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Publication numberUS20050265317 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/124,830
Publication dateDec 1, 2005
Filing dateMay 9, 2005
Priority dateMay 7, 2004
Also published asUS7523178, US8635265, US20050262238, US20060031525
Publication number11124830, 124830, US 2005/0265317 A1, US 2005/265317 A1, US 20050265317 A1, US 20050265317A1, US 2005265317 A1, US 2005265317A1, US-A1-20050265317, US-A1-2005265317, US2005/0265317A1, US2005/265317A1, US20050265317 A1, US20050265317A1, US2005265317 A1, US2005265317A1
InventorsDamian Reeves, Ben Mansell, Owen Garrett, Crispin Flowerday
Original AssigneeZeus Technology Limited
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Managing the flow of data traffic
US 20050265317 A1
Abstract
Flow of data traffic between at least one server and a plurality of clients is managed. Client-side connections are provided and server-side connections are provided. An isolated processing environment is created responsive to instructions specific to the environment. Isolated environment specific instructions are received, defining a traffic management rule. A request from a client, via an established client-side connection, is received and a response is made following the environment specific instructions.
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Claims(30)
1. A method of managing the flow of data traffic between at least one server and a plurality of clients, comprising the steps of
providing browser-side connections;
providing server-side connections;
creating an isolated processing environment responsive to instructions specific to said environment;
receiving isolated environment-specific instructions defining a traffic management rule;
receiving a request from a client via an established browser-side connection; and
responding to said request in response to said environment-specific instructions.
2. A method according to claim 1, wherein said environment-specific instructions result in communication with said server via a server-side connection.
3. A method according to claim 1, wherein said environment-specific instructions identify a requirement for additional information, the further execution of said instructions is placed in a wait state and a request is made for said additional information.
4. A method according to claim 3, wherein other requests are serviced while said execution is in said wait state.
5. A method according to claim 3, wherein said execution is resumed upon receiving the requested information.
6. A method according to claim 3, wherein said additional information is requested from said requesting client.
7. A method according to claim 3, wherein said additional information is requested from an independent source.
8. A method according to claim 7, wherein the communication of data from said independent source is a secure communication.
9. A method according to claim 7, wherein said independent source is a database.
10. A method according to claim 1, wherein said environment specific instructions are obtained in response to a compilation of a high level script.
11. Apparatus for managing the flow of data traffic between at least one server and a plurality of clients, comprising a processor, memory and network connections, wherein said processor is configured to:
provide browser-side connections;
provide server-side connections;
create an isolated processing environment responsive to instructions specific to said environment;
receive isolated environment-specific instructions defining a traffic management rule;
receive a request from a client via an established browser-side connection; and
respond to said request in response to said environment-specific instructions.
12. Apparatus according to claim 11, wherein said environment-specific instructions result in communication with said server via a server-side connection.
13. Apparatus according to claim 11, wherein said environment-specific instructions identify a requirement for additional information, the further execution of said instructions is placed in a wait state and a request is made for said additional information.
14. Apparatus according to claim 13, wherein other requests are serviced while said execution is in said wait state.
15. Apparatus according to claim 13, wherein said execution is resumed upon receiving the requested information.
16. Apparatus according to claim 13, wherein said additional information is requested from said requesting client.
17. Apparatus according to claim 13, wherein said additional information is requested from an independent source.
18. Apparatus according to claim 17, wherein the communication of data from said independent source is a secure communication.
19. Apparatus according to claim 17, wherein said independent source is a database.
20. Apparatus according to claim 11, wherein said environment specific instructions are obtained in response to a compilation of a high level script.
21. A computer-readable medium having computer-readable instructions contained thereon, wherein when executed by a computer said instructions configure said computer to:
provide browser-side connections to and from a plurality of clients;
provide server-side connections to and from at least one server;
create an isolated processing environment responsive to instructions specific to said environment;
receive isolated environment-specific instructions defining a traffic management rule;
receive a request from a client via an established browser-side connection; and
respond to said request in response to said environment-specific instructions.
22. A computer-readable medium according to claim 21, wherein said environment-specific instructions result in communication with said server via a server-side connection.
23. A computer-readable medium according to claim 21, wherein said environment-specific instructions identify a requirement for additional information, the further execution of said instructions is placed in a wait state and a request is made for said additional information.
24. A computer-readable medium according to claim 23, wherein other requests are serviced while said execution is in said wait state.
25. A computer-readable medium according to claim 23, wherein said execution is resumed upon receiving the requested information.
26. A computer-readable medium according to claim 23, wherein said additional information is requested from said requesting client.
27. A computer-readable medium according to claim 23, wherein said additional information is requested from an independent source.
28. A computer-readable medium according to claim 27, wherein the communication of data from said independent source is a secure communication.
29. A computer-readable medium according to claim 27, wherein said independent source is a database.
30. A computer-readable medium according to claim 21, wherein said environment specific instructions are obtained in response to a compilation of a high level script.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to managing the flow of data traffic between at least one server and plurality of clients.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    A problem concerning data traffic managing systems is that of how to define functionality. The design of such systems is complicated greatly if it is necessary to access external sources, such as client databases to determine, for example, appropriate levels of client access. The situation is complicated further in that the implementation of standard engineering techniques could easily undermine requirements for security and resistance to unauthorised communications.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    According to an aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method of managing the flow of data traffic between at least one server and a plurality of clients, comprising the steps of providing browser-side connections, providing server-side connections, creating an isolated processing environment responsive to instructions specific to said environment, receiving isolated environment-specific instructions defining a traffic management rule, receiving a request from a client via an established browser-side connection, and responding to the request in response to said environment-specific instructions.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0004]
    FIG. 1 shows an environment in which communication is provided between a server and browsing clients;
  • [0005]
    FIG. 2 shows a hardware platform for implementing traffic management instructions;
  • [0006]
    FIG. 3 shows operations performed by the traffic management system;
  • [0007]
    FIG. 4 shows procedures for configuring the traffic management system;
  • [0008]
    FIG. 5 shows an illustration of a compilation process;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 6 shows an example of main memory contents;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 7 shows a table of active connections;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 8 shows the execution of traffic management instructions;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 9 shows operations performed by a listener object;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 10 shows client management procedures;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 11 shows procedures for ending client management;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 12 shows ongoing client request processing;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 13 shows server management processing;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 14 shows the ending of server management;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 15 shows details of a client connection object;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 16 shows the processing of a cached server connection object;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 17 shows a typical set of relationships;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 18 details procedures for implementing script-based processing shown in FIG. 10;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 19 details procedures for the execution of a script instruction shown in FIG. 18;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 20 shows an example of steps performed to obtain data during FIG. 18;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 21 shows details steps taken during FIG. 21 to process an Internet access manager object;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 22 shows an example of the syntax used in the high level language for defining traffic management; and
  • [0026]
    FIG. 23 shows a further example of the syntax used in the high level language.
