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Publication numberUS20050274858 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/866,614
Publication dateDec 15, 2005
Filing dateJun 10, 2004
Priority dateJun 10, 2004
Publication number10866614, 866614, US 2005/0274858 A1, US 2005/274858 A1, US 20050274858 A1, US 20050274858A1, US 2005274858 A1, US 2005274858A1, US-A1-20050274858, US-A1-2005274858, US2005/0274858A1, US2005/274858A1, US20050274858 A1, US20050274858A1, US2005274858 A1, US2005274858A1
InventorsDale Fedewa
Original AssigneeDale Fedewa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tilt lock box mount system
US 20050274858 A1
Abstract
A TILT LOCK BOX MOUNT. The TILT LOCK BOX MOUNT enables a user to actuate a wall-mounted article such that a user may tilt the article away from the wall to any angled position between an upper and lower limit, in an easy, safe, and reliable manner.
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Claims(13)
1. A mechanism for holding an article in a first position, a second position, and a range of intermediate positions, the mechanism comprising:
means for allowing motion in a first direction from said first position to said intermediate positions;
means for allowing motion in said first direction from said intermediate positions to said second position;
means for allowing motion in a second direction from said second position to said first position; and
means for preventing motion in said second direction from said intermediate positions if said article was in said first position more recently than said article was in said second position.
2. The mechanism of claim 1, wherein said second direction is opposite to said first direction.
3. The mechanism of claim 1, wherein said first position is a first angle, said second potion is a second angle, said first direction is a direction of angular rotation, and said second direction is a direction of angular rotation.
4. The mechanism of claim 1, wherein the article is oriented in a greater vertical position in said intermediate position than in said first position, and the article is in a greater vertical position in said second position than in said intermediate position.
5. A mechanism for holding an article in a first (position, a second position, and a range of intermediate positions, the mechanism comprising:
a cam adapted to rotate as the article moves from said first position through said intermediate positions to said second position;
a wedge contacting said cam, wherein said cam and said wedge are adapted to allow the article to move in a first direction from said first position to said intermediate positions and in said first direction from said intermediate positions to said second position;
a release linkage adapted to separate said wedge from said cam when the article approaches said second position and allows said wedge to contact said cam when said article approaches said first position, allowing the article to move in a second direction from said second position to said first position; and
said cam and said wedge prevent motion in said second direction from said intermediate positions when said release linkage allows said wedge to contact said cam.
6. The mechanism of claim 5, wherein said second direction is opposite to said first direction.
7. The mechanism of claim 5, wherein the article is adapted to be located in a greater vertical position in said intermediate position than in said first position, and adapted to be in a greater vertical position in said second position than in said intermediate position.
8. The mechanism of claim 5, the article is a display screen.
9. The mechanism of claim 5, further comprising a bracket system to transfer the movement of said cam to said wedge, comprising, a spring bracket, a pivot bracket, a push-pull bracket, and a wedge bracket.
10. The mechanism of claim 5, wherein said release linkage comprises, a latch bracket, a wedge hook, and a wedge spring.
11. A display device for positioning at a variety of angles, the display device comprising:
a display screen adapted to display a moving image received via a signal;
a mechanism adapted to support said display screen and to position said display screen in a first position, a second position, and a range of intermediate positions, the mechanism comprising:
a cam adapted to rotate as the article moves from said first position through said intermediate positions to said second position;
a wedge contacting said cam, wherein said cam and said wedge are adapted to allow the article to move in a first direction from said first position to said intermediate positions and in said first direction from said intermediate positions to said second position;
a release linkage adapted to separate said wedge from said cam when the article approaches said second positions and allow said wedge and said cam to contact when said article approaches said first position, allowing the article to move in a second direction from said second position to said first position; and
said cam and said wedge prevent motion in said second direction from said intermediate positions when said release linkage allows said wedge to contact said cam.
12. The display device of claim 11, wherein the display screen is a flat panel display screen.
13. The display device of claim 11, wherein the signal is a digital signal.
Description
FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention generally relates to mechanisms used as part of mount systems for supporting articles. More specifically, the invention relates to mechanisms that allow an article to tilt away from a wall or a support member at various angles between an upper and lower limit.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In the consumer electronics industry, advancements in television technology has created a strong demand for the recent development of wall mounted, flat panel screen TVs. While the initial large price for these unique televisions prohibited the average consumer from purchasing one, as generally happens with developing technology, prices eventually recede to levels such that the technology is more affordable to a wider demographic audience. The attraction of flat panel screen, TV technology is that the units are generally only a few inches thick, and because of the thin feature, offer significant aesthetic appeal by allowing the TV unit to be hung on a wall and viewed like a picture. Further driving the popularity of these televisions is that beyond the thin dimensions, the televisions also incorporate advanced TV display technology that offers a much clearer picture than conventional CRT televisions.

