Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20060014580 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/893,258
Publication dateJan 19, 2006
Filing dateJul 19, 2004
Priority dateJul 19, 2004
Publication number10893258, 893258, US 2006/0014580 A1, US 2006/014580 A1, US 20060014580 A1, US 20060014580A1, US 2006014580 A1, US 2006014580A1, US-A1-20060014580, US-A1-2006014580, US2006/0014580A1, US2006/014580A1, US20060014580 A1, US20060014580A1, US2006014580 A1, US2006014580A1
InventorsNate Hawthorn
Original AssigneeNate Hawthorn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for providing gaming and a gaming device with electronically modifiable electro-mechanical reel displays
US 20060014580 A1
Abstract
A gaming device, such as a slot machine, with electronically modifiable display capabilities, such as electronic paper, on electro-mechanical reels, provides the ability to rapidly, dynamically, and easily change the symbols on the electro-mechanical reels. This in turn provides the ability to easily change the games played on the gaming device, to create more interesting and exciting games, and to be able to change the current odds for that machine.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
1. A gaming device comprising:
a control logic; and
a first reel capable of rotating, having a circumference, and comprising:
a dynamically modifiable reel surface surrounding the circumference of the reel and providing a reel surface display, wherein:
the reel surface display is capable of dynamic modification in response to a first set of control signals from the control logic.
2. The gaming device in claim 1 wherein:
the dynamically modifiable reel surface comprises:
at least one from a group consisting of:
electronic paper;
electronic ink;
magink;
polymer light emitting diodes; and
organic light emitting diodes.
3. The gaming device in claim 1 wherein:
the dynamically modifiable reel surface provides positive lighting elminating any need for backlighting
4. The gaming device in claim 1 wherein:
the first reel further comprises:
a light source; and
the dynamically modifiable reel surface is sufficiently transparent to allow the light source to back light the reel surface display.
5. The gaming device in claim 1 wherein:
the reel surface display has a plurality of display locations for displaying a plurality of images; and
a determination of which of the plurality of image locations is a pay line image location and what image is displayed at the pay line image location when the first reel stops rotating is utilized by the control logic to determine an outcome of a game.
6. The gaming device in claim 5 wherein:
the outcome of the game comprises an entry into a bonus game play.
7. The gaming device in claim 5 wherein:
the outcome of the game comprises an entry into a progressive game play.
8. The gaming device in claim 1 wherein:
the reel surface display has a plurality of display locations for displaying a plurality of images; and
each the display locations is capable of dynamically changing an image displayed at that display location in response to the first set of control signals.
9. The gaming device in claim 8 wherein:
each of the display locations is capable of dynamically changing the image displayed at that display location while the first reel is rotating.
10. The gaming device in claim 1 wherein:
the first reel further comprises:
a stepper motor for starting the first reel rotating, then slowing and stopping the first reel, in response to a third set of control signals from the control logic; and
the gaming device further comprises:
a second reel capable of rotating, having a circumference, and comprising:
a stepper motor for starting the second reel rotating, then slowing and stopping the second reel, in response to a fourth set of control signals from the control logic; and
a dynamically modifiable reel surface surrounding the circumference of the second reel and providing a reel surface display, wherein:
the reel surface display is capable of dynamic modification in response to a second set of control signals from the control logic.
11. A method for providing gaming on a gaming device wherein:
the gaming device comprises:
a first reel comprising a plurality of image locations including a first image location; and
the method comprises:
displaying a first image at the first image location on the first reel; and
displaying a second image at the first image location on the first reel after displaying the first image at the first image location on the first reel.
12. The method in claim 11 wherein:
the method further comprises:
displaying the first image at the first image location on the first reel after displaying the second image at the first image location.
13. The method in claim 11 wherein:
the plurality of image locations on the first reel further includes a second image location; and
the method further comprises:
displaying the first image at the second image location after displaying the second image at the first image location.
14. The method in claim 11 wherein:
a transition is made from displaying the first image at the first image location to displaying the second image at the first image location while the first reel is rotating.
15. The method in claim 11 wherein:
the method further comprises:
identifying one of the plurality of image locations as a first pay line image location; and
determining an outcome of a game comprises determining what image is being displayed at the first pay line image location.
16. The method in claim 15 wherein:
dynamically modifying a player's odds of winning by modifying a frequency that the second image is displayed at one of the plurality of image locations.
17. The method in claim 15 wherein:
the outcome of the game comprises entering into a bonus game play.
18. The method in claim 15 wherein:
the outcome of the game comprises entering into a progressive game play.
19. The method in claim 11 wherein:
the gaming device further comprises:
a second reel comprising a plurality of image locations including a first image location; and
the method further comprises:
displaying a first image at the first image location on the second reel; and
displaying a second image at the first image location on the second reel after displaying the first image at the first image location on the second reel.
