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Publication numberUS2005135 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1935
Filing dateApr 5, 1934
Priority dateApr 5, 1934
Publication numberUS 2005135 A, US 2005135A, US-A-2005135, US2005135 A, US2005135A
InventorsAlbert A Esterson
Original AssigneeCat S Paw Rubber Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton for rubber heels and the like
US 2005135 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 18, 1935. A, A ESTERSON 2,005,135

CARTON FOR RUBBER HEELS AND THE LIKE Filed April 5, 1954 IN VEN TOR wim BY Mw A TT ORNE Ys Patented June 18, 19.35V

CARTON Fon RUBBER HEELs AND frm;

LIKE Albert A. Esterson, Baltimore, Md.,l assigner to Cats Paw Rubber Company, Inc., Baltimore, Md., a corporation of Maryland Application April 5, 1934, serial No. 719,213

3 Claims.

This invention relates to special receptacles and particularly to containers having a removable portion serving as a check for subsequent identification.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a carton for containing rubber heels, soles and the like and having a panel portion which may be removed to provide two checks, one adapted to be retained by ythe dealer and the other to be retained by the customer for subsequent identication of footwear having applied thereto the heels or soles originally contained in the improved carton constituting the invention.

Another object of the `invention is to provide a carton of the character described which is adapted to temporarily hold the soles or heels in position after the panel has been removed.

With such objects in View, as well as other advantages which may be incident to the use of the improvements, the invention consists in the parts and combinations thereof hereinafter set forth and claimed, with the understanding that the several necessary elements constituting the same may be varied in proportions and arrangement without departing from the nature and scope of the invention. y 'In order to make the invention more clearly understoodthere are shown in the accompanying drawing means for carrying the same into practical effect, without limiting the improvements, in their useful application, to the particular construction which, for the purpose of explanation, has been made the subject of illustration.

In the said drawing:-

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a cardboard or like carton constructed in accordance with the present invention, the wall preferably constituting the bottom of the carton being uppermost.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the blank from which the carton is constructed, and

Figure 3 is a view of the removable panel portion in the bottom wall removed and separated from the carton to provide identification cheeks for the dealer and customer respectively.

Referring to the drawing, a carton constructed in accordance with the present invention, is shown as comprising a body I having top and bottom walls 2 and 3 respectively, side walls 4 and end walls 5. The carton is preferably constructed from a blank 6 shown in Figure 2, the side edges of which are provided with bendable flaps or tabs 1 adapted to be glued together to form one of the side walls 4, and with end flaps 8 which are adapted to be folded over one another and united to provide the end walls 5 of the carton. i

The bottom wall 3 of A the carton is provided with a removable panel portion 9 which is deiined by score lines I0 and which is divided transversely by a score line II to provide two' check portions I2 and I3. Each of thesecheck portions bears an area for corresponding identication numbersV indicated at I4 and other appropriate information such as the date on which the goods marketed in the carton may be called for. l

When a customer purchases a pair'of rubber heels, for example, contained in a carton constructed in accordance with this invention, the dealer removes the panel portion 9 by tearing lit from the carton along the weakened lines I0 and then separates the'panel into two checks by tearing the same along the weakened lineI I.

The nature of the -work to be done and the day when the same may be called for -is indicated in the appropriate spaces provided for the purpose on both separated portions of the panels, as will be apparent from the drawing. One of the marked check portions I3 is handed to the customer while the dealer retains the remaining portion I2 together "and in conjunction with the heels and footwear to which the heels are to be applied forsubsequent identification.-

The removal of the panel portion from. the carton provides two longitudinally extending overhanging flanges I5 which serve to prevent the displacement of the rubber heels from the carton until the dealer is ready to apply them to the footwear. The removal of the panel portion from the carton also provides a window through which the rubber heels are or may be displayed until they are applied to the footwear.

If desired the dealers portion I2 of vthe removable panel may be perforated' as indicated at I6 so as to provide means for convenient iiling and storage of the check until the goods are called for, and thereafter.

As best seen in Fig. 2 the top wall 2 of the carton is adapted for the reception of the trademark, description or advertising matter or other desired indicia identifying the nature and origin of the contents of the carton or package.