As a consequence of the flourishing flat panel screen television market, a number of specially tailored mounting systems have begun to emerge on the market. While most articles, such as pictures, are hung with relative ease, the significant weight of a flat panel screen TV requires a more robust mounting system. Traditional mounting systems that accompany a TV allow for only static mounting on a wall or support member. In a general sense, brackets or bolt-type fixtures are secured to a wall or a supporting member, and the flat panel screen TV is affixed to them, via mateable recesses in the rear of the TV, or some type of hook or latch mechanism.

As may be expected, the viewing nature of one type of article may vary from the viewing nature of another type of article, in this example, a picture versus a television. While there certainly exist other types of wall mounted articles, most implore the type of attention span a picture might receive, i.e. a limited viewing time, whereas a television has the unique feature of capturing the attention of a viewer for significantly longer periods, perhaps hours. With such an extended viewing period, it becomes desirable at times to adjust the viewing angle of a television in response to the needs of the viewer. For example, it may be desirable to adjust the television to eliminate a glare, or adjust the position to accommodate viewers at a different angle. Also, a viewer may wish to adjust a wall mounted television to view at one angle and then have the ability to push the TV back up and out of the way when not in use. In response to such demands, a few embodiments have emerged on the market to attempt to address the issue.

One example of such an embodiment, allows a TV to tilt to a desired angle, but the amount of tilt is limited by the placement of the axis of rotation. For example, a TV in close proximity to a wall, with an axis of rotation either horizontally or vertically, would not allow for much rotation before the edge of the TV hit the wall and prevented further movement. The TV would have to be pulled out, away from the wall, in order to allow a significant tilting range.

What is needed in the market is a mechanism that allows a user to safely and to easily adjust the viewing angle of a flat panel screen television through various angles within a range. It is preferable to facilitate an adjustable viewing angle and yet allow the TV to maintain close proximity to the wall or the supporting member.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a mechanism configured to hold an article in a first angled position, a second upright position, and a range of intermediate positions. The mechanism allows the article to move in a first direction from the first angled position to the intermediate position, and subsequently to the second, upright position. The mechanism also allows motion in a second direction, opposite the first direction, from the second upright position back to the first angled position. The mechanism prevents motion in the second direction from the intermediate positions if the article was in the first angled position more recently than the article was in the second upright position.

The mechanism is configured to hold an article, such as a display screen, in the first angled position, the second upright position, and a range of intermediate positions, by using a cam, configured to rotate as the article moves from the first angled position through the intermediate position to the second upright position. The mechanism also comprises of a wedge configured to contact the cam, wherein the cam and the wedge are configured to allow the article to move in the first direction from the first angled position to the intermediate position and to the second upright position. An internal release linkage component is configured to engage when the article approaches the second upright position and to disengage when the article approaches the first angled position. With the linkage disengaged the wedge is held away from the cam and this allows the article to move in the second direction from the second upright position back to the first angled position.

The mechanism comprises internal components to transfer the rotation of the cam to the movement of the wedge, such as, a spring bracket, a pivot bracket, a push-pull bracket, and a wedge bracket, among other things. Moreover, the release linkage used to engage and disengage the wedge comprises of, a latch bracket, a wedge hook, and a wedge spring, among other things.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A more complete understanding of the present invention may be derived by referring to the detailed description and claims when considered in connection with the Figures, where like reference numbers refer to similar elements throughout the Figures, and

FIG. 1 is an isometric view illustrating one embodiment of the present invention used in conjunction with a cross member attached to an article such as a flat panel display television;

FIG. 2 is a side view illustrating an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is an isometric view illustrating an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is an exploded view illustrating an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is an isometric view illustrating the internal components of the present invention; and

FIGS. 6-9 are side views illustrating the internal components in relationship to one another, in an embodiment of the present invention.