20. A gaming device comprising:
a means for activating the gaming device to play a game;
a control logic;
a first reel and a second reel, each capable of rotating in response to the means for activating the gaming device, each having a circumference, and each comprising:
a stepper motor capable of rotating and stopping a corresponding reel; and
a dynamically modifiable reel surface surrounding the circumference of the corresponding reel and providing a reel surface display, wherein:
the reel surface display is capable of dynamic modification in response to a set of signals from the control logic;
a reel display area for viewing the first reel and the second reel as they rotate and stop; and
a means for providing a game pay out to a game player in response to a determination by the control logic as to an outcome of the game.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention generally relates to gaming devices and, more specifically, to electronically modifiable electro-mechanical reel displays oil gaming devices, such as slot machines.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Gaming (or Gambling) has become a multi-billion dollar industry in the United States and around the world. In many casinos, the most lucrative gaming for those casinos is the play on gaming devices such as slot machines.
  • [0003]
    Traditionally, slot machines comprise a handle and multiple, typically three, wheels or “reels”. The reels typically would each have a plurality (typically 25) of different symbols displayed around their circumference. A game player would start play by inserting money, pulling the handle, and the reels would begin spinning. As the reels spin, the different symbols appear and disappear. Then, the reels will eventually slow down and stop, each displaying, in the center of a display, one of the symbols. The combination of symbols thus displayed will typically determine whether or not the game player won, and if he did, how much.
  • [0004]
    There are a number of problems with the traditional, electro-mechanical, slot machines described above, in particular, from the view of casinos. First, typically the only way to change a game is to change the reels. Secondly, it is difficult to change the odds in any given game, and the odds are where casinos make their money.
  • [0005]
    For these, and other reasons, one of the recent trends in electronic gaming has been to move away from electro-mechanical games toward fully electronic games. In the case of slot machines, this often results in simulating the spin of reels on a computer type screen. This appears to game players somewhat similar to the spinning of traditional electro-mechanical reels. This type of electronic game allows games to be changed simply by loading new software into game machines and game odds to be changed by loading new odds tables into the game machines.
  • [0006]
    Unfortunately, this trend towards totally electronic games (excluding the activation, payin, and payout mechanisms) loses the look and feel of the traditional gaming devices with their electro-mechanical reels. It would be advantageous to have some of flexibility of electronic games while retaining the look and feel of electro-mechanical reels.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0007]
    A gaming device, such as a slot machine, with electronically modifiable display capabilities, such as electronic paper, on electro-mechanical reels, provides the ability to rapidly, dynamically, and easily change the symbols on the electro-mechanical reels. This in turn provides the ability to easily change the games played on the gaming device, to create more interesting and exciting games, and to be able to change the current odds for that machine.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0008]
    FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate exemplary gaming devices, in the form of a slot machines, with electro-mechanical reels, in accordance with the prior art;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating a typical prior art electro-mechanical reel or wheel, as used in the gaming devices shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating an electro-mechanical reel, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating operation of electronic paper;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating operation of electronic ink; and
  • [0013]
    FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary electrically modifiable reel surface, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0014]
    FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate exemplary gaming devices 21, 22, in the form of a slot machines, with electro-mechanical reels 28, in accordance with the prior art. Money, in the form of coins, bills, credit cards, etc. are inserted in the gaming devices 21, 22 in an appropriate coin, bill, or card receiver in order to activate a play on the slot machines. An activating device, such as a handle 34, is then pulled or activated, starting electro-mechanical reels or wheels 28 spinning. The reels 28 each have a plurality of symbols 30 on their surface. As is typical, three reels 28 are shown for each of the slot machines 28. However, other numbers of reels 28 are also within the scope of this invention.
  • [0015]
    Eventually, the reels 28 slow down and stop spinning, and a determination is made whether or not the symbols in the center of the display constitute a winning combination. If the symbols on each of the reels 28 together constitute a winning combination, a payout is made to the player playing the game. Winning often takes the form of coins dropping into a coin tray 36 at the bottom of a gaming device 21, 22. FIG. 2 differs from FIG. 1 as the gaming device 22 in FIG. 2 has an additional bonus or progressive play apparatus 38 on the top of the gaming device 22. This is typically activated through one or more reel combinations. Bonus and progressive gaming device operation is well known in the prior art. However, other additional methods of game play are also within the scope of this invention.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating a typical prior art electro-mechanical reel 10 or wheel, as used in the gaming devices 21, 22 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. A typical reel 10 of a prior art stepper motor driven 11 gaming device 21, 22 having a 200 pulse per revolution stepper motor 11 is illustrated. The typical reel surface 12 has 25 equally sized symbols 13 located about its periphery and the usual viewing area through which three adjacent symbols may be viewed is indicated. A reel 10 is typically stopped by the stepper motor 11 with one symbol at the center of the viewing area, considered here as the “pay line”, and the symbol stopped at the pay line is typically used to determine the outcome of a game. Markings 14 have been superimposed on the edge of the reel 10 to indicate the typically 8 pulses which are applied to the stepper motor 11 to move the reel by one symbol position or 1/25th of a revolution. These pulses are utilized by the control logic to cause the stepper motor 11 to stop its reel 10 with a symbol at the pay line. While identically sized symbols are shown in this FIG., non-identically sized symbols and symbol areas are also within the scope of the present invention.
