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Publication numberUS20060123726 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/009,428
Publication dateJun 15, 2006
Filing dateDec 10, 2004
Priority dateDec 10, 2004
Publication number009428, 11009428, US 2006/0123726 A1, US 2006/123726 A1, US 20060123726 A1, US 20060123726A1, US 2006123726 A1, US 2006123726A1, US-A1-20060123726, US-A1-2006123726, US2006/0123726A1, US2006/123726A1, US20060123726 A1, US20060123726A1, US2006123726 A1, US2006123726A1
InventorsMichael Azarin
Original AssigneeMichael Azarin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Channel anchor
US 20060123726 A1
Abstract
A channel anchor for embedding into masonry structures, the channel anchor having an anchor channel and a plurality of anchor shafts attached thereto, with the anchor shaft having a shaft-like structure with an elongated center shank having two ends, a head on one end and a base on the other end, and the anchor shaft being welded to the anchor channel by welding the base of the anchor shaft to the back of the anchor channel.
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Claims(25)
1. A channel anchor comprising:
a) an anchor channel having a generally C-shaped channel having a back, two side and two ends, wherein the back does not have any receiving openings resulting in a generally uniform uninterrupted structure; and
b) at least one anchor shaft welded to the anchor channel, wherein the anchor shaft is a shaft-like structure having an elongated center shank having two ends, a head on one end and a base on the other end, and the anchor shaft is welded to the anchor channel by welding the base of the anchor shaft to the back of the anchor channel.
2. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the center shank is an elongated shaft having a length measured axially between approximately 25 millimeters and 300 millimeters and a diameter of between 8 millimeters and 25 millimeters.
3. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 2, wherein the center shank has a length of between approximately 50 millimeters and 150 millimeters and a diameter of between approximately 8 millimeters and 18 millimeters.
4. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 2, wherein the center shank has a length of between approximately 50 millimeters and 100 millimeters and a diameter of between approximately 10 millimeters and 18 millimeters.
5. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the head is an enlarged portion of the center shank having a diameter greater than that of the center shank and a length between approximately 3 millimeters and 25 millimeters.
6. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 5, wherein the head has a length of between approximately 3 millimeters and 15 millimeters and a diameter of between 1.25 and 3 times the diameter of the center shank.
7. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 6, wherein the head has a length of between approximately 3 millimeters and 8 millimeters and a diameter of approximately 2 times the diameter of the center shank.
8. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 2, wherein the base is an enlarged portion of the center shank having a diameter greater than that of the center shank and a length between approximately 3 millimeters and 25 millimeters.
9. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 8, wherein the base has a length of between approximately 3 millimeters and 15 millimeters and a diameter of between 1.25 and 3 times the diameter of the center shank.
10. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 9, wherein the base has a length of between approximately 3 millimeters and 8 millimeters and a diameter of approximately 2 times the diameter of the center shank.
11. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the back of the anchor channel is a continuous and substantially flat surface and the base comprises two opposing flat surfaces, a thickness, and a perimeter, one of the opposing flat surfaces of the base is attached to the center shank and the other of the opposing flat surfaces of the base is placed against the back of the anchor channel, and a weldment is made about the perimeter of the base thus welding the base to the back.
12. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 11, wherein the anchor shaft is bonded perpendicular to the back of the anchor channel.
13. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the anchor channel has a hollow interior defining a longitudinal slot.
14. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 13, wherein the two ends form the longitudinal slot.
15. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the anchor channel and the anchor shaft are made from the same material.
16. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 12, wherein the anchor supports a force greater than 50 kN.
17. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the cross sectional area of the base is greater than the cross sectional area of the shank.
18. The channel anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the cross sectional area of the head is greater than the cross sectional area of the shank.
19. A method for manufacturing a channel anchor comprising the steps of:
a) providing an anchor channel having a substantially flat back and side arms extending generally normal to the top and then turning inward towards each other so as to form a longitudinal slot opposite the back;
b) providing a plurality of anchor shafts each having a head, a center shank and a mounting base, wherein the base comprises two opposing flat surfaces, a thickness, and a perimeter;
c) placing and positioning the anchor shafts on the anchor channel such that the mounting base contacts the back of the anchor channel approximately mid-width, whereby one of the opposing flat surfaces of the base is attached to the center shank and the other of the opposing flat surfaces is placed against the back of the anchor channel; and
d) welding the mounting base to the back of the anchor channel such that a weldment is made about the perimeter of the base thus welding the base to the back,
wherein the anchor channel is not interrupted or deformed substantially during the welding process and once the weldment has cooled and cured, the channel anchor is a unitary structure.
20. The method as claimed in claim 19, wherein the anchor channel has a continuous and substantially flat back and the anchor shaft is bonded to back.
21. The method as claimed in claim 20, wherein the anchor channel remains continuous during the welding of the base to the anchor channel.
22. An improved channel anchor comprising at least one anchor shaft and an anchor channel, the improvement comprising an anchor shaft having a shaft-like structure with an elongated center shank having two ends, a head on one end and a base on the other end, and the anchor shaft being welded to the anchor channel by welding the base of the anchor shaft to the back of the anchor channel, wherein the base comprises two opposing flat surfaces, a thickness, and a perimeter, and one of the opposing flat surfaces is attached to the center shank.
23. The improved channel anchor as claimed in claim 22, wherein the center shank is an elongated shaft having a length measured axially between approximately 25 millimeters and 300 millimeters and a diameter of between 6 millimeters and 25 millimeters.
24. The improved channel anchor as claimed in claim 23, wherein the head is an enlarged portion of the center shank having a diameter greater than that of the center shank and a length between approximately 3 millimeters and 25 millimeters.
25. The improved channel anchor as claimed in claim 24, wherein the base is an enlarged portion of the center shank having a diameter greater than that of the center shank and a length between approximately 3 millimeters and 25 millimeters.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Technical Field