The Figures in this document illustrate various exemplary embodiments of the present invention. Embodiments of the present invention may include part or all of the features shown in one of these drawings, or may include features from two or more Figures. Embodiments of the present invention may also include features described in the specification, or limitations to features described in the specification. Furthermore, embodiments of the present invention may include features that would be familiar to a person of ordinary skill in the art having studied this document.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In general, the various embodiments of the present invention allow a viewing user to tilt or adjust a wall-mounted article at various angles in an easy, safe, and reliable manner. In one embodiment, the wall-mounted article may be affixed with a cross member, such as a shaft that may include a protuberance running along it's length. The cross member may affix to the back of the article by an affixing means, such as a bracket, clamp, and the like, and the cross member may also position through at least one Tilt Lock Box Mount. The Tilt Lock Box Mount may set in a support bracket that may in turn affix to a wall or support member. The Tilt Lock Box Mount may accept the cross member through a rotatable cam that may include a keyed section to mate with the elongated protuberance. The unique internal mechanism, along with the keyed cam and cross member, may allow the article to adjust or tilt through any angle within a range.

More particularly, and as more fully disclosed in the attached drawings and Figures, the Tilt Lock Box Mount may comprise a cam mated with a cross member, which may affix by an affixing means, such as a bracket, clamp, and the like, to the rear of an article and may allow the article to rotate to the angle desired by the viewer. In such an embodiment, as the viewer adjusts the article to the desired angle, the cam may rotate. The cam may connect to other internal components such as, brackets and armatures, and as the cam rotates, the brackets and armatures may actuate to create a space that may allow a wedge to slide down and occupy. As the viewer finishes adjusting the tilt of the article, the brackets and armature assemblies may set up against the wedge that has slid down to occupy the space created, may hold the article in position, and may transfer the load from the cross member, through the cam, through the wedge, and onto a wall or a support member. Therefore, a wall or a support member may ultimately carry the load of the article, i.e. the weight of a wall-mounted television.

To operate the tilting feature of this particular embodiment of the present invention, assume for the sake of description that an article, hanging on a wall in typical fashion, parallel to the wall, is considered positioned at 0 degrees. Any angles discussed further are those measured between the wall and the back of the article with the angle increasing as the article is tilted further away from the wall. To operate the mechanism, a viewer may initially push up against the top of the article, which is attached to the mechanism as described herein, towards the wall to a position of about negative five degrees, this may engage the tilt mechanism. With the tilt mechanism engaged, the user may next allow the article to lower away from the wall to the full extent that the tilting bracket will allow. For example, some brackets may be configured to tilt to a maximum angle of 90 degrees, other brackets to a maximum angle of 45 degrees, etc. Once the article has tilted all the way out to the maximum limit, the user may push the article back towards the wall to the desired viewing angle. Upon release, the article may now maintain that position until further actuated. At this point, the mechanism will allow the viewer to further adjust to a lower viewing angle, i.e. from a 20-degree angle to a 15-degree angle, by simply pushing the article back towards the wall. But if the viewer wishes to adjust the article to a steeper viewing angle, i.e. from a 20-degree angle to a 25-degree angle, then the mechanism must be re-engaged by pushing the article back to a 0 degree position and then a few degrees to the negative position, and repeat the process as described above.

Turning now to the Figures that depict examples of embodiments of the invention for the purpose of illustrating the practice thereof, and not by way of limitation of the scope of the invention, note that like reference characters refer to corresponding elements throughout the views. FIGS. 1 and 2 are an example of the tilt lock box mount system in connection with an exemplary use, i.e. connected to a flat panel display television and depicted in tilt mode.

FIG. 3 is the tilt lock box mount system in relation to a wall mounting bracket. FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the tilt lock box mount system depicting the various components and how they interconnect, FIG. 5 is an isometric view illustrating the internal components of the present invention, and FIGS. 6-9 are side views illustrating the internal components in relationship to one another, in an embodiment of the present invention.

In an exemplary embodiment, Tilt Lock Box Mount System 5, (hereinafter “Tilt Mount System”) may comprise Housing 10. In this embodiment, Housing 10 encases the internal, operating components of Tilt Mount System 5. Housing 10 may be made of a material that may be formed into the desired shape. In one exemplary embodiment, shown in FIG. 4, Housing 10 is comprised of sheet steel, wherein the sheet steel is cut into a pattern such that the edges may fold up to form one half of each side of Housing 10, as well as other internal brackets, for example Safety Spring Bracket 7 and Load Spring Bracket 3.

Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Cam 15, and is best viewed by FIGS. 4 and 5. Cam 15, in one embodiment may be machined as a solid piece. Cam 15 may comprise Hollowed Out section 16, Cam Recess 19, and Cam Stop 21. Hollowed Out section 16 may comprise a diameter to accept Cross Member 115. Hollowed Out section 16 may further comprise Key 17. Key 17 may configure to mate with Cross Member Lock 116, and prevent Cross Member 115 from turning independently of Cam 15's rotation. While the present invention is described in terms of restricting the rotation of Cross Member 115 independently from Cam 15 using a “Key” and “Lock” configuration, it can be appreciated that other configurations may provide a similar function. For example, Hollowed Out section 16 and Cross Member 115 may comprise of a splined, octagonal, hexagonal, rectangular, or the like configuration that may provide the function of restricting independent rotational movement of Cross Member 115 within Cam 15. Using this type of configuration, the nature of the shape themselves prevents independent rotational movement, and a “Key” and “Lock” system would not be necessary. In other embodiments, Cross Member 115 and Cam 15 may attach to each other with a weld, bolted connection, set screw, interference fit, or the like. While Cam 15 is discussed in one exemplary embodiment as a solid machined piece, any process or material that may produce a substantially similar object to perform the function herein described may be used.

In an exemplary embodiment of the present invention and with continuing reference to FIGS. 4 and 5, Cam 15 may further comprise Rubber Stop 18. Rubber Stop 18 may configure to affix to Cam 15 within a milled out section of Cam Stop 21 and referenced by Cam Recess 19. Rubber Stop 18 may cushion the load as Cam Stop 21 sets up against Wedge Wrap 55. As Cam 15 rotates downward, Cam Stop 21 advances towards Wedge Wrap 55. In this configuration, as the load may move downward, away from the wall or 0 degree position, Wedge 70 may actuate upwards. This upwards movement may create a space eventually to allow Cam Stop 21 to rest up against Wedge Wrap 55. Cam Stop 21 may also include Cam Transfer Opening 11, which may transfer rotation of Cam 15 to other functional components via Cam Transfer Pin 14.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Spring Bracket 20, which may configure to follow the contour of Cam 15 and may connect to Cam 15 via Spring Bracket Pin 26. Spring Bracket Pin 26 may rotate within Spring Bracket Opening 25 in Cam 15. Spring Bracket Pin 26 may be connected to Spring Bracket 20 at Spring Bracket Pin Connection 28, 29, or both, and may be connected by spot welds, screws, rivets, or the like.

