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Publication numberUS20060009187 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/168,949
Publication dateJan 12, 2006
Filing dateJun 28, 2005
Priority dateAug 27, 2002
Also published asCN1685635A, US6914913, US20040042437, US20060003800, WO2004021620A2, WO2004021620A3
Publication number11168949, 168949, US 2006/0009187 A1, US 2006/009187 A1, US 20060009187 A1, US 20060009187A1, US 2006009187 A1, US 2006009187A1, US-A1-20060009187, US-A1-2006009187, US2006/0009187A1, US2006/009187A1, US20060009187 A1, US20060009187A1, US2006009187 A1, US2006009187A1
InventorsArnold Sheynman, Carl Grube, Rajendra Kosgi, Rohini Polisetty, Mahesh Perepa, Maloor Sreekrishna, Krishnamurthy Vijayaprasad, Sharada Raghuram, Donald Dorsey, Kevin Spriggs, Ramesh Sudini
Original AssigneeArnold Sheynman, Carl Grube, Kosgi Rajendra K, Rohini Polisetty, Mahesh Perepa, Sreekrishna Maloor R, Vijayaprasad Krishnamurthy S, Sharada Raghuram, Dorsey Donald A, Spriggs Kevin M, Ramesh Sudini
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-mode interoperable mobile station communications architectures and methods
US 20060009187 A1
Abstract
A multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture (200) including an application layer (210), a services layer (220) interfacing the applications layer, a multi-mode layer (230) interfacing the service layer, and a hardware layer (240) interfacing the multi-mode layer. The multi-mode layer includes first and second interoperable radio access technologies, for example W-CDMA UMTS and GSM/GPRS technologies.
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Claims(13)
1. A multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture, comprising:
a services layer;
an interoperability entity interconnecting first and second radio access technologies;
a packet router coupled to the services layer and to the first and second radio access technologies, the packet router routing packet data to one of the first and second radio access technologies.
2. The multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture of claim 1, the packet router including first and second packet protocol entities corresponding to the first and second radio access technologies.
3. The multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture of claim 1, a radio resource entity coupled to the first and second radio access technologies, a timing entity coupled to the first and second radio access technologies.
4. A multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture, comprising:
a services entity;
a multi-mode entity interconnecting first and second radio access technologies and the service entity,
the multi-mode entity including an interoperability entity for transitioning between the first and second radio access technologies during active calls, the interoperability entity for reselecting among the first and second radio access technologies.
5. The multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture of claim 4, a packet router coupled to the services entity and to the first and second radio access technologies, a packet router routing packet data to one of the first and second radio access technologies.
6. A method in a multi-mode mobile wireless communications device including first and second radio access technologies, comprising:
conducting a communications session with on one of the first and second radio access technologies;
switching between the first and second radio access technologies during the communications session without interrupting the communications session under control of a radio resource component;
conducting the communications session with on the other one of the first and second radio access technologies after switching.
7. The method of claim 6, controlling switching between the first and second radio resource technologies using a real-time coordinator and the radio resource component.
8. The method of claim 6, controlling interrupt processing of the first and second radio access technologies using an interrupt processing portion of a timing component.
9. The method of claim 6,
conducting the communications session includes conducting a packet session,
switching between the first and second radio access technologies includes routing packet data from one of the first and second radio access technologies to the other of the first and second radio access technologies with a packet router.
10. The method of claim 9, routing packet data includes converting the packet data to a protocol corresponding to the radio access technology to which the packet data is routed.
11. The method of claim 6,
conducting the communications session includes conducting a voice call,
switching between the first and second radio access technologies using the radio resource component without interrupting the voice call.
12. A multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture, comprising:
a services entity;
a multi-mode entity interconnecting first and second radio access technologies and the service entity,
the multi-mode entity including a radio resource for transitioning between the first and second radio access technologies;
a time critical functionality component coupled to the first and second radio access technologies.
13. The multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture of claim 12, a packet router coupled to the services layer and to the first and second radio access technologies, the packet router routing packet data to one of the first and second radio access technologies.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application is a continuation of commonly assigned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/228,484 filed on 27 Aug. 2002 with like title, from which the benefits under 35 U.S.C. 120 are claimed, the contents of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

The present disclosure relates generally to wireless mobile station communications, and more particularly to wireless mobile station communication architectures with multi-mode interoperability, for example, communications supporting time division multiple access (TDMA) based and spread spectrum based modes of operation, wireless devices having multi-mode architectures and methods therefor.