  • WRITTEN DESCRIPTION OF THE BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION
  • [0000]
    FIG. 1
  • [0027]
    An environment in which communication is provided between a server and many clients is illustrated in FIG. 1. In this example, a network connection is provided via the Internet and the invention is (although not exclusively) applicable to this environment, given that situations often arise where many (many thousands for example) of browsing clients are requesting data from the same Internet address or website; whereupon a substantial resource is required at the server in order to provide service to all of these requesting browsers at an appropriate level. However, in other embodiments clients could be using other protocols such as Web-Services or SOAP, or could be HTTP clients on networks other than the Internet. The Internet is used here merely as an example of a popular application of the invention.
  • [0028]
    In this example, clients 102 to 106 are shown, although it should be appreciated that this is merely representative of the many thousands of clients requesting data from the server. These browsing clients include personal computers equipped with browsing software, such as “Internet Explorer”, “Mozilla”, “Firefox” and “Safari” for example. Browsing devices also include mobile wireless connected devices, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs), smart phones and any other form of equipment with Internet connection functionality.
  • [0029]
    Server 107 provides services such as the provision of webpages and secure online sales to connected clients, including clients 102 to 106. Secure data store 108 stores details concerning regular customers (in this example including some of clients 102 to 106) who have, for example, accounts relating to online sales and levels of privileged access to services provided by the site or sites hosted by server 107. A server may be any processing system configured to service client requests of some kind, such as requests for information or requests to write to a database.
  • [0030]
    Server site 107 includes physical serving devices (servers) 109 to 116 organised into three server pools consisting of, in this example, a first pool 117, a second pool 118 and a third pool 119. The first pool 117 is for the secure servers running secure protocols, suitable for online sales and other secure transactions. The second pool 118 provides dynamic webpage content requiring a relatively high level of server processing and the third pool 119 includes a collection of inexpensive commodity servers for the serving of static webpages.
  • [0031]
    A traffic management system 120 monitors client requests and directs requests to an appropriate server pool. To do this, the system is provided with functionality enabling it to analyse client requests in detail. Furthermore, additional operations are carried out by the traffic management system (during and after request analysis), in order to maintain a high number of simultaneously connected clients without overloading any of the servers 109 to 116.
  • [0032]
    In order to facilitate the configuration of the servers and the traffic management system 120, an administration station 121 is provided, having human interface peripheral equipment including a monitor and a keyboard etc.
  • [0033]
    A data-carrying medium such as a CD-ROM or DVD etc is illustrated at 122 as a means for supplying executable instructions for the traffic managing process to a traffic management platform. Alternatively, traffic managing instructions may be loaded onto the traffic management platform from the Internet and the transfer of such instructions may be controlled via the administration station 121. An network 123 connects the servers 109 to 116 with the traffic management system 120 and the Internet 101. Thus, in the embodiment, the traffic management system is implemented by a programmable platform having executable instructions installed-thereon.
  • [0034]
    In an alternative embodiment, it is possible for several traffic management systems to be provided, all of which are configured to manage what is perceived as the same Internet site. Each traffic management system would be connected to all of the servers. In the following description, reference is made to a single traffic management system but it should be appreciated that the following description also applies to situations in which a plurality of traffic management systems are provided. When multiple traffic management systems are used, each system is assigned a different address or addresses, or alternatively multiple servers can share the same IP address. The URL for the site is assigned a range of addresses, one of which is selected by the client browser, resulting in the substantially random selection of systems among multiple clients, which is the technique known as round-robin DNS.
  • [0035]
    A difficulty associated with the design of sophisticated traffic management systems concerns the amount of processing overhead that is required, both in the traffic management systems and in the connected servers, to support large numbers of simultaneous client connections. Slow client connections such as those provided by dial-up modems worsen the problem because each connection is held open for the duration of a longer period of data transfer, thereby increasing the number of simultaneous connections that must be held open for the same number of connected clients.
  • [0036]
    It is well known that servers (such as servers 109 to 116) have limits as to the number of simultaneous connections that can be made. For example, in the case of the widely used APACHE webserver, a maximum number of simultaneous connections is two hundred and fifty-six and this number can be used up relatively easily when a significant number of dial-up modems are connected or when an even larger number of high-bandwidth digital subscriber line (DSL) connected clients are accessing the same webpages.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 2
  • [0037]
    Instructions for the implementation of traffic management are executed on a hardware platform such as that illustrated in FIG. 2. The traffic management platform is controlled by the administration station 121 and therefore does not require its own output monitor or input keyboard etc. Typically, hardware of this type is in the form of a rack-mounted unit and several such units may be provided within a rack so as to provide a degree of redundancy in case of hardware failure. It should also be appreciated that servers 109 to 116 may be configured in a similar fashion.
  • [0038]
    A central processing unit 201 is provided such as a Pentium IV running at 3.2 gigahertz and including on chip primary and secondary cache, facilitating the provision of access to frequently used instructions and data.
  • [0039]
    Main memory 202 may comprise two gigabytes of dynamic RAM facilitating the storage of instructions and data to allow regular access while the system is in operation. A hard disk drive 203 of typically sixty gigabytes provides non-volatile storage of instructions and configuration data. In addition, disk 203 also provides access to infrequently used data during operation. Upon system initialisation, configuration files and executable instructions are loaded from disk drive 203 and stored in main memory 202.