  • [0017]
    Upon initiating play of gaming devices 21, 22, each stepper motor 11 starts its corresponding reel 10 spinning. The reels 10 are then progressively slowed by the stepper motors 11 until they stop. The typically 8 pulses per symbol are utilized by control logic (not shown) to stop the reels 10 in the middle of a symbol location 13.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating an electro-mechanical reel 50, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention. Each reel 50 is mounted on a base plate 52 to which is attached a vertical plate 54. To the vertical plate 54 is attached a spindle 56 or axle. To the vertical plate 54 around the spindle 56 are also fixably attached a base plate 58 and a stationary contact plate 60. Revolving around the axle 56 is the reel comprising a wheel structure 64 surrounded by a reel surface 68. In the prior art, the reel surface is typically removably attached to the wheel structure 64 and typically displays 25 symbols around its periphery. This removability provided the ability to play different games on a given gaming device 21, 22 by changing the reel covering. In the present invention, the reel surface 68 is electronically modifiable, and thus removability is not necessary in order to change games or the symbols displayed. Nevertheless, both permanently attached and removably attached reel surfaces 68 are within the scope of the present invention.
  • [0019]
    Fixably attached to the wheel structure 64 is a revolving contact plate 62 that has a plurality of electrical contacts 63 that make contact with corresponding contacts 61 on the stationary contact plate 60. The corresponding contacts 61 on the stationary contact plate 60 form concentric circles so that the electrical contacts 63 on the revolving contact plate 62 can maintain electrical contact as the reel 50 rotates. The contacts 61, 63 are utilized to provide electricity and controls to the stepper motor 11 (see FIG. 3) and the electrically modifiable reel surface 68. A first power and control cable 59 provides a power and control connection between control circuitry (not shown) in the gaming machine and the stationary plate 60. A second power and control cable 65 couples the electrical contacts 61 and a reel controller 66. The reel controller 66 is coupled to and provides low level control of the graphics and animation of the electrically modifiable reel surface 68 through a third power and control cable 67. The reel controller 66 may further provide control of the stepper motor 11.
  • [0020]
    As noted above, the reels 10 spin, progressively showing typically 25 symbols. In the prior art, the symbols are static. In the present invention, they can be dynamically modified. In one embodiment, this is done rather infrequently, allowing one gaming device 21, 22, to provide multiple games. This is typically done between games. In another embodiment however, the symbols are changed during the spin of the reels 10. Thus, for example, one symbol location 13 may present one symbol during one revolution of the corresponding reel 10, and another symbol during the next revolution, with the symbol typically being changed while the corresponding symbol location 10 is not visible to a game player. This provides a number of benefits. One advantage is that more than 25 symbols may be displayed around a given reel 10. Likewise, any given symbol need not reappear every revolution of the reel 10. Thus, a game could have a rotation of 40 symbols around a reel 10 with only 25 symbol locations 13. Also, this provides a mechanism for the inclusion of special symbols that only appear infrequently, initiating, for example, bonus or progressive play, if the reels 10 stop on them. Additionally, player odds can be dynamically modified. For example, this invention can be used to provide better player odds late at night when few people are playing gaming devices 21, 22, and worse odds for players when many of them are playing. Similarly, odds can be modified based on gaming device 21, 22, location. This can be done, for example, by changing the frequency of winning symbols.
  • [0021]
    However, it is not necessary that the symbol displayed at a symbol location 13 change just when the symbol location 13 has rotated out of view. Rather, the symbol locations 13 may also be dynamically modified while still visible. For example, a symbol may be animated, such as a rocket taking off or a symbol may rotate. Similarly, a symbol may move from one symbol location 13 on one reel 10 to another symbol location 13 on the same or another reel 10 as the reels 10 rotate. The variety of what can be done with the present invention is primarily limited by the imagination of the engineers designing games utilizing it.
  • [0022]
    Dynamic symbol display can be implemented in a number of ways. For example, the electrically modifiable reel surface 68 may comprise electronic paper, smart paper, magink or electronic ink (or e-ink). Positive or negative electronic charge supplied to such mediums typically causes them to change state, for example, black to white, or visa versa, allowing them to display different symbols.
