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Publication numberUS20060013145 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/215,771
Publication dateJan 19, 2006
Filing dateAug 30, 2005
Priority dateJun 7, 2000
Also published asUS6965572
Publication number11215771, 215771, US 2006/0013145 A1, US 2006/013145 A1, US 20060013145 A1, US 20060013145A1, US 2006013145 A1, US 2006013145A1, US-A1-20060013145, US-A1-2006013145, US2006/0013145A1, US2006/013145A1, US20060013145 A1, US20060013145A1, US2006013145 A1, US2006013145A1
InventorsSamson Boodaghians
Original AssigneeSamson Boodaghians
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loopback capability for Bi-directional multi-protocol label switching traffic engineered trunks
US 20060013145 A1
Abstract
A system and method for introducing a loopback capability for Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) bi-directional traffic trunks are discussed. MPLS is an emerging technology, which integrates Internet Protocol (IP) routing with label switching techniques. MPLS intends to provide new capabilities in the area of traffic engineering for IP networks. These traffic engineering capabilities will have to be combined with a set of complementary operation, administration and maintenance (OA&M) functions for effectively managing and operating MPLS-based networks. One such function is loopback. A loopback function provides the capability to transmit a OA&M packet on one or more segments of a bi-directional traffic trunk (BTT) in a MPLS network. Using a loopback function, parameters of a BTT, such as connectivity, delay and other Quality of Service (QoS) parameters, can be tested. The system and method provide different techniques for implementing loopback in an MPLS network.
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Claims(51)
1. A method comprising steps of:
establishing a bi-directional traffic trunk; and
performing a loopback function on the established bi-directional traffic trunk.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising a step of:
evaluating at least one parameter of the established bi-directional traffic trunk using the performed loopback function.
3. The method of claim 2, further comprising a step of:
activating the established bi-directional traffic trunk, when the evaluated parameter is any one of (1) equivalent to a predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter and (2) exceeds the predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter.
4. The method of claim 3, further comprising steps of:
performing at least one of (1) re-establishing the bi-directional traffic trunk using a different explicit route and (2) providing notification, when the evaluated parameter is not equivalent to and does not exceed the predetermined standard.
5. The method of claim 2, further including a step of:
deactivating the loopback procedure, when the evaluated parameter is any one of (1) equivalent to a predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter and (2) exceeds the predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter.
6. The method of claim 2, wherein the evaluated parameter includes at least one of connectivity, delay and other quality of service parameters.
7. The method of claim 3, further comprising steps of:
performing the loopback function for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk; and
evaluating at least one parameter for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk using the performed loopback function.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein the loopback function for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk is performed periodically, and the evaluated parameter for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk is evaluated periodically.
9. The method of claim 8, further comprising steps of:
performing at least one (1) re-establishing the bi-directional traffic trunk using a different explicit route and (2) providing notification, when the evaluated parameter for the activated bi-directional trunk is not equivalent to and does not exceed a predetermined standard associated with the evaluated standard.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein the parameter evaluated for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk includes at least one of connectivity, delay and other quality of service parameters.
11. The method of claim 1, further including steps of:
selecting a label switching router in a path traversed by the bi-directional traffic trunk; and
activating a loopback procedure at the label switching router.
12. A method of claim 2, wherein the evaluated parameter is evaluated for at least one portion of the established bi-directional traffic trunk.
13. A method comprising steps of:
activating a bi-directional traffic trunk; and
performing a loopback function on the activated bi-directional traffic trunk.
14. The method of claim 13, further comprising a step of:
evaluating at least one parameter of the established bi-directional traffic trunk using the performed loopback function.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein the loopback function for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk is performed periodically, and the evaluated parameter for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk is evaluated periodically.
16. The method of claim 14, further comprising steps of:
performing at least one of (1) re-establishing the bi-directional traffic trunk using a different explicit route and (2) providing notification, when the evaluated parameter for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk is not equivalent to and does not exceed a predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter.
17. The method of claim 14, wherein the at least one parameter includes at least one of connectivity, delay and other quality of service parameters.
18. A network comprising:
an originating router configured to transmit a packet downstream on a bi-directional traffic trunk; and
a loopback router configured to receive the packet and transmit the packet upstream towards the originating router on the bi-directional traffic trunk.
19. The network of claim 18, wherein the originating router receives the packet from the loopback router and evaluates at least one parameter of the bi-directional traffic trunk using the packet.
