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Publication numberUS20060166734 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/335,049
Publication dateJul 27, 2006
Filing dateJan 19, 2006
Priority dateJan 20, 2005
Publication number11335049, 335049, US 2006/0166734 A1, US 2006/166734 A1, US 20060166734 A1, US 20060166734A1, US 2006166734 A1, US 2006166734A1, US-A1-20060166734, US-A1-2006166734, US2006/0166734A1, US2006/166734A1, US20060166734 A1, US20060166734A1, US2006166734 A1, US2006166734A1
InventorsTrent Gaites
Original AssigneeTrent Gaites
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Progressive jackpot system and method
US 20060166734 A1
Abstract
A progressive jackpot and promotion system and method related to playing golf. In general, a golfer has the option to pay an additional entry fee into a progressive jackpot. The fee is used to seed the jackpot, add to the jackpot, provide income to participating golf courses, provide charitable contributions and profit promoters of the system and method. In consideration of the entry fee, the golfer also receives discount vouchers to providers of goods and services as well as a discount to additional rounds of golf.
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Claims(30)
1. A method, comprising:
providing a round of golf to a golfer;
obtaining compensation for the round of golf; and
optionally obtaining additional compensation as an entry fee into a contest;
2. The method as claimed in claim 1 further comprising distributing promotions to the golfer.
3. The method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the promotion is a discount voucher for a round of golf.
4. The method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the promotion is a discount voucher for a nationally recognized provider of goods and services.
5. The method as claimed in claim 2 wherein the promotion is distributed over a network.
6. The method as claimed in claim 5 wherein the promotion is distributed via email.
7. The method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the entry fee is used to fund a progressive jack pot.
8. The method as claimed in claim 7 wherein the jack pot is won by at least one golfer who achieves an ace at a target hole on a golf course.
9. The method as claimed in claim 8 wherein the target hole is under surveillance for accuracy.
10. The method as claimed in claim 9 wherein the target hole and subsequent hole in ones are recorded.
11. The method as claimed in claim 10 wherein the recorded event is used as promotional material.
12. The method as claimed in claim 11 wherein the promotion is distributed over a network.
13. The method as claimed in claim 7 wherein a portion of the entry fee is used as seed money for the jack pot.
14. The method as claimed in claim 7 wherein a portion of the entry fee is used as income for the golf course.
15. The method as claimed in claim 7 wherein a portion of the entry fee is used for a charitable contribution.
16. The method as claimed in claim 15 wherein the golfer chooses the charity to which the portion of the entry fee is distributed.
17. The method as claimed in claim 7 wherein a portion of the entry fee is used as profit for the promoter.
18. The method as claimed in claim 9 wherein a portion of the entry fee is used to pay for surveillance equipment used to monitor the target hole.
19. A method for generating a prize related to a round of golf, comprising:
receiving a payment from a golfer;
applying at least a portion of the payment to fund a progressive jackpot;
allowing the golfer access to a golf course in which at least one hole in the golf course is under surveillance;
using the surveillance to determine whether the golfer has scored an ace on the hole; and
providing a prize to the golfer for scoring the ace.
20. The method as claimed in claim 19 further comprising entering demographic information regarding the golfer into a web interface.
21. The method as claimed in claim 19 further comprising permitting the golfer to download promotions related to the payment from the golfer for entering the progressive jackpot.
22. A method for a golf game of skill, comprising:
paying for a round of golf;
playing a round of golf;
during the round of golf, attempting to score an ace on a given hole in the round of golf; and
receiving a prize if the ace is attained on the given hole in the round of golf.
23. The method as claimed in claim 22 further comprising providing demographic information for entry into a web interface.
24. The method as claimed in claim 23 wherein the demographic information is used to generate promotions in consideration of entering the golf game of skill.
25. The method as claimed in claim 22 wherein a paying for a round of golf includes providing a payment portion in consideration of entry into a progressive jackpot.
26. The method as claimed in 25 wherein the prize is the progressive jackpot.
27. The method as claimed in claim 26 wherein the progressive jackpot increases in value from payments provided by additional golfers who did not score an ace on the given hole in the round of golf.
28. A golf system, comprising:
a golf course having a number of holes;
a surveillance device monitoring at least one of the number of holes;
a network;
an entry computer connected to the network for receiving information about a golfer who is to play a round of golf on the golf course; and
a promotions provider computer connected to the network for receiving the demographic information about the golfer from the network.
29. The system as claimed in claim 28 further comprising at least one additional computer for monitoring the status of a contest for scoring a hole in one on the golf course.
30. The system as claimed in claim 29 wherein the additional computer is for receiving promotions from the promotions provider computer via the network.
Description

Priority based on Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/645,187, filed on Jan. 20, 2005, and entitled, “Progressive Jackpot System and Method” is claimed.

