination or symbol 432.

FIGS. 19 and 20 show that the inside surface 427 of the window cover 422 formed from the second ply 420 may contain additional rules, winning information, redemption techniques or other information.

FIGS. 18 and 19 show the inside surface 411 of the first ply 410 is provided with variable advertising space that is sold by the organizer of the tickets. This variable advertising is described in detail elsewhere herein and will not be repeated here.

FIG. 19 further shows a value piece identification code 436 which is used to redeem or register the value piece for subsequent use either alone or in combination with other value part awards. The value associated with the value part is at least the purchase price 423 or can be a higher value as may be indicated on the value piece, preferably on inside surface 411. FIG. 19 shows a suitable value award 441 which as illustrated is a value of five. The proper value award can also be associated with the value part identification code 436. However, it is preferred to show the value award upon an interior or hidden surface of the ticket so that the value award code cannot be surreptitiously obtained without purchasing the ticket and opening the ticket.

Three-Ply Ticket

FIGS. 21, 22, 23A and 23B show a preferred construction ticket formation according to the inventions. Ticket 500 has a three-ply construction. The first ply 501 has an exterior surface 511 and interior surface 521. The second ply 502 has an exterior surface 512 and interior surface 522. The third ply 503 has an exterior surface 513 and interior surface 523.

FIG. 21 shows the front of the ticket 500 having a front surface formed by the exterior surface 511 of the first ply. Printed or otherwise indicated thereon 2 is the ticket identification code or serial number 514. The front may also include various attractive text or pictures 515 used to make the ticket more attractive to purchasers. It may also include a game name or trademark.

FIG. 22 shows the back face of ticket 500 formed of the exterior surface 513 of the third ply 503. The third ply 503 has perforations or other lines of weakness 543 which define a removable window cover 544. The window cover 544 forms part or all of the value part of ticket 500. The window cover 544 may be removed by opening at the lines of weakness 543.

As shown in FIG. 23A the window cover 544 is opened along three sides and folded forward to show the interior surface 523 of the third ply 503. Included on the surface 523 is a value award indicator 546 which as shown is for $3 worth of savings value which may be used to pay in part for an item purchased from a web based mall or other cooperative trade forum. The value may also be for a value award which is given in points or gift card values which may be used dollar for dollar and can be used to provide the full purchase price of a selected item from the web based mall or other trade forum having a plurality of participating merchants.

The window cover 544 also preferably includes a value part serial or registration number 548 along the inside surface 523 which keeps the value part number hidden until the ticket is opened and used. The registration number is used to register the award in a saving account or validate the value piece if otherwise redeemed.

FIGS. 23A and 23B also show the second ply 502 having a second ply window covering 552 which is shown partly disconnected and folded upward in FIG. 23B. The inside surface 522 can be used to present variable advertising messages (not illustrated). FIG. 24 diagrammatically shows another use of surface 522 which is to present a checkout savings code 562.

FIG. 23B also shows variable advertising messages 567. The interior 8 surface 521 of the first ply also contains a game part 568 which as illustrated is an indication that the holder of this ticket has won $50. The value part formed by window cover 544 may be detached from the game part on interior surface 521 of the first ply 501.

Ticket Handling System and Cooperative Trade Forum 14

FIGS. 25 and 26 show the active parts of a system 600 for using the tickets described herein. The system is organized by an organizer 601 which typically will also be the ticket producer 602, although contract production of the tickets is another alternative.

The organizer 601 contacts advertisers 610 who want to participate by placing variable advertising on one or more tickets contained in a ticket set or group of ticket sets. Contacting by the organizer 601 is represented by arrow 608 in FIG. 25. Participating advertisers pay variable advertising fees for varying exposure on tickets as represented by arrow 609.

The advertisers may employ their own web site 611 to facilitate offering particular products, specially priced products, or their full product or service line to ticket purchasers or recipients 676 (FIG. 26). The ability to offer products or services on the cooperative trade forum 633 or by communications links 612 and 613 (such as via the internet) to the advertiser's web site 611, may be included as part of the advertising costs paid, or there may be a separate charge.

FIG. 25 also shows a savings accountancy 653 which is preferably a computer database which is secure and only assessable by users to their individual accounts. Access is controlled by having proper authentication, such as a PIN number or other verification or authentication parameters. The savings accountancy 653 will have information on each registered user and the items of value which have been registered on the user account. The items of value can be used singularly or by grouping multiple value items so that the use may purchase larger items than otherwise would be possible with the value received from a single ticket.

In one form the user can bank in their individual saving accounts values which are used as a part of an item purchase price or as a supplement to money and shipping and handling charges that must be paid in money or by charge or debit account. In another version of the invention the values may be gift card values which can be used to fully provide the payment of the purchase price. In another form the values may include a point award which may be honored by some of all of the participating merchant or merchant partners 661.