20. The network of claim 19, wherein the bi-directional traffic trunk is not activated.
21. The network of claim 20, wherein the originating router performs at least one of (1) re-establishing the bi-directional traffic trunk using a different explicit route and (2) providing notification, when the evaluated parameter is not equivalent to and does not exceed a predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter.
22. The network of claim 20, wherein the originating router activates the established bi-directional traffic trunk, when the evaluated parameter is any one of (1) equivalent to a predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter and (2) exceeds a predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter.
23. The network of claim 20, wherein the parameter is evaluated for at least one portion of the bi-directional traffic trunk.
24. The network of claim 19, wherein the bi-directional traffic trunk is activated.
25. The network of claim 24, wherein the originating router performs at least one of (1) re-establishing the bi-directional traffic trunk using a different explicit route and (2) providing notification, when the evaluated parameter for the activated bi-directional traffic trunk is not equivalent to and does not exceed a predetermined standard associated with the evaluated parameter.
26. The network of claim 19, wherein the at least one parameter includes at least one of connectivity, delay and other quality of service.
27. A method comprising steps of:
receiving a packet traveling downstream on a bi-directional traffic trunk; and
transmitting the received packet upstream on the bi-directional traffic trunk.
28. The method of claim 27, further comprising a step of identifying the incoming label of the received packet.
29. The method of claim 28, further comprising a step of replacing the identified incoming label with an incoming label corresponding to a received packet travelling upstream on the bi-directional traffic trunk.
30. The method of claim 29, further comprising steps of:
maintaining a table of next hop label forwarding entries; and
determining the received packet's next hop using a next hop label forwarding entry associated with the replaced incoming label.
31. The method of claim 27, wherein the step of receiving a packet further includes receiving the packet at a label switching router, and the receiving label switching router is any one of a label edge router and an intermediate label switching router.
32. The method of claim 27, wherein the bi-directional traffic trunk is in a multi-protocol label switching network.
33. A router comprising:
a plurality of ports, one port of the plurality of ports receiving a packet travelling downstream on a bi-directional traffic trunk; and
processing circuitry processing the packet and forwarding the packet to a selected port of the plurality of ports for transmission to a next hop upstream on the bi-directional traffic trunk.
34. A method comprising steps of:
constructing a packet at a router;
transmitting the packet downstream on a bi-directional traffic trunk from the router constructing the packet;
receiving the packet at a router; and
determining whether to perform a loopback procedure at the router receiving the packet.
35. The method of claim 34, further comprising a step of:
identifying the received packet as a loopback packet.
36. The method of claim 35, further comprising a step of:
processing the received packet in accordance with a command in the packet, when the packet is determined to be a loopback packet
37. The method of claim 36, wherein the command is associated with at least one parameter of the bi-directional traffic trunk.
38. The method of claim 37, wherein the at least one parameter includes at least one of connectivity, delay, and other quality of service parameters.
39. The method of claim 34, wherein the router constructing the packet and the router receiving the packet are label switching routers.
40. The method of claim 34, wherein the step of determining whether to perform a loopback procedure further includes a step of determining whether the received packet is a loopback packet.
41. The method of claim 40, wherein the step of determining whether to perform a loopback procedure further includes a step of determining whether the router receiving the packet is a loopback router for the received packet.
42. The method of claim 38, further comprising a step of:
transmitting the received packet to a next hop downstream on the bi-directional traffic trunk, when the received packet is not a loopback packet.
43. The method of claim 39, further comprising a step of:
transmitting the received packet to a next hop downstream on the bi-directional traffic trunk, when the router receiving the packet is not the loopback router for the received packet.
44. A network comprising:
a bi-directional traffic trunk;
an originating router constructing a packet and transmitting a packet downstream on the bi-directional traffic trunk; and
a receiving router receiving the packet and determining whether the receiving router is a loopback router for the received packet.
45. The network of claim 44, wherein the receiving router performs a loopback procedure, when the receiving router is the loopback router for the received packet.
46. The network of claim 45, wherein the receiving router processes the received packet in accordance with a command in the packet.
47. The network of claim 46, wherein the command is associated with at least one parameter of the bi-directional traffic trunk.
48. The network of claim 47, wherein, the at least one parameter includes at least one of connectivity, delay, and other quality of service parameters.
49. The network of claim 45, wherein the receiving router transmits the received packet to a next hop upstream, towards the originating router, when the receiving router is the loopback router for the received packet.
50. The network of claim 44, wherein the receiving router transmits the received packet to a next hop downstream on the bi-directional traffic trunk, when the receiving router is not the loopback router for the received packet.
51. The network of claim 44, wherein the originating router and the receiving routers are label switching routers.
Description