  • [0040]
    For the optional loading of traffic managing instructions from data carrying media, a CD-ROM/DVD drive 204 is provided, configurable to receive instructions from an instruction carrying medium, such as disk 122. In addition, one or more network connections are provided by at least one network interface 205 thereby allowing the traffic management system to connect to the network 123 and the Internet 101. Internally, the devices 201 to 205 are connected by a data bus 206.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 3
  • [0041]
    Operations performed with respect to the traffic management system 120 are illustrated in FIG. 3. At step 301 power is supplied to the system and a question is asked at step 302 as to whether instructions have been installed. When answered in the negative, a question is asked at step 303 as to whether a network installation is to be performed. When answered in the affirmative, instructions are installed from the network at step 304 or, alternatively, when answered in the negative, instructions are installed from CD-ROM at step 305.
  • [0042]
    At step 306 a question is asked as to whether the traffic management system is to be configured and when answered in the affirmative, system configuration is performed at step 307. When answered in the negative or upon completion of step 307, the traffic management instructions run at step 308.
  • [0043]
    Upon completion of the run, a question is asked at step 309 as to whether reconfiguration is required which, when answered in the affirmative, results in control returning to step 307 for the reconfiguration to be performed. When answered in the negative, the system is powered down at step 310.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 4
  • [0044]
    Procedures 307 shown in FIG. 3 for the configuration of the traffic management system are detailed in FIG. 4. At step 401 server configuration is performed which involves accessing configuration parameters for each of the servers 109 to 116. The individual servers are assigned to pools and this pool configuration data is then supplied to the traffic management system.
  • [0045]
    At step 402 traffic management configuration scripts are generated and edited as appropriate. The scripts are written in a high level language to simplify the definition of the decision making processes for traffic management and routing.
  • [0046]
    At step 403 the traffic management scripts are compiled by the execution of a compiler on the administration station 121. Thus, following this compilation exercise, binary executable instructions are generated for execution on a virtual processor, described below, running on the traffic management system 120.
  • [0047]
    The compilation of scripts may result in the generation of syntax or other errors which are identified by the compiler during the execution of step 403 and displayed to an operator at the administration station 121. If compilation is not successful, it is necessary for the errors to be fixed by an editing operation being performed on the offending script or scripts. Thus, at step 404 a question is asked as to whether compilation has been successful and if answered in the negative control is returned to step 402.
  • [0048]
    At step 405, following successful compilation, compiled scripts are uploaded to the traffic management system 120. The uploaded scripts are stored on hard disk drive 203, for subsequent loading into main memory 202 when the system 120 is operating. In an alternative embodiment, the traffic management system 120 includes a compiler and is passed the source text of the rule for compilation.
  • [0049]
    It is also possible for operational errors to be detected during the testing of new scripts, during trial runs of the traffic management system. Thus, when these situations occur, it is also necessary for an editing and recompilation process to be performed by an operator of the administration station. Alternatively, the editing and compilation may be performed at a different site, whereafter compiled instructions may be returned to the server environment, preferably via a secure link.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 5
  • [0050]
    An illustration of the compilation process is shown in FIG. 5. High level language configuration scripts 501 to 503 are compiled (by process 403) into respective files of binary executable code 504, 505 and 506 containing instructions for a virtual processor running on the traffic management system 120.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 6
  • [0051]
    An example of the data content of main memory 202 is given in FIG. 6. At 601, an operating system is stored, such as Linux® or another appropriate OS.
  • [0052]
    At 602 traffic management instructions are stored, derived possibly via an installation process from CD-ROM as previously described.
  • [0053]
    At 603 configuration data is stored, such as that defining the grouping of servers into pools, plus the IP address or addresses assigned to the traffic management system.
  • [0054]
    Compiled scripts, such as scripts 504, 505 and 506 previously described with reference to FIG. 5 are stored at 604.
  • [0055]
    At 605 a table of active connections is stored. Connections are made (typically TCP/IP connections) between the traffic manager 120 and the client browsers, which may be referred to as client-side connections. In addition, the traffic management system 120 also makes separate connections to the servers, which may be referred to as server-side connections. All of the established connections, client-side and server-side, are listed in the table of active connections, as detailed in FIG. 7.
  • [0056]
    At 606 worker objects are stored. Each connection has an associated worker object and these worker objects come in different forms, such that each has a specialised task. When the traffic management system starts up, it starts with a single worker object, specialised as a listener, illustrated at 607. The listener object 607 has the sole task of listening for incoming new connections from clients. The listener creates a new worker object (608) when it gets a new client trying to make such a connection. This new object is specialised as a “client manager” and client manager objects typically require access to the server so that these in turn create a “server manager” object 609.
  • [0057]
    Thus, the traffic management instructions make provision for the inclusion of a worker-based class, from which several other specialised classes inherit common functionality, such as the ability to read from and write to the TCP/IP connection. These derived classes are customised into different variants but generally, the worker objects, regardless of specialisation, are treated equally.
  • [0058]
    A client connection cache is provided at 611. The cache 611 stores connections from clients that can be reused by the client rather than establishing new connections. In the example shown, the client connection cache 611 includes cached client connections 612 to 617. These are connections that have been maintained by HTTP keep alive protocols, or are simply those which have not yet been disconnected by the client.
  • [0059]
    At 618 there is provided a server connection cache. Cache 618 stores details of cached connections to servers that can be reused. The cache includes details of cached server connections 619 to 623 and these connections are reused preferably on a most-recently-used (MRU) basis. Thus the cache operates an MRU-cache policy, since more recently used connections are less likely to be broken by the server through a timeout. The cached connections can only be reused if they provide connection to the required pool, so that the cache includes server-pool assignment information. Thus, in this way, it is possible to reuse at least one of the server-side connections for one or more of the client-side connections. This makes better use of the limited number of server-side connections available (effectively allowing them to be shared over a number of browsers) while at the same time minimising the re-establishment of connections which in turn reduces processor overhead.
  • [0060]
    At 624 instructions for virtual processors are stored, including virtual processors 625, 626 and 627. These virtual processors are created and deleted as required by the worker objects 606. Typically, a virtual processor object is created when a new client connection is made. The virtual processor object executes the compiled scripts 604, to determine whether traffic management actions need to be taken for the new connection. These actions include the possible instant discarding of the connection, without making connection to the server at all, which may occur, for example, for security reasons.
