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Publication numberUS20060178556 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/319,011
Publication dateAug 10, 2006
Filing dateDec 27, 2005
Priority dateJun 29, 2001
Also published asCN101340853A, CN101978928A, CN102028545A, DE102006059379A1, EP1965718A2, EP2735278A2, US20120190920, WO2007120353A2, WO2007120353A3
Publication number11319011, 319011, US 2006/0178556 A1, US 2006/178556 A1, US 20060178556 A1, US 20060178556A1, US 2006178556 A1, US 2006178556A1, US-A1-20060178556, US-A1-2006178556, US2006/0178556A1, US2006/178556A1, US20060178556 A1, US20060178556A1, US2006178556 A1, US2006178556A1
InventorsChristopher Hasser, Nitish Swarup, Thomas Cooper, S. Anderson
Original AssigneeIntuitive Surgical, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Articulate and swapable endoscope for a surgical robot
US 20060178556 A1
Abstract
The present invention is directed to an articulate minimally invasive surgical endoscope with a flexible wrist having at least one degree of freedom. When used with a surgical robot having a plurality of robot arms, the endoscope can be used with any of the plurality of arms thereby allowing the use a universal arm design. The endoscope in accordance to the present invention is made more intuitive a to a user by attaching a reference frame used for controlling the at least one degree of freedom motion to the flexible wrist for wrist motion associated with the at least one degree of freedom. The endoscope in accordance to the present invention attenuates undesirable motion at its back/proximal end by acquiring the image of the object in association with the at least one degree of freedom based on a reference frame rotating around a point of rotation located proximal to the flexible wrist.
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Claims(28)
1. A minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope coupled to a surgical robotic system having a plurality of arms, the endoscope comprising:
an elongate shaft having a working end, a proximal end, and a shaft axis between the working end and the proximal end;
a flexible wrist having a distal end and a proximal end, the proximal end of the wrist connected to the working end of the elongate shaft;
an endoscopic camera lens installed at the distal end of the wrist, the camera lens acquiring an image of an object; and
a plurality of actuation links connecting the wrist to the proximal end of the elongate shaft such that the links are actuatable to provide the wrist with at least one degree of freedom;
wherein a reference frame used for controlling the at least one degree of freedom motion is attached to the flexible wrist for wrist motion associated with the at least one degree of freedom.
2. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 1, wherein the at least one degree of freedom involving a pitching motion and a yawing motion of the wrist.
3. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 2, wherein a reference frame used for controlling other degrees of freedom associated with the endoscope is attached to the object.
4. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 1, wherein an image of the object acquired by the endoscope in association with the at least one degree of freedom is based on the reference frame rotating around a point of rotation located proximal to the flexible wrist.
5. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 4, where in the image of the object is an orbital view.
6. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 1, wherein the endoscope is releaseably coupled to any of the plurality of arms and is designed to be swapped between the plurality of arms such that one standard arm design is used for the surgical robotic system.
7. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 1, wherein the at-least one degree of freedom is position or velocity controlled.
8. A minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope coupled to a surgical robotic system having a plurality of arms, the endoscope comprising:
an elongate shaft having a working end, a proximal end, and a shaft axis between the working end and the proximal end;
a flexible wrist having a distal end and a proximal end, the proximal end of the wrist connected to the working end of the elongate shaft;
an endoscopic camera lens installed at the distal end of the wrist, the camera lens acquiring an image of an object; and
a plurality of actuation links connecting the wrist to the proximal end of the elongate shaft such that the links are actuatable to provide the wrist with at least one degree of freedom;
wherein an image of the object acquired by the endoscope in association with the at least one degree of freedom is based on a reference frame rotating around a point of rotation located proximal to the flexible wrist.
9. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 8, where the image of the object is an orbital view.
10. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 8, wherein the reference frame used for controlling the at least one degree of freedom motion is attached to the flexible wrist for wrist motion associated with the at least one degree of freedom.
11. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 10, wherein the at least one degree of freedom involving a pitching motion and a yawing motion of the wrist.
12. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 11, wherein a reference frame used for controlling other degrees of freedom associated with the endoscope is attached to the object.
13. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 8, wherein the endoscope is releaseably coupled to any of the plurality of arms and is designed to be swapped between the plurality of arms such that one standard arm design is used for the surgical robotic system.
14. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope of claim 8, wherein the at-least one degree of freedom is position or velocity controlled.
15. A method to provide more intuitiveness to a user for a minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope having a flexible wrist with at least one degree of motion comprising attaching a reference frame used for controlling the at least one degree of freedom motion to the flexible wrist for wrist motion associated with the at least one degree of freedom.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein the at least one degree of freedom involving a pitching motion and a yawing motion of the wrist.
17. The method of claim 16, wherein a reference frame used for controlling other degrees of freedom associated with the endoscope is attached to the object.
18. A method to attenuate motion of a proximal end of an articulate surgical endoscope having a flexible wrist at a distal end with at least one degree of motion when acquiring an image of an object in association with the at least one degree of freedom comprising:
acquiring the image of the object in association with the at least one degree of freedom based on a reference frame rotating around a point of rotation located proximal to the flexible wrist.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein the image of the object is an orbital view.
20. A master-slave robotic system comprising:
a master controller comprising:
a platform;
at least one master input device rotatable about three axes relative to the platform and translatable along three axes relative to the platform;
a linkage supporting the input device relative to the platform;
a sensor system coupled to the linkage to measure motion about a plurality of locations on the linkage;
a drive system drivingly engaging the driven joint; and
a processor coupling to the sensor system to the drive system so that the drive system actuates the linkage while the at least one master input device is repositioned; and
at least one slave linkage coupled to the master, the at least one slave linkage articulating with 6 degrees of freedom in response to the repositioning of the at least one master input device, the slave linkage comprising a minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope, the endoscope comprising:
an elongate shaft having a working end, a proximal end, and a shaft axis between the working end and the proximal end;
a flexible wrist having a distal end and a proximal end, the proximal end of the wrist connected to the working end of the elongate shaft;
an endoscopic camera lens installed at the distal end of the wrist, the camera lens acquiring an image of an object; and
a plurality of actuation links connecting the wrist to the proximal end of the elongate shaft such that the links are actuatable to provide the wrist with at least one degree of freedom;
wherein a reference frame used for controlling the at least one degree of freedom motion is attached to the flexible wrist for wrist motion associated with the at least one degree of freedom.
21. The master-slave robotic system of claim 20, wherein the at least one degree of freedom involving a pitching motion and a yawing motion of the wrist.
22. The master-slave robotic system of claim 21, wherein a reference frame used for controlling other degrees of freedom associated with the endoscope is attached to the object.
23. The master-slave robotic system of claim 20, wherein an image of the object acquired by the endoscope in association with the at least one degree of freedom is based on the reference frame rotating around a point of rotation located proximal to the flexible wrist.
24. The master-slave robotic system of claim 23, where in the image of the object is an orbital view.
25. The master-slave robotic system of claim 20, wherein the endoscope is releaseably coupled to any of the plurality of arms and is designed to be swapped between the plurality of arms such that one standard arm design is used for the surgical robotic system.
26. The master-slave robotic system of claim 20, wherein the at least one master input device is further used to control functions of the endoscopic camera lens including focus or aperture.
27. The master-slave robotic system of claim 20, wherein a master alignment compensation is carried out continuously and incrementally by adjusting the master transform to match the slave transform during a movement of the endoscopic camera lens to maintain master-slave intuitiveness.
28. The master-slave robotic system of claim 20, wherein the at-least one degree of freedom is position or velocity controlled.
Description
RELATED U.S. APPLICATION DATA

