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Publication numberUS20060060366 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/943,795
Publication dateMar 23, 2006
Filing dateSep 17, 2004
Priority dateSep 17, 2004
Publication number10943795, 943795, US 2006/0060366 A1, US 2006/060366 A1, US 20060060366 A1, US 20060060366A1, US 2006060366 A1, US 2006060366A1, US-A1-20060060366, US-A1-2006060366, US2006/0060366A1, US2006/060366A1, US20060060366 A1, US20060060366A1, US2006060366 A1, US2006060366A1
InventorsThomas Bodine, Michael Justis
Original AssigneeBodine Thomas J, Justis Michael S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Variable speed drill
US 20060060366 A1
Abstract
A variable speed drill includes a housing and a motor within the housing. The motor has (a) a motor field lamination diameter greater than 65 mm, (b) a motor current rating greater than 8 amps, (c) a motor power level greater than 600 Watts, (d) a maximum torque level at the chuck greater than 580 in-lbs, (e) a weight greater than 5.5 pounds or (f) a maximum speed less than 550 rpm. A mixing implement is rotationally coupled to the motor. A variable speed switch is mounted to the housing and is operable to vary a rotational speed of the motor and therefore of the mixing implement.
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Claims(27)
1. A variable speed drill comprising:
a housing;
a motor within the housing having a lamination length of at least 30 millimeters and a lamination diameter of at least 65 millimeters;
a variable speed switch mounted to the housing and operable to vary a power output of the motor.
2. The variable speed drill of claim 1, wherein the housing defines a handle, and the variable speed switch is mounted to the handle.
3. The variable speed drill of claim 1, wherein the variable speed switch is operable in a first position and a second position.
4. The variable speed drill of claim 3, wherein movement of the variable speed switch from the first position to the second position increases the power output of the motor.
5. The variable speed drill of claim 1, further comprising a mixing implement rotationally coupled to the motor.
7. A variable speed drill comprising:
a housing;
a motor within the housing having a motor current rating greater than 8 amps;
a variable speed switch mounted to the housing and operable to vary a power output of the motor.
8. The variable speed drill of claim 7, wherein the housing defines a handle, and the variable speed switch is mounted to the handle.
9. The variable speed drill of claim 7, wherein the variable speed switch is operable in a first position and a second position.
10. The variable speed drill of claim 9, wherein movement of the variable speed switch from the first position to the second position increases the power output of the motor.
11. The variable speed drill of claim 7, further comprising a mixing implement rotationally coupled to the motor.
12. A variable speed drill comprising:
a housing;
a motor within the housing having a motor power level greater than 600 Watts;
a variable speed switch mounted to the housing and operable to vary a power output of the motor.
13. The variable speed drill of claim 12, wherein the housing defines a handle, and the variable speed switch is mounted to the handle.
14. The variable speed drill of claim 12, wherein the variable speed switch is operable in a first position and a second position.
15. The variable speed drill of claim 14, wherein movement of the variable speed switch from the first position to the second position increases the power output of the motor.
16. The variable speed drill of claim 12, further comprising a mixing implement rotationally coupled to the motor.
17. A variable speed drill comprising:
a housing;
a motor within the housing having a maximum speed less than 550 rpm;
a variable speed switch mounted to the housing and operable to vary a power output of the motor.
18. The variable speed drill of claim 17, wherein the housing defines a handle, and the variable speed switch is mounted to the handle.
19. The variable speed drill of claim 17, wherein the variable speed switch is operable in a first position and a second position.
20. The variable speed drill of claim 19, wherein movement of the variable speed switch from the first position to the second position increases the power output of the motor.
21. The variable speed drill of claim 17, further comprising a mixing implement rotationally coupled to the motor.
22. A variable speed drill comprising:
a housing;
a motor within the housing;
a gear reduction mechanism drivingly connected to said motor;
a chuck drivingly connected to said gear reduction mechanism, wherein said drill has a maximum torque level at the chuck greater than 580 in-lbs; and
a variable speed switch mounted to the housing and operable to vary a power output of the motor.
23. The variable speed drill of claim 22, wherein the housing defines a handle, and the variable speed switch is mounted to the handle.
24. The variable speed drill of claim 22, wherein the variable speed switch is operable in a first position and a second position.
25. The variable speed drill of claim 24, wherein movement of the variable speed switch from the first position to the second position increases the power output of the motor.
26. The variable speed drill of claim 22, further comprising a mixing implement rotationally coupled to the motor.
27. A variable speed drill comprising:
a housing;
a motor within the housing having a lamination length of at least 30 millimeters and a lamination diameter of at least 65 millimeters and having a motor current rating greater than 8 amps and having a motor power level greater than 600 Watts;
a gear reduction mechanism drivingly connected to said motor;
a chuck drivingly connected to said gear reduction mechanism, wherein said drill has a maximum torque level at the chuck greater than 580 in-lbs
a variable speed switch mounted to the housing and operable to vary a power output of the motor; and
a mixing implement rotationally coupled to the chuck.