  • [0061]
    At 628 a connection work list is stored. During operation, the traffic management system may or may not require processing to be performed on each of the connections in the table of active connections. The connection work list indicates which of the active connections require work to be done. It also defines whether the work to be done includes a read, or write operation for the active connection.
  • [0062]
    A table of active connections 605 is detailed in FIG. 7.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 7
  • [0063]
    Each TCP/IP connection used by the traffic management system 120 is assigned a file ID by the operating system 601. The numerical value of the file ID is arbitrary and is provided as a unique way of identifying a connection.
  • [0064]
    The table of active connections associates active connections 701 with worker objects 702 that handle the connections. For example, the listener worker object 607 is associated with a connection that has a numerical file ID value (1). The client manager 608, the server manager 609 and another client manager 610 are each associated with a file ID (7, 8 and 40 respectively) for a particular connection.
  • [0065]
    When the traffic management system is started, only the listener object is present. However, as clients make requests, many hundred of such entries will exist in the table of active connections 605.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 8
  • [0066]
    The execution of traffic manager instructions 308 (identified in FIG. 3) is detailed in FIG. 8.
  • [0067]
    At step 801 data structures are initialised and at step 802 a single worker object is created that specialises in listening (usually on port 80) for incoming client requests. This is the listener object 607.
  • [0068]
    At step 803 a connection work list 628 is initialised by asking each of the worker objects what it needs to do next, that is to say, whether the object needs to read, write or do nothing. Initially, there will only be the listener object, which always requests a read operation, on the basis that its purpose is to identify attempts made by clients to make open a connection.
  • [0069]
    There is a procedure for checking all connections using the operating system call select( ). This is called with three arguments, in the form select(arg1, arg2, arg3). When considered at the operating system level, connections of this type are usually referred to as “sockets” and when making this call, arg1 is the pointer to a bit field that specifies (by means of which bits are set and which bits are clear) which of the file IDs are to be read from. File IDs are numerical values such that, if bit1 is set in arg1, that means “read from the connection assigned to file ID No 1”. By setting several of the bits, a request is made to see whether there is data available to be read from the corresponding connection. This operation does not read the data. What happens is that the set bits are cleared if there is no data to be read from that file ID. Thus, upon return from execution, the system is provided with a pattern of bits in arg1 that identify the requested connections from which data is available to be read.
  • [0070]
    A similar operation is performed for arg2 with respect to writing. Thus, connections for writing to are specified by setting bits and those that are still set in arg2 upon exit are those which are ready for writing to.
  • [0071]
    For the argument arg3, upon exit, bits are set for those connections where an exception (an error) condition has occurred. The connection work list 628 effectively supplies arguments arg1 and arg2 on entry to step 804. On exit from step 804, the connection work list has now been updated. Thus, having started with a list of connections for which work would like to be done, a list of connections is provided that are now ready for work to be done.
  • [0072]
    At step 805 a connection in the updated connection work list is selected. At step 806 the worker object associated with that connection is identified by consulting the table of active connections 605, as detailed in FIG. 7.
  • [0073]
    At step 807 processing is performed in response to the instructions of the worker object. Thus, this involves object processing for the worker types listener, client manager, server manager, cached client connection, cached server connection and Internet access manager. The cached connections have worker objects as various maintenance operations are required even though these connections are effectively dormant. In particular, an unused connection may be broken by the other party, meaning that it can no longer be used and should therefore be removed from the cache. Each client request includes information on whether the connection should be kept alive or closed. This information is removed by a traffic manager before the request is forwarded to a server. Similar information is included in server responses, and is likewise removed.
  • [0074]
    At step 808 a question is asked as to whether all connections in the work list have been serviced and when answered in the negative control is returned to step 805 whereupon the next connection is selected.
  • [0075]
    When the question asked at step 808 is answered in the affirmative, to the effect that all of the connections have been serviced, a question is asked at step 809 as to whether traffic management is to continue. When answered in the affirmative, control is returned to step 803 resulting in the re-initialisation of the connection work list. Alternatively, if the question asked at step 809 is answered in the negative, the traffic management system is shut down at step 810.
  • [0076]
    Thus, the operations shown in FIG. 8 represent the top-level procedures for the traffic management. Step 807 includes the creation and deletion of additional specialised worker objects as necessary. The performance of reading and writing data, using non-blocking I/O calls, is performed at step 807 and is detailed below.
  • [0077]
    In this embodiment, the system operates using a single operating thread or process thereby providing an advantage to the effect that operating system overheads associated with large numbers of threads are avoided. Typically, existing traffic managers and servers operate one thread per connection, thereby increasing the amount of memory and system processing required to set up, manage and maintain each connection. The system outlined in FIG. 1 avoids the need to do this and furthermore provides a framework within which non-blocking reads and writes to TCP/IP (and possibly UDP/IP) socket connections can be applied efficiently.
  • [0078]
    It is possible for multiple instantiations of the process shown in FIG. 8 to be provided on one or several processors or traffic managing systems, thereby maintaining these advantages even within a multi-processor system or other distributed processing environment.
  • [0079]
    Operations performed at step 807 for a listener work object are detailed in FIG. 9.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 9
  • [0080]
    At step 901 a new request is received from a client. A listener object listens on port 80 (the standard port for making a new client request). A client issuing a request can either reuse an existing keep alive connection to the traffic manager or create a new TCP/IP connection on which to transmit the request.
  • [0081]
    Thus at step 902 a question is asked as to whether this request has been received by the listener object, meaning that a new connection is required, or by a client manager object in the connection cache. If it has been received by a client manager object then the cached connection for that object is to be used and so this procedure is completed.
  • [0082]
    If it is received by the listener object then at step 903 a new worker object specialising as client manager is created. Thus, for example client manager 608 would be created at this step because there is a client making a request for some data, such as a webpage, to be supplied from the server.
  • [0083]
    At step 904 a new connection (socket) is created and the file ID for this connection is entered in the table of active connections. To achieve this, a system call accept( ) is made. This takes the incoming client request, accepts it as a valid TCP request and sets up a new additional socket for the connection. The new worker object is associated with the client connection at step 905. The connection has its own unique file ID and a new entry is made in the table of active connections 605, associating the file ID for the connection with the new worker object which, in this example, is a worker object specialised as a client manager object 608.