BACKGROUND

I. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to the field of games of skill and more particularly to a system and method of a progressive jackpot and promotion related to playing golf.

II. Description of the Related Art

Currently there are approximately 20,000 golf courses in the United States. In addition, there are about 33.5 million casual golfers in the Untied States. On average the casual golfer plays about 20 rounds per year, which amounts to about 670 million rounds of golf played each year. Although on average, 33,500 rounds of golf are played on each course per year, each golf course attempts to remain competitive and find solutions on how to increase rounds of golf for their particular course.

SUMMARY

In general, the invention features a progressive jackpot and promotion system and method related to playing golf. In general, a golfer has the option to pay an additional entry fee into a progressive jackpot. The fee is used to seed the jackpot, add to the jackpot, provide income to participating golf courses, provide charitable contributions and profit promoters of the system and method. In consideration of the entry fee, the golfer also receives discount vouchers to providers of goods and services as well as a discount to additional rounds of golf.

In general, in one aspect, the invention features a method, including providing a round of golf to a golfer, obtaining compensation for the round of golf and optionally obtaining additional compensation as an entry fee into a contest;

In one implementation, the method further includes distributing promotions to the golfer.

In another implementation, the promotion is a discount voucher for a round of golf.

In another implementation, the promotion is a discount voucher for a nationally recognized provider of goods and services.

In another implementation, the promotion is distributed over a network.

In another implementation, the promotion is distributed via email.

In another implementation, the entry fee is used to fund a progressive jack pot.

In another implementation, the jack pot is won by at least one golfer who achieves an ace at a target hole on a golf course.

In another implementation, the target hole is under surveillance for accuracy.

In still another implementation, the target hole and any hole in one are recorded.

In another implementation, the recorded event is used as promotional material.

In yet another implementation, the promotion is distributed over a network.

In another implementation, a portion of the entry fee is used as seed money for the jack pot.

In another implementation, a portion of the entry fee is used as income for the golf course.

In another implementation, a portion of the entry fee is used for a charitable contribution.

In another implementation, the golfer chooses the charity to which the portion of the entry fee is distributed.

In another implementation, a portion of the entry fee is used as profit for the promoter.

In another implementation, a portion of the entry fee is used to pay for surveillance equipment used to monitor the target hole.

In another aspect, the invention features a method for generating a prize related to a round of golf, including receiving a payment from a golfer, applying at least a portion of the payment to fund a progressive jackpot allowing the golfer access to a golf course in which at least one hole in the golf course is under surveillance, using the surveillance to determine whether the golfer has scored an ace on the hole, and providing a prize to the golfer for scoring the ace.

In one implementation, the method further includes entering demographic information regarding the golfer into a web interface.

In another implementation, the method further includes permitting the golfer to download promotions related to the payment from the golfer for entering the progressive jackpot.

In another aspect, the invention features a method for a golf game of skill, including paying for a round of golf, playing a round of golf, during the round of golf, attempting to score an ace on a given hole in the round of golf and receiving a prize if the ace is attained on the given hole in the round of golf.

In one implementation, the method further includes providing demographic information for entry into a web interface.

In another implementation, the demographic information is used to generate promotions in consideration of entering the golf game of skill.

In another implementation, paying for a round of golf includes providing a payment portion in consideration of entry into a progressive jackpot.

In another implementation, the prize is the progressive jackpot.

In another implementation, the progressive j ackpot increases in value from payments provided by additional golfers who did not score an ace on the given hole in the round of golf.