In a continued exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Safety Spring 92, 93 or both. Safety Spring 92, 93 or both may connect to Spring Bracket Hole 22, 23 or both, at the top of Spring Bracket 20. The other end of Safety Spring 92, 93, or both may connect to Safety Spring Hole 90, 91, or both. In the embodiment illustrated, as Cam 15 may rotate downward, i.e. increase the article's angle from the wall or support member, thus engaging the tilt mechanism, Safety Spring 92, 93, or both, may extend, and the tension may assist a user in moving the article away from the wall in a controlled fashion. In similar fashion, once the tilt mechanism is engaged, the tension on Safety Spring 92, 93 or both, may assist a user to move the article up, back towards the wall or support member until the desired angle is reached.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Pivot Pin 30 and 31, or both. Pivot Pin 30, 31, or both may affix perpendicular to Housing 10 and are located on the inside of Housing 10. Pivot Pin 30, 31, or both, may provide the axis of rotation for Pivot Bracket 60. Pivot Bracket 60 may contain Pivot Pin Hole 61, 62, or both, that are of a diameter to receive Pivot Pin 30, 31, or both, Pivot Pin 30, 31, or both, may affix to Housing 10 by spot welds, screws, rivets, or the like.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Push-Pull Bracket 35. Push-Pull Bracket 35 may comprise Push-Pull Pin Orifice 33, 34, or both, and Cam Transfer Pin Point 12, 13, or both. Push-Pull Bracket 35 may connect to Pivot Bracket 60 and Cam 15, and may function to transfer the rotation of Cam 15 to Pivot Bracket 60, wherein Pivot Bracket 60 in turn may actuate other internal mechanisms to carry out the function of the invention. In one embodiment, Push-Pull Bracket 35 may connect to Pivot Bracket 60 via Push-Pull Pin 36. Push-Pull Pin 36 may affix to Pivot Bracket 60 at Push-Pull Pin Point 37, 38, or both, and may affix by screw, spot weld, rivet, or the like. Push-Pull Pin 36 may pass through Push-Pull Pin Orifice 33, 34, or both, of Push-Pull Bracket 35, and Push-Pull Pin 36 may provide an axis of rotation for Push-Pull Bracket 35. Push-Pull Bracket 35 may actuate by rotation of Cam 15, wherein Cam 15 may translate movement via Cam Transfer Pin 14, which may pass through Cam Stop 21 at Cam Transfer Opening 11. Cam Transfer Pin 14 may rotate freely within Cam Transfer Opening 11, wherein Cam Transfer Pin 14 may affix to Push-Pull Bracket 35 at Cam Transfer Pin Point 12, 13, or both by spot weld, screw, rivet, or the like.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Load Spring 40. Load Spring 40 may connect to Cam 15 at Cam Load Spring Connection 24; and the other end of Load Spring 40 may anchor to Load Spring Anchor 42. Load Spring 40 may function to assist a user in controlling a load as the load moves from a static position to an angled position. When a user actuates Tilt Mount System 5, Load Spring 40, extended by the rotation of Cam 15, may provide tension to help offset a portion of the load as the article moves away from the wall or support member. Similarly, as the article is pushed back up towards the wall, the tension in Load Spring 40 may assist to pull the article back up and towards the wall, or 0 degree position.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Load Spring Plate 46. Load Spring Plate 46 may comprise, Load Spring Anchor 42, Pin Lock Rotation Point 44, and Load Spring Pin Lock 45. Load Spring Plate 46 abuts against Load Spring Bracket 3. Load Spring Plate 44 pivots about Pin Lock Rotation Point 44 connected to Load Spring Bracket 3 at Load Spring Bracket Rotation Point 47 by a means that allows rotation in relation to one another. Load Spring Pin Lock 45 deters rotation of Load Spring Plate 46 when engaged by a Load Spring Lock Pin 49. A user through Wall Bracket Lock Point 132, Load Spring Pin Lock 45, and Load Spring Bracket Lock Point 48, may insert Load Spring Lock Pin 49. In this manner, Load Spring Plate 46 may be prohibited from rotating, in turn allowing Load Spring 40 to extend and compress as Tilt Mount System 5 actuates. With Load Spring Lock Pin 49 removed, Load Spring Plate 46 may rotate and thus, Load Spring 40 is not actuated when Tilt Mount System 5 is actuated. This component allows a user to increase or decrease the amount of assistance supplied by Load Spring 40 and described more fully below.