  • [0084]
    The effect of steps 903 to 905 is to set up a client manager object for an incoming client request on a new channel. The client manager object has its own connection with the client that can be read from and written to as required. At this stage, it is not yet known which server is to be assigned to the new client.
  • [0085]
    Once the new client manager object has been created and is present in the list of active connections, it will be processed eventually as one of the worker objects and thereby dealt with in the main loop of steps 805 to 808.
  • [0086]
    The processing procedures implemented by a client manager object are detailed in FIG. 10.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 10
  • [0087]
    At step 1001 a question is asked as to whether a server has already been assigned to handle the client request. Initially, when a client manager object 608 has been created, it will only have a connection with the client. It uses this connection to receive the request in full and to analyse it. Based upon this analysis, a server pool is chosen based on the nature of the request being made (for a secure transaction, dynamic content or static web content for example). The client manager object does not itself communicate directly with the server and this communication is facilitated by a server manager created for the purpose.
  • [0088]
    If the question asked at step 1001 is answered in the affirmative, to the effect that a server has already been assigned, control is directed to step 1013 for the ongoing client request processing. If the question asked at step 1001 is answered in the negative, a non-blocking read of the client request is made at step 1002.
  • [0089]
    At step 1002 the data from the client is read, so a certain amount of data is received but control is never interrupted, regardless of the quantity of data that is supplied by the client connection.
  • [0090]
    At step 1003 script-based processing of the client request is made, resulting in the request being analysed in accordance with the compiled scripts 604.
  • [0091]
    At step 1004 a question is asked as to whether the script-based processing is conclusive and when answered in the negative control is directed to step 808. It is possible that not enough data has been received from the client to analyse the request conclusively. If the script-based processing requires more data, processing states are stored for later recovery once more data has been received. However, for the time being, this concludes the client manager's processing operations given that no more can be done without the data.
  • [0092]
    At step 1005 a question is asked as to whether a server is required and when answered in the negative, this results in the end of client management at step 106 and again control effectively directed to step 808.
  • [0093]
    To reach step 1005, the script-based processing must have been successful and this typically results in an indication to the effect that a server from a particular pool is required. However, this is not always the result and sometimes a request is malformed or a time-out expires before enough data is received. In these cases, a server is not required and the client is discarded.
  • [0094]
    If a server is required, as identified at step 1005, the script-based processing will have defined which pool the server should belong to. It may also define other parameters, including specifying how requests should be modified before being passed to the server and also how server data should be modified before being passed to the client. In the embodiment, such modification procedures are important because the traffic manager must operate transparently between the client and server. However, this is often requires at least some modification of client requests. Complex modifications can occur, even to the extent that secure connections may be established between the client and the traffic management system and between the traffic management system and the server, so as to establish full end-to-end security, even when the traffic management system is analysing each new client request.
  • [0095]
    In response to the question asked at step 1005 being answered in the affirmative, control is directed to step 1007. At step 1007 a new worker object is created that specialises as server manager object. Thus, a server manager object is created to provide communication with a selected server.
  • [0096]
    At step 1008 a question is asked as to whether to reuse a connection in the server connection cache. Although the traffic manager generally uses the most-recently-used connection in the cache in preference to using any other cached connection or establishing a new connection, the answering of this question depends also on an analysis of which server will serve the client most quickly. Thus it may be quicker to open a new connection to a server that is currently processing only a few requests than to use a cached connection. Other factors could be that a server recently processed a similar request and thus might be expected to have the required information in its RAM, or that one server is known to be more reliable than another. Thus the traffic manager first decides whether there are available connections in the cache to be reused, and then decides between them or considers whether it would be better to use a new connection based on which server is likely to respond fastest to the client.
  • [0097]
    If the question asked at step 1008 is answered in the affirmative, to the effect that a cached connection is to be reused, control is directed to step 1010 resulting in the reuse of an existing server connection identified from the server connection cache.
  • [0098]
    If the question asked at step 1008 is answered in the negative, a new socket is created and its file ID is put in the table of active connections at step 1009.
  • [0099]
    The completion of step 1009 or step 1010 results in control being directed to step 1011. At step 1011 a new worker object is associated with the server connection.
  • [0100]
    At step 1012 the client manager object is associated with the new server manager object. Thus, at this stage, two worker objects have been established. The client manager 608 handles the connection between the traffic management system 120 and the client 103. The server manager object handles the connection between the system 120 and a server 115. An association with each other to allow data to pass between them is achieved in this example by each object having a pointer to the other. Data may be passed by exchanging pointers to buffers. The buffers may be circular buffers of limited size, thereby providing a flow control mechanism.
  • [0101]
    At step 1013 ongoing client request processing is conducted. Having set up the server manager object, there is now the potential for communication between the client and a server, which occurs at this stage. This is mainly the transfer of data from the server which is then subsequently modified by the traffic management system and supplied to the client.
  • [0102]
    At step 1014 a question is asked as to whether an error occurred while processing the client request. This can occur particularly when a cached connection is selected for reuse at the same time as the server decides to close the connection, for example due to a timeout. The traffic management system will receive an error when it attempts to issue a request down this closed connection. Thus if this question is answered in the affirmative control is returned to step 1007 to identify a new connection.
  • [0103]
    Procedures 1006 for ending client management are detailed in FIG. 11.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 11
  • [0104]
    When ending client management, the previously used client connection can be put back into the client connection cache for possible reuse. Cached client connections have their own specialised worker objects in the form of cached client connection objects.
  • [0105]
    At step 1101 a cached client connection object is created as a new worker object specialised for this purpose.
  • [0106]
    At step 1102 the new worker object is associated with a client connection. Thus, in the table of active connections 605, the object associated with the client connection is changed from the client connection manager object to the new cached client connection object.
  • [0107]
    At step 1103 the new worker object is placed in the client connection cache. To implement this, a pointer to the new client connection object is stored in the client connection cache 611 (the client connection cache is configured to store pointers to these worker objects, not to the connections themselves).