The present invention relates generally to construction materials and methods. More particularly, this invention relates to channel anchors for use in structural materials, including concrete, to secure objects or fixtures to each other or to structural supports or other structures. This invention further relates generally to a method for manufacturing such a channel anchor.

2. Prior Art

Concrete structures, such as prefabricated barriers or panels, are ubiquitous in the construction industry. As these structures are very heavy, such structures must be positioned through the use of heavy equipment such as a crane. In order to facilitate positioning, anchors, such as channel anchors, are installed in the concrete structures so as to provide a means to releasably attach or connect such structures to each other or to other structures. Typically, the anchors are embedded into the concrete structures at the time of pouring and curing of the concrete; however, the anchors also can be retrofitted into the concrete structures by epoxying the anchors into cutouts or slots in the concrete structures.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,729,951 to Frohlich discloses an anchor device for the construction industry that is in common use. The Frohlich '951 device has an anchor rail that is a C-shaped channel with a hollow interior. The anchor rail has legs connected to a back, with the legs having angled free ends pointing toward one another and delimiting therebetween a longitudinal slot. Anchors are connected to the anchor rail by inserting the anchors into conical openings in the anchor rail such that an end of the anchor extends into the hollow interior of the anchor rail, and then swaging the end of the anchor extending into the hollow interior of the anchor rail. The swaging causes plastic material deformation of the end of the anchor and often of the conical opening of the anchor rail. The swaged end of the anchor cooperates with the conical opening in the anchor rail to secure the anchor to the anchor rail.