This application is a continuation-in-part of patent application with Ser. No. 11/071,480 filed Mar. 3, 2005 which is a continuation-in-part of patent application with Ser. No. 10/726,795 filed Dec. 2, 2003 which claims priority from provisional application No. 60/431,636 filed on Dec. 6, 2002. This application is also a continuation-in-part of patent application with Ser. No. 10/980,119 filed Nov. 1, 2004 which is a continuation of U.S. Pat. No. 6,817,974, issued on Nov. 16, 2004 which claims priority from provisional application No. 60/301,967 filed on Jun. 29, 2001 and provisional application No. 60/327,702, filed on Oct. 5, 2001. This application is related to the following patents and patent applications, the full disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference:

U.S. Pat. No. 6,699,235, entitled “Platform Link Wrist Mechanism”, issued on Mar. 2, 2004;

U.S. Pat. No. 6,786,896, entitled “Robotic Apparatus”, issued on Sep. 7, 2004;

U.S. Pat. No. 6,331,181, entitled “Surgical Robotic Tools, Data Architecture, and Use”, issued on Dec. 18, 2001;

U.S. Pat. No. 6,799,065, entitled “Image Shifting Apparatus and Method for a Telerobotic SystemA”, issued on Sep. 28, 2004;

U.S. Pat. No. 6,720,988, entitled “Stereo Imaging System and Method for Use in Telerobotic System”, issued on Apr. 13, 2004;

U.S. Pat. No. 6,714,839, entitled “Master Having Redundant Degrees of Freedom”, issued on Mar. 30, 2004;

U.S. Pat. No. 6,659,939, entitled “Cooperative Minimally Invasive Telesurgery System”, issued on Dec. 9, 2003;

U.S. Pat. No. 6,424,885, entitled “Camera Referenced Control in a Minimally Invasive Surgical Apparatus”, issued on Jul. 23, 2002;

U.S. Pat. No. 6,394,998, entitled “Surgical Tools for Use in Minimally Invasive Telesurgical Applications”, issued on May 28, 2002; and

U.S. Pat. No. 5,808,665, entitled “Endoscopic Surgical Instrument and Method for Use”, issued on Sep. 15, 1998; and

U.S. Pat. No. 6,522,906, entitled “Devices and Methods for Presenting and Regulating Auxiliary Information on An Image Display of a Telesurgical System to Assist an Operator in Performing a Surgical Procedure”, issued on Feb. 18, 2003.