  • [0023]
    Many of these technologies currently use ambient light rather than requiring light producing equipment. All of these technologies strive for high reflectivity, brilliant color and video speed. E-ink utilizes small particles that migrate within a monolayer of bubbles to change its reflective surface. Smart paper twirls two-toned spheres to alter its reflected image. Magink tilts helical molecules to bounce a colorful image across its surface and electronic paper dazzles its reflection through oil. Other technologies are also within the scope of this invention, including, but not limited to electrowetting e-paper disclosed by Royal Phillips Electronics and in “Electrowetting touted for new display technology” by Chappell Brown in the Sep. 26, 2003 edition of EE Times, Polymer Light Emitting Diodes (“PLED”), as disclosed by Royal Phillips Electronics and in “Polymeric anodes for improved polymer light-emitting diode performance” starting at page 70 of the Apr. 21, 1977 edition of the Applied Physics Letters Of the American Institute of Physics, and Organic Light Emitting Diodes (“OLED”) as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,688,551 to Littman, et al. and in “Better Displays with Organic Films”, starting at page 76 of the February 2004 edition of Scientific America.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating operation of electronic paper. Invented by Xerox at Xerox PARC, electronic paper (also known as epaper) is made from a display technology called “gyricon”. A gyricon sheet is a thin piece of transparent plastic that contains millions of small beads. Each bead—half white half black—is contained in an oil-filled cavity and is free to rotate within its cavity. Epaper is electrically writable and erasable and can be re-used thousands of times. When voltage is applied to one side of the sheet, the beads rotate to display either their black sides or white sides. Images of pictures and text are created when a pattern of voltages are sent to the paper. The image will remain until the voltage pattern changes. Ambient light flows through a fluid sandwich of water and oil before bouncing off the white backboard of the screen. Alternatively, colored beads can be utilized to provide full color. Currently, epaper. provides 100 pixels/inch of display screen. The image resolution is high and quick . . . too fast for us to see the dance of the individual pixels . . . only the overall image moving fluidly on the surface of the screen.
  • [0025]
    In this FIG., a plurality of beads 72 are shown, each with a light half 74, and a dark half 75. In this example, the light half 74 has a negative charge, and the dark half 75 has a positive charge. When a negative voltage 78 is applied to a corresponding electrode, the beads 72 rotate so that the positively charged, dark sides 75, are closer to the negative electrode, and the negatively charged, light sides 74, are further away, providing a “light” state 74. Similarly, when a positive voltage 79 is applied to the electrode, the beads 72 rotate so that the negatively charged light sides 74 are closer to the positive electrode, and the positively charged dark sides 75 are further away, resulting in a “dark” state 77. This is illustrative only, since reversing light and dark, positive and negative, whether the electrode is on the top or the bottom, and whether the beads are black and white or colored, are engineering decisions, all within the scope of the present invention.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating operation of electronic ink (or E-Ink). Electronic ink is a proprietary material developed by E Ink Corporation that is processed into a film for integration into electronic displays. Electronic ink is a straightforward fusion of chemistry, physics, and electronics to create this material. The principal components of electronic ink are millions of tiny microcapsules 82, about the diameter of a human hair. In one incarnation, each microcapsule contains positively charged white particles 84 and negatively charged black particles 85 suspended in a clear fluid. When a negative electric field 89 is applied to the top of a microcapsule 82, the white particles 84 move to the top of the microcapsule 82 where they become visible to the user. This makes the surface appear white at that spot. At the same time, an opposite electric field pulls the black particles 85 to the bottom of the microcapsules where they are hidden. By reversing this process, the black particles 85 appear at the top of the capsule, which now makes the surface appear dark at that spot.
  • [0027]
    In this FIG., a pair of microcapsules 82 are shown in both a light state 86 and a dark state 87. Each microcapsule 82 contains a plurality of positively charged white particles 84 and a plurality of negatively charged black particles 85. When a positive voltage 88 is applied to the bottom of a microcapsule 82, the negatively charged black particles 85 migrate to the bottom of that microcapsule 82, while the positively charged white particles 84 migrate away from the positive electrode towards the top. This results in a light side 86 being shown. Similarly, when a negative voltage 89 is applied to the bottom of a microcapsule 82, the positively charged white particles 84 migrate to the bottom of that microcapsule 82, while the negatively charged black particles 85 migrate away from the negative electrode towards the top. This results in a dark side 87 being shown. This is illustrative only, since reversing light and dark, positive and negative, whether the electrode is on the top or the bottom, and whether the particles 84, 85 are black and white or colored, are engineering decisions, all within the scope of the present invention.
  • [0028]
    To form an E Ink electronic display, the ink is printed onto a sheet of plastic film that is laminated to a layer of circuitry. The circuitry forms a pattern of pixels that can then be controlled by a display driver, preferably included in the control logic (not shown). These microcapsules are suspended in a liquid “carrier medium” allowing them to be printed using existing screen printing processes onto virtually any surface, including glass, plastic, fabric and even paper. Ultimately electronic ink will permit most any surface to become a display, bringing information out of the confines of traditional devices and into the world around us.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary electrically modifiable reel surface 68, 90, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention. The electrically modifiable reel surface 90 has a top layer 98, over a plurality of color changing modules 96, over an intermediate layer 93, over a plurality of electrodes 92, over a bottom layer 92. The plurality of color changing modules 96 are for example electronic paper beads 72 or electronic ink microcapsules 82, and change color in response to an electronic field or charge in the corresponding electrodes 92. In an alternate embodiment, there is also an corresponding electrode 92 above each color changing module 92. For example, in the case of electronic ink, this increases the speed and clarity of color state transitions. In this FIG., the electrodes 92 are shown located between the intermediate layer 93 and bottom layer 92. This is exemplary only. In some embodiments, the electrodes 92 are embedded in, for example, a medium, such as a plastic. Similarly, the color changing modules 96 typically will also reside in a medium, dependant upon what color changing technology is being utilized. Thus, in the case of electronic paper, the intermediate layer 93 and upper layer 98 provide the oil-filled cavity containing the beads 72.