28. The variable speed drill of claim 27, wherein said drill has a weight greater than 5.5 pounds.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to power tools and more particularly to a variable speed drill.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    In many workplaces or construction site environments, it is necessary to use various substances to perform a given task. Many of these substances, for example paints, coatings, mortars, cements, powders, etc., may require a certain amount of mixing before use. As the quantity of these substances can be relatively high in any given application, a need arose for an easy and efficient way to mix these substances.
  • [0003]
    To meet this need, various mixing implements or “paddles” have been introduced into the market. These paddles are designed to be coupled to traditional drills commonly found in many workplaces and construction sites. In this regard, operation of the drill in turn rotates the paddle which may then mix a given substance.
  • [0004]
    However, there are limitations in the art. For example, to successfully mix a thick substance such as cement or mortar, a power drill having a high torque must be employed. These drills do not have variable speed switches to regulate the rotational speed of the paddle, and therefore the drills must be turned on and off in order to reduce the rotational speed and hence splashing or over-mixing. This can be tiring to the user and is inefficient. Accordingly, the present invention seeks to improve the art with a variable speed drill for use in mixing applications.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    A variable speed drill includes a housing and a motor within the housing. The motor has a lamination length of at least 30 millimeters and a lamination diameter of at least 73 millimeters. A mixing implement is rotationally coupled to the motor. A variable speed switch is mounted to the housing and is operable to vary a rotational speed of the motor and therefore of the mixing implement.
  • [0006]
    Further areas of applicability of the present invention will become apparent from the detailed description provided hereinafter. It should be understood that the detailed description and specific examples, while indicating the preferred embodiment of the invention, are intended for purposes of illustration only and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0007]
    The present invention will become more fully understood from the detailed description and the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • [0008]
    FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a variable speed drill constructed according to the principles of the present invention having an exemplary mixing implement attached thereto;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 1A is a front perspective view of an alternate mixing implement used with the variable speed drill of the present invention;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 2A is a perspective view of a motor used with the variable speed drill of the present invention;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 2B is a side view of a motor used with the variable speed drill of the present invention;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 2C is a front view of a motor used with the variable speed drill of the present invention;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 3 is a schematic connection diagram of the variable speed drill of the present invention; and
  • [0014]
    FIG. 4 is a graph illustrating the function of the variable speed switch according to the principles of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0015]
    The following description of the preferred embodiment(s) is merely exemplary in nature and is in no way intended to limit the invention, its application, or uses.
  • [0016]
    With reference to FIG. 1, a variable speed drill constructed according to the principles of the present invention is generally indicated by reference numeral 10. The variable speed drill 10 generally includes a housing 12 that partially defines a handle 14. The housing 12 encases a motor 16 including an armature 16A and field winding 16B (FIGS. 2A-2C) that are operable to rotate a chuck 18. In the particular example provided, the motor 16 receives power from a power source (not shown) through a cord 19 coupled to the handle 14 of the variable speed drill 10.
  • [0017]
    The chuck 18 is adapted to receive an implement (e.g., a tool such as a drill bit, screwdriver head, etc.) therein. In the particular example provided, the chuck 18 receives a mixing implement or “paddle” 20. Rotation of the chuck 18 upon activation of the motor (FIG. 2) in turn rotates the paddle 20. The paddle 20 is adapted to be used in mixing a particular substance via rotation of the paddle 20. For example, paint, mortar, cement, or plasters may be mixed by the paddle 20. Moreover, various other paddle designs may be used to mix these substances. With brief reference to FIG. 1A, an alternate paddle 20′ is illustrated. The paddle 20′ is adapted to be coupled to the chuck 18 of the variable speed drill 10. The paddle 20′ is best used with powder materials and paints.
  • [0018]
    Returning to FIG. 1, the variable speed drill 10 is operated by activating a trigger 22. The trigger 22 is mounted within the handle portion 14 of the housing 12. The trigger 22 is coupled to the motor 16, shown in FIGS. 2A-2C, and when depressed activates the motor. The trigger 22 engages a variable speed switch 24 which is mounted within the handle portion 14 of the housing 12. The variable speed switch 24 is operable to variably control the power output of the motor 16 and accordingly operable to variably control the rotational speed of the chuck 18 and in turn the paddle 20.