U.S Pat. No. 6,364,888 entitled “Alignment of Master and Slave in a Minimally Invasive Surgical Apparatus”, issued on Apr. 2, 2002.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to endoscopes and, more particularly, to steerable/articulate and swappable endoscopes for performing robotic surgery.

Advances in minimally invasive surgical technology could dramatically increase the number of surgeries performed in a minimally invasive manner. Minimally invasive medical techniques are aimed at reducing the amount of extraneous tissue that is damaged during diagnostic or surgical procedures, thereby reducing patient recovery time, discomfort, and deleterious side effects. The average length of a hospital stay for a standard surgery may also be shortened significantly using minimally invasive surgical techniques. Thus, an increased adoption of minimally invasive techniques could save millions of hospital days, and millions of dollars annually in hospital residency costs alone. Patient recovery times, patient discomfort, surgical side effects, and time away from work may also be reduced with minimally invasive surgery.

The most common form of minimally invasive surgery may be endoscopy. Probably the most common form of endoscopy is laparoscopy, which is minimally invasive inspection and surgery inside the abdominal cavity. In standard laparoscopic surgery, a patient's abdomen is insufflated with gas, and cannula sleeves are passed through small (approximately ½ inch) incisions to provide entry ports for laparoscopic surgical instruments. The laparoscopic surgical instruments generally include a laparoscope (for viewing the surgical field) and working tools. The working tools are similar to those used in conventional (open) surgery, except that the working end or end effector of each tool is separated from its handle by an extension tube. As used herein, the term “end effector” means the actual working part of the surgical instrument and can include clamps, graspers, scissors, staplers, and needle holders, for example. To perform surgical procedures, the surgeon passes these working tools or instruments through the cannula sleeves to an internal surgical site and manipulates them from outside the abdomen. The surgeon monitors the procedure by means of a monitor that displays an image of the surgical site taken from the laparoscope. Similar endoscopic techniques are employed in, e.g., arthroscopy, retroperitoneoscopy, pelviscopy, nephroscopy, cystoscopy, cisternoscopy, sinoscopy, hysteroscopy, urethroscopy and the like.

There are many disadvantages relating to current minimally invasive surgical (MIS) technology. For example, existing MIS instruments deny the surgeon the flexibility of tool placement found in open surgery. Most current laparoscopic tools have rigid shafts, so that it can be difficult to approach the worksite through the small incision. Additionally, the length and construction of many endoscopic instruments reduces the surgeon's ability to feel forces exerted by tissues and organs on the end effector of the associated tool. The lack of dexterity and sensitivity of endoscopic tools is a major impediment to the expansion of minimally invasive surgery.

Minimally invasive telesurgical robotic systems are being developed to increase a surgeon's dexterity when working within an internal surgical site, as well as to allow a surgeon to operate on a patient from a remote location. In a telesurgery system, the surgeon is often provided with an image of the surgical site at a computer workstation. While viewing a three-dimensional image of the surgical site on a suitable viewer or display, the surgeon performs the surgical procedures on the patient by manipulating master input or control devices of the workstation. The master controls the motion of a servomechanically operated surgical instrument. During the surgical procedure, the telesurgical system can provide mechanical actuation and control of a variety of surgical instruments or tools having end effectors such as, e.g., tissue graspers, needle drivers, or the like, that perform various functions for the surgeon, e.g., holding or driving a needle, grasping a blood vessel, or dissecting tissue, or the like, in response to manipulation of the master control devices.

While minimally invasive surgical robotic systems such as the da Vinci® from Intuitive Surgical Inc. of Sunnyvale, Calif. can provide surgeons with much more articulation and much improved quality 2D and 3D video images during surgeries than conventional laparoscopy, currently such surgical robotic systems may be more limited in terms of flexibility in certain functions. In particular, due to their size and weight, a surgical robot architecture with a “dedicated” robot arm is required to hold the endoscope and its camera heard such as that described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,451,027. As a result, surgeons cannot exchange the endoscope between ports as typically occurred in conventional laparoscopy. Moreover, the size and weight of the endoscope causes difficulty in dismounting and manually maneuvering the endoscope especially to see difficult-to-reach or hidden areas. This loss of flexibility means that while minimally invasive surgical robotic systems excel in difficult reconstructive surgeries in confined areas such as the heart and pelvis, they become less applicable for procedures involving access to large anatomical areas (e.g., multiple quadrants of the abdomen) and/or access from different directions.

Furthermore, current robotic endoscopes are rigid, pointing either straight ahead (i.e., zero (0) degree angle) or at a thirty (30) degree angle from the long axis of the endoscope which allows the surgeon to more easily look down or up. Consequently, during many surgical procedures, the surgeon may require to switch back and forth numerous times between a straight ahead scope and a thirty-degree scope to obtain different perspectives inside the surgical site. Such scope switching increases the surgical procedure's duration, operational and logistic complexity, and even safety concerns. However, even with scope switching, the surgeon is still limited to only a few visual perspectives and therefore a smaller area of visibility. Additionally, the surgeon may yet be prevented from getting a desired view of the body tissues that are hidden around obstacles (e.g., during gynecological procedures) or between tissue that requires some tunneling (e.g., during atrial fibrillation or endoluminal diagnosis and treatment).