  • [0030]
    The electrically modifiable reel surface 90 may be relatively transparent or may be translucent. The top layer 98 is typically transparent, allowing the color of the color changing modules 96 to be viewed. The intermediate layer 93 and/or the lower layer 92 may be transparent, translucent, solid, or reflective, depending on the technology utilized and the effects sought. Thus, if transparent or translucent, a light can be placed in the center of the reel 10, illuminating the symbols from behind. Alternatively, using less transparent layers will typically provide better viewing when the display is not back lit, but rather room lighting is utilized. Also, some technologies do not require any backlighting, such as PLEDs and OLEDs.
  • [0031]
    It should be understood that in many situations, the material for the electrically modifiable reel surface 90 will be obtained already formed. For example, as noted above, an E-Ink electronic display is formed by printing electronic ink onto a sheet of plastic film that is laminated to a layer of circuitry. The E-Ink electronic display would then be cut and shaped to fit a reel 10, and the electrodes embedded therein would be connected, as required, to control logic (not shown). An additional lower layer 92 may be added to provide a specified viewing characteristics. As noted above, this FIG. is exemplary. Other types of electronically modifiable reel surfaces 68 are also within the scope of this invention.
  • [0032]
    Those skilled in the art will recognize that modifications and variations can be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. Therefore, it is intended that this invention encompass all such variations and modifications as fall within the scope of the appended claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4504062 *Jun 4, 1981Mar 12, 1985Smith EngineeringDigital watch having matrix display for arcade-like game playing
US4686524 *Nov 4, 1985Aug 11, 1987North American Philips CorporationPhotosensitive electrophoretic displays
US5725428 *Mar 9, 1995Mar 10, 1998Atronic Casino Technology Distribution GmbhVideo slot machine
US5836819 *May 23, 1996Nov 17, 1998Kabushiki Kaisha SankyoImage display type game apparatus
US5890962 *Dec 28, 1994Apr 6, 1999Kabushiki Kaisha Ace DenkenGaming machine with multiple independent display gaming areas
US5896575 *Feb 28, 1997Apr 20, 1999Motorola, Inc.Electronic device with display viewable from two opposite ends
US6027115 *Mar 25, 1998Feb 22, 2000International Game TechnologySlot machine reels having luminescent display elements
US6283473 *Nov 19, 1998Sep 4, 2001Frank AbramopoulosMethod of operating progressive reel slot machines and device therefor
US6290600 *Sep 8, 1999Sep 18, 2001Naomi GlassonElectronic game with moving bonus symbol
US6369793 *Mar 30, 1999Apr 9, 2002David C. ZimmanPrinted display and battery
US6413162 *Oct 16, 2000Jul 2, 2002IgtGaming device having independent reel columns
US6439993 *Feb 1, 2000Aug 27, 2002I.G.T. (Australia) Pty LimitedOperation of gaming machines with addition of wild card symbols
US6445489 *Mar 18, 1999Sep 3, 2002E Ink CorporationElectrophoretic displays and systems for addressing such displays
US6891588 *Apr 16, 2002May 10, 2005Hitachi, Ltd.Liquid crystal display device
US7169048 *Oct 31, 2003Jan 30, 2007Aruze CorporationGaming machine capable of conducting demonstration display
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7452276Feb 15, 2002Nov 18, 2008Wms Gaming Inc.Simulation of mechanical reels on a gaming machine
US7458890May 25, 2007Dec 2, 2008Wms Gaming Inc.Reel spinning slot machine with superimposed video image
US7510475Nov 7, 2003Mar 31, 2009Wms Gaming, Inc.Gaming machine with superimposed display image
US7585220Dec 1, 2006Sep 8, 2009Wms Gaming Inc.Gaming machine with superimposed display image
US7654899Feb 2, 2010Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with simulated mechanical reels
US7674172Mar 9, 2010IgtGaming device having a wheel-based game
US7708630Dec 11, 2006May 4, 2010IgtRotor-based gaming device having a system for changing the quantity of potential game outcomes for subsequent plays
US7727061Apr 14, 2003Jun 1, 2010IgtMethod for playing a video gaming machine
US7727068Sep 12, 2005Jun 1, 2010IgtGaming system having a common display, a first bonus game or a first bonus game paytable and an option to purchase a second bonus game or a second bonus game paytable with relatively expected higher values
US7811170Oct 11, 2006Oct 12, 2010IgtLight emitting interface displays for a gaming machine
US7828294Nov 9, 2010IgtGaming system having a dice-based game with a plurality of wager areas
US7846018Dec 7, 2010IgtGaming device and method having purchasable enhanced paytables