Although the Frohlich '951 device is suitable for many applications, the use of a swaging attachment technique has drawbacks. First, the swaged end of the anchor defines a weak point in the anchor. The swaged portion of the anchor and the transition portion between the swaged portion and the anchor shaft (that is, the portions of the anchor that have undergone plastic deformation) often are weaker than the unswaged remainder of the anchor. Second, a portion of the conical opening often undergoes plastic deformation as well, and the portion of the anchor rail that has undergone plastic deformation also defines a weak point in the anchor rail. Likewise, the transition portion between the portion of the anchor rail that has undergone plastic deformation and the remainder of the anchor rail often is weaker than the remainder of the anchor rail. Third, the end of the anchor extending into the hollow interior of the anchor rail may not be swaged flush with the interior surface of the back of the anchor rail, possibly leaving bumps and valleys that can interfere with connectors inserted into the anchor rail. Fourth, improperly swaged anchors may be or become loose within the anchor rail. Fifth, the swaged joints or connections typically have a strength approximately 40% less than welded joints.

Accordingly, there is always need for an improved channel anchor for use in the construction industry. For example, there is a need for an improved channel anchor having fewer or no weak points, or with weak points that are relatively strong compared to prior art devices. Such a channel anchor also should have a relatively simple structure and be relatively inexpensive to manufacture. Further, such channel anchors should be able to be embedded securely into concrete structures such that the anchor may resist forces applied to the anchors during positioning. It is to these needs, among others, that the present invention is directed.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Briefly, the present invention is a channel anchor that may be embedded into masonry structures such as concrete panels and barriers. The channel anchor comprises an anchor channel (sometimes referred to as an anchor rail) and one or more anchor shafts attached thereto. The anchor channel is a generally C-shaped channel, preferably manufactured from a high strength material such as steel. Each anchor shaft comprises a shank having an enlarged head at one end and an enlarged base at the other, opposite end. The anchor shafts are welded to the back (the exterior surface of the back) of the anchor channel so that each anchor shaft extends perpendicularly from the back of the anchor channel.

The anchor channel is more or less typical of anchor channels with the important exception that the anchor channel does not have any receiving openings. Specifically, unlike the prior art, the back of the anchor channel does not have any receiving openings through which the anchors or any other devices may extend. Thus, the anchor channel is a generally uniform uninterrupted structure and therefore has a greater strength than a non-uniform interrupted structure. Preferably, the anchor channel is cold-rolled or formed from a piece of sheet material, such as sheet steel or other material.

The anchor shafts are shaft-like structures having an elongated center shank having two ends, a head on one end and a base on the other end. Preferably, the anchor is manufactured from a single piece of material, with the head and base bring formed from the ends of the center shank. Alternatively, the head and base can be separate structures welded or otherwise attached to the ends of a rod-like center shank. However, it has been found that manufacturing the anchor from a single piece of material results in a stronger anchor than manufacturing an anchor from two or more separate pieces.

The center shank typically is a cylindrical rod with a circular cross section, but may be any elongated shaft with any cross section, such as triangular, square, pentagonal or any other polygonal or non-polygonal cross section. The center shank assists in anchoring the device within a concrete or other material structure, and typically has a length (measured axially) between approximately 25 millimeters inch and 300 millimeters. Preferably, the center shank has a length of between approximately 50 millimeters and 150 millimeters, with between approximately 50 millimeters and 100 millimeters being most preferred. Preferably, the center shank has a diameter of between 6 millimeters and 25 millimeters, with between approximately 6 millimeters and 18 millimeters being more preferred, and between approximately 10 millimeters and 18 millimeters being most preferred. The length and diameter of the center shank can be selected based on the application and one of ordinary skill in the art can select the length and diameter of the center shank without undue experimentation.

The head assists in anchoring the device within a concrete or other material structure, and typically is an enlarged portion of the center shank having a diameter (or the equivalent for non-circular cross section center shanks) greater than that of the center shank and a length (measured axially to the center shank) between approximately 3 millimeters and 25 millimeters. Preferably, the head has a length of between approximately 3 millimeters and 15 millimeters, with between approximately 3 millimeters and 8 millimeters being preferred, and a diameter of between 1.25 and 3 times the diameter of the center shank, with approximately 2 times the diameter of the center shank being preferred. The length and diameter of the head can be selected based on the application and one of ordinary skill in the art can select the length and diameter of the head without undue experimentation.