Thus, a need exists for a surgical robotic endoscope system and method that allows for simplification of future surgical robot architectures, provides more flexible port placement, provides a greater area of visibility, provide multiple visual perspectives without added operational and logistic complexity or safety concerns, and provides the most desirable view of hidden body tissues.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, the present invention provides an articulate and swappable surgical robotic endoscope system and method that allows for simplification of future surgical robot architectures, provides more flexible port placement, provides a greater area of visibility, provide multiple visual perspectives without added operational and logistic complexity or safety concerns, and provides the most desirable view of hidden body tissues.

The present invention meets the above need with a minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope comprising an elongate shaft, a flexible wrist, an endoscopic camera lens, and a plurality of actuaction links. The elongate shaft has a working end, a proximal end, and a shaft axis between the working end and the proximal end. The flexible wrist has a distal end and a proximal end. The proximal end of the wrist is connected to the working end of the elongate shaft. The endoscopic camera lens is installed at the distal end of the wrist. The plurality of actuation links are connected between the wrist and the proximal end of the elongate shaft such that the links are actuatable to provide the wrist with at least one degree of freedom (e.g., both wrist pitching and yawing motions) wherein a reference frame used for controlling the at least one degree of freedom motion is attached to the flexible wrist for wrist motion associated with the at least one degree of freedom to provide more intuitiveness to the user during the at least one degree of freedom motion. Conversely, the reference frame used for controlling other degrees of freedom (e.g., Cartesian space insertion/extraction motion and shaft rotation) associated with the endoscope is attached to the object. The minimally invasive articulate surgical endoscope is releaseably coupled to any of the plurality of arms and is designed to be swapped between the plurality of arms such that one standard arm design is used for the surgical robotic system.

When the articulate surgical endoscope is used to acquire an image (e.g., an orbital image) of an anatomy in association with the at least one degree of freedom, the reference frame for such image is one that rotates around a point of rotation located proximal to the flexible wrist to minimize undesirable motion at the proximal end of the endoscope. Such undesirable motion is further attenuated when the reference frame used for controlling the at least one degree of freedom is attached to the flexible wrist.

All the features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of its preferred embodiments whose description should be taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective of a surgical tool according to an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of a wrist according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is cross-sectional view of the wrist of FIG. 2 along II-III.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 4A and 4B are, respectively, a plan view and an elevation view of a distal portion of an example of a wrist similar to that of FIG. 4, showing details of the cable arrangement.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 9 is an elevational view of the wrist of FIG. 8 with a tool shaft and a gimbal plate.

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 11 is an elevational view of the wrist of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is an elevational view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 13 is a plan view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 15 is a partial sectional view of the wrist of FIG. 14 in bending.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 17 is a plan view of the wrist of FIG. 16.

FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 20 is a plan view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 21 is a perspective view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 22 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 23 and 24 are plan views of the disks in the wrist of FIG. 22.

FIG. 25 is a perspective view of an outer piece for the wrist of FIG. 22.

FIG. 26 is a cross-sectional view of the outer piece of FIG. 25.

FIG. 27 is a perspective view of a wrist according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 28 is an cross-sectional view of a wrist cover according to an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 29 is an cross-sectional view of a wrist cover according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 30 is a perspective view of a portion of a wrist cover according to another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 31 illustrates an embodiment of an articulate endoscope used in robotic minimally invasive surgery in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 32 illustrates catheter 321 releasably coupled to endoscope 310 by a series of releasably clips 320.

FIG. 33 illustrates catheter guide 331 releasably coupled to endoscope 310 by a series of releasably clips 320.

FIG. 34 is a video block diagram illustrating an embodiment of the video connections in accordance to the present invention.

FIG. 35 illustrates an embodiment of an articulate endoscope used in robotic minimally invasive surgery in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 36 is a simplistic exemplary illustration of intuitive versus counter-intuitive relative to different frames of reference for a robotic minimally invasive endoscope.

FIG. 37 illustrates the different potential points of rotation for endoscope 310″ in accordance to the present invention

FIG. 38 illustrates the two master input devices virtually combined to operate in a similar fashion to a bicycle handle bar

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As used herein, “end effector” refers to an actual working distal part that is manipulable by means of the wrist member for a medical function, e.g., for effecting a predetermined treatment of a target tissue. For instance, some end effectors have a single working member such as a scalpel, a blade, or an electrode. Other end effectors have a pair or plurality of working members such as forceps, graspers, scissors, or clip appliers, for example. In certain embodiments, the disks or vertebrae are configured to have openings which collectively define a longitudinal lumen or space along the wrist, providing a conduit for any one of a number of alternative elements or instrumentalities associated with the operation of an end effector. Examples include conductors for electrically activated end effectors (e.g., electrosurgical electrodes; transducers, sensors, and the like); conduits for fluids, gases or solids (e.g., for suction, insufflation, irrigation, treatment fluids, accessory introduction, biopsy extraction and the like); mechanical elements for actuating moving end effector members (e.g., cables, flexible elements or articulated elements for operating grips, forceps, scissors); wave guides; sonic conduction elements; fiberoptic elements; and the like. Such a longitudinal conduit may be provided with a liner, insulator or guide element such as a elastic polymer tube; spiral wire wound tube or the like.