BACKGROUND

Wireless cellular communication mobile stations with multi-service interoperability will enable communications in areas served by different communications protocols, otherwise referred to herein as a heterogeneous communications environments.

The initial deployment of new communications technologies is characterized typically by limited areas of new technology service in contiguous regions served by legacy technologies. In many countries, for example, the W-CDMA implementation of Universal Mobile Telecommunications Services (UMTS) will be deployed initially on isolated islands of service in a sea served by existing Groupe Special Mobile services (GSM)/Generalized Packet Radio Services (GPRS) network infrastructure.

UMTS services will not be offered over substantial contiguous areas until new technology infrastructure is installed or until existing infrastructure is upgraded, but this will require substantial capital outlays by telecommunications services providers and may not be complete for some time, resulting in a heterogeneous communications environment in many geographic regions for the foreseeable future.

Multi-mode cellular handsets capable of operating in areas served by emerging and legacy communications infrastructures will provide users earlier access to the emerging communications technology and hasten its deployment. Multi-mode wireless communications devices are also desirable for communications in other heterogeneous environments.

Mobile wireless communications devices will require architectures with multi-mode interoperability for seamless operation in heterogeneous communications environments.

The various aspects, features and advantages of the present disclosure will become more fully apparent to those having ordinary skill in the art upon careful consideration of the following Detailed Description with the accompanying drawings described below.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an exemplary communications coverage area served by two different communications protocols.

FIG. 2 is an exemplary multi-mode mobile station communications architecture.

FIG. 3 is a more detailed schematic of an exemplary multi-mode mobile station architecture for GSM and W-CDMA communications.

FIG. 4 is an exemplary radio resource coordinator module for multi-mode communication architectures.

FIG. 5 is an exemplary mobility management component for multi-mode communication architectures.

FIG. 6 is an exemplary data router configuration.

FIG. 7 is another exemplary data router configuration.

FIG. 8 is another exemplary data router configuration.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 is an exemplary heterogeneous communications environment 100 comprising a relatively contiguous GSM/GPRS coverage area 110 and several isolated W-CDMA coverage areas 120 and 122. The heterogeneous environment of FIG. 1 is typical of the early stages of deployment of advanced communications network infrastructure, e.g., a W-CDMA network, in area where an existing infrastructure, e.g., GSM/GPRS, is already well established. The exemplary environment 100 is not limited to one served by the exemplary radio access networks, but may be served more generally by a heterogeneous network comprising any radio access technologies, for example, one comprising 3rd and 4th generation communications service and beyond.

For multi-mode wireless communications devices operating in heterogeneous networks, for example a mobile terminal following user route 130 in FIG. 1, it is desirable for the communications devices to simultaneously monitor cells of the different radio access networks in idle and active modes to perform cell selection and handover procedures, including the bi-directional handoff of radio access bearer services, for example in networks comprising GSM Base Station Subsystems (BSS) and Universal Terrestrial Radio Access Network (UTRAN) access networks.

FIG. 2 is an exemplary multi-mode mobile wireless communications device architecture 200 comprising generally an application layer 210 interfaced with a services layer 220 interfaced with a multi-mode layer 230, comprising at least two interoperable radio access technologies, interfaced with a hardware layer 240.

In FIG. 2, the application layer 200, at the top of the model, comprises generally one or more application subsystems. In the exemplary architecture 300 of FIG. 3, the application layer 310 includes a single application subsystem comprising an AT command parser 312, an application manager 314, and, for example, Synergy applications. The application layer may also include generally other application subsystems, for example a Java Virtual Machine and its corresponding applications, among other application subsystems.