  • [0108]
    At step 1104 the client manager object is deleted; the connection has been cached and the client manager is no longer required.
  • [0109]
    Step 1013 for ongoing client request processing was identified in FIG. 10 and this is now detailed in FIG. 12.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 12
  • [0110]
    Steps identified in FIG. 12 are not completed in a single iteration. Each time the process detailed in FIG. 12 is encountered, the current processing context is retrieved at step 1201 and processing may then re-establish at any of steps 1202 to 1205, effectively where it left off previously.
  • [0111]
    Thus, at step 1201 the current client request processing context is retrieved. The client request processing context is a pointer to any of steps 1202 to 1205 identifying the point where processing in a previous iteration of the steps terminated. Thus, after step 1201, processing is resumed at any point in steps 1202 to 1205.
  • [0112]
    At step 1202 a non-blocking read operation is performed from the client connection so as to read as much data as is presently available on the client connection.
  • [0113]
    At step 1203 a client request is modified as necessary and supplied to the associated server manager. In the embodiment, this modification process may include decrypting a secure HTTPS connection.
  • [0114]
    At step 1204 served data is modified as necessary and supplied to the client. Served data is received from the associated server manager object and supplied to the connection client. Again, in the embodiment, this may include encrypting data for a secure HTTPS client connection.
  • [0115]
    At step 1205 the client management process ends.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 13
  • [0116]
    Server manager object processing is detailed in FIG. 13. This represents the processing performed in response to the object created at step 1007 and again the steps are not completed in a single pass. Each time the processing is picked up, it continues after the point in steps 1302 to 1306 that it previously reached.
  • [0117]
    At step 1301 the current server object context is received, thereby resulting in the recommencement of processing from one of steps 1302 to 1305.
  • [0118]
    At step 1302 client request data is received from the client manager object until the request has been completed or until the buffer is full. The client manager object coupled with the server manager object it creates at step 1007. At step 1302, the server manager object picks up data (having been modified as necessary) from the client manager. It tries to get the full request so it can pass this on to the server. However, the request may not necessarily be complete or may be too long to fit in the buffer that is used to communicate between the client and server manager objects; there is a limit, given that there can be large numbers of worker-object pairs communicating in this way. If the request is not fully received, the context is saved and processing picks up at the same point in the next iteration.
  • [0119]
    At step 1303 a non-blocking write is made to the server connection of the client request, possibly in modified form. Thus, another non-blocking connection operation is provided, this time writing to the server connection.
  • [0120]
    At step 1304 a non-blocking read from the server connection is made, which is the point at which data is picked up from the server, ready to be supplied to the client.
  • [0121]
    At step 1305, data is transmitted to the client manager object. The client and server managers communicate with each other. This time, the server object supplies the data it has received from the server to the client manager object using internal memory buffers in main memory to facilitate this communication.
  • [0122]
    At step 1306, the server management ends. Once the full request and receive cycle is over (even if it is just for a single graphic for example) the server manager object is deleted and the connection it created (or re-used) is put in the server connection cache.
  • [0123]
    This process is described for protocols such as HTTP where the client “talks first”. When using protocols where the server “talks first”, such as SMTP or FTP, this process is slightly different.
  • [0124]
    Procedure 1306 for ending server management is detailed in FIG. 14.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 14
  • [0125]
    At step 1401, as part of the server management ending procedure 1306, a question is asked as to whether the connection is to be cached. A possible reason why a traffic manager might decide not to cache a connection is because it has a lot of cached connections to a server with a small concurrency limit, and caching more connections could result in other traffic managers being unable to access that server. Thus if the question is answered in the negative control is directed to step 1406 to discard the connection.
  • [0126]
    If the question is answered in the affirmative, then the connection is recorded as the most recently used server connection. Server connections are reused in part according to a MRU-cache policy, and therefore it is necessary to note the recency of connections as they are placed in the cache. This can be achieved, for example, by the ordering of a linked list of cached objects.
  • [0127]
    At step 1403, a worker object is created that specialises as a cached server connection object. Cached server connections require maintenance, and therefore each has its own specialised worker object as described below.
  • [0128]
    At step 1404, the new worker object is associated with the server connection. Thus, in the table of active connections 605 the object association is changed with the server connection from the server management object to the new cached server connection object.
  • [0129]
    At step 1405, the new cached server connection object is placed in the server connection cache 618. Thereafter, at step 1406, the server manager object is deleted.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 15
  • [0130]
    A worker object 612 in the client connection cache, representing a client connection, is detailed in FIG. 15. Maintenance may be required on cache connections in situations where the client breaks the connection. Thus, the procedures represent the object processing performed for a cached client connection.
  • [0131]
    At step 1501 a question is asked as to whether the client has broken the connection, with the procedure terminating if the question is answered in the negative.
  • [0132]
    If the question asked at step 1501 is answered in the affirmative, to the effect that the client has broken the connection, the client connection object is removed from the client connection cache at step 1502.
  • [0133]
    At step 1503 the socket is deleted and at step 1504 the connection's row entry in the table of active connections is removed. Thereafter, at step 1505 the cached client connection object is deleted.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 16
  • [0134]
    The processing of a cached server connection object is detailed in FIG. 16. This is required because a server may also break a connection (due to hardware failure for example) in which case the connection is not available and must be removed from the cache. Thus, the processing is similar to that required for cached client connections.
  • [0135]
    At step 1601 a question is asked as to whether the server has broken the connection. If answered in the negative, the procedure is terminated.
  • [0136]
    If the question asked at step 1601 is answered in the affirmative, to the effect that the server has broken the connection, the server connection object is removed from the server connection cache at step 1602.
  • [0137]
    At step 1603 the MRU precendence ordering for the server connection cache is updated. Thus, in this embodiment, the server connection cache preserves the recency ordering so that it knows which is the most recently used connection in each server pool. This may be implemented by a linked list, ordered according to recency. When a connection is removed from the cache, the next connection up and next connection down in the linked list are linked together, thereby excluding the unwanted connection.
  • [0138]
    At step 1604 a socket is deleted and at step 1605 the connection's file row entry ID is removed from the table of active connections. Thereafter, at step 1606, the cached server connection object is deleted.