The base is used to secure the anchor to the anchor channel, and also typically is an enlarged portion of the center shank having a diameter (or the equivalent for non-circular cross section center shanks) greater than that of the center shank and a length (measured axially to the center shank) between approximately 3 millimeters and 25 millimeters. Preferably, the base has a length of between approximately 3 millimeters and 15 millimeters, with between approximately 3 millimeters and 8 millimeters being preferred, and a diameter of between 1.25 and 3 times the diameter of the center shank, with approximately 2 times the diameter of the center shank being preferred. The length and diameter of the base can be selected based on the application and one of ordinary skill in the art can select the length and diameter of the base without undue experimentation.

The anchor shafts are mounted on the anchor channel by welding so that the base acts as a mounting base and is welded to the back (the exterior surface of the back) of the anchor channel. The strength of the weldment bond between the anchor shaft and the anchor channel generally is greater that a swaged bond, and often is in the range of 100 kN or more. Further, the combination of a lack of receiving openings in the anchor channel and using welding to bond the anchor to the anchor channel results in a stronger device.

The anchor shafts can be mounted upon the anchor channel without substantially deforming the continuous back of the anchor channel. That is, the anchor shafts may be mounted upon the anchor channel such that the back interior surface of the back of the anchor channel is essentially and continuous flat. Preferably, the back interior surface of the back of the anchor channel remains a continuous flat surface and is not deformed during the bonding of the anchor shafts to the exterior surface of the back of the anchor channel. The essentially flat structure reduces the friction and catching that can occur when inserting a connecting device within the hollow interior of the anchor channel. Further, the essentially flat exterior surface maximizes the strength of the weldments between the anchor and the anchor channel and the overall strength of the channel anchor particularly along the anchor channel in the positions corresponding to the anchor shafts.

In use and application, the channel anchor may be embedded or cast into a masonry structure. In one embodiment, the anchor shafts of the channel anchor are placed into the wet material (that is, the uncured concrete or other masonry material, or other suitable materials such as epoxies, carbon fiber materials, graphite fiber materials, ceramics, and the like) such that a cast forms around the anchor shafts. In another embodiment, a hole or slot is drilled into the masonry structure (for ease of understanding, all structures for which the channel anchor can be used will be referred to as a masonry structure irrespective of the actual material of manufacture), a construction epoxy is filled therein, and the anchor shafts of the channel anchor are then inserted therein. In another embodiment, the channel anchor is positioned within a mold of a masonry structure and the masonry material is poured into the mold such that the mold is filled and the wet material forms a cast around the anchor shafts. After the material has set and cured, the anchor shafts are secured in place within the masonry structure.

Another aspect of the invention is a method for manufacturing the channel anchor. In one embodiment, this method for manufacturing the channel anchor comprises the steps of:

(1) providing an anchor channel having a substantially flat back and side arms extending generally normal to the top and then turning inward towards each other so as to form a longitudinal slot opposite the back;

(2) providing a plurality of anchor shafts each having a head and a mounting base;

(3) placing and positioning the anchor shafts on the anchor channel such that the mounting base contacts the back of the anchor channel approximately mid-width; and

(4) welding the mounting base to the back of the anchor channel. Preferably, the anchor channel is not interrupted or deformed substantially during the welding process. Once the welding has cooled and cured, the channel anchor is preferably unitary with the material fused into a single unit.

These features, and other features and advantages of the present invention, will become more apparent to those of ordinary skill in the relevant art when the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments is read in conjunction with the appended drawings in which like reference numerals represent like components throughout the several views.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the channel anchor of the present invention.

FIG. 2A is a cross section of one embodiment of an anchor channel compatible with the channel anchor of the present invention.

FIG. 2B is a cross section of another embodiment of an anchor channel compatible with the channel anchor of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a side view of one embodiment of the anchor shaft of the channel anchor shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a sectional side view of the channel anchor taken along the line 4′-4′ of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is top view of the channel anchor shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a cutaway side view showing the channel anchor embedded in a masonry structure.