This is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/589,464, filed Jun. 7, 2000, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to network operation, administration, and maintenance (OA&M) functions for communication networks. More particularly, the present invention relates to a loopback function for networks employing label switching techniques.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A typical digital communications network has a network architecture that is based upon the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model for providing communication between a multiplicity of interconnected digital end systems or “nodes.” The OSI Reference Model divides networking protocols into seven layers, which, in ascending order of abstraction, are: 1) the physical layer, 2) the data-link layer, 3) the network layer, 4) the transport layer, 5) the session layer, 6) the presentation layer, and 7) the application layer.

Local area networks (LANs), i.e., a short-distance communications network, operate at layer 2 in the OSI model. Routers operate at layer 3 in the OSI model and may connect two LANs or other types of networks having different protocols. More specifically, routers at the network layer terminate local data-link layer protocols and utilize network layer addresses and data frame restructuring to communicate with each other.

Internet Protocol (IP) is a typical layer 3 routing protocol. For IP routing, a router receives a packet and determines a next hop, i.e., the next destination for the received packet in the path towards the final packet destination. Typically, each router in the path to the final destination of the packet analyzes the packet header for identifying the packet's destination address and runs a routing algorithm for determining the next hop towards the identified destination address.

Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) optimizes conventional routing techniques by assigning labels to a Forwarding Equivalent Class (FEC). A FEC is defined as a set of packets that can be handled equivalently for the purpose of forwarding and thus is suitable for binding to a label. Once a binding between a FEC and a label is done, it is not necessary for each label switching router (LSR) in a label-switched path (LSP) , i.e., a path through one or more LSRs followed by packets having the same FEC, to analyze a received packet's IP header for determining the packet's destination address. Instead, LSRs make forwarding decisions based on the label attached to the packet, and consequently, packets are routed through the network faster.

MPLS is being developed for high-speed networks that, for example, are used by some Internet-service providers (ISPs). MPLS is currently being standardized by the MPLS Working Group of the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force).

FIG. 1 illustrates an MPLS packet having a data-link layer 8, MPLS shim header 7, network layer 6 and a payload 5. MPLS uses a shim header 7 between a data-link layer 8 and a network layer 6 for integrating IP routing with label switching. The MPLS architecture encapsulates an IP packet in an MPLS shim header 7. The shim header 7 is placed between the data-link layer 8 and the network layer 6 headers. MPLS can operate on any layer 2 media (e.g., ATM, FR, PPP), but MPLS currently serves only the IP client network layer. The shim header consists of a series of label stack entries. Each label stack entry contains a 20-bit label field 1, a 3-bit experimental field 2, a single bit field 3 indicating the bottom of the label stack and an 8-bit time-to-live (TTL) field 4.

Similar to conventional routing table entries, each LSR in a MPLS network may include a forwarding table having next hop label forwarding entries (NHLFEs). Each NHLFE, among other information, contains the physical interfaces or ports, the incoming label, and the outgoing label for the next hop for a received packet. A label in a label stack entry of a received packet is used as an index for retrieving a NHLFE containing the next hop for the received packet. Generally, the label from the label stack entry on the top of the label stack is used to index the NHLFEs in the LSR. After identifying the NHLFE for the next hop, the outgoing label for the next hop, which is retrieved from the identified NHLFE, is placed on top of the label stack for the packet, and the packet is transmitted to the next hop. This label switching technique is used by the LSRs for routing MPLS packets through the MPLS network.

FIG. 2 illustrates a reference topology for a typical MPLS network 45. MPLS network 45 includes a set of nodes or LSRs for performing MPLS routing and forwarding. The LSRs in MPLS network 45 include intermediate LSRs and label-edge routers, e.g., LER 1 and LER 2. The set of contiguous nodes that an MPLS packet traverses in the MPLS network is called a Label Switched Path (LSP).

MPLS network 45 includes a bi-directional traffic engineering trunk (BTT) 42 having two traffic engineering trunks with the same endpoints, i.e., LER 1 and LER 2, and opposite directions of transmission. The two traffic trunks that form BTT 42 traverse two unidirectional explicitly-routed label-switched paths (ER-LSPs) between LER 1 and LER 2. An ER-LSP is a LSP defined by a management system or a single LSR that is typically the ingress LSR for that particular direction of transmission, e.g., LER 1 or LER 2. ER-LSPs are set up independent of IP shortest path routing algorithms. BTT 42 is formed of two traffic trunks traversing two ER-LSPs in opposite directions. One traffic trunk flows downstream from ingress LER 1 towards egress LER 2 on one ER-LSP. The other traffic trunk flows upstream from egress LER 2 towards ingress LER 1 on the other ER-LSP. Consequently, BTT 42 traverses a complete round-trip path between LER 1 and LER 2.

It is envisioned that ER-LSPs, which form BTTs, will be set up for carrying possibly hundreds to several thousands of individual IP flows. Hence, it is crucial to ascertain parameters of a BTT, such as connectivity, delay and other quality of service (QoS) parameters that may effect traffic flow in the BTT.

MPLS describes six basic traffic engineering functions that can be performed on a traffic engineering trunk: establish, activate, deactivate, modify attributes, reroute, and destroy. MPLS currently lacks OA&M functions that can provide the ability for ascertaining parameters of a BTT. Hence, a need exists for a set of OA&M functions in MPLS that provide the ability for ascertaining parameters of a BTT.