US7901280Mar 8, 2011IgtMultiple reel roulette game
US7971879Mar 17, 2009Jul 5, 2011Wms Gaming Inc.Gaming machine with superimposed display image
US7972206Nov 19, 2003Jul 5, 2011Wms Gaming Inc.Gaming machine and display device therefor
US8002621Aug 23, 2011IgtGaming device and method having purchasable randomly selected paytables
US8002624Sep 27, 2001Aug 23, 2011IgtGaming machine reel having a flexible dynamic display
US8016669Sep 13, 2011Aruze Corp.Gaming machine
US8016670Sep 13, 2011IgtVirtual glass for a gaming machine
US8096867Jan 17, 2012Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine and display device with fail-tolerant image displaying
US8096878Jun 29, 2007Jan 17, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with simulated mechanical reels
US8109821Feb 7, 2012IgtGaming system and method which enables multiple players to simultaneously play multiple individual games or group games on a central display
US8123609Jun 3, 2005Feb 28, 2012Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine
US8128477Jun 29, 2007Mar 6, 2012Wms Gaming, Inc.Wagering game with simulated mechanical reels
US8133108Jul 10, 2007Mar 13, 2012Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine and game control method
US8152171Feb 12, 2010Apr 10, 2012IgtGaming device having a wheel-based game
US8157649 *Aug 29, 2007Apr 17, 2012Atlantic City Coin & Slot Service Company, Inc.Gaming apparatus having one or more organic light emitting diode display devices and a roller
US8172666Apr 1, 2009May 8, 2012Aruze Gaming America, Inc.Slot machine
US8177234Mar 25, 2010May 15, 2012IgtRotor-based gaming device having a system for changing the quantity of potential game outcomes for subsequent plays
US8177627Jun 15, 2010May 15, 2012IgtGaming device and method having purchasable enhanced paytables
US8216051Oct 23, 2006Jul 10, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Slot machine with alterable reel symbols
US8216065Sep 5, 2006Jul 10, 2012IgtGaming system having multiple adjacently arranged gaming machines which each provide a component for a multi-component game
US8216068Jul 10, 2012Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine
US8221214Jul 17, 2012IgtRotor-based gaming device having a secondary award system
US8231455Sep 14, 2007Jul 31, 2012IgtMethod and apparatus for providing a bonus to a player
US8231464Dec 13, 2006Jul 31, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Multigame gaming machine with transmissive display
US8235801Oct 30, 2006Aug 7, 2012IgtGaming system and method for providing enhanced player opportunities for depositing monetary amounts above a designated level
US8235804May 7, 2008Aug 7, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game
US8241121Jan 31, 2011Aug 14, 2012Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine with a light guiding plate subjected to a light scattering process and having a light deflection pattern
US8251795Jun 29, 2007Aug 28, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with simulated mechanical reels
US8262457Oct 31, 2008Sep 11, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game apparatus and method to provide a trusted gaming environment
US8262459Jul 12, 2011Sep 11, 2012IgtGaming device and method having purchasable randomly selected paytables
US8262460Jul 12, 2011Sep 11, 2012IgtGaming device and method having purchasable randomly selected paytables
US8317597Apr 28, 2010Nov 27, 2012IgtMethod for playing a video gaming machine
US8337286Dec 25, 2012Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine with image display assistance feature
US8342938Oct 8, 2008Jan 1, 2013IgtGaming machine reel having a rotatable dynamic display
US8342941Jul 5, 2012Jan 1, 2013IgtRotor-based gaming device having a secondary award system
US8353766Jan 15, 2013Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine
US8371938Apr 28, 2010Feb 12, 2013IgtGaming system having a common display, a first bonus game or a first bonus game paytable and an option to purchase a second bonus game or a second bonus game paytable with relatively expected higher values
US8382578Feb 26, 2013IgtGaming device and method having purchasable randomly selected paytables
US8388432 *Nov 3, 2006Mar 5, 2013IgtBi-stable downloadable reel strips
US8403740Mar 26, 2013IgtGaming system and method which enables multiple players to simultaneously play multiple individual games or group games on a central display
US8403743Nov 13, 2008Mar 26, 2013Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with simulated mechanical reels
US8439741May 14, 2013Wms Gaming Inc.Simulation of mechanical reels on a gaming machine
US8460095Jul 23, 2012Jun 11, 2013IgtGaming system and method for providing enhanced player opportunities for depositing monetary amounts above a designated level