  • [0019]
    With reference to FIGS. 2A-2C, the motor is an electric motor having an output shaft 26 extending from the armature 16A. The output shaft 26 is coupled to the chuck 18 (FIG. 1) through a gear reduction system, which will increase the torque at chuck 18. The motor 16 is preferably a “heavy-duty,” electric motor. In other words, the motor 16 has a high current rating, greater than 8 amps, preferably 9 amps, a high power level, greater than 600 Watts, preferably 640 Watts, and the motor has a large size with a field lamination diameter (D) (FIG. 2C) of at least 65 mm, preferably 73 mm, and a field and armature lamination stack length (L) (FIG. 2B) of at least 30 mm. A motor of the above size provides 10-12 in-lbs of torque, which is typically necessary for heavy-duty mixing, and with a gear reduction mechanism 30 having a gear reduction of approximately 1 to 40 is capable of providing a maximum torque at the chuck which is greater than 580 in-lbs, preferably 595 in-lbs. It should be appreciated, however, that various other sized motors may be employed with the present invention. The drill 10 has a larger, heavier construction than previous variable speed drills, including a weight greater than 5.5 pounds, preferably 7.5 pounds or greater 9
  • [0020]
    Turning now to FIG. 3, an electronic diagram of the variable speed switch 24 and the motor 16 is generally indicated by reference numeral 100. The electronic diagram 100 illustrates how the power from the cord 19 is transferred to the field windings 16B of the motor. In the example provided, the variable speed switch 24 includes a variable power module 102 located therein. The variable power module 102 is connected between a power source via the cord 19 and the motor 16.
  • [0021]
    During operation of the variable speed drill 10, power received from the cord 19 is communicated through the variable power module 102. By moving the switch 24 into various positions, the switch 24 in turn sets the variable power module 102 to provide variable power flow into the motor 16 to achieve variable speeds. Accordingly, the rotational output of the motor 16 and hence the rotational speed of the paddle 20 may then be governed by simply setting the position of the variable speed switch 24. The graph of FIG. 4 shows plot of trigger travel vs. output voltage and shows that the output voltage ranges between a low power position A and a “full power” position B with the trigger travel. The drill 10 preferably has a maximum speed less than 550 RPM. In the “low power” position, only a fraction of the power supplied from the cord 19 is transferred to the motor 16. In the “full power” position, full power is supplied from the cord 19 to the motor 16. It should be appreciated that any number of switch positions may be employed with the present invention to provide a range of rotational speeds to the paddle 20. Variable output power modules of this type are known.
  • [0022]
    By allowing a user to set the rotational speed of the paddle 20 via the variable speed switch 24, the variable speed drill 10 is ideal for mixing various substances. By providing various rotational speeds for the paddle 20, the mixing can be tailored to the substance to be mixed, thereby reducing the chance of splatter, over-mixing, or under-mixing. Variable speed drills having a smaller motor than the present invention have been known. However, these known variable speed drills have insufficient power to use for typical heavy-duty mixing applications. Previous heavy-duty drills that are used for heavy-duty mixing applications have to be repeatedly started and stopped until the material being mixed reaches a consistency that allows constant running of the motor. Thus, the use of a heavy-duty motor on a variable speed drill for heavy-duty mixing applications is believed to be a novel and non-obvious improvement in the art. Heretofore, variable speed drills having: (a) a motor field lamination diameter greater than 65 mm, (b) a motor current rating greater than 8 amps, (c) a motor power level greater than 600 Watts, (d) a maximum torque level at the chuck greater than 580 in-lbs, (e) a weight greater than 5.5 pounds or (f) a maximum speed less than 550 rpm, have not existed.
  • [0023]
    The description of the invention is merely exemplary in nature and, thus, variations that do not depart from the gist of the invention are intended to be within the scope of the invention. Such variations are not to be regarded as a departure from the spirit and scope of the invention.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2799485 *Jan 28, 1955Jul 16, 1957Isaac SilvermanDrill attachment for mixing paints and the like
US4422770 *Jan 20, 1982Dec 27, 1983Geible Harry FPaint stirrer
US5704711 *Jul 31, 1996Jan 6, 1998Simmons; Michael R.Portable mixing apparatus including a hand-held tool drive assembly
US6007277 *Feb 26, 1999Dec 28, 1999Orb Industries, Inc.Multiple bit power tool
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8267192Sep 18, 2012Black & Decker Inc.Ergonomic handle for power tool
US8800679Mar 12, 2013Aug 12, 2014Black & Decker Inc.Trigger profile for a power tool
US8800680Mar 12, 2013Aug 12, 2014Black & Decker Inc.Trigger profile for a power tool
US8988015Apr 7, 2011Mar 24, 2015Black & Decker Inc.Power tool having a non-linear trigger-speed profile
US20130258433 *Mar 28, 2013Oct 3, 2013Aml SystemsCutoff mechanism for an optical module and an optical module comprising such a mechanism
USD609544Feb 9, 2010Black & Decker, Inc.Drill driver
USD615837Dec 15, 2009May 18, 2010Black & Decker Inc.Power tool handle
USD617622Sep 30, 2009Jun 15, 2010Black & Decker Inc.Impact driver
USD626394Nov 2, 2010Black & Decker Inc.Drill
USD646947Oct 18, 2011Black & Decker Inc.Drill
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/213, 173/217
International ClassificationE21B17/22
Cooperative ClassificationB25F5/001, B23B45/02
European ClassificationB23B45/02, B25F5/00B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 6, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: BLACK & DECKER INC., DELAWARE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BODINE, THOMAS J.;JUSTIS, MICHAEL S.;REEL/FRAME:016140/0119;SIGNING DATES FROM 20041215 TO 20041221