As used herein, the terms “surgical instrument”, “instrument”, “surgical tool”, or “tool” refer to a member having a working end which carries one or more end effectors to be introduced into a surgical site in a cavity of a patient, and is actuatable from outside the cavity to manipulate the end effector(s) for effecting a desired treatment or medical function of a target tissue in the surgical site. The instrument or tool typically includes a shaft carrying the end effector(s) at a distal end, and is preferably servomechanically actuated by a telesurgical system for performing functions such as holding or driving a needle, grasping a blood vessel, and dissecting tissue.

The various embodiments of the flexible wrist described herein are intended to be relatively inexpensive to manufacture and be capable of use for cautery, although they are not limited to use for cautery. For MIS applications, the diameter of the insertable portion of the tool is small, typically about 12 mm or less, and preferably about 5 mm or less, so as to permit small incisions. It should be understood that while the examples described in detail illustrate this size range, the embodiments may be scaled to include larger or smaller instruments.

Some of the wrist embodiments employ a series of disks or similar elements that move in a snake-like manner when bent in pitch and yaw (e.g., FIGS. 14 and 22). The disks are annular disks and may have circular inner and outer diameters. Typically, those wrists each include a series of disks, for example, about thirteen disks, which may be about 0.005 inch to about 0.030 inch thick, etched stainless steel disks. Thinner disks maybe used in the middle, while thicker disks are desirable for the end regions for additional strength to absorb cable forces such as those that are applied at the cable U-turns around the end disk. The end disk may include a counter bore (e.g., about 0.015 inch deep) into which the center spring fits to transfer the load from the cables into compression of the center spring. The disks may be threaded onto an inner spring, which acts as a lumen for pulling cables for an end effector such as a gripper, a cautery connection, or a tether to hold a tip thereon. The inner spring also provides axial stiffness, so that the gripper or tether forces do not distort the wrist. In some embodiments, the disks include a pair of oppositely disposed inner tabs or tongues which are captured by the inner spring. The inner spring is at solid height (the wires of successive helix pitches lie in contact with one another when the spring is undeflected), except at places where the tabs of the disks are inserted to create gaps in the spring. The disks alternate in direction of the tabs to allow for alternating pitch and yaw rotation. A typical inner spring is made with a 0.01 inch diameter wire, and adjacent disks are spaced from one another by four spring coils. If the spring is made of edge wound flat wire (like a slinky), high axial force can be applied by the cables without causing neighboring coils to hop over each other.

In some embodiments, each disk has twelve evenly spaced holes for receiving actuation cables. Three cables are sufficient to bend the wrist in any desired direction, the tensions on the individual cables being coordinated to produce the desired bending motion. Due to the small wrist diameter and the moments exerted on the wrist by surgical forces, the stress in the three cables will be quite large. More than three cables are typically used to reduce the stress in each cable (including additional cables which are redundant for purposes of control). In some examples illustrated below, twelve or more cables are used (see discussion of FIG. 4 below). To drive the cables, a gimbal plate or rocking plate may be used. The gimbal plate utilizes two standard inputs to manipulate the cables to bend the wrist at arbitrary angles relative to the pitch and yaw axes.

Some wrists are formed from a tubular member that is sufficiently flexible to bend in pitch and yaw (e.g., FIGS. 2 and 4). An inner spring may be included. The tubular member may include cut-outs to reduce the structural stiffness to facilitate bending (e.g., FIGS. 5 and 19). One way to make the wrist is to insert wire and hypotube mandrels in the center hole and the actuation wire holes. A mold can be made, and the assembly can be overmolded with a two-part platinum cure silicone rubber cured in the oven (e.g., at about 165° C.). The mandrels are pulled out after molding to create channels to form the center lumen and peripheral lumens for the pulling cables. In this way, the wrist has no exposed metal parts. The rubber can withstand autoclave and can withstand the elongation during wrist bending, which is typically about 30% strain.

In specific embodiments, the tubular member includes a plurality of axial sliding members each having a lumen for receiving an actuation cable (e.g., FIG. 8). The tubular member may be formed by a plurality of axial springs having coils which overlap with the coils of adjacent springs to provide lumens for receiving the actuation cables (e.g., FIG. 10). The tubular member may be formed by a stack of wave springs (e.g., FIG. 12). The lumens in the tubular member may be formed by interiors of axial springs (e.g., FIG. 16). The exterior of the tubular member may be braided to provide torsional stiffness (e.g., FIG. 27).

