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Publication numberUS20060049067 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/933,893
Publication dateMar 9, 2006
Filing dateSep 4, 2004
Priority dateSep 4, 2004
Publication number10933893, 933893, US 2006/0049067 A1, US 2006/049067 A1, US 20060049067 A1, US 20060049067A1, US 2006049067 A1, US 2006049067A1, US-A1-20060049067, US-A1-2006049067, US2006/0049067A1, US2006/049067A1, US20060049067 A1, US20060049067A1, US2006049067 A1, US2006049067A1
InventorsDuane McDonald
Original AssigneeMcdonald Duane L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Top or bottom loading container
US 20060049067 A1
Abstract
A container including: a container top having a dispensing opening formed from a plurality of top flaps; a container bottom disposed opposite the container top formed from a plurality of bottom flaps; and a plurality of decorative panels forming a sidewall of the container having a continuous decorative surface. The plurality of decorative panels creating a continuous decorative surface that extends in side-fold continuity across the decorative panels except at an edge where two of the decorative panels are joined. As a result, there is more continuity of the decorative panels forming the sidewall and no sidewalls formed by glued together flaps. In this manner, there is less interruption of any graphics placed on the container's sidewall.
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Claims(22)
1. A container comprising:
a first section having a first section decorative panel, a first section top flap disposed at a first end of the first section decorative panel and a first section bottom flap disposed at a second end of the first section decorative panel;
a second section connected to the first section, the second section having a second section decorative panel, a second section top flap disposed at a first end of the second section decorative panel and a second section bottom flap panel disposed at a second end of the second section decorative panel;
a third section connected to the second section, the third section having a third section decorative panel, a third section top flap disposed at a first end of the third section decorative panel and a third section bottom panel disposed at a second end of the third section decorative panel;
a fourth section connected to third section, the fourth section having a fourth section decorative panel and a fourth section top flap disposed at a first end of the fourth section decorative panel and a fourth section bottom flap disposed at a second end of the fourth section decorative panel;
a tab connected to either the first section decorative panel or the fourth section decorative panel for securing the fourth section decorative panel to the first section decorative panel; and
wherein top flaps define a container top having at least a portion of the dispensing opening in the container top, and the bottom flaps define a container bottom, and the first, second, third and fourth section decorative panels form a sidewall of the container having a continuous decorative surface.
2. The container of claim 1 wherein the continuous decorative surface extends in side fold continuity across at least three of the edges where adjacent decorative panels meet.
3. The container of claim 1 wherein the first, second, third and fourth section decorative panels are in top fold continuity with the respective top flaps and in bottom fold continuity with the respective bottom flaps.
4. The container of claim 1 wherein the dispensing opening further comprises a dispensing window having a dispensing orifice.
5. The container of claim 4 further comprising a removable surf board that covers at least a portion of the dispensing window.
6. The container of claim 1 in combination with a plurality of sheet materials.
7. The container of claim 6 wherein the sheet material comprises tissue.
8. The container of claim 7 wherein the container comprises an upright tissue carton.
9. The container of claim 1 wherein the dispensing opening spans the top of the container and at least one of the decorative panels.
10. The container of claim 9 wherein the opening comprises an oval.
11. The container of claim 1 wherein the dispensing opening resides solely in the top of the container.
12. A facial tissue container comprising:
a container top comprising a plurality of top flaps folded to form the container top having at least a portion of the container opening located in the container top;
a container bottom disposed opposite the container top comprising a plurality of bottom flaps folded to form the container bottom;
and at least three decorative panels forming a continuous decorative surface that extends in side-fold continuity across a plurality of edges where adjacent decorative panels meet except at an edge where the first decorative panel is joined to the last decorative panel to form a sidewall of the container.
13. The facial tissue container of claim 12 wherein one of the decorative panels is adjoined along a top edge to one of the plurality of top flaps of the container top.
14. The facial tissue container of claim 12 wherein one of the decorative panels is adjoined along a bottom edge to one of the plurality of bottom flaps of the container bottom.
15. The facial tissue container of claim 13 wherein the dispensing opening comprises a dispensing window having a dispensing orifice.
16. The facial tissue container of claim 15 further comprising a removable surf board that covers at least a portion of the dispensing window.
17. The container of claim 12 wherein the tissue container comprises an upright tissue carton.
18. The container of claim 12 wherein the dispensing opening spans the top of the container and at least one of the decorative panels.
19. The container of claim 18 wherein the opening comprises an oval.
20. The container of claim 12 wherein the dispensing opening resides solely in the container top.
21. The container of claim 20 wherein the dispensing opening resides entirely in at least one of the plurality of top flaps.
22. The container of claim 21 further comprising a unitary dispensing window having a dispensing orifice.
Description
BACKGROUND