FIG. 7 is a cutaway side view showing the channel anchor in a masonry structure held in place using an epoxy resin.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED

Illustrative embodiments of the present invention include a channel anchor that may be embedded into masonry structures and structures of other materials, such as but not limited to concrete and cement barriers, concrete and cement panels, and prefabricated panels and barriers. The channel anchor of the present invention is useful particularly with masonry structures that are positioned using mechanical means and with structures that attach to similar or to other structures. While the invention is described herein in conjunction with the preferred and illustrative embodiments, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to these embodiments.

Referring now to the figures in general, the figures illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention in the best mode known to the inventor at this time. Specifically, FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the channel anchor 10 of the present invention in finished form. FIG. 2A is a cross section of a preferred embodiment of an anchor channel 30 and FIG. 2B is a cross section of an alternative embodiment of an anchor channel 30 compatible with the channel anchor 10 of the present invention. FIG. 3 is a side view of one embodiment of the anchor shaft 20 of the present invention. FIG. 4 is a sectional side view of the channel anchor 10 showing the unitary structure of the anchor shaft 20 and the preferred weldment 50 design. FIG. 5 is top view of the channel anchor 10 illustrating the preferred location of the anchor shafts 20 on the anchor channel 30. FIG. 6 is a cutaway side view showing the channel anchor 10 embedded in a masonry structure 100. FIG. 7 is a cutaway side view showing the channel anchor 10 in a masonry structure 100 held in place using an epoxy resin 101.

Referring now to FIG. 1, an embodiment of a channel anchor 10 in accordance with this invention comprises an anchor channel 30 and a plurality of anchor shafts 20 attached thereto. The anchor channel 30 is a generally C-shaped channel, preferably manufactured from a high strength material such as steel. Each anchor shaft 20 comprises a shank 24 having enlarged head 22 at one end and an enlarged base 40 at the other, opposite end. The anchor shafts 20 are welded to back 32 (the exterior surface of the back) of the anchor channel 30 so that each anchor shaft 20 extends perpendicularly from the back 32 of the anchor channel 30. Preferably, the plurality of anchor shafts 20 are arranged in the center (mid-width) of the anchor channel 30 and are arranged equidistant from each of their respective ends 31 of the anchor channel 30. Opposite the side where the anchor shafts 20 are attached is a longitudinal channel 38 that may be anchored to another structure.

Referring now to FIGS. 2A and 2B, sectional side views of the anchor channel 30 show that anchor channel 30 is comprised of a back 32, side faces 34, and edges 42. The anchor channel 30 is more or less typical of known anchor channels with the important exception that the anchor channel 30 does not have any receiving openings. Specifically, unlike the prior art, the back 32 of the anchor channel does not have any receiving openings through which the anchors 20 or any other devices may extend. Thus, the anchor channel 30 is a generally uniform uninterrupted structure and therefore has a greater strength than a non-uniform interrupted structure. Preferably, the anchor channel 30 is cold-rolled or formed from a piece of sheet material, such as sheet steel or other material.

The shape of the anchor channel 30 defines a hollow interior or longitudinal channel 38 with edges 50. Essentially, the longitudinal channel 38 is formed by the ends 42 of the anchor channel 30 and provides a means for interconnecting the anchor channel 30 with a connector (not shown). In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2A, the ends 42 are angled inward towards the hollow interior of the anchor channel. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2B, the ends 42 are straight such that ends 42 extend towards each other.

Referring now to FIG. 3, a side view of one anchor shaft 20 shows that the anchor shaft 20 comprises a shank 24 having a first end connected to and integrally formed with a head 22 and a second end on the opposite end of the shank 24 and connected to and integrally formed with a mounting base 40. The anchor shafts 20 are shaft-like structures having an elongated center shank 24 having two ends, a head 22 on one end and a base 40 on the other end. Preferably, the anchor is manufactured from a single piece of material, with the head 22 and base 40 bring formed from the ends of the center shank 24. Alternatively, the head 22 and base 40 can be separate structures welded or otherwise attached to the ends of a rod-like center shank 24. However, it has been found that manufacturing the anchor 20 from a single piece of material results in a stronger anchor 20 than manufacturing an anchor 20 from two or more separate pieces.