US8512121Jul 2, 2012Aug 20, 2013IgtGaming system having multiple adjacently arranged gaming machines which each provide a component for a multi-component game
US8545326Sep 7, 2006Oct 1, 2013IgtCasino display methods and devices
US8562419Jun 30, 2011Oct 22, 2013IgtGaming system, device, and method providing a multiple streak game
US8562427May 8, 2012Oct 22, 2013IgtGaming device and method having purchasable enhanced paytables
US8602870Jan 20, 2012Dec 10, 2013Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine and game control method
US8613650Feb 8, 2013Dec 24, 2013IgtGaming system and method which enables multiple players to simultaneously play multiple individual games or group games on a central display
US8632399Jan 18, 2013Jan 21, 2014IgtGaming system having a common display, a first bonus game or a first bonus game paytable and an option to purchase a second bonus game or a second bonus game paytable with relatively expected higher values
US8668576Nov 8, 2012Mar 11, 2014IgtMethod for playing a video gaming machine
US8668577Nov 8, 2012Mar 11, 2014IgtMethod for playing a video gaming machine
US8727862Dec 27, 2010May 20, 2014IgtMultiple reel roulette game
US8758121May 28, 2013Jun 24, 2014IgtGaming system and method for providing enhanced player opportunities for depositing monetary amounts above a designated level
US8864567Jul 24, 2007Oct 21, 2014IgtCasino display methods and devices
US8974297Feb 24, 2012Mar 10, 2015Wms Gaming Inc.Reconfigurable gaming displays and gaming terminals with reconfigurable display devices
US8986104Oct 1, 2013Mar 24, 2015IgtGaming system, device, and method providing a multiple streak game
US8986106Sep 2, 2011Mar 24, 2015IgtGaming system, gaming device, and method providing selectable different roulette wheels for play of roulette game
US8992310Oct 16, 2013Mar 31, 2015IgtGaming device and method having purchasable enhanced paytables
US9005004Sep 2, 2011Apr 14, 2015IgtGaming system, gaming device, and method providing selectable different roulette wheels for play of roulette game
US9058714May 22, 2012Jun 16, 2015Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game systems, wagering gaming machines, and wagering gaming chairs having haptic and thermal feedback
US9064372Nov 9, 2007Jun 23, 2015Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering game with simulated mechanical reels having an overlying image display
US9076285Jul 22, 2011Jul 7, 2015Wms Gaming Inc.Simulation of mechanical reels on a gaming machine
US9129488Nov 21, 2012Sep 8, 2015IgtGaming machine reel having a rotatable dynamic display
US9142083Jun 4, 2012Sep 22, 2015Bally Gaming, Inc.Convertible gaming chairs and wagering game systems and machines with a convertible gaming chair
US9171418Nov 21, 2012Oct 27, 2015Bally Gaming, Inc.Gaming devices and gaming systems with multiple display device arrangement
US9214056Nov 13, 2013Dec 15, 2015IgtGaming system and method which enables multiple players to simultaneously play multiple individual games or group games on a central display
US9230394Apr 22, 2014Jan 5, 2016IgtMultiple reel roulette game
US20030060269 *Sep 27, 2001Mar 27, 2003Craig PaulsenGaming machine reel having a flexible dynamic display
US20030207713 *Apr 14, 2003Nov 6, 2003Taylor William A.Method for playing a video gaming machine
US20040147303 *Oct 31, 2003Jul 29, 2004Hideaki ImuraGaming machine
US20040152501 *Nov 19, 2003Aug 5, 2004Kazuo OkadaGaming machine and display device therefor
US20040209668 *Oct 31, 2003Oct 21, 2004Kazuo OkadaGaming machine
US20040214635 *Oct 31, 2003Oct 28, 2004Kazuo OkadaGaming machine
US20040242313 *May 29, 2003Dec 2, 2004Munoz Andre Michael PaulGaming device having adjustable reel operation and sliding paytable
US20050153776 *Jan 12, 2004Jul 14, 2005IgtVirtual glass for a gaming machine
US20050215307 *May 2, 2005Sep 29, 2005IgtMultiple wheel roulette game
US20050282617 *Jun 3, 2005Dec 22, 2005Aruze Corp.Gaming machine
US20060237905 *Feb 23, 2005Oct 26, 2006Mark NicelyBonus structures for multi-outcome/multi-bet gambling games
US20070004510 *Sep 7, 2006Jan 4, 2007IgtCasino display methods and devices
US20070054730 *Nov 3, 2006Mar 8, 2007IgtBi-stable downloadable reel strips
US20070060292 *Sep 12, 2005Mar 15, 2007Peterson Lance RGaming system having a common display, a first bonus game or a first bonus game paytable and an option to purchase a second bonus game or a second bonus game paytable with relatively expected higher values
US20070077984 *May 19, 2006Apr 5, 2007Konami Gaming IncorporatedGaming machine and system comprising electronic paper
US20070077986 *Dec 1, 2006Apr 5, 2007Wms Gaming Inc.Gaming machine with superimposed display image
US20070093290 *Oct 11, 2006Apr 26, 2007IgtLight emitting interface displays for a gaming machine
