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Publication numberUS20060016546 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/043,603
Publication dateJan 26, 2006
Filing dateJan 26, 2005
Priority dateAug 1, 2002
Also published asCA2494056A1, DE10235227A1, EP1525343A1, WO2004013393A1
Publication number043603, 11043603, US 2006/0016546 A1, US 2006/016546 A1, US 20060016546 A1, US 20060016546A1, US 2006016546 A1, US 2006016546A1, US-A1-20060016546, US-A1-2006016546, US2006/0016546A1, US2006/016546A1, US20060016546 A1, US20060016546A1, US2006016546 A1, US2006016546A1
InventorsJohann Berger
Original AssigneeJohann Berger
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of producing woven webbing
US 20060016546 A1
Abstract
Disclosed is a method for the production of a woven belt band, especially for safety belts in vehicles, especially motor vehicles, consisting of warp threads and at least one weft thread, characterized in that a multifilament thread, made up of individual filaments, is used as a weft thread during weaving, said filaments consisting of a core surrounded by a meltable skin; also characterized in that the belt band is thermoset after weaving. The multifilament thread melts in an undulated form to form a monofilament spring-elastic single thread body, thereby increasing the cross-resistance of the belt, and is especially glued to the warp threads.
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Claims(20)
1. A method of producing woven webbing, particularly for vehicular seat belts, especially for use in motor vehicles, comprising warp threads and at least one weft thread, the method comprising, in weaving, use is made of a multifil yarn as at least one weft thread, the multifil yarn being composed of individual fibrils comprising a core sheathed by a fusible skin, the weft threads in the edge portion forming weft reversals having flexible elliptically flattened keying points, and that the webbing is thermoset after weaving, the undulating multifil yarn thereby melting into a uniform elastomeric monofil type yarn body in thus enhancing the CD stiffness of the webbing.
2. The method as set forth in claim 1 wherein after weaving, the webbing is thermoset, resulting in the multifil yarn bonding to the warp threads.
3. The method as set forth in claim 1 wherein polyamide is used for the skin and polyester for the core.
4. The method as set forth in claim 1 wherein polyester is used for the skin and for the core.
5. The method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the skin-to-core mass ratio is in the range of approx. 20%-80% to approx. 30%-70%.
6. The method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the at least one weft thread is woven over only part of the warp threads and a second weft thread is woven shedded with the at least one first weft thread but running over the full width of the webbing.
7. The method as set forth claim 1 wherein the webbing is woven with circular selvedge.
8. The method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the webbing is provided in its edge portion with additional threads.
9. The method as set forth claim 1 wherein the at least one weft thread at the edge is interlaced with tuck and/or seal threads.
10. A method of manufacturing a product, the method comprising:
(a) weaving a multifil thread with a second thread;
(b) interbonding fibrils of the multifil thread; and
(c) creating a vehicular seat belt from the woven threads.
11. The method of claim 10 further comprising creating an elliptically flattened soft reversal in an edge portion of the seat belt.
12. The method of claim 10 further comprising thermosetting the woven multifil and second threads together.
13. The method of claim 10 further comprising using a multifil thread including a core sheathed by a fusible skin.
14. The method of claim 10 further comprising:
weaving a weft one of the threads over only part of a warp one of the threads; and
weaving and shedding another weft thread over a full width of the seat belt.
15. A seat belt webbing comprising a multifil yarn including individual fibrils each having a core within a fusible skin, at least some of the fibrils interbonding due to heated fusion of the fusible skin.
16. The seat belt webbing of claim 15 wherein the multifil yarn is melted into a substantially uniform elastomeric monofil type yarn body.
17. The seat belt webbing of claim 15 wherein the multifil yarn is woven weftwise to create a flexible elliptical with substantially flat lying keying points in a shed end.
18. The seat belt webbing of claim 15 further comprising a warp thread woven with the multifil yarn, the multifil yarn acting as a weft thread.
19. The seat belt webbing of claim 15 wherein polyamide is used for the skin and polyester is used for the core.
20. The seat belt webbing of claim 15 wherein polyester is used for the skin and the core.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This is a continuation of PCT Serial No. PCT/EP2003/008311, filed Jul. 28, 2003, which claims priority to German Application No. 102 35 227.5-26, filed Aug. 1, 2002, both of which are incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a method of producing woven webbing, particularly for vehicular seat belts, especially for use in motor vehicles, comprising warp threads, and at least one weft thread.