  • [0139]
    In this embodiment, connections are reused whenever possible and server connections are reused multiple times. The effect of this is that for a client who is connected over several seconds (or even minutes), requests and responses are buffered by the traffic management system. The system picks up the most appropriate available server connection swiftly, sends the requests quickly and receives a quick response. The slow communication with the client can be continued. Meanwhile, the server and its connection have gone on to be reused, possibly by a different client altogether. Thus a layer of “network buffering” is provided between each client and server, meaning that each server application can operate very efficiently. By rewriting client requests and data, the servers need not be specifically programmed to take account of the presence of the traffic management.
  • [0140]
    The traffic management system itself is highly configurable in this embodiment and makes traffic management decisions according to sophisticated scripted configurations. In this way, it is possible to make best use of available server resources, both in terms of their suitability to particular serving operations (secure/dynamic/static) and also in terms of their available bandwidth. Servers have a limit to the number of simultaneous transactions they can maintain. Thus, by shortening the attention span required for each server request transaction, the total number of clients handled in a given time period is significantly increased for the same server capability.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 17
  • [0141]
    A typical set of relationships of clients and servers, along with objects facilitating their communication on the traffic management system is illustrated in FIG. 17. Thus, client 103 is communicating with server 115 by the operations performed by a client manager object 608 and server manager object 609.
  • [0142]
    Client 104 wishes to establish communication and its request is identified by listener object 607. This results in the creation of a client manager object 610. Client connection with client 104 has been cached as recorded at 612. Similarly, connections to server 112 have been established and are presently inactive as illustrated by their cached server objects 619 and 620.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 18
  • [0143]
    From the description previously given, it can be understood that the traffic manager 120 manages the flow of data traffic between the servers and the clients. It provides, when required, browser-side connections and similarly, when required it provides server-side connections. A further problem exists, however, in that the traffic manager itself must receive instructions such that it has information telling it how to respond to specific requests. In particular, it may need to interrogate external data store 108 in order to determine to which server pool (117, 118 or 119) to convey a request. A problem therefore exists in terms of providing an environment which is relatively straightforward for instructions to be created while at the same time ensuring that the environment remains secure and not susceptible to unwanted third party interrogations.
  • [0144]
    In this embodiment, an isolated processing environment is provided, preferably in the form of a virtual machine, responsive to instructions specific to that environment. Isolated environment-specific instructions are received defining a traffic management rule. A request from a client via an established browser-side connection is received and a response is made to the request in accordance with the environment-specific instructions.
  • [0145]
    Procedures for implementing script-based processing are illustrated in FIG. 18. At step 1801 a question is asked as to whether this is the start of compiled script instructions processing.
  • [0146]
    If the question is answered in the affirmative, to the effect that this is the start of processing of this type, a new virtual processor is instantiated at step 1802. Thus, procedures for executing the virtual processor are created to perform script instruction execution. Furthermore, after the instantiation of the new virtual processor at step 1802, the program counter forming part of that object is set to zero.
  • [0147]
    At step 1803 the script is read and the next script instruction is executed on the virtual processor.
  • [0148]
    At step 1804 a question is asked as to whether the instructions have been successfully completed. Instruction execution on the virtual processor can result in one of three possible outcomes, namely: a success (a completed instruction), a wait (waiting to read or write data), or an exception (that is an error). In this embodiment, an instruction is allowed to wait for more data without blocking other processing operations that are being performed. Thus, at this step, the procedure waits to see what the outcome of attempting to execute a single instruction has been. If the question asked at step 1804 is answered in the negative, control is directed to step 1807.
  • [0149]
    If the question asked at step 1804 is answered in the affirmative, to the effect that the instruction has successfully completed, the program counter is incremented at step 1805. Thus, if the instruction was successfully executed, the procedure moves on to the next one.
  • [0150]
    At step 1806 a question is asked as to whether this is the end of the script and when answered in the negative, control is returned to step 1803 for the next script instruction to be executed. Eventually the script will complete and will specify a traffic managing action, typically identifying which of the available pools of server to request service from.
  • [0151]
    If an instruction is not successfully completed, resulting in the question asked at step 1804 being answered in the negative, a question is asked at step 1807 as to whether an instruction is waiting for data transfer. If this question is answered in the negative, a script execution error is generated at step 1808. Alternatively, when answered in the affirmative, to the effect that an instruction is waiting for data transfer and therefore an action is to be taken but cannot be completed at this stage, the virtual processor operation is suspended at step 1809. Thus, it is not possible to do anything further at this time so an exit from the process takes place. However, processing will be resumed from the same place the next time around, as more data becomes available.
  • [0152]
    Procedures 1803 for the execution of a script instruction are detailed in FIG. 19.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 19
  • [0153]
    At step 1901 data is read or written as required. The reason for a WAIT state could be that the instruction is waiting for data. The data could be obtained by using a non-blocking I/O to read data from the client connection, either from a connection that has already been established with the client or to analyse part of the request that the client has made. The data could be obtained from an external source. Since in this embodiment connections are made via the Internet, data could be required from somewhere else on the Internet. However, it could also be from a device installed on the traffic manager or a local software service. This is a relatively more complicated issue in that, in order to obtain this information, a separate connection to the Internet must be established. Alternatively, for example, the WAIT might be for confirmation that data has been written to a database or that a request has been made.
  • [0154]
    It should be understood that the steps being performed here are those of a virtual processor, having instruction primitives for accessing data (or a service) via a network, such as the Internet. The provision of a processor of this type, in this embodiment, virtually ensures that a malicious attack cannot malform the instruction to gain access to the traffic manager's data. Thus, by running the traffic management scripts on a virtual processor, both the scripts and the virtual processor can be kept simple in design while providing a high level of functionality without compromising security. The scripting language itself may be made relatively user-friendly given that it is created within the environment of a high-level language. The actual instruction primitives as encoded remain proprietary and are effectively known only to the compiler. Thus, the virtual machine exists in a substantially isolated environment where it understands only its own unique primitives supplied to it via a process of compilation specific to it.
  • [0155]
    At step 1902 an attempt is made to execute the instruction, and at step 1903 a question is asked as to whether the instruction has been completed successfully. On many occasions, sufficient information will have been received, from the client or from an external source, thereby allowing the instruction to execute. However, it is possible that further information may be required therefore the question asked at step 1903 may be answered in the negative resulting in control being directed to step 1907.