Hosts use commands, such as Ping and Traceroute, in conjunction with Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) for diagnosing routing problems. For example, a router unable to deliver a datagram can send an ICMP message to a host that originated the datagram.

There is a proposed approach for diagnosing routing problems in MPLS networks that relies on layer 3 ICMP messages. This approach, however, can only be implemented if the layer 3 protocol is IP. Furthermore, this approach may be adequate for some OA&M functions (e.g, checking continuity with Ping and Traceroute) from a host to another host or server but will not be adequate for checking continuity and QoS attributes of a TE trunk. The OA&M functions for managing TE Trunks will have to adapt to the coarser flow granularity of the TE trunks in order to scale when used in large provider networks. Therefore, a need exists for a set of MPLS-layer OA&M functions that provide the ability for ascertaining the parameters of a BTT.

The present invention includes a loopback OA&M function, which can operate independent of the layer 3 client protocols. That is, it can be used whether or not the layer 3 protocol is IP. If the layer 3 protocol is IP, then all the IP diagnostic tools such as Ping and Traceroute can be used in combination with the proposed OA&M (in this case loopback) functions. An MPLS network having a loopback OA&M function has the ability to test parameters of a BTT. A BTT must be tested prior to loading the BTT with user traffic to ensure, for example, that the BTT is connected and that the BTT has adequate QoS. In addition, the BTT must be tested after being loaded with user traffic to detect data loss caused by a disconnection or inadequate QoS, and take appropriate corrective action. A loopback function can perform double-ended connectivity verification and test QoS. Thus, a loopback function can simplify OA&M for MPLS networks and can potentially reduce unit cost for any MPLS-based network. Given the tremendous growth of IP traffic and potential migration of circuit-switched and data traffic to an MPLS core transport mechanism, a loopback traffic engineering function can have large impact on the way an MPLS-based network is managed and operated.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an aspect of the present invention to provide a loopback OA&M function that can be introduced as an additional function to the MPLS traffic engineering framework or as part of a more comprehensive OA&M framework in MPLS. An MPLS-layer loopback function, hereinafter referred to as a loopback function, is a OA&M function providing the capability for testing parameters of traffic trunks in a MPLS network. For example, an originating LSR, i.e., an LSR constructing a loopback packet for transmission on a specific BTT, can send a loopback packet downstream to a loopback LSR. A loopback packet is a OA&M packet intended to be transmitted, from a LSR constructing the loopback packet, downstream, i.e. from the constructing LSR towards a loopback LSR. A loopback LSR is an LSR that receives the loopback packet and performs a loopback procedure for transmitting the loopback packet upstream, i.e., towards the LSR that constructed the loopback packet. The LSR that constructed the loopback packet, receives the loopback packet from the loopback LSR, and evaluates one or more BTT parameters using information provided by the loopback packet. The loopback packet may be an in-band network management packet (INMP). An INMP is a label-switched network management packet that carries OA&M information and commands. Each LSR along the BTT, receiving the loopback packet, may process the loopback packet for testing parameters of the BTT. For example, an LSR receiving a loopback packet for testing delay can perform delay measurements for the packet. Also, once the loopback packet is received by the originating LSR after the loopback procedure is performed, the originating LSR can ascertain tested BTT parameters using the received loopback packet.

It is another aspect of the present invention to provide a technique for performing a loopback procedure in a loopback LSR.

It is still another aspect of the present invention to provide a technique for processing an INMP.

In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a system and method for performing in-service and pre-service loopback functions in an MPLS network. An originating LSR establishes a BTT, and the loopback function is activated at another LSR along the path of the established BTT. The LSR that has activated the loopback function performs a loopback procedure, and at least one parameter of the BTT is evaluated by the originating LSR. If an evaluated parameter is equivalent to or exceeds a predetermined standard, then the BTT is activated. After the BTT is activated and loaded with user-traffic, at least one parameter of the activated BTT can be periodically tested.

The present invention further provides a system and method for processing an INMP. An LSR constructs and transmits an INMP downstream towards a loopback LSR. An LSR receives the INMP, identifies the received packet as an INMP, processes the INMP and determines whether it is the loopback LSR. If the LSR receiving the INMP is the loopback LSR, then the LSR performs a loopback procedure for transmitting the INMP upstream towards the LSR constructing the INMP.