A. Wrist Having Wires Supported by Wire Wrap

FIG. 1 shows a wrist 10 connected between a distal end effector 12 and a proximal tool shaft or main tube 14 for a surgical tool. The end effector 12 shown includes grips 16 mounted on a distal clevis 18, as best seen in FIG. 2. The distal clevis 18 includes side access slots 20 that house distal crimps 22 of a plurality of wires or cables 24 that connect proximally to hypotubes 26, which extend through a platform or guide 30 and the interior of the tool shaft 14. The guide 30 orients the hypotubes 26 and wire assembly, and is attached the tool shaft 14 of the instrument. The guide 30 also initiates the rolling motion of the wrist 10 as the tool shaft 14 is moved in roll. The side access slots 20 conveniently allow the crimps 22 to be pressed into place. Of course, other ways of attaching the wires 24 to the distal clevis 18, such as laser welding, may be employed in other embodiments.

FIGS. 2 and 3 show four wires 24, but a different number of wires may be used in another embodiment. The wires 24 may be made of nitinol or other suitable materials. The wires 24 create the joint of the wrist 10, and are rigidly attached between the distal clevis 18 and the hypotubes 26. A wire wrap 34 is wrapped around the wires 24 similar to a coil spring and extends between the distal clevis 18 and the hypotubes 26. The shrink tube 36 covers the wire wrap 34 and portions of the distal clevis 18 and the guide 30. The wire wrap 34 and shrink tube 36 keep the wires 24 at fixed distances from each other when the hypotubes 26 are pushed and pulled to cause the wrist 10 to move in pitch and yaw. They also provide torsional and general stiffness to the wrist 10 to allow it to move in roll with the tool shaft 14 and to resist external forces. The wire wrap and shrink tube can be configured in different ways in other embodiments (one preferred embodiment is shown in FIG. 27 and described in Section J below). For example, they can be converted into a five-lumen extrusion with the wires 24 as an internal part. The function of the wire wrap or an equivalent structure is to keep the wires 24 at a constant distance from the center line as the wrist 10 moves in roll, pitch, and/or yaw. The shrink tube can also provide electrical isolation.

B. Wrist Having Flexible Tube Bent by Actuation Cables

FIG. 4 shows a wrist 40 that includes a tube 42 having holes or lumens 43 distributed around the circumference to receive actuation cables or wires 44, which may be made of nitinol. The tube 42 is flexible to permit bending in pitch and yaw by pulling the cables 44. The wrist 40 preferably includes a rigid distal termination disk 41 (as shown in an alternative embodiment of FIG. 4B) or other reinforcement that is substantially more rigid than the flexible tube 42 to evenly distribute cable forces to the flexible tube 42. The hollow center of the tube 42 provides room for end effector cables such as gripping cables. There are typically at least four lumens. An inner spring 47 may be provided.

FIG. 4 shows twelve lumens for the specific embodiment to accommodate six cables 44 making U-turns 45 at the distal end of the tube 42. The high number of cables used allows the tube 42 to have a higher stiffness for the same cable pulling force to achieve the same bending in pitch and yaw. For example, the use of twelve cables instead of four cables means the tube 42 can be three times as stiff for the same cable pulling force. Alternatively, if the stiffness of the tube 42 remains the same, the use of twelve cables instead of four cables will reduce the cable pulling force required by a factor of three. Note that although the material properties and cable stress levels may permit the U-turns 45 to bear directly on the end of the tube 42, a reinforced distal termination plate 41 may be included to distribute cable forces more smoothly over the tube 42. The proximal ends of the cables 44 may be connected to an actuator mechanism, such as an assembly including a gimbal plate 46 that is disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/187,248, filed on Jun. 27, 2002, the full disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. This mechanism facilitates the actuation of a selected plurality of cables in a coordinated manner for control of a bendable or steerable member, such as controlling the flexible wrist bending angle and direction. The example of an actuator mechanism of application Ser. No. 10/187,248 can be adapted to actuate a large number of peripheral cables in a proportionate manner so as to provide a coordinated steering of a flexible member without requiring a comparably large number of linear actuators. Alternatively, a separately controlled linear actuation mechanism may be used to tension each cable or cable pairs looped over a pulley and moved with a rotary actuator, the steering being controlled by coordinating the linear actuators.

The tube 42 typically may be made of a plastic material or an elastomer with a sufficiently low modulus of elasticity to permit adequate bending in pitch and yaw, and may be manufactured by a multi-lumen extrusion to include the plurality of lumens, e.g., twelve lumens. It is desirable for the tube to have a high bending stiffness to limit undesirable deflections such as S-shape bending, but this increases the cable forces needed for desirable bending in pitch and yaw. As discussed below, one can use a larger number of cables than necessary to manipulate the wrist in pitch and yaw (i.e., more than three cables) in order to provide sufficiently high cable forces to overcome the high bending stiffness of the tube.

FIGS. 4A and 4B show schematically an example of two different cable arrangements in a wrist embodiment similar to that shown in FIG. 4. Note that for constant total cable cross-sectional area, including cables in pairs and including a greater number of proportionately smaller cables both permit the cables to terminate at a greater lateral offset relative to the wrist centerline. FIGS. 4A and 4B show a plan view and an elevational view respectively of a wrist embodiment, split by a dividing line such that the right side of each figure shows a wrist Example 1, and the left side of each figure shows a wrist Example 2. In each example the tube 42 has the same outside radius R and inside radius r defining the central lumen.

