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Publication numberUS20060100617 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/984,383
Publication dateMay 11, 2006
Filing dateNov 9, 2004
Priority dateNov 9, 2004
Also published asDE602005021814D1, EP1809196A2, EP1809196A4, EP1809196B1, WO2006052374A2, WO2006052374A3
Publication number10984383, 984383, US 2006/0100617 A1, US 2006/100617 A1, US 20060100617 A1, US 20060100617A1, US 2006100617 A1, US 2006100617A1, US-A1-20060100617, US-A1-2006100617, US2006/0100617A1, US2006/100617A1, US20060100617 A1, US20060100617A1, US2006100617 A1, US2006100617A1
InventorsMikhail Boukhny
Original AssigneeAlcon, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Capsularhexis device
US 20060100617 A1
Abstract
A flexible ring having a diameter suitable for an anterior chamber rhexis. Imbedded in the ring is a heating element or filament. Alternatively, the ring may contain a pair of adjacent, circular electrodes. The electrodes or heating filament are placed against the anterior capsule and electrical current is applied, causes localized heating around the electrodes or filament. The flexible nature of the ring and electrodes allow the ring to be folded so as to pass through a relatively small (<3 mm) incision, yet retain its full ring-shape once within the anterior chamber of the eye.
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Claims(7)
1. A capsularhexis device, comprising:
a) a handle;
b) a flexible ring having a posterior surface;
c) a shaft connecting the ring to the handle; and
e) a pair of electrode embedded in the ring at the posterior surface.
2. The device of claim 1 wherein the electrodes are concentric.
3. The device of claim 1 wherein the ring is made from a relatively flexible material.
4. The device of claim 3 wherein the ring can be inserted into an eye through an incision of less than 2 mm.
5. A capsularhexis device, comprising:
a) a handle;
b) a flexible ring having a posterior surface;
c) a shaft connecting the ring to the handle; and
e) a resistive wire embedded in the ring at the posterior surface.
6. The device of claim 5 wherein the ring is made from a relatively flexible material.
7. The device of claim 6 wherein the ring can be inserted into an eye through an incision of less than 2 mm.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to the field of cataract surgery and more particularly to an apparatus for performing a capsularhexis.

The human eye in its simplest terms functions to provide vision by transmitting light through a clear outer portion called the cornea, and focusing the image by way of the lens onto the retina. The quality of the focused image depends on many factors including the size and shape of the eye, and the transparency of the cornea and lens.

When age or disease causes the lens to become less transparent, vision deteriorates because of the diminished light that can be transmitted to the retina. This deficiency in the lens of the eye is medically known as a cataract. An accepted treatment for this condition is surgical removal of the lens and replacement of the lens function by an artificial intraocular lens (IOL).

In the United States, the majority of cataractous lenses are removed by a surgical technique called phacoemulsification. A typical surgical handpiece suitable for phacoemulsification procedures consists of an ultrasonically driven handpiece, an attached cutting tip, and irrigating sleeve and an electronic control console. The handpiece assembly is attached to the control console by an electric cable and flexible tubings. Through the electric cable, the console varies the power level transmitted by the handpiece to the attached cutting tip and the flexible tubings supply irrigation fluid to and draw aspiration fluid from the eye through the handpiece assembly.

The operative part of the handpiece is a centrally located, hollow resonating bar or horn directly attached to a set of piezoelectric crystals. The crystals supply the required ultrasonic vibration needed to drive both the horn and the attached cutting tip during phacoemulsification and are controlled by the console. The crystal/horn assembly is suspended within the hollow body or shell of the handpiece by flexible mountings. The handpiece body terminates in a reduced diameter portion or nosecone at the body's distal end. The nosecone is externally threaded to accept the irrigation sleeve. Likewise, the horn bore is internally threaded at its distal end to receive the external threads of the cutting tip. The irrigation sleeve also has an internally threaded bore that is screwed onto the external threads of the nosecone. The cutting tip is adjusted so that the tip projects only a predetermined amount past the open end of the irrigating sleeve.