The present invention further provides methods for performing a loopback procedure in a loopback LSR. An LSR receives an incoming packet travelling downstream on a BTT and identifies an incoming label from the received packet. In a first preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure, the LSR replaces the identified incoming label with an incoming label corresponding to a received packet travelling upstream on the BTT. Then, the LSR determines the next hop for the received packet using an NHLFE for the replaced label. In a second preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure, instead of replacing the incoming label, the LSR determines the next hop using a loopback label forwarding entry (LLFE) for the identified incoming label.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention is illustrated by way of example and not limitation in the accompanying figures in which like reference numerals indicate similar elements and in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating a format of a packet header used in a MPLS network;

FIG. 2 is a schematic block diagram illustrating a typical BTT within a MPLS network;

FIG. 3 is a schematic block diagram of a typical BTT within an MPLS network of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a schematic block diagram of a router of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram of a first preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure in an LSR;

FIG. 6 is a flow diagram of a second preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure in an LSR;

FIG. 7 is a flow diagram for performing a pre-service loopback function;

FIG. 8 is a flow diagram for performing an in-service loopback function; and

FIG. 9 is a flow diagram for processing loopback INMPs.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

1. Label Switching Router Performing Loopback

FIG. 3 illustrates MPLS network 40 and NHLFEs for LSR 1 and LER B. An originating LSR, such as ingress LER A, can activate a loopback function in an intermediate LSR or a LER. As shown using loopback arrows 12 and 13, FIG. 3 illustrates that either an intermediate LSR, such as LSR 1, or a LER, such as LER B, may be a loopback LSR. Using either LSR 1 or LER B as a loopback LSR, a loopback packet, transmitted on BTT 10 from LER A, is transmitted back to LER A on BTT 10 from the loopback LSR.

FIG. 4 is a schematic block diagram of a preferred embodiment of an LSR performing a loopback procedure in MPLS network 40. The LSR shown in FIG. 4 includes ports 50-53, processing circuitry 65 and switching fabric 60. Each of ports 50-53 includes transmitting circuitry, receiving circuitry and packet assembly circuitry, as is known in the art. Ports 50-53 are connected to processing circuitry 65 through switching fabric 60. The switching fabric, for example, may be a high-speed bus and include one or more multiplexors and demultiplexors. Processing circuitry 65 includes a processor 61 and memory 62. Processor 61 may include a high-speed processor and performs forwarding/routing functions. Memory 62 stores NHLFEs in a table or database for determining a next hop.

Typical operation of the LSR shown in FIG. 4 may include receiving incoming packets at ports 50-53. Packet information from the incoming packets is sent to processing circuitry 65. Processing circuitry 65 processes the packet information to determine the next hop for an incoming packet. For example, processing circuitry 65 can identify an incoming label for each packet, and retrieve an NHLFE corresponding to the incoming label from a table stored in memory 62. The retrieved NHLFE, among other information, contains the label and the physical port for sending the packet to the next hop. Then processing circuitry 65 forwards the packet information with the new label through switching fabric 60 to the port associated with the next hop. The packet information is assembled into an outgoing packet. The outgoing packet is then transmitted to the next hop.

In a first preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure at a loopback LSR, an incoming packet travelling downstream on BTT 10 is received at a port on the LSR. Processing circuitry 65 identifies the incoming label of the received packet. Then processing circuitry 65 replaces the incoming label with an incoming label corresponding to a received packet travelling upstream on BTT 10. This can be done since the routers are aware that the constituent unidirectional LSPs, which form the BTT, constitute a single logical entity. Processing circuitry 65 retrieves the NHLFE associated with the replaced incoming label, and the received incoming packet is transmitted to a next hop upstream on BTT 10.

In a second preferred embodiment for performing a loopback procedure at a loopback LSR, loopback label forwarding entries (LLFEs) are stored in a table or database in memory 62 in a loopback LSR. LLFEs provide the next hop for a loopback packet. For example, instead of retrieving the NHLFE for the incoming label, processing circuitry 65 retrieves the LLFE for the incoming label. Using the LLFE for the incoming label, processing circuitry 65 determines the next hop for loopback, and the incoming packet is transmitted to a next hop upstream on BTT 10. The LLFEs may be constructed by every LSR immediately after a BTT is established. Alternatively, in order to save processor memory, LLFEs can be constructed only by the loopback LSR immediately after receiving a loopback command. Also, in the latter method, LLFEs may be stored for the duration loopback is activated in a loopback LSR.