In a continued exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Wedge Wrap 55. Wedge Wrap 55 may comprise of a thin, rectangular piece of material formed to follow the contour of the inner perimeter of Housing 10. Beginning in a groove in Safety Spring Bracket 7, Wedge Wrap 55 may fit along the top of Housing 10, then next along the side of Housing 10, and finally wedge to the bottom of Housing 10. Wedge Wrap 55 may also include Wedge Stop 56, which may be a protuberance that may restrict movement of Wedge 70 on its downward stroke. As the mechanism actuates, Wedge 70 may move along Wedge Wrap 55, on it's downward stroke, Wedge Stop 56 may impede any further downward movement of Wedge 70. With Wedge 70 constricted from any further downward movement, further rotation by Cam 15 may actuate Wedge Bracket 65 to compress Wedge Spring 75, and may effectuate Latch Bracket 85 to latch onto Wedge Hook 80, see also FIG. 7. However, it should be appreciated that other configurations that allow Wedge 70 to be impeded on its downward stroke such that Latch Bracket 85 may latch onto Wedge Hook 80 may be used.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Pivot Bracket 60. Pivot Bracket 60 may comprise, Push-Pull Pin Point 37, 38, or both, Pivot Pin Hole 61, 62, or both and Wedge Bracket Pivot Point 67, 68, or both. Pivot Bracket 60, may transfer actuation from Push-Pull Bracket 35 to Wedge Bracket 65. Pivot Bracket 60 may connect to Wedge Bracket 65 at Wedge Bracket Pivot Point 67, 68, or both, by pins, rivets or the like, wherein Pivot Point 67, 68, or both may allow Pivot Bracket 60 and Wedge Bracket 65 to rotate in relation to one another.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Wedge Bracket 65. Wedge Bracket 65 may comprise Wedge Bracket Pivot Point 67, 68, or both, Latch Bracket Pin Point 87, 88, or both, Latch Bracket Stop 89, and Latch Bracket Pin 86. Wedge Bracket 65 may translate Cam 15 rotation, from Push-Pull Bracket 35, and Pivot Bracket 60 to actuate Wedge 70. Wedge Bracket 65 may connect to Pivot Bracket 60 at Wedge Bracket Pivot Point 67, 68, or both by pins, rivets or the like, which may allow Pivot Bracket 60 and Wedge Bracket 65 to rotate in relation to one another. Latch Bracket Pin Point 87, 88, or both, may comprise points of fixation for Latch Bracket Pin 86, which may be spot welds, rivets, screws, or the like to affix Latch Bracket Pin 86. Latch Bracket Pin 86 may provide an axis of rotation for Latch Bracket 85, and Latch Bracket Pin 86 may be allowed to rotate within Latch Bracket Pin Opening 96, 97, or both. Latch Bracket Stop 89 may affix to Wedge Bracket 65 at Latch Bracket Stop Point 98, 99, or both. Latch Bracket Stop 89 may be affixed by spot welds, rivets, screws, or the like, and may limit the amount of rotation by Latch Bracket 85.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Wedge 70. Wedge 70 may further comprise Spring Recess 71, Wedge Spring 75, and Hasp Screw Mount 73, 74, or both. Spring Recess 71 may comprise of an opening at the top of Wedge 70 to accept Wedge Spring 75. Wedge Hasp 72, wherein Screw 78, 79 or both, at Hasp Screw Mount 73, 74, or both, may secure Wedge Hasp 72, and holds Wedge Spring 75 in place. One skilled in the art can appreciate that while in one preferred embodiment Wedge Hasp 72 may be secured by Screw 78, 79, or both, Wedge Hasp 72 may be affixed, for example, by spot welds, rivets, or the like.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Wedge Hook 80. Wedge Hook 80 may further comprise of a section of Wedge Hasp 72 that, in one preferred embodiment, may bend to create a hook like mechanism, and configured to operate in conjunction with Latch Bracket 85.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIG. 3, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise Wall Bracket 130. Wall Bracket 130 may comprise Wall Bracket Lock Point 132, Housing Lock Point 9, and Wall Mount Points 135 and 136. Wall Bracket 130 may affix to a wall or a support member and act as a receptacle for Housing 10. Wall Bracket Lock Point 132 may provide an opening to insert Load Spring Lock Pin 49 as described above. Wall Mount Points 135 and 136 provide an opening to insert a bolt, screw and the like, to secure Wall Bracket 130 to a wall or a support member.

In an exemplary embodiment, best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, Tilt Mount System 5 may comprise at least one Housing Locks 150 and 151. Housing Locks 150 and 151, configured in on aspect, may comprise of a male and female latching mechanism. Upon assembly of Tilt Mount System 5, the two halves of Housing 10 are brought together and locked by the male-female lock configuration. This configuration prevents easy access to the internal components of Tilt Mount System 5. However, it should be appreciated that other configurations may be used to effectuate locking or assembling the two halves of Housing 10, for example, screws, rivets, welds, and the like.