Increasingly, producers of consumer use product containers, such as facial tissue cartons, are making maximum use of the container surface area through the use of full face graphics, specialized graphics, including three dimensional, lenticular, holographic, laminated films, foils and other printed, photographic and digital effects. The increased use of such graphics creates a desire for the minimization of visible boundaries at the meeting point of edges to maximize the visual effect of the printed graphics.

Also, in the manufacture of containers, or any other die cut process, minimizing the amount of material needed to produce a given sized container is a cost saving goal. The savings in materials consumed corresponds to a direct savings in manufacturing costs, and more efficient production. It is highly desirable to have a container construction that decreases the amount of container material required to construct a container having the same functionality.

Therefore, a need exists for a carton that has a continuous decorative surface on its sidewall to maximize the graphical appeal of the carton by having a minimum of design interruptions and that can be made at a low cost.

SUMMARY

The inventor has discovered that by relocating the closure flaps used to fill a container from the sides or sidewall of the container to the top and bottom of the container, a container having a continuous decorative surface on the sidewall can be constructed. Additionally, by designing the container such that the dispensing opening resides partially in the top and partially in the sidewall, less carton material can be used to produce the container.

Hence in one aspect, the invention resides in a container for sheet materials including: a first section having a first section decorative panel, a first section top flap disposed at a first end of the first section decorative panel and a first section bottom flap disposed at a second end of the first section decorative panel; a second section connected to the first section, the second section having a second section decorative panel, a second section top flap disposed at a first end of the second section decorative panel and a second section bottom flap panel disposed at a second end of the second section decorative panel; a third section connected to the second section, the third section having a third section decorative panel, a third section top flap disposed at a first end of the third section decorative panel and a third section bottom panel disposed at a second end of the third section decorative panel; a fourth section connected to third section, the fourth section having a fourth section decorative panel and a fourth section top flap disposed at a first end of the fourth section decorative panel and a fourth section bottom flap disposed at a second end of the fourth section decorative panel; a tab connected to either the first section decorative panel or the fourth section decorative panel for securing the fourth section decorative panel to the first section decorative panel; and wherein the top flaps define a container top having at least a portion of the dispensing opening in the container top, and the bottom flaps define a container bottom, and the first, second, third and fourth section decorative panels form a sidewall of the container having a continuous decorative surface.

In another aspect, the invention resides in a facial tissue container including: a container top comprising a plurality of top flaps folded to form the container top having at least a portion of the container opening located in the container top; a container bottom disposed opposite the container top comprising a plurality of bottom flaps folded to form the container bottom; and at least three decorative panels forming a continuous decorative surface that extends in side-fold continuity across a plurality of edges where adjacent decorative panels meet except at an edge where the first decorative panel is joined to the last decorative panel to form a sidewall of the container.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above aspects and other features, aspects, and advantages of the present invention will become better understood with regard to the following description, appended claims, and accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a top view of a container blank in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the container made from the blank of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a top view of another container blank in accordance with another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a container made from the blank of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a prior art upright facial tissue carton.

Repeated use of reference characters with primes in the specification and drawings is intended to represent the same or analogous features or elements of the invention in different embodiments.

Definitions

As used herein, forms of the words “comprise”, “have”, and “include” are legally equivalent and open-ended. Therefore, additional non-recited elements, functions, steps or limitations may be present in addition to the recited elements, functions, steps, or limitations.

As used herein, “sheet material” is a flexible substrate, which is useful for household chores, cleaning, personal care, health care, food wrapping, and cosmetic application or removal. Non-limiting examples of suitable substrates for use with the dispenser include nonwoven substrates; woven substrates; hydro-entangled substrates; air-entangled substrates; paper substrates comprising cellulose such as tissue paper, toilet paper, or paper towels; waxed paper substrates; coform substrates comprising cellulose fibers and polymer fibers; wet substrates such as wet wipes, moist cleaning wipes, moist toilet paper wipes, and baby wipes; film or plastic substrates such as those used to wrap food; shop towels; and metal substrates such as aluminum foil. Furthermore, laminated or plied together substrates of two or more layers of any of the preceding substrates are also suitable.

