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Publication numberUS2005842 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1935
Filing dateMar 8, 1934
Priority dateMar 11, 1933
Also published asDE637233C
Publication numberUS 2005842 A, US 2005842A, US-A-2005842, US2005842 A, US2005842A
InventorsMarcus Etienne
Original AssigneeMarcus Etienne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy aeroplane
US 2005842 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 25,1935. E. MARCUS TOY JAEROPLANE Filed March 8, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 June 25, 1935- i I E. M Rcus 2,005,842

I TO'f AEROPLANE I Filed March a; 1954 4 Sheets- Sheet 2 E. MARCUS TOY AEROPLANE Filed March 8, 1934 June 25, 1935.

4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented June 25,1935' UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TOY AEROPLANE Etienne Marcus, Paris, France Application March 8, 1934, Serial No. 714,691 In France March 11, 1933 5 Claims. (CI. 46-50) aviation.

The said invention is characterized by} various I simple devices for assembling the parts, which can be employed singly or in combination in the same model. p

The following description, illustrated by the accompanying drawings, shows, by way of example, some of the methods whereby the invention can be carried out. I

Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 show outlines which may be printed on a'sheet of paper or the like, and

Figures 6,7, and 8 show a toy monoplane built of parts out from a sheet thus marked.

Figures 9, 10, 11 and 12 illustrate a modification of the manner of inserting the wing.

Figure 13 is a side view of a toy biplane.

The outlines marked on a sheet, as shown in Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 represent the following parts: In Figure 1, I is the body or fuselage which is slit at 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 6a, with parts 1, 8 representing wheels. The rudder controlling elevation is shown at 9, two lateral bands at I0 and II to serve as balance weights and two tongues l2 and I3 for attaching together the parts. Figure 2 shows the supporting wings with the outline of two teeth or filling pieces l4, l5 and two parts to be folded l6 and H. In Figure 3 the direction rudder is shownwith slits l8 and I9. Figure 4 shows the support 20 for the screw, marked with lines at which the said support is to be folded. Figure 5 shows the screw 22'.

The parts are cut out along the full lines and folded along the dotted lines.

As shown in these figures and in Figures 6, 7 and 8, the balance weight 23, occupying the place usually occupied by the motor, is formed by folding the two paper bands In and II, which are preferably symmetrical with reference to the axis of the toy aeroplane and are integral with the body or fuselage; the outer ends of the two bands form a tongue 24 which, after the folding, is inserted in the slit 4 cut in one of the bands.

The rear part of the body or fuselage, tapered in imitation of a real aeroplane,-is held in the folded position by introducing the tongue I2 through the slit 5.

The direction controlling rudder is mounted in place by inserting the body or fuselage into the slit l8 until the end of the slit l8 abuts against the end of the slit to and the locking up of the assemblage is effected by inserting'the tongue l3 through the slit l9- into the slit 6.

The wing piece of the monoplane, after folding on the lines 25 and Y26, is inserted through the slits 2, 3 which are of a length equal to the distance between the folds 25, 26 so as effectively to secure the wing piece at the front and at the back.

The teeth l4 and I5 are then bent out in the interior of the body to serve as filling pieces. The fold I! which serves as an aileron or banking rudder is also bent into position. The part l6 alone remains folded at' the leading edge and thus increases the rigidity of thewing and acts as a securing member.

The lateral members of the body are thus supported on both sides, at the front and at the back, interiorly by the teeth or filling pieces and exteriorly by the edge of the wing piece. Therefore also the wing piece cannot be displaced.

The curvature of the slits 2 and 3 gives the wing piece a cambered profile like that of actual aeroplane wings and this increases its rigidity.

Moreover this mode of assembly brings, into play the resiliency of the body and of the wing piece, respectively, in two perpendicular planes and ensures great rigidity of the built up model;

The screw support 20 is introduced, after folding on the lines 2|, into the interior of the balance weight 23 and the screw is affixed by means of an ordinary dress pin.

The toy thus assembled and thrown into the air is capable of travelling correctly and gliding along a prolonged course. This valuable attainment is conferred ,on the toy more especially by the arrangement of the balance weight with which it is provided near the front in the place where the motor is located in actual aeroplanes.

Moreover the toy responds to the inclinations given to the direction and elevation rudders and to the ailerons or banking rudders. Its course can thus be varied at will.