In another aspect, the invention features a golf system, including a golf course having a number of holes, a surveillance device monitoring at least one of the number of holes, a network an entry computer connected to the network for receiving information about a golfer who is to play a round of golf on the golf course an entry computer connected to the network receiving information about a golfer who is to play a round of golf on the golf course and a promotions provider computer connected to the network for receiving the demographic information about the golfer from the network.

In one implementation, the system further includes at least one additional computer for monitoring the status of a contest for scoring a hole in one on the golf course.

In another implementation, the additional computer is for receiving promotions from the promotions provider computer via the network.

One advantage of the invention is that it provides incentives for golfers to play rounds of golf at participating golf courses.

Another advantage of the invention is that golfers achieve an incentive to play rounds of golf at a particular golf course.

Another advantage of the invention is that golf courses obtain additional income.

Another advantage of the invention is that golfers obtain the opportunity to win ajack pot while attaining other benefits.

Another advantage of the invention is that charitable contributions are made from contributions made to a progressive jackpot.

Other objects, advantages and capabilities of the invention will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings showing the preferred embodiment of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates a system level diagram of an embodiment of a progressive jackpot system;

FIG. 2 illustrates a block flow diagram of an embodiment of a composite ticket number code combining encoder subsystem;

FIG. 3 illustrates a block flow diagram of an embodiment of a composite ticket number code decoder system; and

FIG. 4 illustrates a flow diagram of an embodiment of a codeword sequence encryption algorithm.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In a typical embodiment, a golfer goes to a golf course and pays for a round of golf. In addition to the payment of a round of golf, the golfer is given the option to pay an additional fee as an entry fee, say ten dollars, in return for a voucher good for a ten dollar discount on the next round of golf. In another implementation, the golfer can also be given a discount for purchases made at the golf course's Pro Shop for that particular day. In this way, the golfer may shop at the shop with the discount when he or she may have not otherwise shopped at the shop without the discount. Furthermore, the voucher for ten dollars off the next round of golf may generate a round of golf that would not have otherwise been generated in the absence of the voucher.

In addition, the golfer can provide demographic information such as an address, email address and certain likes and dislikes. As such, the particular golfer can be mailed or emailed a series of coupons for legitimate discounts at nationally recognized providers or goods and services, such as restaurants, car dealerships, retail stores and the like. Such promotions can range from free appetizers at restaurants, discounts on tires, to free stays at quality hotels, and even large rebates on the purchase of cars. It is understood that there are virtually limitless promotions that can be transmitted to the golfer. Attractive point of sale materials identifying the particular course as the promotional retailer can also be provided.

In still another implementation, for each entry fee paid (e.g., the ten dollar example as above), a portion can be committed to a weekly pot in which every golfer who participates (by paying the additional fee) has a opportunity to win the pot. Every golfer who makes an ace (hole-in-one) during a round of golf can share equally in the proceeds of the pot. In a typical embodiment, a smaller fee is committed from the additional fee in order to provide seed money to the progressive jackpot. In general, surveillance cameras can be set up to monitor the target holes to ensure that an ace in deed has occurred. In this way, the need for constant human monitoring and independent witnesses is reduced or eliminated. Furthermore, the camera can be used to actually record hole-in-one events for use by the promoters as additional advertising media.

Several promotional methods can be implemented to advertise and promote the progressive jackpot. For example, an announcement letter can be sent to golf courses, in particular to the owners and managers of the course, nationwide in order to introduce and describe the promotional systems and methods as well as the progressive jackpot. The system and method can also be introduced and described at various trade shows and conventions such as the PGA Merchandise Show, which typically attracts owners, managers and pros from around the nation and perhaps the world. Furthermore a company newsletter can be distributed to all participants and possibly other prospective participants. In general, various print advertising, holiday cards and gifts as well as thank you cards can all be used to promote the system and method.