In an exemplary method, shown by the various Figures, Cross member 115 may affix to the rear, bottom of a wall mounted article by any means that allows Cross member 115 to affix. Beginning with a wall mounted article positioned in a typical fashion, wherein the article is parallel to the wall and designated at such a position to be at 0 degrees, FIG. 6. In the event a user wishes to tilt the article away from the wall, in a manner that describes an increasing angle the further from the wall the article moves, a user may initially push the article towards the wall a few degrees in the negative direction, FIG. 7. The article, with Cross Member 115 affixed, may rotate Cross Member 115 that in turn may rotate Cam 15, wherein Cross Member 115 may lock within Cam 15 by Key 17 mated with Cross Member Lock 116 running lengthwise along Cross Member 115. Turning Cam 15 may actuate Push-Pull Bracket 35, wherein Cam Transfer Pin 14 may connect Push-Pull Bracket 35 to Cam 15. The actuation of Push-Pull Bracket 35 may further actuate Pivot Bracket 60, wherein Push-Pull Bracket 35 may connect to Pivot Bracket 60 via Push-Pull Pin 36, which may affix at Push-Pull Pin Point 37, 38, or both. Pivot Bracket 60, actuated by Push-Pull Bracket 35, may rotate about Pivot Pin 30, 31, or both, at Pivot Pin Hole 61, 62, or both. Pivot Bracket subsequently may actuate Wedge Bracket 65 and may connect to Wedge Bracket 65 at Wedge Bracket Pivot Point 67, 68, or both. In this manner Wedge Bracket 65 may pull down on Latch Bracket 85, which may connect to Wedge Bracket 65 via Latch Bracket Pin Point 87, 88 or both. As Wedge Bracket 65 pulls down on Latch Bracket 85, Wedge Spring 75 may compress because Wedge 70 may be restricted to any further downward movement by Wedge Stop 56. As Wedge Spring 75 may compress, wherein Wedge Hasp 72 may secure Wedge Spring 75 in Spring Recess 71 of Wedge 70, Latch Bracket 85 may latch onto Wedge Hook 80. With Wedge 70 engaged by Wedge Hook 80, a user may continue to actuate the system by now pulling the article away from the wall to the angle at which Wedge 70 may disengage from Wedge Hook 80, as described below.

As a user moves the article through an increasing angle, Wedge 70, engaged by Wedge Hook 80, may move up along Wedge Wrap 55 via the internal mechanisms described above. A user may be assisted in moving the article by the tension in Safety Spring 92, 93, or both, and Load Spring 40. Movement may continue until Cam Stop 21, with Rubber Stop 18, which may be situated in Cam Recess 19, rests up against Wedge Wrap 55, thus restricting any further movement. At or about such point, Latch Bracket 85 may force against the top of the inside of Housing 10, FIG. 8A. This force may cause Latch Bracket 85 to rotate about Latch Bracket Pin 86 in such a manner that Latch Bracket 85 may disengage from Wedge Hook 80, FIG. 8B. At this point, a user may now rotate the article back towards the wall to set the desired viewing angle, FIG. 9.

As a user moves the article to the desired viewing angle, Wedge 70 may move down in conjunction with the space created by Cam Stop 21 as Cam Stop 21 moves away from Wedge Wrap 55. Cam Stop 21 may move away from Wedge Wrap 55 via the internal mechanisms described above. At any time a user may cease moving the article and the article will remain at that angled position via the force of Cam Stop 21 against Wedge 70. This load may then subsequently be transferred through Wedge Wrap 55, Housing 10, Wall Bracket 130, and finally into the wall or support member. A user may continue to actuate the Tilt Mount System 5 through any decreasing angle and upon release, Tilt Mount System 5 will support that angled position. This process may continue until the article returns to the 0 degree position, and the process cycle begins anew.

In the above description, the invention is described as a system to allow a user to adjust the angle of a wall mounted article. It should be appreciated though, that the present invention might be used in the described or modified manner for another purpose, wherein an effective mechanism to control the rotation of a cantilevered article is desired. While the present invention is described in an exemplary embodiment for controlling a wall-mounted article, the system may be used in another configuration such that the configuration may claim benefit to the described system.

In the foregoing specification, the invention has been described with reference to specific embodiments. However, it will be appreciated that various modifications and changes can be made without departing from the scope of the present invention. The specification and Figures are to be regarded in an illustrative manner, rather than a restrictive one, and all such modifications are intended to be included within the scope of the present invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7404535 *Oct 29, 2007Jul 29, 2008Elexa Consumer Products, Inc.Video monitor unit
US7889482 *Jun 20, 2007Feb 15, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Display assembly for refrigerator
US8456808 *Sep 8, 2008Jun 4, 2013Milestone Av Technologies LlcDisplay wall mount with elastomeric spring latch and post-installation height adjustment and leveling feature
US20100309615 *Sep 8, 2008Dec 9, 2010Milestone Av Technologies LlcDisplay wall mount with elastomeric spring latch and post-installation height adjustment and leveling feature
WO2009109100A1 *Feb 27, 2009Sep 11, 2009Feng ChengPanel display screen wall-hanging device
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/284.1, 248/923
International ClassificationF16M13/02, F16M11/10, E04G3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16M2200/041, F16M11/10, F16M13/02
European ClassificationF16M11/10, F16M13/02