In Example 1, the number of cables 44 in the wrist 40.1 is equal to four (n=4) with each cable individually terminated by a distal anchor 44.5, set in a countersunk bore in the distal termination plate 41, each cable extending through a respective lateral cable lumen 43 in the distal termination plate 41 and the flexible tube 42. The anchor 44.5 may be a swaged bead or other conventional cable anchor.

In Example 2, the number of cables 44′ in the wrist 40.2 is equal to sixteen (n2=16), with the cables arranged as eight symmetrically spaced pairs of portions 44′, each pair terminated by a distal “U-turn” end loop 45 bearing on the distal termination plate 41′ between adjacent cable lumens 43′. The edges of the distal termination plate 41′ at the opening of lumens 43′ may be rounded to reduce stress concentration, and the loop 45 may be partially or entirely countersunk into the distal termination plate 41. The diameters of the sixteen cables 44′ are ½ the diameters of the four cables 44, so that the total cross-sectional cable area is the same in each example.

Comparing Examples 1 and 2, the employment of termination loop 45 eliminates the distal volume devoted to a cable anchor 44.5, and tends to permit the cable lumen 43′ to be closer to the radius R of the tube 42 than the cable lumen 43. In addition, the smaller diameter of each cable 44′ brings the cable centerline closer to the outer edge of the cable lumen 43′. Both of these properties permit the cables in Example 2 to act about a larger moment arm L2 relative to the center of tube 42 than the corresponding moment arm L1 of Example 1. This greater moment arm L2 permits lower cable stresses for the same overall bending moment on the tube 42 (permitting longer cable life or a broader range of optional cable materials), or alternatively, a larger bending moment for the same cable stresses (permitting greater wrist positioning stiffness). In addition, smaller diameter cables may be more flexible than comparatively thicker cables. Thus a preferred embodiment of the wrist 40 includes more that three cables, preferably at least 6 (e.g., three pairs of looped cables) and more preferably twelve or more.

Note that the anchor or termination point shown at the distal termination plate 41 is exemplary, and the cables may be terminated (by anchor or loop) to bear directly on the material of the tube 42 if the selected material properties are suitable for the applied stresses. Alternatively, the cables may extend distally beyond the tube 42 and/or the distal termination plate 41 to terminate by connection to a more distal end effector member (not shown), the cable tension being sufficiently biased to maintain the end effector member securely connected to the wrist 40 within the operational range of wrist motion.

One way to reduce the stiffness of the tube structurally is to provide cutouts, as shown in FIG. 5. The tube 50 includes a plurality of cutouts 52 on two sides and alternating in two orthogonal directions to facilitate bending in pitch and yaw, respectively. A plurality of lumens 54 are distributed around the circumference to accommodate actuation cables.

In another embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6, the tube 60 is formed as an outer boot wrapped around an interior spring 62 which is formed of a higher stiffness material than that for the tube 60. The tube 60 includes interior slots 64 to receive actuation cables. Providing a separately formed flexible tube can simplify assembly. Such a tube is easier to extrude, or otherwise form, than a tube with holes for passing through cables. The tube also lends itself to using actuation cables with preformed termination structures or anchors, since the cables can be put in place from the central lumen, and then the inner spring inserted inside the cables to maintain spacing and retention of the cables. In some cases, the tube 60 may be a single use component that is sterile but not necessarily autoclavable.

FIG. 7 shows a tube 70 having cutouts 72 which may be similar to the cutouts 52 in the tube 50 of FIG. 5. The tube 70 may be made of plastic or metal. An outer cover 74 is placed around the tube 50. The outer cover 74 may be a Kapton cover or the like, and is typically a high modulus material with wrinkles that fit into the cutouts 72.

C. Wrist Having Axial Tongue and Groove Sliding Members

FIGS. 8 and 9 show a wrist 80 having a plurality of flexible, axially sliding members 82 that are connected or interlocked to each other by an axial tongue and groove connection 84 to form a tubular wrist 80. Each sliding member 82 forms a longitudinal segment of the tube 80. The axial connection 84 allows the sliding members 82 to slide axially relative to each other, while maintaining the lateral position of each member relative to the wrist longitudinal centerline. Each sliding member 82 includes a hole or lumen 86 for receiving an actuation cable, which is terminated adjacent the distal end of the wrist 80. FIG. 9 illustrates bending of the wrist 80 under cable pulling forces of the cables 90 as facilitated by sliding motion of the sliding members 82. The cables 90 extend through the tool shaft 92 and are connected proximally to an actuation mechanism, such as a gimbal plate 94 for actuation. The sliding members 82 bend by different amounts due to the difference in the radii of curvature for the sliding members 82 during bending of the wrist 80. Alternatively, an embodiment of a wrist having axially sliding members may have integrated cables and sliding members, for example whereby the sliding members are integrally formed around the cables (e.g., by extrusion) as integrated sliding elements, or whereby an actuation mechanism couples to the proximal ends of the sliding members, the sliding members transmitting forces directly to the distal end of the wrist.