In FIG. 3, the exemplary services layer 320 comprises a Data Flow Service Provider (DFSP) 322, a Data Session Service Provider (DSSP) 324, and Connection Management (CM) components 326. The application layer interfaces with the services layers and communications therebetween are performed by function calls, for example Application Utility Functions (AUF). Communications also occur within the application and services layers, for example, between the DFSP 324 and the DSSP 324.

The multi-mode layer comprises generally an interoperability entity that interconnects the radio access technologies. In FIG. 2, the first radio access technology 232 is a GSM/GPRS radio access technology, which may include an extension, for example EDGE or EDGE Classic. The second radio access technology 234 is a non-GSM technology, for example Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) Universal Mobile Telecommunications Services (UMTS) radio access technology.

In FIG. 2, the multi-mode layer, or engine layer, comprises generally a common subsystem 236 comprising components shared among the different radio access technologies, for example mobility management layer, data router, connectivity components, etc. The engine layer also includes a time critical functionality control component 238, which is shared among the radio access technologies, for example for measurement control, scheduling, cell selection, etc. as discussed more fully below.

In the exemplary architecture of FIG. 3, the components shared by the first and second radio access technologies include the application layer 310 and the services layer 320. In one embodiment, several components of the multi-mode layer 330 are also shared by the radio access technologies, including the mobility management component 332, the Session Management (SM) component 334, the Radio Link Protocol (RLP) component 336, and other components discussed further below. In FIG. 3, a Digital Signal Processing (DSP) component 350 includes generally modulation and demodulation functionality for the corresponding radio access technologies, WCDMA and GSM/GPRS in the exemplary embodiment.

In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 3, the architecture includes a radio resource layer 338 for transitioning between the first and second radio access technologies. In this exemplary embodiment, the radio resource layer is shared by the radio access technologies.

FIG. 4 is a more detailed illustration of the radio resource layer 400 comprising a radio resource component 402 including a state transition component 410 and first and second state machines 420 and 430 for the corresponding radio access technologies. Other state machines may be included for embodiments that include additional radio access technologies. The state transition component 410 generally allocates resources among the first and second radio access technologies. The state transition component also maintains current state information while transitioning from one state machine to the other to enable returning to the current state if the transition is unsuccessful.

In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 4, the first state machine 420 is coupled generally to a W-CDMA radio resource entity (RRC) 440, which includes a W-CDMA message parser 442, a message builder 444, and a layer configuration controller 446, among other known functionality elements. The second state machine 430 is coupled to the GPRS radio resource (GRR)/GSM radio resource (RR) entity 450, which includes a GSM/GPRS message parser 452, a message builder 454, and a configuration controller 456, among other known elements. The radio resource entities 440 and 450 and corresponding elements are specific to the radio access technologies in the device.

In FIG. 3, the radio resource layer 338 communicates radio resource status and other control information, for example registration area and NAS system information, PLMN availability, etc., to a mobility management layer, and in the exemplary embodiment to a mobility management component 332 thereof, the functionality of which is discussed more fully below.

In FIG. 3, a timing component 340 is coupled to the radio resource layer 338. The exemplary timing component 340 is divided into a real-time task processing portion 342, and an interrupt-processing portion 344. The real-time task portion is coupled to corresponding portions of the radio access technologies for performing real-time processing, and the interrupt-processing portion is coupled to the radio access technologies for performing interrupt processing.

Time critical radio access technology functionality, for example, Public Land Mobile Network (PLMN) selection, cell selection and reselection, signal measurement, handover, etc., is coordinated by a real-time coordinator 343 in the real-time portion of the timing component. The real-time coordinator reports status and other information to the radio resource layer 338, and the real-time coordinator controls switching between radio access technologies under control from the radio resource component 337.