As used herein, “wet sheet material” includes substrates that are either wet or pre-moistened by an appropriate liquid, partially moistened by an appropriate liquid, or substrates that are initially dry but intended to be moistened prior to use by placing the substrate into an appropriate liquid such as water or a solvent. Non-limiting examples of suitable wet substrates include a substantially dry substrate (less than 10% by weight of water) containing lathering surfactants and conditioning agents either impregnated into or applied to the substrate such that wetting of the substrate with water prior to use yields a personal cleansing product. Such substrates are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,980,931 entitled Cleansing Products Having A Substantially Dry Substrate, issued to Fowler et al. on Nov. 9, 1999. Other suitable wet sheet materials can have encapsulated ingredients such that the capsules rupture during dispensing or use. Examples of encapsulated materials include those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,215,757 entitled Encapsulated Materials, issued to El-Nokaly on Jun. 1, 1993, and U.S. Pat. No. 5,599,555 entitled Encapsulated Cosmetic Compositions, issued to El-Nokaly on Feb. 4, 1997. Other suitable wet sheet materials include dry substrates that deliver liquid when subjected to in-use shear and compressive forces. Such substrates are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,121,165 entitled Wet-Like Cleaning Articles, issued to Mackay et al. on Sep. 19, 2000.

As used herein, an “upright dispenser” is a container that dispenses sheet materials that have been assembled into a clip and the clip folded prior to insertion into the dispenser. In one embodiment, the upright dispenser comprised a facial tissue carton made from board stock having an overall height of approximately 127 mm and a footprint or bottom of approximately 110 mm by 110 mm that formed a parallelepiped having a generally cubical shape.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

It is to be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art that the present discussion is a description of exemplary embodiments only and is not intended as limiting the broader aspects of the present invention, which broader aspects are embodied in the exemplary construction.

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a blank, generally indicated by the numeral 10 for a container in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention. The inside surface of the blank or the resulting container's interior surface is illustrated. In one embodiment, the container was a facial tissue carton suitable for housing a plurality of facial tissue sheets. The blank can be sized to form either upright cartons or flat cartons. Additionally, the blank and the resulting container can be used to house other suitable sheet materials. The blank 10 includes a first section 12 having a first section decorative panel 14, a first section top flap 16 disposed at a first end 18 of the first section decorative panel and a first section bottom flap 20 disposed at a second end 22 of the first section decorative panel. Blank 10 further includes a second section 24 connected to first section 12, the second section having a second section decorative panel 26, a second section top flap 28 disposed at a first end 30 of the second section decorative panel and a second section bottom flap 32 disposed at a second end 34 of the second section decorative panel. The blank 10 still further includes a third section 36 connected to second section 24, the third section having a third section decorative panel 38, a third section top flap 40 disposed at a first end 42 of the third section decorative panel and a third section bottom flap 44 disposed at a second end 46 of the third section decorative panel. The blank 10 still further includes a fourth section 48 connected to third section 36, the fourth section having a fourth section decorative panel 50 and a fourth section top flap 52 disposed at a first end 54 of the fourth section decorative panel and a fourth section bottom flap 56 disposed at a second end 58 of the fourth section decorative panel. Finally, the blank 10 includes a tab 60 connected to a third end 62 of the first section decorative panel 14 or the fourth section decorative panel 50. Tab 60 is utilized to secure the fourth section decorative panel 50 to the first section decorative panel 14 in constructing a container that can be made from the blank 10. To form the container, the blank is folded along a plurality of lines 63 illustrated by the dashed line having long and short dashes.

The first, second, third and fourth section decorative panels form a sidewall 64 of the container having a continuous decorative surface 66 between the arrowheads on the longitudinal center line. The continuous decorative surface can be on the interior or the exterior of the container, but is typically on the exterior of the container. Continuous surface 66 is referred to as a continuous decorative surface in that it can receive vector or graphic art in, for example, printed form, to maximize a visual effect to a consumer. Advantageously by spanning across several decorative panels, the registration problems that typically occur as a result of having the closing flaps forming at least a portion of the container's sidewall, as seen in the prior art upright tissue carton of FIG. 5, are eliminated. The flaps on the sidewall can interrupt a continuous design that is placed onto the sidewall since the top and bottom flap must be folded perfectly to meet with each other and the remainder of the container such that the registration of the design is not interrupted. In prior upright dispensers, the flaps may not be perfectly folded and sealed such that the graphics on the flaps aligns with the graphics on the other decorative panels forming the sidewall. Moreover, when the flaps form a portion of the sidewall, discontinuous boundaries result at the flaps that impedes the visual unity of any graphics design applied to the container's sidewall.