FIG. 5 is a flow diagram for the first preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure at an LSR. FIG. 5 will be described using LSR 1 as a loopback LSR, as illustrated in FIG. 3. Loopback arrow 12, in FIG. 3, illustrates a loopback procedure performed at LSR 1. Also, elements of the loopback LSR illustrated in FIG. 4 will be used in the description of FIG. 5. In step 70, LSR 1 receives a loopback packet from LER A on port 50 having incoming label 102 in the loopback packet header. The packet information for the loopback packet is forwarded to processing circuitry 65. In step 71, processing circuitry 65 determines that the packet is a loopback packet from packet header information for the loopback packet, and identifies itself as the loopback LSR for the received loopback packet travelling downstream on BTT 10. Techniques for identifying loopback packets, such as INMPs, are described in co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. TBD (Attorney Docket No. 3493.85735), previously incorporated by reference. In step 72, processing circuitry 65 replaces incoming label 102 with incoming label 406 that corresponds to a packet received from BTT 10 travelling upstream on BTT 10. In step 73, processing circuitry 65 identifies the NHLFE associated with the replaced label 406. For example, processing circuitry 65 may index a table having NHLFEs and retrieve the NHLFE associated with replaced label 406. Processing circuitry 65 determines the next hop using the identified NHLFE, and the loopback packet is transmitted to LER A. If per-interface label space method is used (as opposed to per-platform label space), the loopback packet is label switched using the NHLFE associated with the interface corresponding to label 406 in FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 is a flow diagram for a second preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure at a loopback LSR. FIG. 6 will be described using LSR 1 as a loopback LSR, as illustrated in FIG. 3. Loopback arrow 12, in FIG. 3, illustrates a loopback procedure performed at LSR 1. Also, elements of the loopback LSR illustrated in FIG. 4 will be used in the description of FIG. 6. In step 80, LSR 1 receives a loopback packet from LER A on port 50 having incoming label 102 in the packet header. The packet information for the loopback packet is forwarded to processing circuitry 65. In step 81, processing circuitry 65 determines that the packet is a loopback packet from packet header information, and identifies itself as the loopback LSR for the received loopback packet travelling on BTT 10. In step 82, processing circuitry 65 identifies the LLFE associated with incoming label 102. For example, processing circuitry may index a table having LLFEs using incoming label 102, and retrieve the LLFE associated with incoming label 102. Processing circuitry 65 determines the next hop using the identified LLFE, and the loopback packet is transmitted to LER A. If per-interface label space is used (as opposed to per-platform label space), the loopback packet is label switched using the LLFE corresponding to the interface on which it has been received (i.e., the interface corresponding to label 102 in FIG. 3).

The first and second preferred embodiments of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure can be performed by an edge LSR, such as LER A or LER B, or an intermediate LSR, as described above. Also, the first and second preferred embodiments of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure may be performed for an in-service loopback function, a pre-service loopback function and a remote loopback function; the in-service, pre-service and remote loopback functions are described in detail below.

2. Pre-Service and In-Service Loopback Functions

Pre-service and in-service loopback functions are two types of loopback functions that may be performed on a MPLS network. The pre-service loopback function is performed prior to loading the BTT with user traffic. For the pre-service loopback function, a loopback procedure is activated in a target LSR (i.e., an LSR that is intended to receive an OA&M command), after establishing a BTT but before activating the BTT. For the in-service loopback function, a loopback procedure is performed at the loopback LSR after the BTT is activated, i.e., while a BTT carries user traffic. The activated procedure for the in-service or the pre-service loopback function may, for example, be a loopback procedure described in either of the first and second embodiments of the present invention for performing a loopback procedure. Both the pre-service and the in-service loopback functions are useful for testing parameters of a BTT, e.g., connectivity, delay and other QoS parameters. For example, a loopback INMP may carry information that contains the address of each traversed LSR, starting with the originating LSR. Using the address information in the loopback INMP, the path traversed by the loopback LSR may be traced, and connectivity of the BTT may be verified.

OA&M commands, such as the one for activating a loopback procedure, may be sent to the target LSR using in-band or out-of band techniques. To activate loopback out-of-band, for example, an “activate loopback” network management (NM) command may be sent from a NM system, e.g., a remote network station or an operator console connected to an LSR. The command instructs the LSR to activate a loopback procedure for a specific BTT, so the loopback function is performed for packets travelling on the specific BTT. For activating loopback in-band, an originating LSR transmits an INMP, carrying, for example, an “activate loopback” command in its payload, to a target LSR. The target LSR, after receiving the INMP, activates a loopback procedure. Then, the target LSR may send an acknowledgement INMP to the originating LSR indicating that it has activated the loopback procedure.

The pre-service loopback function can be performed by activating a loopback procedure using an in-band or out-of-band command, e.g., “activate loopback”. The LSR activating the loopback procedure may be a LER or an intermediate LSR. Once a procedure for performing loopback is activated, a loopback INMP can be looped through a BTT for testing parameters of the BTT. For example, a loopback INMP can be used for ascertaining round trip time (RTT) or delay of a BTT. A single clock source at an originating ingress LSR may be used for measuring RTT. Also, loopback may be used for ascertaining connectivity, delay and other QoS parameters for a BTT.