In another embodiment, the entry fee as described above can be further broken down into several components. For example, for the ten dollar entry fee example above, one dollar can be contributed for the purchase or lease of the surveillance equipment described above and three dollars can be committed to the progressive jackpot as described. In addition, as also described above, one dollar can be committed to seed money for the jackpot until the pot reaches a predetermined initial pot amount, say $10,000.00. As the number of weekly participants increase, the seed money can be reduced while maintaining the same initial predetermined pot amount. In this same example, $0.75 can be committed to the golfcourse as income and $0.25 can be committed to a golf related charity such as Junior Golf, the First Tee and the like. In one implementation, the participant can choose the organization to which his or her charity portion goes. In addition, each time an ace is achieved and the pot is distributed, $1000.00 can go to the golf course as additional income. Finally, one dollar can be committed to online expenses, advertising and other overhead expenses, leaving three dollars as profit for the promoter of the system and method.

It is generally appreciated that substantial steps in the method can be implemented online through a network such as the Internet. In general, as described above, the golfer can obtain promotions via email or even by download by a participating website. For example, when the golfer pays an entry fee, he or she obtains a password or other encrypted code to enter at a website for access to certain promotions. Furthermore, in another embodiment, the golfer can pay the entry fee through the network by any of a number of online payment methods such as Paypal or direct credit card sale. In this way, payment online can provide the golfer with the opportunity to enter all pertinent demographic information for use by the promoter.

Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the several figures, reference is made first to FIG. 1 that illustrates a system level diagram of an embodiment of a progressive j ackpot system 100. In general, the system 100 includes a golf course 110 having at least one hole 120 under surveillance, typically by electronic surveillance equipment 130. The system 100 further includes a network 140, which can have one or more computers connected to it. In general, the computers connected to the network can include any variety of servers and clients. For example, the golf course 110 can include a general server 150 connected to the network 140. The server 150 can manage any typical duties associated with the management of the golf course 110. In one embodiment, the server 150 can also be used to enter demographic information about a golfer 160. An agent of the golf course 110 can accept payment from the golfer 160 for however many rounds of golf that the golfer 160 is interested in playing. During the same payment transaction, the agent can further solicit payment from the golfer 160 for entry into a game of skill. In one implementation, the game of skill can be a progressive jackpot into which the additional payment paid by the golfer 160 can be added. By making such payment, the golfer 160 can take an opportunity to score an ace, typically in the hole 120 that is under surveillance. Therefore, when the golfer 160 remits payment and enters the golf course 110 as shown by arrow A, the golfer 160 has the opportunity to score an ace when he/she reaches the particular hole 120 under surveillance.

During the round of golf, if the golfer 160 does indeed score the ace on the hole 120, then the golfer 160 wins the proceeds of the jackpot. If the golfer 160 does not score the ace, then the jackpot continues to grow. In order to preserve accuracy and integrity of the contest, the hole 120 is under surveillance as described above. In a typical embodiment, the surveillance equipment 130 can be connected to the network 140 so that the data obtained from the surveillance equipment 130 can be accessed by several sources. Typically, the data is available to the server 150 and can be stored and authenticated as needed. In another embodiment, the surveillance equipment can include a dedicated connection to the server or other dedicated computer. It is understood that the surveillance equipment can gather and transmit data in a variety of ways including but not limited to streaming video. It is further understood that other systems and methods of surveillance can be implemented including, but not limited to human witnesses.

The system 100 can further include any number of additional computers connected to the network 140 for a variety of purposes. For example, as described above, when the golfer 160 enters into the progressive jackpot, the golfer 160 can automatically be entered into a number of participating promotions providers' databases in order to receive many types of promotions as described above. As such, by simply having access to several promotions, which can include discount coupons and the like, the golfer 160 may be very likely to enter the contest. In a typical embodiment, a promotions provider computer can be connected to the network 140 in order to have access to the demographic information entered into the server 150 when the entry fee into the progressive jackpot contest is paid. In one implementation, the provider computer 170 can also receive the data from the surveillance equipment 130 in order to have accurate recording of an ace (if scored) in order to optionally offer additional promotions upon scoring of the ace. The golfer 160 can also access his or her own computer 180, as shown generally by arrow B, in order to access promotions available from the provider computer 170 or simply to check the access of the contest on the server 150 or any other golfing information available on the network 140.

In a typical method implemented in the system 100 described above, a course owner can enter new players into a hole-in-one jackpot contest via a web interface located on the server 150. The jackpot players, such as the golfer 160, are able to printout and determine their coupon, rebate, other promotion, and jackpot status through a web interface displayed on the computer 180. Participating vendors are able to validate and authenticate coupons, typically through a web interface displayed on the computer 170 or through other methods such as phone validation.