The blank further includes a dispensing opening 68 and optionally includes a dispensing window 70. For loading on an automated carton line, the dispensing window should be pre-attached to the carton blank by attaching the dispensing window to either the inside or the outside of the top flap, preferably on the inside as shown. The dispensing window can be made from a suitable material such as a film, nonwoven, or paper material that can retain a partially dispensed sheet, such as a facial tissue, within the dispensing opening for pop-up dispensing. The dispensing window 70 has a dispensing orifice 71 that can be a slit; a curvilinear line; a geometric shape such as an oval, a circle, or a triangle; or X-shaped, +-shaped or H-shaped orifice. Alternatively, the dispensing window can be eliminated and fingers or tabs projecting into the dispensing opening 68 can be used to retain a partially dispensed sheet.

The dispensing opening 68 can be any size or shape such as square, circular, or oval. The dispensing opening can be located such that it resides entirely in one of the top flaps or the dispensing opening can be located such that a portion resides in one of the top flaps and another portion resides in one of the decorative panels. By having the dispensing opening span portions of the top flap and decorative panel, the amount of board material utilized to form the carton can be minimized. Thus occurs since the overall size of the top flaps can be decreased because less material is needed to surround the dispensing opening. Additionally, by having the dispensing opening span portions of the top flap and decorative panel, a unitary or one-piece dispensing window can be used that simplifies the overall construction of the carton and allows for maximum flexibility in choosing the shape of the dispensing orifice. By unitary it is meant that the dispensing window is a single continuous piece rather than formed from two or more pieces that meet or overlap. Because the window is unitary, any desired shape for the dispensing orifice can be cut into the window without concern of having separate pieces meet or join together precisely to form the dispensing orifice and/or dispensing window.

The blank further includes an optional removable surfboard 72 that can be attached to the top flap by a perforated or weakened line. The removable surf board can be used to prevent foreign materials from entering the assembled container and provides protection for the more fragile dispensing window during loading and shipping. The blank can also include an optional film wrapper 72 (FIG. 2) that can span any of the decorative panels (14, 26, 38, and 50) by attaching the opposing ends of the film wrapper to the top and bottom flaps of the chosen decorative panel. The film wrapper can be used to display printed information, such as a prominent trademark, that can identify the manufacturer at the point of purchase, which then later can be removed by the consumer so as not to detract from the continuous graphic design on the sidewall of the container.

The carton blank 10 can be designed such that there are major flaps and minor flaps. The major flaps have a longer over all length than the minor flaps. In the illustrated embodiment, the major flaps are 28, 32, 52, and 56, while the minor flaps are 16, 20, 40, and 44. Alternatively, the carton can be designed such that all the flaps are approximately the same length. To minimize the carton material required, the major flaps are designed to have a length that is approximately ˝ the distance between opposing decorative panels in the assembled container. In this manner, the major flaps will just meet or slightly overlap when folded to form the top or bottom of the container. While extra material can be used, such as a top or bottom flap that spans the entire end of the container, more board is needed resulting in a more expensive carton and reduced nesting of adjacent blanks during the die cutting process.

FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of a container 74 that can be formed from the blank 10 of FIG. 1. In one embodiment, the container comprised an upright tissue carton and housed a plurality of facial tissue sheets. Shown are the first section decorative panel 14 and the second section decorative panel 26, the second section top flap 28, and the fourth section top flap 52. The top flaps form a container top 76, while the bottom flaps form a container bottom 77. In the completed container 74, decorative panels 14 and 26 are folded so as to be in side fold continuity across an edge 78, and by this it is meant that there is a continuity of material, which is used to create or form the continuous decorative surface as described previously. The exterior of the container, and in particular the continuous decorative surface, is particularly well suited for receiving commercially suitable decoration, such as image, print, indicia, graphics, fresnel lens, lenticular lens, color, an embossed area, a debossed area, and/or coating(s). Advantageously, the sidewall 64 of the container is not interrupted by the closing flaps as shown in the prior art container of FIG. 5. The sidewall 64 of the container is in side fold continuity across three of the four edges 78 joining the four decorative panels forming the sidewall, with the exception of the interruption where the fourth decorative panel 50 is joined to the first decorative panel 14 at edge 80.