The center shank 24 typically is a cylindrical rod with a circular cross section, but may be any elongated shaft with any cross section, such as triangular, square, pentagonal or any other polygonal or non-polygonal cross section. The center shank 24 assists in anchoring the device within a concrete or other material structure 100, and typically has a length (measured axially) between approximately 25 millimeters and 300 millimeters. Preferably, the center shank 24 has a length of between approximately 50 millimeters and 150 millimeters, with between approximately 50 millimeters and 100 millimeters being most preferred. Preferably, the center shank 24 has a diameter of between 6 millimeters and 25 millimeters, with between approximately 6 millimeters and 18 millimeters being more preferred, and between approximately 10 millimeters and 18 millimeters being most preferred. The length and diameter of the center shank 24 can be selected based on the application and one of ordinary skill in the art can select the length and diameter of the center shank 24 without undue experimentation.

The head 22 assists in anchoring the device 10 within a concrete or other material structure 100, and typically is an enlarged portion of the center shank 24 having a diameter (or the equivalent for non-circular cross section center shanks 24) greater than that of the center shank 24 and a length (measured axially to the center shank 24) between approximately 3 millimeters and 25 millimeters. Preferably, the head 22 has a length of between approximately 3 millimeters and 15 millimeters, with between approximately 3 millimeters and 8 millimeters being preferred, and a diameter of between 1.25 and 3 times the diameter of the center shank 24, with approximately 2 times the diameter of the center shank 24 being preferred. The length and diameter of the head 22 can be selected based on the application and one of ordinary skill in the art can select the length and diameter of the head 22 without undue experimentation.

The base 40 is used to secure the anchor shaft 20 to the anchor channel 30, and also typically is an enlarged portion of the center shank 24 similar to the head 22 and having a diameter (or the equivalent for non-circular cross section center shanks 24) greater than that of the center shank 24 and a length (measured axially to the center shank 24) between approximately 3 millimeters and 25 millimeters. Preferably, the base 40 has a length of between approximately 3 millimeters and 15 millimeters, with between approximately 3 millimeters and 8 millimeters being preferred, and a diameter of between 1.25 and 3 times the diameter of the center shank 24, with approximately 2 times the diameter of the center shank 24 being preferred. The length and diameter of the base 40 can be selected based on the application and one of ordinary skill in the art can select the length and diameter of the base 40 without undue experimentation.

The base 40 also can be analogized to a wafer, coin or disc shaped structure having two opposing flat surfaces, a thickness (the length disclosed above), and a perimeter. One of the opposing flat surfaces is attached to the center shank 24 (it preferably is an extension of the center shank 24) and the other of the opposing flat surfaces is placed against the back 32 of the anchor channel 30. The weldment 52 is made about the perimeter of the base 40 thus welding the base 40 to the back 32. As disclosed previously, the base 40 can be any shape such as a circle, oval, polygon or non-polygon, and the terms wafer, coin or disc are used only for illustration.

Referring now to FIG. 4, anchor shaft 20 is welded onto anchor channel 30 so that the mounting base 40 is welded to the back 32 of the anchor channel 30. The anchor shafts 20 are mounted on the anchor channel 30 by welding so that the base 40 acts as a mounting base and is welded to the back 32 (the exterior surface of the back) of the anchor channel 30. The strength of the weldment 50 bond between the anchor shaft 20 and the anchor channel 30 generally is greater that a swaged bond, and often is in the range of 100 kN or more. Further, the combination of a lack of receiving openings in the anchor channel 30 and using welding to bond the anchor shafts 20 to the anchor channel 30 results in a stronger device 10.