In general, in a typical embodiment, scalability and fraud prevention mechanisms are implemented through all phases of the system 100 and methods implemented therein. For example, all web interfaces described herein are password protected, with typical case sensitive data is required. All servers and respective databases are protected, secured and backed up. Various redundancy features are implemented to allow for high volume and instantaneous scaling. Coupon number generation and feature scaling are robust to allow for user error during coupon validation as well as deliberate fraud attempts. For example, unlike telephone number sequences, typing an incorrect digit when validating a coupon does not tend to lead to a different coupon, In addition, attempting to generate a false coupon sequence is inherently thwarted.

In a typical embodiment, on the front end of the system 100, the consumer/player registration operation allows a user, typically the course owner/manager to enroll a new player as described above. This enrollment is typically achieved through the server 150. The system 100 can generally include a sub-system operation that provides printing and status information, which is generally provided through the golfer's computer 180, but more generally through a subset of the information available from the server 150. The system 100 further includes a promotion redemption operation, which can be a voice response system (in addition to the web-based system) used to perform validation and authentication. Therefore, it is generally appreciated that the system includes three main subsystems: one related to the course owner; another related to the golfer 160; and the third related to a third party promotions provider.

In general, the back end of the system 100 includes a robust database as discussed above. The database evolves and exists in an object stored format that includes, but is not limited to, object identification, object interaction, event definition, property discovery, object value history, object relationships, optimization through table reduction, index addition and the like.

As discussed above, the system 100 generally includes the ability to provide promotions as part of the jackpot incentive. As such, as mentioned above, the system 100 can include a number of fraud preventative subsystems as are now described. In one embodiment, the system 100 can include a ticket number coder and decoder subsystem, which includes a codeword encryption algorithm.

FIG. 2 illustrates a block flow diagram of an embodiment of a composite ticket number code combining encoder subsystem 200. The basic logic of the encoder subsystem structure is based on typical demographic information including, but not limited to, personal data such as phone number, name, social security number, birth date and the like. The information can also include ticket options information, which contains all options of the ticket information. The information can further include ticket information seed selection for first level ticket information protection.

In general, the validation process is the first step to the processing of the information. This step requires database comparison. Therefore, network-based processing is typically required. After this stage is completed, the ticket number is generated through a concatenated feedback codeword encoding process. In the first stage of each field, each field is encoded using a higher-order diversity block encryption code. The order of the code is based on the order generator polynomial with coefficients based on the roots selected from the Galois field of elements. The encoding process can be seen as a modified RSA type encryption algorithm with a dimension of diversity added to enhanced protection.

Referring again to FIG. 2, the ticket/coupon/promotion request is made 205. As described above, the information used for encoding can include personal input data 210, ticket options selection 215 and ticket information seed selection 220. Typically, the personal data input 210 is processed by data formulation and database processing 225, which outputs to an inner code encoder 1. The ticket options selection is processed by ticket option validation and processing 230 and output to inner code encoder 2. The ticket information seed selection is typically processed by ticket seed randomization and output to inner code encoder 3. Data is output from the inner code encoders into a diversity codeword combiner 255 that is further output to an outer code encryption processor 260, which ultimately ends in an encoded codeword output 270.

FIG. 3 illustrates a block flow diagram of an embodiment of a composite ticket number code decoder system 300. The diversity codeword combiner receives the multiple encoded elements from the inner code encoders and combines the codeword into one initial codeword. There are typically many options in formulating the protocol structure. This structure is based on the level of data accessibility and encoded requirements, which involve numerous factors including, but not limited to, ticket number length, database format, and how the ticket number is used. The final stage of the encoding process is the outer code encryption processor 305, which processes the final stage of encryption. This step enables the system 100 to formulate the ticket number based on an element by element encoding and encryption process independent of the simple ticket checking process. In a typical implementation, a simple ticket validation process based on a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) or check sum (CS) operation can be used. These processes enable tickets to be checked easily for their validity without having to decode the encrypted user information of ticket options information. In another implementation, multiple encoding may be needed for multiple layer encoding. In this implementation, iterative feedback encoding can be used.