  • [0156]
    When the question asked at step 1903 is answered in the affirmative, to the effect that the instruction has been completed successfully, an instruction exit condition is set to “completed” at step 1904 and the process exits.
  • [0157]
    In response to an unsuccessful execution, a question is asked at step 1905 as to whether the instruction needs more data. In response to this question being answered in the affirmative, the instruction exit condition is set to “waiting” at step 1906. Alternatively, if the question is answered in the negative, the instruction exit condition is set as “error” at step 1907.
  • [0158]
    One of the possible procedures performed at step 1902 is obtaining data from the Internet. Instructions performed for this purpose are detailed in FIG. 20.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 20
  • [0159]
    At step 2001 a question is asked as to whether it is necessary to start a virtual processor Internet access. It is possible that the Internet access processor has been started, because there could have been a partially completed Internet access operation that did not obtain sufficient data to complete, in which case it is not necessary to set up a further Internet access manager and its connection. Thus, when the question asked at step 2001 is answered in the negative, control is directed to step 2006.
  • [0160]
    In response to the question asked at step 2001 being answered in the affirmative, a new worker object specialised as an Internet access manager object is created at step 2002.
  • [0161]
    At step 2003 a new socket is created and a file ID for this connection is placed in the table of active connections.
  • [0162]
    At step 2004 a new connection is associated with the new worker object by updating a new row in the table of active connection with a pointer to a newly created Internet access manager object.
  • [0163]
    At step 2005 a URL specified in a script instruction is supplied as an argument to the Internet access manager object, so that said object knows where to go on the Internet to obtain its data. The procedure then exits. The URL system is commonly used on the Internet, but any service naming scheme could be used. It may describe a service local to the machine as well as on an external machine.
  • [0164]
    At step 2006 data is read from the Internet access manager object and at step 2007 a question is asked as to whether all of the data has been obtained. When this question is answered in the affirmative, the Internet access connection is deleted at step 2008, else the process exits.
  • [0165]
    At step 2009 the Internet connection file ID is removed from the table of active connections and at step 2010 the Internet access manager object is deleted.
  • [0166]
    It should be appreciated that the above steps do not read any data from the Internet. These procedures create an Internet access manager object which will read from the URL specified. The data from the Internet access manager object is transferred at step 2006.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 21
  • [0167]
    The processing of an Internet access manager object is shown in FIG. 21. This is a further sequence of operations that usually only partly completes in each iteration. Thus, the first step (2101) consists of retrieving the current Internet access manager processing state, thereby allowing the procedure to pick up where it left off by loading the context. Procedures then continue in one of steps 2102 to 2106 until all of the data has been obtained. The procedure can exit at any of steps 2102, 2104 and 2105 back to step 2007 in a “wait” state if the instruction could not complete.
  • [0168]
    At step 2101 the current object's processing state is retrieved and at step 2102 the DNS lookup of the specified URL is performed using non-blocking I/O. At step 2103 a new connection may need to be established (or a cached connection reused where the protocol provides such functionality).
  • [0169]
    A step 2104 a non-blocking write is formed of a request to the Internet site. Thereafter at step 2105 a non-blocking read from the Internet site is performed in order to read the data, and at step 2106 server data is stored for the virtual processor.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 22
  • [0170]
    An example of the syntax used in the high level language for defining traffic management is illustrated in FIG. 22. This code represents an example of the use of the Internet access function as it is written in the high-level language.
  • [0171]
    In this example, a URL is specified in the first line 2201. A variable is set to the data returned from that URL.
  • [0172]
    In the second line 2202, the data obtained from the URL is supplied straight back to the connected client, without intervention from a server.
  • [0000]
    FIG. 23
  • [0173]
    Further high level code is illustrated in FIG. 23, which represents the second form of the Internet access instruction. This allows the specification of data used in the POST function of HTTP. These two examples of forms are only instances of how an operation could be invoked for the HTTP protocol. Other protocols would use other functions.
  • [0174]
    At line 2301, a variable has been filled with account information obtained from an analysis of the client request. This is supplied to the URL specified. The URL then supplies back a response, this time dependent upon the client account details.
  • [0175]
    In lines 2302 and 2303, a conditional statement selects a pool of servers that has (elsewhere) been named, which in this example is “gold”. If the account details supplied include the word “gold” at the end, a server from this pool is used.
  • [0176]
    These high level statements are compiled into executable binary instructions that are executed on a virtual processor at step 1803. Request.get and request.post functions each compile to corresponding individual instructions for the virtual processor. Each individual instruction is capable of being partially executed when insufficient data is obtained at a first attempt. Thereafter, instead of blocking a thread, processing continues for other connections, utilising a single overall processing thread for many such operations, with the possibility of many such virtual processors being executed in sequence according to their intermediate status.
  • [0177]
    The system described in this embodiment facilitates the implementation of a relatively straightforward processing language, as shown in the examples of FIGS. 22 and 23, while providing an underlying framework that is efficient both in the utilisation of available server resources and the versatility of traffic management. Servers connected to the traffic manager are configured as if the traffic manager were not present. The traffic manager load balances servers that are available in each pool. Servers may break down or become unavailable but the traffic manager will continue to operate successfully.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification370/235, 707/E17.107, 707/E17.001, 370/401
International ClassificationG06F17/30, H04L12/66, G06F15/173, H04L29/14, H04L12/56, H04L12/26, H04Q3/00, H04L29/08, H04L9/00, H04L29/12, H04L29/06, H04Q7/34, H04L12/24
Cooperative ClassificationH04L67/1019, H04L67/1034, H04L67/1002, H04L69/40, H04L67/1008, H04L67/1023, H04L67/1017, H04L61/1511, H04L43/0817, H04L41/0681, H04L29/12066
European ClassificationH04L29/08N9A1F, H04L29/08N9A1G, H04L29/08N9A1B, H04L29/08N9A11, H04L29/08N9A1J, H04L43/08D, H04L41/06E, H04L61/15A1, H04L29/14, H04L29/08N9A, H04L29/12A2A1
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