The anchor shafts 20 can be mounted upon the anchor channel 30 without substantially deforming the back 32. That is, the anchor shafts 20 may be mounted upon the anchor channel 30 such that the back 32 is essentially flat. Preferably, the back of the anchor channel 30 remains a continuous flat surface and is not deformed during the bonding of the anchor shafts 20 thereto. The essentially flat structure maximizes the strength of the bond between the anchor channel 30 and the anchor shafts 20. More importantly, the essentially flat back 32 maximizes the strength of the channel anchor 10 particularly along the anchor channel 30 in the positions corresponding to the anchor shafts 20.

As disclosed previously, the length of the base 40 can be chosen within certain economic parameters. Specifically, the length of the base 40 should be large enough such that the weldment 50 attaches the base 40, and thus the anchor shaft 20, to the anchor channel 30 with sufficient strength such that the anchor channel 30 will not separate from the anchor shafts 20 under the desired operating load. For lower load situations, the height of the base 40 can be smaller and for higher load situations, the height of the base 40 can be larger. It has been found that using a base 40 height of between approximately 3 millimeters and 8 millimeters and a base 40 diameter of approximately 25 millimeters and welding the base 40 to the anchor channel 30 in a common manner provides a weldments 42 strength of up to 100 kN or more, which is suitable for most common situations of connecting concrete structures.

Referring now to FIG. 5, a top view of the anchor shafts 20 mounted on an anchor channel 30 shows that head 22 extends radially outward about the edge of the shank 24. When the head 22 is embedded in the masonry structure 100, the head 22 can serve to distribute the weight and can create the resistance to the concrete 100 to prevent the channel anchor 10 from being pulled out. Hence, it is possible to create additional resistance by using a larger head 22. One of ordinary skill in the art may the dimensions of the head 22 for optimal resistance within the masonry structure 100 without undue experimentation.

FIG. 5 also shows preferred locations for the anchor shafts 20 on the anchor channel 30. Specifically, when using two anchor shafts 20 per anchor channel 30, the anchor shafts 20 preferably are mounted mid-width on the anchor channel between one-fifth and one-third the length of the anchor channel 30 in from the edges 31, and more preferably approximately one-fourth the length of the anchor channel 30 in from the edges 31.

Referring now to FIG. 6, the channel anchor 10 may be embedded into a masonry structure 100. In one embodiment, the anchor head 22 extends in a direction perpendicular to a pulling force applied to the anchor channel 30 so as to assist in preventing the channel anchor 10 from being pulled out of the surrounding material. In this embodiment, the anchor shafts 20 are embedded in a masonry structure 100 by casting masonry structure 100 around the anchor shafts 20. Preferably, the masonry structure 100 is molded such that the anchor shafts 20, including the head 22, are immobilized in the masonry structure 100. For example, the masonry material may be poured into a mold or frame so that the masonry material flows around the anchor shafts 20 and around the head 22 so as to the secure the anchor shafts 20 into the masonry structure 100. Hence, the anchor heads 22 provide effective resistance against pulling the channel anchor 10 from a masonry structure 100.

FIG. 6 also shows an alternative structure of the center shank 24. In this alternative structure, the outer surface of center shank 24 is patterned with protrusions 54 or dimples 56. The use of protrusions 54 or dimples 56 provides additional holding force for the anchor shafts 20 within the masonry structure 100. As an analogy, protrusions 54 or dimples 56 act much like the protrusions on reinforcing bar (rebar) used for concrete structures such as roads and buildings.

Referring now to FIG. 7, the channel anchor 10 is shown mounted in a slot 104 or other opening in a masonry structure 100. A slot 104 of a radius (or other shape depending on the shape of the anchor shaft 24 or the tool used to create the slot 104) larger than of the anchor shaft 20 and spaced according to the channel anchor 10 are drilled or otherwise formed into the masonry structure 100. After the debris and any extraneous material are removed, an injection gun may be used to inject a construction epoxy 101 into the slot 104. The anchor shafts 20 of the channel anchor 10 are inserted then into the slot 104 such that the back 32 rests against the masonry structure 100. The construction epoxy 101 surrounds anchor shafts 20 once the channel anchor 10 is in place. After the construction epoxy 101 has set and cured, the anchor shafts 20 are secured in place within the masonry structure 100. This method of installation provides a means for installing the channel anchor 10 into masonry structure 100 that has previously set.