FIG. 25 shows that the organizer 601 makes arrangements or contracts with the participating merchants as represented by arrow 662. Fees may optionally be paid by the participating merchants to the organizer as represented by arrow 663. The merchants may also have a merchant web site 664 which is linked by communications linkages 665 and 666 to allow presentation of goods and services offered by the merchant. The trade forum 633 has a plurality of participating merchants which allow a person having ticket values which can be redeemed by purchasing from a variety of different merchants. This is in contrast to earlier coupons that allow discounts or credits for particular services or goods offered by a single advertiser.

FIG. 25 also shows an auction system 691 which can interface with the web based mall or other trade forum to expand the goods and services being offered and allow bidding to determine the prices for the auction goods. The bids may use any registered type of value.

FIGS. 25 and 26 show the savings accounts are available for use by link in the web based mall for some or all of the purchase prices.

FIG. 26 shows that tickets are typically distributed by ticket wholesale distributors 702 who pay the organizer for sets of tickets and then sell the tickets to distributing retailers 703. The distributing retailers are typically obligated to pay any game winnings 706 directly to their purchaser, recipient or holder of the game part of the tickets. The value part of the tickets are redeemable by the holder to the retailers or through authorized redemption centers 710. Redemption centers may receive redemption from the organizer. The free recipients of the game part of the tickets may be required to redeem the winning game parts directly to the organizer.

Methods

Various methods and aspects and features thereof have been explained herein and will not be repeated.

Methods according to the invention may include methods for producing chance tickets. The methods include selling advertising space for a ticket or multiple tickets comprising part of a set of chance tickets. The number or frequency of advertising messages purchased or otherwise allocated in the production of the ticket set may be adjusted as desired by the particular advertiser. Thus the advertiser may select any number of messages from the total number of advertising messages available for a particular set of tickets.

The methods further include involving and selling advertising to multiple advertisers in the production of a ticket set. This allows multiple advertisers to participate, yet reduces costs compared to the purchase of advertising for an entire set of tickets.

The set of tickets are produced by producing each ticket with a potentially different and variable advertising messages from multiple advertisers. The frequency may vary dependent upon the total chance tickets per set.

Methods according hereto may also include producing groups of tickets which may comprise a game or multiple games wherein the set or sets of tickets of the group have different advertisers or be directed at different market areas.

A method for producing chance tickets comprising: taking advertising orders from multiple advertisers who desire to have advertising sections included on chance tickets which form a set of chance tickets; said set of chance tickets including a plurality of chance tickets each chance ticket having at least one symbol set which is hidden when distributed by a distributor and then opened by an end user to reveal the at least one symbol set, said at least one symbol set including at least one symbol that is indicative of a winning condition or a non-winning condition of the symbol set; producing said set of chance tickets with advertising sections on individual chance tickets which vary from ticket to ticket with different advertisements from different advertisers.

A method according to the prior paragraph wherein said producing includes having the frequency of advertisements be variable by advertiser.

Further Aspects and Features

The above description has set out various features and aspects of the invention and the preferred embodiments thereof. Such aspects and features may further be defined according to the following claims which may individually or in various combinations help to define the invention.

Interpretation Note

The invention has been described in language directed to the current embodiments shown and described with regard to various structural and methodological features. The scope of protection as defined by the claims is not intended to be necessarily limited to the specific features shown and described. Other forms and equivalents for implementing the inventions can be made without departing from the scope of concepts properly protected hereby.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7059514 *May 20, 2005Jun 13, 2006Peters Darin LLottery-type ticket having a winner indication
US7357393Feb 2, 2004Apr 15, 2008Gtech Rhode Island CorporationPlayer key for an instant-win lottery ticket and method for validating same
US7922178Apr 8, 2008Apr 12, 2011Gtech Rhode Island CorporationPlayer key for an instant-win lottery ticket and method for validating same
US7946922Mar 5, 2008May 24, 2011Howard Hung YinAdvertising funded gaming system
US8047907 *May 19, 2005Nov 1, 2011Scientific Games Holdings LimitedMethod and apparatus for conducting a game of chance using pull-tab tickets
US8220798Jan 31, 2011Jul 17, 2012Gtech Rhode Island CorporationPlayer key for an instant-win lottery ticket and method for validating same
US8403760May 23, 2011Mar 26, 2013Howard Hung YinAdvertising funded gaming system
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/269
International ClassificationG09F23/10, A63F3/06, G09F1/00, G09F1/04
Cooperative ClassificationG09F1/00, G09F23/10, G09F1/04, A63F3/069, A63F2250/22
European ClassificationG09F23/10, A63F3/06F6, G09F1/00, G09F1/04