Methods of producing such webbing and the disadvantages of webbing produced as such are known in a wealth of variants. As a rule, the warp threads of such webbing are made of multifil yarns. Whereas for the weft thread(s) use is made solely of multifil yarns or solely of monofil yarns or combinations of monofil and multifil yarns. Making webbing exclusively with weft thread material of multifil yarn has the disadvantage that it features hardly any stiffness and elasticity in the cross machine direction (CD). Although webbing made of monofil material weft threads exhibits the necessary CD stiffness and elasticity, it has, however, the drawback that the monofil weft thread at its so-called reversals after critical wear and tear juts out from the edge of the webbing as sharp as a sawtooth profile which is damaging to the clothing of the vehicle occupant and injurious to trunk and neck locations. Apart from this, webbing made of monofil weft thread material is relatively bulky as compared to webbing made exclusively of multifil material.

The invention is based on the object of proposing a method of producing woven webbing which avoids, or at least greatly reduces, the disadvantages of prior art. This object is achieved by a method as set forth in claim 1. This method has the advantage that working the multifil yarn weftwise now makes it possible to achieve the positive structures of the keying points in the weave. Each individual fibril of the multifil yarn consists of a core sheathed in a fusible skin. This yarn, simply termed “two-component yarn” hereinafter is woven weftwise and forms flexible elliptical and flat lying keying points in the shed end, which are unachievable with monofil yarns. In setting, after weaving, the multifil yarn is heated in accordance with the invention, resulting in the fibrils of the multifil yarn interbonding due to fusion of the fusible skin and the undulating multifil yarn melting into a uniform elastomeric monofil type yarn body in thus enhancing the CD stiffness of the webbing.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The process as described for engineering the mechanical properties—in achieving the desired CD stiffness and elasticity—occurs with the threads configured undulating, results in the thickness of the woven webbing being less and the surface of the webbing formed by the warp threads being smoother, because the tips of the keying points are less pronounced. As indicated above, an elliptically flattened soft reversal is now achieved in the edge portion when producing webbing in accordance with the invention due to the multifil yarn structure of warp and weft threads. Damage to the edges of the webbing resulting from abrasion of the selvedge now no longer results in the feared sawtooth effect and its possible negative consequences known from prior art.

In one advantageous aspect of the method in accordance with the invention the multifil, respectively its outlying fibrils, are additionally bonded to the warp threads interlacing them in the keying points in thermosetting, to now make it possible to achieve an even higher CD consolidation of the webbing. In another advantageous aspect of the method in accordance with the invention polyamide is used for the skin and polyester for the core, resulting in an optimal harmonizing marriage thereof in the webbing. In still another advantageous aspect of the invention polyester is used for both the skin and the core of the multifil thread of the warp thread. This has additionally the great advantage of enhanced recycling. Advantageously, the polyester skin in this case is made of an engineered polyester.

In textile sheeting made by thermally treating the two-component yarn at approx. 220° C. in the method in accordance with the invention the individual fibrils interbond such that a monofil yarn body having the mechanical properties (elastic response, low fluffiness, stiffness) of a monofil yarn is attained in the weft thread. Thus combines all positive features of multifil and monofil yarn in the method in accordance with the invention and in the product thereof. The method in accordance with the invention is compatible, of course, with all known types of webbing. The advantages now achievable for the first time are obvious: thinner webbing, smoother webbing surface, gentle reversals in the edge portion, elastic response, CD stiffness and a perfect surface finish. To advantage, multifil yarns are employed as the weft thread whose skin-to-core mass ratio is in the range of approx. 20%-80% to approx. 30%-70%.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7563735Nov 20, 2006Jul 21, 2009Takata CorporationWebbing for a seat belt
US7662734Nov 22, 2006Feb 16, 2010Takata CorporationWoven belt and seat belt apparatus
US7735933May 24, 2007Jun 15, 2010Takata CorporationWoven belt
US7780194Dec 12, 2005Aug 24, 2010Global Safety Textiles GmbhMethod for producing an air bag
US7799709Nov 22, 2006Sep 21, 2010Takata CorporationWoven belt and seatbelt device
US7871945Mar 21, 2006Jan 18, 2011Johann BergerWoven webbing
US8763649May 7, 2007Jul 1, 2014Global Safety Textiles GmbhSeam construction for a one piece woven airbag fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/148
International ClassificationD04H13/00, D03D1/00, D03D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD10B2401/041, D03D1/0005
European ClassificationD03D1/00A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 10, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: BERGER GMBH & CO. HOLDING KG, GERMANY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BERGER, JOHANN;REEL/FRAME:017082/0122
Effective date: 20050920