Another aspect of the invention is a method for manufacturing the channel anchor. In one embodiment, a method for manufacturing the channel anchor 10 comprises the steps of:

(1) providing an anchor channel 30 having a substantially flat back 32 and side arms 42 extending generally normal to the back 32 and then turning inward towards each other so as to form a longitudinal slot 38 opposite the back 32;

(2) providing a plurality of anchor shafts 20 each having a head 22 and a mounting base 40;

(3) placing and positioning the anchor shafts 20 on the anchor channel 30 such that the mounting base 40 is up against the back 32 of the anchor channel 30; and

(4) welding the mounting base 40 to the back 32 of the anchor channel 30.

Preferably, the anchor channel 30 is not interrupted or deformed substantially during the welding process. Once the weldment 52 has cooled and cured, the channel anchor 10 is preferably unitary with the material fused into a single unit.

The channel anchor 10 may be manufactured from a suitable metal or other material. For example, the anchor shafts 20 may be machined, forged or cast from a steel bar stock. Likewise, the anchor channel 30 may be cold rolled from a steel bar stock. Another suitable metal is zinc-plated steel. As welding is the preferred method for joining the anchor shafts 20 and the anchor channel 30, it is preferred that the anchor shafts 20 and the anchor channel 30 be manufactured of the same metal. The quality of steel suitable with the channel anchor 10 may be selected according to the load bearing forces upon the channel anchor 10. One of ordinary skill in the art may select a suitable material without undue experimentation.

The dimensions of the channel anchor 10 may be dependent on the designed load requirements of a particular application. However, the dimensions may depend on factors such as size of the connectors, the size of the masonry structure 100, and the material selected for the channel anchor 10. One of ordinary skill in the art may select appropriate dimensions for the channel anchor 10 and components thereof.

As disclosed previously, in use and application, the channel anchor 10 may be embedded or cast into a masonry structure 100. In one embodiment, the anchor shafts 20 of the channel anchor are placed into the wet material (that is, the uncured concrete or other masonry material, or other suitable materials such as epoxies, carbon fiber materials, graphite fiber materials, ceramics, and the like) such that a cast forms around the anchor shafts 20. In another embodiment, a hole or slot 104 is drilled into the masonry structure 100 (as mentioned previously, for ease of understanding, all structures for which the channel anchor 10 can be used will be referred to as a masonry structure 100 irrespective of the actual material of manufacture), a construction epoxy 101 is filled therein, and the anchor shafts 20 of the channel anchor 10 are then inserted therein. In another embodiment, the channel anchor 10 is positioned within a mold of a masonry structure 100 and the masonry material is poured into the mold such that the mold is filled and the wet material forms a cast around the anchor shafts 20. After the material has set and cured, the anchor shafts 20 are secured in place within the masonry structure 100.

The channel anchor 10 may be used with or embedded in any masonry structure 100 including concrete structures. For example, such concrete structures may include prefabricated panels or barriers. Such masonry structures 100 include concrete barriers or concrete blocks. Further, the channel anchor 10 may be used with or embedded in prefabricated walls and construction panels. Masonry structures 100 suitable with this invention are obvious to those with ordinary skill in the art.

The above detailed description of the preferred embodiments, examples, and the appended figures are for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to limit the scope and spirit of the invention, and its equivalents, as defined by the appended claims. One skilled in the art will recognize that many variations can be made to the invention disclosed in this specification without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
EP2388381A2 *Apr 29, 2011Nov 23, 2011HILTI AktiengesellschaftMounting rail
WO2011144394A2 *Apr 13, 2011Nov 24, 2011Hilti AktiengesellschaftMounting bar
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/334
International ClassificationE04B5/18
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/4107
European ClassificationE04B1/41B