For example, during initial cell selection the radio resource component 337 controls cell selection on the appropriate radio access technology, for example GSM or W-CDMA in the exemplary embodiment, commands power measurement and channel synchronization, commands to read system information scheduled by Radio Resource (RR) component, and follows cell selection procedure to camp on the most suitable cell. After finding a cell to camp on, the radio resource component sends an indication to RR/RRC. If no cells are found suitable on the desired radio access technology, cell selection procedure on the other radio access technology is selected. If no suitable cells are found, an available PLMN list is sent to radio resource component.

The timing component also controls interrupt processing, for example medium access control (MAC) functionality of the first and second radio access technologies. The W-CDMA Layer 1/MAC interruption service routine (ISR) functionality includes, for example, DSP timing, transport to logical and vice verse channel mapping, etc. The timing component also controls interrupt processing for the GSM/GPRS Layer 1 MAC ISR, for example Adaptive Gain Control (AGC), Adaptive Frequency Control (AFC), waveform generation, MAC procedures, etc.

Interrupt processing information is communicated from each Layer 1 MAC ISR to the corresponding radio link control (RLC) components 346 and 348 of the first and second radio access technologies and to a DSP 350 via an Micro Controller Unit (MCU)/DSP interface 352 common to both radio access technologies.

FIG. 5 is an exemplary mobility management task layer 500 comprising a mobility management component 510 coupled a GPRS Mobility Management (GMM), element 520 and to a Mobility Management (MM) element 530. The GMM and MM components include functionality blocks specific to the integrated radio access technology, for example registration, de-registration and location management, authentication, message building and parsing, etc.

The mobility management layer interfaces with the radio resource layer 540, the radio access technology L1-task layer 550, the GSM Logical Link Control (LLC) entity 560, the Session Management (SM) entity 570, the MMICM 580, and the DSSP 590. These interfaces are also illustrated generally in FIG. 3. The mobility management layer also interfaces with and provides radio access technology status information to the data router as discussed below.

In the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 3, a data router 360 is coupled to the services layer 320, and particularly to the data flow service provider (DFSP) 322 thereof by a bi-direction data bus. The data router 360 is also coupled to the first and second radio access technologies, and in the exemplary embodiment to a W-CDMA Packet Data Communications Protocol (PDCP) 362 and to a GSM Sub Network Dependent Communications Protocol (SNDCP) 364.

The data router 360 generally routes data between the services layer 320 and one of the radio access technologies. In FIG. 3, the radio resource component 338 is coupled to the data router 360 by the mobility management module 332, which provides control information to the data router for selecting one of the radio access technologies. In FIG. 6, the data router 600 is configured for routing data from the DFSP 610 to the PDCP 620 for W-CDMA radio access technology (RAT). In FIG. 7, the data router 700 is configured for null mode, as occurs when the radio access technology is undefined, and FIG. 8 illustrates the data router 800 configured for routing data from the DFSP 810 to the SNDCP 820 for GSM radio access technology.

While the present disclosure and what is considered presently to be the best mode thereof have been described in a manner that establishes possession thereof by the inventors and that enables those of ordinary skill in the art to make and use the same, it will be understood and appreciated that there are many equivalents to the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein and that myriad modifications and variations may be made thereto without departing from the scope and spirit thereof, which are to be limited not by the exemplary embodiments but by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7280506 *Jan 2, 2004Oct 9, 2007Industrial Technology Research InstituteApparatus for controlling multi-mode radio access and method for the same
US7636345 *Apr 6, 2006Dec 22, 2009Comsys Communication & Signal Processing Ltd.Apparatus for and method of time related communications between multiple devices having different time bases
US8699419Oct 11, 2011Apr 15, 2014Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.Method, system and apparatus for providing access mode selection to multimode terminal
US8750201Apr 7, 2009Jun 10, 2014Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.Method, system and apparatus for providing access mode selection to multimode terminal
US20100002653 *Jul 7, 2009Jan 7, 2010Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Method for handoff during connected mode of a multimode mobile station in a mixed deployment
USRE42537 *Apr 24, 2009Jul 12, 2011Industrial Technology Research InstituteApparatus for controlling multi-mode radio access and method for the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification455/318
International ClassificationH04B1/26, H04W88/06
Cooperative ClassificationH04W88/06
European ClassificationH04W88/06