FIG. 7 is a flow diagram of a preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing the pre-service loopback function. FIG. 7 will be described using a LER, such as LER B shown in FIG. 3, as a loopback LSR. Loopback arrow 13 in FIG. 3 illustrates a loopback procedure activated at LER B for performing a loopback function. In step 200, BTT 10 is established by LER A using a NM command. In step 201, prior to loading BTT 10 with user traffic, an LSR in the path of BTT 10 is selected for performing a loopback procedure. For example, if the entire BTT 10 needs to be evaluated, the opposite edge router, such as LER B, is selected. Otherwise, an intermediate LSR in BTT 10 is selected. In this example, a loopback procedure in LER B is activated using, for example, an in-band or out-of-band “activate loopback” command. Then, LER A transmits a loopback packet, such as a loopback INMP, to LER B. LER B performs the loopback procedure for the received loopback packet and sends the packet upstream towards LER A. The loopback LER, LER B, may set a flag in the payload of the loopbacked INMP indicating that the INMP sent upstream is a loopbacked INMP. In step 202, LER A evaluates at least one parameter of BTT 10. In step 202, LER A, after receiving the loopback packet from LER B, determines whether at least one parameter of BTT 10, such as connectivity, delay, and/or other QoS parameters, is equivalent to or exceeds, i.e., is better than, predetermined standards. A predetermined standard may, for example, include a predetermined tolerance, such as a delay tolerance, or a predetermined threshold, such as a delay threshold or whether a BTT is connected. If one or more tested parameters pass, i.e., the tested parameters are equivalent to or exceed their respective predetermined standards, then a “deactivate loopback” command may be sent in-band or out-of-band to LER B in step 203. For example, if delay is tested for BTT 10, and the predetermined standard is a delay threshold value, then the tested delay passes if the tested delay exceeds, i.e., the tested delay is less than the delay threshold, or is equivalent to the delay threshold. One of ordinary skill in the art, however, can readily set the predetermined standard, so the tested parameter must exceed the predetermined standard to pass. For example, if delay is tested for BTT 10, and the predetermined standard is a delay threshold value, then the tested delay must exceed the delay threshold value, i.e., the tested delay must be less than the delay threshold, for the tested delay to pass. Then BTT 10 is activated in step 204, and BTT 10 is loaded with user traffic, if the at least one tested parameter passes. If one or more tested parameters fail, i.e., one or more tested parameters are not equivalent or do not exceed respective predetermined standards, notification is provided, for example, alarms can be activated at the NM system, and/or BTT 10 is re-established, for example, using another ER-LSP. Then, the remaining steps for implementing the pre-service loopback function are repeated.

As described above, the pre-service loopback function may be performed at a LER, so, for example, bi-directional connectivity for the entire BTT may be tested. Alternatively, the pre-service loopback function may be performed at an intermediate LSR for trouble-shooting a BTT. For example, a trouble spot in a BTT can be isolated by progressively performing a loopback function for consecutive portions of a BTT.

Additionally, when a procedure for performing loopback is activated for the pre-service loopback function, a procedure for performing loopback for the remote loopback function can be activated at the same LSR. The remote loopback function ensures continuity of signal for the remote LER during pre-service BTT testing. The remote loopback function is illustrated with a remote loopback arrow 15 in FIG. 3 for LSR 1. If the remote loopback function is performed, a packet transmitted from LER B will be looped back to LER B. Therefore, LER A can test the portion of BTT 10 between LER A and LSR 1, and LER B can test the remaining portions of BTT 10. A procedure for performing loopback for the remote loopback function may, for example, include the procedures described in the first and second preferred embodiments for performing a loopback procedure.

There is also a need for monitoring parameters of a BTT while the BTT carries user traffic. The in-service loopback function provides the capability to test parameters of a BTT, such as connectivity, delay and/or other QoS parameters, while the BTT carries user traffic. For the in-service loopback function, the loopback LSR must distinguish between user traffic and a network management packet, such as an INMP. For example, a loopback LSR may perform a loopback procedure for a received INMP, while user traffic received by the loopback LSR is forwarded towards its final destination.

FIG. 8 is a flow diagram of a preferred embodiment of the present invention for performing the in-service loopback function using an INMP. FIG. 8 will be described in conjunction with MPLS network 40, as shown in FIG. 3, using LER B as a loopback LSR. Loopback arrow 13 in FIG. 3 illustrates a loopback procedure performed at LER B. Steps 300-302 are equivalent to steps 200-202, in FIG. 7, for implementing the pre-service loopback function, because BTT 10 has not been activated. In step 300, BTT 10 is established by LER A using a NM command. In step 301, an LSR in the path of BTT 10 is selected for performing a loopback procedure. For example, if the entire BTT 10 needs to be evaluated, the opposite edge router, such as LER B, is selected. Otherwise, an intermediate LSR in BTT 10 is selected. In this example, a loopback procedure for the pre-service loopback function is activated at LER B using either an in-band or out-of-band command. After activating a loopback procedure at LER B, LER B performs the activated loopback procedure for a received packet. In step 302, LER A evaluates at least one parameter of BTT 10. For example, LER A, after receiving the loopback packet from LER B, determines whether at least one parameter of BTT 10, such as connectivity, delay, and/or other QoS parameters, is equivalent to or exceeds a predetermined standard. If one or more tested parameters pass, then BTT 10 is activated in step 303. BTT 10 is then loaded with user traffic. If one or more tested parameters fail, notification is provided, for example, to the NM system, and/or BTT 10 is re-established, for example, using another ER-LSP. Then, the remaining steps for implementing the pre-service loopback function are repeated.