Prior to removing the cataractous lens, an opening, or rhexis, must be made in the anterior capsule. During phacoemulsification, there is a great deal of tension on the cut edges of the anterior capsularhexis while the lens nucleus is emulsified. Accordingly, for this method, a tagless, continuous cut or tear rhexis is a critical step for safe and effective phacoemulsification. If the capsule is opened with numerous small capsular tears, the small tags which remain can lead to radial capsular tears which may extend posteriorly through the posterior capsule. Such a radial tear constitutes a complication since it destabilizes the lens for further cataract removal and safe intraocular lens placement within the lens capsule later in the operation. More importantly, once the posterior capsule is punctured, the vitreous gains access to the anterior chamber of the eye. If the vitreous enters the front of the eye through a hole in the posterior capsule, the vitreous must be removed by an additional procedure with special instruments. The loss of vitreous also is associated with an increased rate of subsequent retinal detachment and/or infection within the eye. Importantly, these complications are potentially blinding. Prior art devices and methods used to produce a continuous curvilinear capsular opening require extraordinary skill and technique by the surgeon performing the operation. This is due to the extreme difficulty in controlling the path of the device.

For example, the most typical method begins with a capsular incision made with a cystotome. This incision is then coaxed to form a circular or oval shape by pushing the leading edge of the freshly tearing capsule with the cystotome in a non-cutting fashion. Alternatively, the initial capsular incision is torn into a circular shape by grasping the leading edge with fine caliber forceps and advancing the cut in a very uncontrolled manner. This is a very challenging maneuver and, even in the most experienced hands, the tearing motion can lead to an undesirable tear of the capsule toward the back of the lens. Moreover, even if a tagless edge is ultimately produced, the size and/or position of the capsular opening may present a problem. A small capsular opening can impair the safe removal of the lens nucleus and cortex and prevent proper intraocular lens insertion into the lens capsule. The additional stresses necessary to accomplish the operation with a small or misplaced capsular opening put the eye at risk for zonular and capsular breakage. Both of these types of breakage will likely increase the length and complexity of the operation and can result in vitreous loss.

A continuous, properly positioned and circular opening is highly desirable because it results in: (1) a significant reduction in radial tears and tags within the anterior capsule, (2) capsule integrity necessary for proper centering of a lens prosthesis; (3) safe and effective hydrodissection; and (4) safe use of capsular procedures on patients having poorly visualized capsules and/or small pupil openings. In addition, the capsularhexis must be properly sized relative to the diameter of the IOL being implanted in order to reduce the chances of a secondary cataract, also called posterior capsule opacification (“PCO”) and for use with proposed accommodative IOLs designs. Therefore, a need continues to exist for a device that can safely and effectively perform an anterior chamber capsularhexis.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally includes a flexible ring having a diameter suitable for an anterior chamber rhexis. Imbedded in the ring is a heating element or filament. Alternatively, the ring may contain a pair of adjacent, circular electrodes. The electrodes or heating filament are placed against the anterior capsule and electrical current is applied, causes localized heating around the electrodes or filament. The flexible nature of the ring and electrodes allow the ring to be folded so as to pass through a relatively small (<3 millimeter (mm)) incision, yet retain its full ring-shape once within the anterior chamber of the eye.

Accordingly, one objective of the present invention is to provide a capsularhexis device.

Another objective of the present invention is to provide a capsularhexis device capable of being inserted through a small incision.

Another objective of the present invention is to provide a capsularhexis device having a pair of electrodes.

These and other advantages and objectives of the present invention will become apparent from the detailed description and claims that follow.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an enlarged, partial top plan view of the device of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view of a first embodiment of the device of the present invention taken at line 2-2 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a schematic illustration of the device of the present invention prior to insertion into an eye.

FIG. 4 is a schematic illustration of the device of the present invention inserted into an eye.

FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of the device of the present invention being removed from an eye.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of a second embodiment of the present invention similar to FIG. 2.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As seen in FIGS. 1 and 3-5, device 10 of the present invention generally include ring 12, handle 14 and shaft 16 connecting ring 12 with handle 14. Ring 12 may be made of any suitable flexible material such as an elastomer, acrylic or thermoplastic and may be any desired diameter, for example, between 3 mm and 6 mm. Embedded within ring 12 are two adjacent electrodes 18 and 20 made from a flexible wire or other conductive material. As seen in FIG. 2, concentric electrodes 18 and 20 are located at posterior surface 21 of ring 12, and may even project out a small distance from surface 21. Alternatively, ring 12 may contain single electrode or resistive wire 19, as shown in FIG. 6, embedded in ring 12 in a manner similar to electrodes 18 and 20. Electrodes 18 and 20, and resistive wire 19 are connected to a source of electrical current (not shown) through shaft 16 and handle 14. Shaft 16 and handle 14 may be made from an inexpensive material, such as a thermoplastic.