The container top and bottom can be formed by folding either the major flaps over the minor flaps as shown, or by reversing the folding sequence such that the minor flaps are folded over the major flaps. Thus, for the illustrated folding sequence, the major flaps (28, 32, 52, and 56) are in top and bottom fold continuity across the first and second ends (30 and 34) of the second decorative panel 26 and across the first and second ends (54 and 58) of the fourth decorative panel 50. The design is interrupted at the first and second ends (18 and 22) of the first decorative panel 14 and at the first and second ends (42 and 46) of the third decorative panel 38. The misalignment in the flaps relative to the edges of the carton is exaggerated for the purposes of illustration in FIG. 2 and they would be much less noticeable in the actual folded cartons. Additionally, the flaps can be cut such that there is less taper along the length of the flap so as to more align the edges of the flaps with the edges of the top and bottom of the container. However, by folding the major flaps first and then the minor flaps, it is possible to achieve more top and bottom fold continuity around the top and bottom perimeters of the container.

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of an alternative embodiment for a blank, generally indicated by the numeral 10′ for a container in accordance with the present invention. In one embodiment, the container was a facial tissue carton suitable for housing a plurality of facial tissue sheets. The blank can be sized to form either upright cartons or flat cartons. Additionally, the blank and the resulting container can be used to house other suitable sheet materials. The blank 10′ includes a first section 12′ having a first section decorative panel 14′, a first section top flap 16′ disposed at a first end 18′ of the first section decorative panel and a first section bottom flap 20′ disposed at a second end 22′ of the first section decorative panel. Blank 10′ further includes a second section 24′ connected to first section 12′, the second section having a second section decorative panel 26′, a second section top flap 28′ disposed at a first end 30′ of the second section decorative panel and a second section bottom flap 32′ disposed at a second end 34′ of the second section decorative panel. The blank 10′ still further includes a third section 36′ connected to second section 24′, the third section having a third section decorative panel 38′, a third section top flap 40′ disposed at a first end 42′ of the third section decorative panel and a third section bottom flap 44′ disposed at a second end 46′ of the third section decorative panel. The blank 10′ still further includes a fourth section 48′ connected to third section 36′, the fourth section having a fourth section decorative panel 50′ and a fourth section top flap 52′ disposed at a first end 54′ of the fourth section decorative panel and a fourth section bottom flap 56′ disposed at a second end 58′ of the fourth section decorative panel. Finally, the blank 10′ includes a tab 60′ connected to a third end 62 of the first section decorative panel 14 or the fourth section decorative panel 50′. Tab 60′ is utilized to secure the fourth section decorative panel 50′ to the first section decorative panel 14′ in constructing a container that can be made from blank 10′. To form the container, the blank is folded along a plurality of lines 63′ illustrated by the dashed and dotted lines. The first, second, third and fourth section decorative panels form a sidewall 64′ of the container having a continuous decorative surface 66′ between the arrowheads on the longitudinal center line. Continuous surface 66′ is referred to as a continuous decorative surface in that it can receive vector or graphic art in, for example, printed form, to maximize a visual effect to a consumer.

In this embodiment, the dispensing opening 68′ is located entirely in one of the top flaps rather than being formed by partial cutouts in two or more flaps. As a result, the blank 10′ would utilize slightly more board material, approximately 30 percent more, than the embodiment of FIG. 1 for an equivalently sized interior volume container. However, the design of the dispensing opening 68 is familiar to consumers of traditional upright cartons which may prefer that the dispensing opening be located entirely within the top of the container rather than span a portion of the top and sidewall as done in the embodiment of FIG. 2. Since the dispensing opening is located entirely in the top flap, a unitary dispensing window 70′ can be applied over the dispensing opening 68′ located entirely within the second section top flap 28′. As previously discussed having a unitary dispensing window greatly simplifies the assembly of the blank 10′ into a container allowing for a variety of shapes for the dispensing orifice 71. In the illustrated embodiment, a slit aligned with the major axis of the oval-shaped dispensing opening is used.

FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of a container 74′ that can be formed from the blank 10′ of FIG. 3. In one embodiment, the container comprised an upright tissue carton and housed a plurality of facial tissue sheets. Shown are first section decorative panel 14′ and second section decorative panel 26′, and second section top flap 28′. The top flaps form a container top 76′ and the bottom flaps form a container bottom 77′. In the completed container 74′, decorative panels 14′ and 26′ are folded so as to be in side fold continuity across an edge 78′, and by this it is meant that there is a continuity of material (which is used to create or form the continuous decorative surface described previously). The exterior of the container, and in particular the continuous decorative surface, is particularly well-suited for receiving commercially suitable decoration, such as image, print, indicia, graphics, fresnel lens, lenticular lens, color, an embossed area, a debossed area, and/or coating(s). The sidewall 64′ of the container is in side fold continuity across three of the four edges joining the four panels forming the sidewall, with the exception of the interruption where the fourth decorative panel 50′ is joined to the first decorative panel 14′ at edge 80′.

Preferably, the minor flaps (16′, 20′, 40′, and 44′) are folded closed first, and then the major flaps 52′ and 56′ are folded closed with the major flaps 28′ and 32′ closed last. In this particular embodiment, the top and bottom flaps are in top and bottom fold continuity only along the first and second ends (30′ and 34′) of the second decorative panel 26′. However, since the major top flaps span the entire carton top, excellent alignment of the top flap edges with the first and second ends of the decorative panels (14′, 26′, 38′, and 50′) forming the sidewall 64′ is possible such that the interruption in the design is barely perceptible. Additionally, having a top flap that covers substantially the entire top of the container reduces the bulging or bowing that can occur when two smaller flaps are overlapped to form the container top. The overlapping creates a thicker area near the middle of the top or bottom, creating at least a partial gap between the major flaps and the minor flaps where the flaps are not over lapped. In this embodiment, since both of the major top flaps (28′ and 52′) span the entire top of the container, the bulging or bowing is eliminated. The container top 76′ can be made more planner than an embodiment where the top flaps overlap in the middle. As seen in the FIG. 4, there is only a small discontinuity where the second section top flap 28′ meets the first section decorative panel 14′ at the first and second ends (18′ and 22′).

The blank 10′ can be assembled into a container 74′ by folding the minor top and bottom flaps first and covering them with the major top and bottom flaps, or by folding the major top and bottom flaps first and covering them with the minor top and bottom flaps.

The container can be made from suitable materials that include, without limitation, cardboard, carton stock, paper board, polypropylene, polyethylene, polystyrene, ABS plastic, plastic, metal, wood, and glass, amongst other suitable alternatives.

Other modifications and variations to the present invention may be practiced by those of ordinary skill in the art, without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention, which is more particularly set forth in the appended claims. For example, three, five, six or more decorative panels can form the sidewall to form differently shaped geometric containers instead of the four illustrated. Standard flat tissue containers can be constructed in the manner described.

Another container for facial tissue is described in U.S. patent application 2004/0144795 entitled In-Line Windowed Facial Tissue Carton filed by Gerald Keberlein on Jul. 3, 2003, and herein incorporated by reference. An additional container is described in a co-pending patent application entitled Top or Bottom Loading Container having attorney docket number 21014B that was filed on Sep. 4, 2004, and assigned U.S. patent application Ser. No. ______ and herein incorporated by reference.

It is understood that aspects of the various embodiments may be interchanged in whole or part. All cited references, patents, or patent applications in the above application for letters patent are herein incorporated by reference in a consistent manner. In the event of inconsistencies or contradictions between the incorporated references and this application, the information present in this application shall prevail. The preceding description, given by way of example in order to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to practice the claimed invention, is not to be construed as limiting the scope of the invention, which is defined by the claims and all equivalents thereto.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7398629May 19, 2006Jul 15, 2008Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flexible carton loading apparatus
US7699214Nov 21, 2006Apr 20, 2010Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Carton with recloseable lid
US7938312 *Jan 17, 2007May 10, 2011Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Carton with bag closures
US7959060Mar 21, 2007Jun 14, 2011Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Multi-ply carton having reclosable opening feature
US8602258Mar 27, 2008Dec 10, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Top or bottom loading container
US8672214Oct 25, 2006Mar 18, 2014Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Cartons with reclosable opening features
WO2009014978A2 *Jul 17, 2008Jan 29, 2009Graphic Packaging Int IncA container including a decorative film and blank for making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/233, 206/494, 229/125.015
International ClassificationB65D43/00, B65D73/00, B65D71/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/0847, B65D83/0805
European ClassificationB65D83/08B, B65D83/08D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 18, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: KIMBERLY-CLARK WORLDWIDE, INC., WISCONSIN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MCDONALD, DUANE LYLE;REEL/FRAME:015391/0702
Effective date: 20040908