In another constructional form, the toy can be cut from a single piece of sheet material comprising the body or fuselage, the rear flight con-.

trolling members, the monoplane wings, the wheels and the balance weight.

In a further constructional form, the insertion of the wingpiece into the fuselage is effected at a V and .12 the slits 21 and 23 folds to retain the piece each attached to V fuselage.

different height. As shown in Figures 9, 10, 11 are cut to form a wind screen 23 and the back 30 of the cock-pit. The wing piece, part, comprises teeth 3|, 32 which are introduced within the body or fuselage to act as filling pieces.

In this example it is unnecessary wing piece in the slits. It can be introduced through the space between the wind screen and the back of the cockpit. The wing piece may be made with or without a front securing rib.

This method of attachment is also applicable in the case of a wing piece arranged in a lowered position, the slits in which it is; inserted being then provided at the lower part of the body or fuselage.

In the case of machines with more than one motor, the wing piece can be cut in more than one the body or fuselage in the manner hereinabove described.

Figure 13 shows a toy biplane wherein this method of attachment is applied to both wing pieces 33 andv 34. The lower plane 3| has an extension forming a' brace or stay 35 locked at its end inthe upper plane 33 by means of a projecting tongue 36.

In a modification the support for the screw is omitted, and in place thereof there is provided a longitudinal extension of the lateral bands serving as the balance weight.

In the construction of a toy hydroplane with a hull or float, embodying the principle of this invention, a. balance weight is provided forward of the hull and this not only adds to the equilibrium of the craft but also adds to the elegance of its silhouette.

It is to be understood'that the cited examples are not to be taken as imposing any limitation, as the principle of the invention can be applied to any land or sea plane.

I claim:

1. Toy aeroplane constructed by cutting and folding sheets of paper or the like, comprising a fuselage of V section, a balance weight, at the front part of the fuselage obtained by cutting and folding from the sheet, a wing inserted in the fuselage and a steering rudder attached to the fuselage of V section, inthis case also at a centralto provide r of the fuselage, means for 2. Toy aeroplane constructed by cutting and folding sheets of paper or the like, comprising a means for spacing apart the members of the V section in the middle portion of the fuselage, means for keeping thesemembers united in front and behind, a balance weight at the front part of the fuselage obtained by cutting and folding from the sheet, a wing inserted in the fuselage and a steering the fuselage.

3. Toy aeroplane constructed by cutting and folding sheets of paper or the like, comprising a fuselage of V section, means for spacing apart the members of the V section'in the middle portion of the fuselage, means for keeping these members united in front and behind, bands integral with the front part of the fuselage and rolled and folded the said bands terminating in a point inserted, after folding, in a slit in the bands, an air screw constituted by folding paper or the like and inserted in the interior of the said folded bands," a wing inserted in the fuselage and a steering rudder attached to the fuselage.

4. Toy aeroplane constructed by cutting and folding sheets of paper or the like, comprising a fuselage of 'V section,-means for spacing apart the members of 'the V section in the middle portion of the fuselage, means for keeping these rudder attached to members united in front and behind, a balance 5. Toy aeroplane constructed by cutting and folding sheets of paper or the like, comprising a fuselage of V section, means for spacing apart the members of the V section in the middle portion keeping these members and behind, a balance weight at the front'part of the fuselage obtained by cutting and folding from the sheet, slits in the fuselage which are cut to form the windscreen and the back of the cockpit, a wing inserted in the fuselage through the said slits and a steering rudder attached to the fuselage.

united in front MARCUS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2637139 *Feb 2, 1945May 5, 1953John R HarrisToy airplane
US2769276 *Oct 19, 1953Nov 6, 1956Bromo Mint CompanyInfant's plaything
US2867941 *May 1, 1957Jan 13, 1959Breuil Robert A DuToy airplane
US3653151 *Oct 13, 1970Apr 4, 1972Laurent Andre J MAirfoil structure
US4103454 *May 19, 1977Aug 1, 1978Myron StoneFolding assembled article such as a toy airplane
US4270301 *Jan 22, 1979Jun 2, 1981Meek Donald JModel airplane and blank therefore
US20160023743 *Jun 9, 2015Jan 28, 2016Ronald M. BarrettFlat-stock aerial vehicles and methods of use
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/67
International ClassificationA63H27/00, A63H27/16
Cooperative ClassificationA63H27/001
European ClassificationA63H27/00A