After BTT 10 is activated in step 303 at least one parameter for BTT 10 is tested using the in-service loopback function. In step 305, at least one BTT parameter such as connectivity, delay, and/or other QoS parameters, is tested periodically. For example, connectivity of BTT 10 may be tested every second using loopback INMPs transmitted once per second from LER A. The period between tests may be increased or decreased depending on characteristics of the network and the desired measurement. If the one or more tested parameters fail in step 305, notification is provided, for example, to the NM system, and/or BTT 10 is re-established, for example, using another ER-LSP. Then, the remaining steps for implementing the pre-service loopback function are repeated.

3. Processing INMPs

FIG. 9 is a flow diagram for processing INMPs. FIG. 9 will be described in conjunction with MPLS network 40 as shown in FIG. 3 and using LER B as a loopback LSR. In step 500, LER A constructs a loopback INMP. In step 501, LER A transmits the loopback INMP downstream towards the loopback LSR, e.g., LER B. LSR 1 is the next hop on BTT 10 in the downstream direction, and in step 502, LSR 1 receives the loopback INMP. In step 503, LSR 1 identifies the packet as an INMP using a MPLS shim header for the INMP. The shim header and its use for differentiating between user packets and INMPs is described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. TBD (Attorney Docket No. 3493.85735), previously incorporated by reference. LSR 1 then determines whether the received INMP is a loopback INMP, for example, by reading a command in the payload of that INMP. In step 504, LSR 1 processes the INMP in accordance with the command type in the payload. For example, LSR 1 may determine from a command in the payload that the loopback INMP is for testing at least one parameter of the BTT, such as delay. In step 505, LSR 1 determines whether it is the loopback LSR for the received INMP. The LSR makes the latter determination, for example, by examining the payload and discovering its address in the target LSR address field of the INMP payload. LSR 1 is not the loopback LSR, so LSR 1 transmits the INMP to the next hop downstream, towards the loopback LSR. Steps 501-505 are repeated until LER B receives the loopback INMP. In step 506, after LER B receives the loopback INMP and identifies itself as the loopback LSR for the loopback INMP, LER B transmits the INMP to a next hop upstream, towards LER A. The loopback LER, LER B, may set a flag in the payload of the loopbacked INMP indicating that the INMP sent upstream is a loopbacked INMP.

The flow diagram of FIG. 9 is applicable for both the in-service and the pre-service loopback functions. For pre-service loopback, however, it is not necessary to distinguish between user traffic and INMPs, because the BTT has not been loaded with user traffic. Consequently, for pre-service loopback, determining whether the received packet is an INMP is not necessary.

As discussed above, in section 2, concerning the in-service and the pre-service loopback functions, a loopback INMP may carry an NM command, such as “activate loopback” or “deactivate loopback”. If an LSR receiving an INMP containing a command, such as “activate loopback” or “deactivate loopback”, determines that the command is intended for itself, the LSR performs the command. Then, instead of transmitting the INMP upstream, towards the originating LSR, the INMP is terminated. This is because the INMP in this case is a command INMP as opposed to a test INMP. The LSR receiving the command may then send a signal to the originating LSR acknowledging that the receiving LSR has performed the command. Thus, in step 506, the loopback INMP may be terminated, if the loopback INMP contains a command for the loopback LSR, such as “activate loopback” or “deactivate loopback.”

The present invention is applicable to Internet backbones and enterprise networks. In addition, it is apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that the present invention can be applied to any label switching network under a single technical administration, in which at least two paths exist between two nodes. Furthermore, the present invention can be implemented for ATM, Frame Relay, and optical networks utilizing label switching techniques.

What has been described are the preferred embodiments of the present invention. It, however, will be apparent to those skilled in the art that it is possible to embody the invention in specific forms other than those disclosed in the preferred embodiments described above. This may be done without departing from the spirit of the invention, and the preferred embodiments are merely illustrative and should not be considered restrictive in any way. The scope of the invention is given by the appended claims, rather than the preceding description.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification370/249
International ClassificationH04J3/14, H04L12/26, H04L12/56
Cooperative ClassificationH04L43/08, H04L12/2697, H04L43/0811, H04L45/50, H04L43/50
European ClassificationH04L45/50, H04L43/08C, H04L43/08, H04L43/50, H04L12/26T