The invention is particularly useful when the carton is employed for rubbervheels; and obviates the expense as heretofore of printing separate repair tags to'A accompany the cartons containing the heels. Ordinarily, when shoes are left with a repairer to have rubber heels applied, 5

separate repair tags must be provided and are retained by the customer and dealer respectively for subsequent identiiication purposes when the goods are called for. 'Ihese separate repair tags cost in the neighborhood of $1.50 to $2.00 per thousand to be printed, depending upon the quality, and are sometimes in excess of this amount. v

According to the present invention not only are the separate repair tags or identification checks dispensed with together with the attendant expense of printing and preparing the same, but there is no lpossibility of the repair tags becoming separated from the merchandise or misplaced until the check is actually handed to the customer. No part of the valuable advertising is lost since the top portion of the cover has not been departed from andspace is provided on the removable panel portion to include sufficient advertising matter to identify the contents and origin of the goods contained Within the carton when viewed from its under side. In this manner the advertising value of the'carton is preserved without added expense over cartons previously used, and the very material expense of printing separate repair tags accompany' the cartons is entirely obviated. The savingy in expense of printing the separate repair tags as heretofore inures directly to the benet ofthe shoe repairer with resultant advantage. l

What is claimed is:

1. A job-identifying repair package containing a shoe repair element or elements, said element or elements being housed and retained within and by the walls of the package, one of said Walls having a portion lthereof circumscribed 'or partially circumscribed by a means indicating and setting oi'said portion as a detachable job identifying check, the conguration and location of the indicating means being such that` the removal of the check does not destroy the capability of the aforesaidpackage to retain its contents, said detachable check bearing `'corresponding indicia of an identifying character and .being separable between the said indicia intotwovsections, whereby one of said sectionsinay be .retained by the dealer together with the repair elements conned within the remaining portion ofV the package, and

the other of said sections may be retained by the customer for subsequent presentation and identiiication of the job.

2. A job identifying repair package containing a shoe repair element or elements, said element or elements being housed and vretained within and by the walls of the package, one of said walls having a portion thereof circumscribed or partially circumscribed `by Ia weakened line indicating and setting oir said portion as a detachable job identifying check, the coniguration and location of the weakened line being such thatjthe removal of the check does not destroy the capability of the aforesaid package to retain its contents, said `detachable check bearing corresponding indicia of an identifying character and being separable between the said indicia into'two sections, wherebyone of said sections may be retained by the dealer together with the repair elements confined Within the remaining portion of the package, and the other of said sections may be retained by the customer for subsequent presentation and identification of the job. v

3. A job identifying repair package constructed of yieldable materialcontaining rubber heels or the like, said rubber heels being housed and retained within and by the walls of the package, one of said walls having a portion thereof circumscribed or means indicating and setting off said portion as a detachable job identifying check,\the conguration and location of the indicating means being such that the removal of Vthel'check leaves flanges overlying said heels and capable of yieldably retaining said rubber` heels within said package, said detachable check bearing correspending indicia of an identifying character and being separable between the said indicia into two sections, whereby the removal of said check provides an opening in said package through which the rubber heels may be removed by the dealer by flexing or tearing said yieldableanges, and ,whereby one of said sections may be retained by the dealer' together Withthe repair elements coniined within the remaining portion of the pack-` age, and the other of said sections, may be retained by thecustom'er for subsequent presentation and identification of the job.` l

ALBERT A. ESTERSON.

partially circumscribed by ar

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2745596 *Nov 23, 1951May 15, 1956Publishers Printing Co IncWrappings for chocolate, cookies, candy, and other sweets
US2986325 *Feb 29, 1960May 30, 1961Richard E LoderhosePhonograph jacket and method of making same
US3987897 *Apr 7, 1975Oct 26, 1976Monarch Marking Systems, Inc.Label roll package
US4023678 *Dec 29, 1975May 17, 1977Fiedler Dolores EPackage and identification record for an intrauterine device
US5246161 *Feb 5, 1993Sep 21, 1993Mort KappBox with collectible card
US7478745 *Mar 31, 2006Jan 20, 2009International Paper CompanyContainer and blank having easy opening feature
WO2000030942A1 *Nov 24, 1999Jun 2, 2000Korpershoek Matijs JohannesPackaging having means for recording time
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/232, 206/831, 206/459.5, 206/810, 229/242, 206/299
International ClassificationB65D5/42
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/831, Y10S206/81, B65D5/4229
European ClassificationB65D5/42E1D