US20070120320 *Nov 10, 2006May 31, 2007IgtGaming device having a wheel-based game
US20070135203 *Dec 11, 2006Jun 14, 2007IgtRotor-based gaming device having a system for changing the quantity of potential game outcomes for subsequent plays
US20070135204 *Dec 11, 2006Jun 14, 2007IgtRotor-based gaming device having a secondary award system
US20070263426 *Feb 9, 2007Nov 15, 2007Takashi HiragaOptical flip-flop circuit
US20080020820 *Jul 10, 2007Jan 24, 2008Aruze CorpGaming machine and game control method
US20080020827 *Jul 24, 2007Jan 24, 2008IgtCasino Display methods and devices
US20080039181 *Oct 19, 2007Feb 14, 2008Wms Gaming Inc.Simulation of mechanical reels on a gaming machine
US20080039182 *Oct 19, 2007Feb 14, 2008Wms Gaming Inc.Simulation of mechanical reels on a gaming machine
US20080058051 *Aug 29, 2007Mar 6, 2008Seelig Jerald CVideo gaming display and method
US20080076503 *Sep 1, 2006Mar 27, 2008IgtGaming device and method having purchasable randomly selected paytables
US20080113755 *Nov 9, 2007May 15, 2008Rasmussen James MWagering game with simulated mechanical reels having an overlying image display
US20080176653 *Jan 23, 2008Jul 24, 2008Aruze Corp.Gaming machine
US20080188292 *Sep 14, 2007Aug 7, 2008Walker Jay SMethod and apparatus for providing a bonus to a player
US20080248854 *Aug 24, 2005Oct 9, 2008Rasmussen James MGaming Machine Having Electrophoretic Displays and Method Thereof
US20080261674 *Nov 19, 2003Oct 23, 2008Kazuo OkadaGaming machine and display device therefor
US20080262883 *Feb 19, 2008Oct 23, 2008Weiss Stephen JSystems and methods for compliance and announcement display and notification
US20090075721 *Nov 13, 2008Mar 19, 2009Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering Game With Simulated Mechanical Reels
US20090104969 *Oct 8, 2008Apr 23, 2009IgtGaming Machine Reel Having a Rotatable Dynamic Display
US20090117977 *Dec 13, 2006May 7, 2009Gelber Philip BMultigame Gaming Machine With Transmissive Display
US20090131148 *Jan 21, 2009May 21, 2009Loose Timothy CGaming machine with superimposed display image
US20090170588 *Nov 8, 2006Jul 2, 2009IgtGaming device and method having purchasable enhanced paytables
US20090181755 *Jun 29, 2007Jul 16, 2009Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering Game With Simulated Mechanical Reels
US20090181757 *Feb 24, 2009Jul 16, 2009IgtMultiple reel roulette game
US20090181758 *Mar 17, 2009Jul 16, 2009Wms Gaming Inc.Gaming Machine With Superimposed Display Image
US20090227357 *Oct 23, 2006Sep 10, 2009Rasmussen James MSlot machine with alterable reel symbols
US20090247276 *Apr 1, 2009Oct 1, 2009Aruze Gaming America, Inc.Slot Machine
US20090305779 *Dec 10, 2009IgtGaming system having a dice-based game with a plurality of wager areas
US20090312095 *Jun 29, 2007Dec 17, 2009Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering Game With Simulated Mechanical Reels
US20100062830 *Oct 26, 2007Mar 11, 2010Hornik Jeremy MWagering game having bonus-award feature with changing state
US20100117299 *May 15, 2009May 13, 2010IgtGaming system, device and method involving a role-based game and side game
US20100197378 *Jul 9, 2008Aug 5, 2010Wms Gaming Inc.Wagering Game Having Display Arrangement Formed By An Image Conduit
US20100210338 *Apr 28, 2010Aug 19, 2010IgtMethod for playing a video gaming machine
US20100210348 *Apr 28, 2010Aug 19, 2010IgtGaming system having a common display, a first bonus game or a first bonus game paytable and an option to purchase a second bonus game or a second bonus game paytable with relatively expected higher values
US20100227665 *Mar 25, 2010Sep 9, 2010IgtRotor-based gaming device having a system for changing the quantity of potential game outcomes for subsequent plays
US20100291993 *May 7, 2008Nov 18, 2010Gagner Mark BWagering game
US20110003630 *Sep 15, 2010Jan 6, 2011Wms Gaming Inc.Gaming machine electrophoretic apparatus, systems, and methods
US20110117990 *May 19, 2011Wilkins Kevan LRapid bonus features using overlaid symbols
US20110124411 *Jan 31, 2011May 26, 2011Universal Entertainment CorporationGaming machine with a light guiding plate subjected to a light scattering process and having a light deflection pattern
WO2008030781A2 *Aug 31, 2007Mar 13, 2008IgtCasino display methods and devices
WO2008030781A3 *Aug 31, 2007May 29, 2008Yuliya HungateCasino display methods and devices
WO2008057929A1 *Nov 1, 2007May 15, 2008IgtBi-stable downloadable reel strips
WO2011067449A1 *Nov 30, 2010Jun 9, 2011Proindumar, S. L.Device simulating a reel with animated figures for slot machines
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/20
International ClassificationA63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/3202, G07F17/3211
European ClassificationG07F17/32C2F, G07F17/32C