As best seen in FIGS. 3-5, prior to insertion into eye 22, ring 12 is expanded to its full diameter because of the flexible material used to form ring 12, such material also preferably have a shape memory. Ring 12 is easily collapsed (as seen in FIG. 5) so that it may be inserted into eye 22 through a small incision, for example, by use of intraocular lens insertion cartridge 24. Once within eye 22, ring 12 expands back to its full diameter. Following the formation of the capsularhexis, ring 12 may be withdrawn from eye 22 in a similar manner.

Once in the eye, as been seen in FIG. 4, ring 12 is pressed tightly against anterior capsule 26. Electrical current is supplied to electrodes 18 and 20, causing current to flow through capsule 26 between electrodes 18 and 20. This current flow causes localized heating of capsule 26 in the area between electrodes 18 and 20. Similar heating of capsule 26 is accomplished by applying electrical current to resistive wire 19. Such heating weakens capsule 26 and it may not be necessary to bum completely through capsule 26. Rather, this localized weaken area may define a boundary for the rhexis sufficient for the circular piece of capsule 26 to be removed using a conventional forceps, with little risk of radial tearing. Such heating also has a cauterizing effect on the rim of the rhexis, providing an additional resistance to radial tearing.

This description is given for purposes of illustration and explanation. It will be apparent to those skilled in the relevant art that changes and modifications may be made to the invention described above without departing from its scope or spirit.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8137344 *Dec 10, 2008Mar 20, 2012Alcon Research, Ltd.Flexible, automated capsulorhexis device
US8591577Dec 16, 2010Nov 26, 2013Bausch & Lomb IncorporatedCapsulotomy device and method using electromagnetic induction heating
US8702698May 13, 2009Apr 22, 2014Mynosys Cellular Devices, Inc.Ophthalmic surgical device for capsulotomy
US20110118734 *Nov 16, 2009May 19, 2011Alcon Research, Ltd.Capsularhexis device using pulsed electric fields
US20110282335 *May 11, 2010Nov 17, 2011Guangyao JiaCapsule Polishing Device and Method For Capsule Polishing
US20120078242 *Sep 29, 2010Mar 29, 2012Alcon Research, Ltd.Attenuated RF Power for Automated Capsulorhexis
US20130066283 *Oct 22, 2010Mar 14, 2013Nexisvision, Inc.Corneal Denervation for Treatment of Ocular Pain
US20130197548 *Jun 7, 2010Aug 1, 2013Mynosys Cellular Devices, Inc.Ophthalmic surgical device for accessing tissue and for performing a capsulotomy
WO2010044988A1 *Sep 22, 2009Apr 22, 2010Alcon Research, Ltd.Capsularhexis device with flexible heating element
WO2010068662A1Dec 9, 2009Jun 17, 2010Alcon Research, Ltd.Flexible, automated capsulorhexis device
WO2010080859A1 *Jan 7, 2010Jul 15, 2010Alcon Research, Ltd.Capsularhexis device with retractable bipolar electrodes
WO2010141179A1 *May 6, 2010Dec 9, 2010Alcon Research, Ltd.Capsulotomy repair device and method for capsulotomy repair
WO2010141181A1 *May 7, 2010Dec 9, 2010Alcon Research, Ltd.Capsularhexis device with flexible heating element having an angled transitional neck
WO2011059913A1Nov 8, 2010May 19, 2011Alcon Research, Ltd.Capsularhexis device using pulsed electric fields
WO2011135592A2 *Apr 29, 2011Nov 3, 2011Amol KaduSurgical apparatus
WO2012044615A1Sep 27, 2011Apr 5, 2012Alcon Research, Ltd.Attenuated rf power for automated capsulorhexis
WO2012082386A1 *Dec 1, 2011Jun 21, 2012Bausch & Lomb IncorporatedCapsulotomy apparatus using heat
WO2012082387A1 *Dec 1, 2011Jun 21, 2012Bausch & Lomb IncorporatedCapsulatomy device and method using electromagnetic induction heating
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/41
International ClassificationA61B18/18
Cooperative ClassificationA61B18/082, A61B18/14, A61F9/00754
European ClassificationA61F9/007R4
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 9, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: ALCON, INC., SWITZERLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BOUKHNY, MIKHAIL;REEL/FRAME:015979/0097
Effective date: 20041108