Referring still to FIG. 3, the outer code decryption processor 305 provides output to inner code decoder 1, inner code decoder 2 and inner code decoder 3. Inner code decoder 1 provides output to data formulation and database processing 325. Inner code decoder 2 provides output to ticket option validation and processing 330. Inner code decoder 3 provides output to ticket seed randomization. These outputs are all provided to diversity codeword decoder 240 that provides output to final ticket information and validation post-processing 350, which ultimately provides a decoded ticket, personal output data and ticket options information 355.

In general, the dashed lines in FIGS. 2 and 3 illustrate the process stream of multiple encoding for multiple layer encoding.

FIG. 4 illustrates a flow diagram of an embodiment of a codeword sequence encryption algorithm 400. In general, the algorithm 400 is an example of multi-key encryption processing for streaming data encoding. At start 405, the algorithm chunks the message into a known number of fragments 410. The message is then decrypted with a private key of the source 415. A first decision is made determining whether or not the length of the fragment is less than the fixed length k 420. If yes, then the fragment is padded with the required number of bits to make the length equal to the length k 425. If the decision at 420 is no, then the message is encrypted using the public key of the destination 430. This step 430 is also accomplished after step 425. After step 430, a second decision is made determining whether or not there are any more fragments 435. If there are fragments, the process returns to step 420, until there are no more fragments and then the algorithm stops 440.

In general, it has been discussed above that telephony and more specifically interactive voice response (IVR) can be implemented in the system 100. IVR is generally a computerized system that allows a user to select an option from a voice menu and interface with a computer system. Generally, the system plays pre-recorded voice prompts to which the user presses or says a number on the telephone keypad to select an option. IVR can therefore be used during any of the promotion's processes as discussed above. In a typical embodiment, well-known IVR systems can be implemented. Due to support, feature scaling, consumer scaling, and other considerations, additional requirements and customization can be implemented as needed for the system 100. In other embodiments, other technologies can be implemented including, but not limited to voiceXML, which can be implemented with web-enabled applications.

The software techniques and methods discussed above can be implemented in digital electronic circuitry, or in computer hardware, firmware (as discussed), software, or in combinations of them. Apparatus may be implemented in a computer program product tangibly embodied in a machine-readable storage device for execution by a programmable processor; and methods may be performed by a programmable processor executing a program of instructions to perform functions by operating on input data and generating output. Further embodiments may advantageously be implemented in one or more computer programs that are executable on a programmable system including at least one programmable processor coupled to receive data and instructions from, and transmit data and instructions, to a data storage system, at least one input device, and at least one output device. Each computer program may be implemented in machine language or assembly language which can be assembled or translated, or a high level procedural or object-oriented programming language, which can be complied or interpreted. Suitable processors include, by way of example, both general and special purpose microprocessors. Generally, a processor receives instructions and data from read-only memory and or RAM. Storage devices suitable for tangibly embodying computer program instructions and data include all forms of non-volatile memory, including by way of example semiconductor memory devices, such as EPROM, EEPROM, and flash memory devices; magnetic disks such as internal hard disks and removable disks; magneto-optical disks; and CD-ROM disks. Any of the foregoing may be supplemented by, or incorporated in, specially designed application specific integrated circuits (ASICs).

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, various modifications may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof and it is desired, therefore, that only such limitations shall be placed thereon as are imposed by the prior art and which are set forth in the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7666090Jan 25, 2005Feb 23, 2010IgtMethod of leasing a gaming machine for a percentage of a net win amount
US7890365Jan 25, 2005Feb 15, 2011IgtMethod of leasing a gaming machine for a flat fee amount
US7908169Jan 25, 2005Mar 15, 2011IgtMethod of leasing a gaming machine for a percentage of a total coin-in amount
WO2008077186A1 *Dec 20, 2007Jul 3, 2008Marc AmourMethods and systems for sales promotion
WO2011038264A1 *Sep 24, 2010Mar 31, 2011Goodplay Media LlcSystems and methods for facilitating charitable donations
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/25, 463/42
International ClassificationA63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/3258, G07F17/38
European ClassificationG07F17/32K12, G07F17/38