FIG. 13 shows a wrist 130 having a plurality of axial members 132 that are typically made of a flexible plastic material. The axial members 132 may be co-extruded over the cables 134, so that the cables can be metal and still be isolated. The axial members 132 may be connected to each other by an axial tongue and groove connection 136 to form a tubular wrist 130. The axial members 132 may be allowed to slide relative to each other during bending of the wrist 130 in pitch and yaw. The wrist 130 is similar to the wrist 80 of FIG. 8 but has a slightly different configuration and the components have different shapes.

D. Wrist Having Overlapping Axial Spring Members

FIGS. 10 and 11 show a wrist 100 formed by a plurality of axial springs 102 arranged around a circumference to form a tubular wrist 100. The springs 102 are coil springs wound in the same direction or, more likely, in opposite directions. A cable 104 extends through the overlap region of each pair of adjacent springs 102, as more clearly seen in FIG. 11. Due to the overlap, the solid height of the wrist 100 would be twice the solid height of an individual spring 102, if the wrist is fully compressed under cable tension. The springs 102 are typically preloaded in compression so that the cables are not slack and to increase wrist stability.

In one alternative, the springs are biased to a fully compressed solid height state by cable pre-tension when the wrist is neutral or in an unbent state. A controlled, coordinated decrease in cable tension or cable release on one side of the wrist permits one side to expand so that the springs on one side of the wrist 100 expand to form the outside radius of the bent wrist 100. The wrist is returned to the straight configuration upon reapplication of the outside cable pulling force.

In another alternative, the springs are biased to a partially compressed state by cable pre-tension when the wrist is neutral or in an unbent state. A controlled, coordinated increase in cable tension or cable pulling on one side of the wrist permits that side to contract so that the springs on one side of wrist 100 shorten to form the inside radius of the bent wrist 100. Optionally this can be combined with a release of tension on the outside radius, as in the first alternative above. The wrist is returned to the straight configuration upon restoration of the original cable pulling force.

E. Wrist Having Wave Spherical Mating Surfaces

FIG. 12 shows a wrist in the form of a wave spring 120 having a plurality of wave spring segments or components 122 which are stacked or wound to form a tubular, wave spring wrist 120. In one embodiment, the wave spring is formed and wound from a continuous piece of flat wire in a quasi-helical fashion, wherein the waveform is varied each cycle so that high points of one cycle contact the low points of the next. Such springs are commercially available, for instance, from the Smalley Spring Company. Holes are formed in the wave spring wrist 120 to receive actuation cables. Alternatively, a plurality of separate disk-like wave spring segments may be strung bead-fashion on the actuator cables (retained by the cables or bonded to one another).

The wave spring segments 122 as illustrated each have two opposite high points and two opposite low points which are spaced by 90 degrees. This configuration facilitates bending in pitch and yaw. Of course, the wave spring segments 122 may have other configurations such as a more dense wave pattern with additional high points and low points around the circumference of the wrist 120.

F. Wrist Having Disks with Spherical Mating Surfaces

FIG. 14 shows several segments or disks 142 of the wrist 140. An interior spring 144 is provided in the interior space of the disks 142, while a plurality of cables or wires 145 are used to bend the wrist 140 in pitch and yaw. The disks 142 are threaded or coupled onto the inner spring 144, which acts as a lumen for pulling cables for an end effector. The inner spring 144 provides axial stiffness, so that the forces applied through the pulling cables to the end effector do not distort the wrist 140. In alternative embodiments, stacked solid spacers can be used instead of the spring 144 to achieve this function. The disks 142 each include a curved outer mating surface 146 that mates with a curved inner mating surface 148 of the adjacent disk. FIG. 15 illustrates bending of the wrist 140 with associated relative rotation between the disks 142. The disks 142 may be made of plastic or ceramic, for example. The friction between the spherical mating surfaces 146, 148 preferably is not strong enough to interfere with the movement of the wrist 140. One way to alleviate this potential problem is to select an appropriate interior spring 144 that would bear some compressive loading and prevent excessive compressive loading on the disks 142 during actuation of the cables 145 to bend the wrist 140. The interior spring 144 may be made of silicone rubber or the like. An additional silicon member 150 may surround the actuation cables as well. In alternate embodiments, the separate disks 142 may be replaced by one continuous spiral strip.

In alternate embodiments, each cable in the wrist 160 may be housed in a spring wind 162 as illustrated in FIGS. 16 and 17. An interior spring 164 is also provided. The disks 170 can be made without the annular flange and holes to receive the cables (as in the disks 142 in FIGS. 14 and 15). The solid mandrel wires 172 inside of the spring winds 162 can be placed in position along the perimeters of the disks 170. A center wire mandrel 174 is provided in the middle for winding the interior spring 164. The assembly can be potted in silicone or the like, and then the mandrel wires 172, 174 can be removed. Some form of cover or the like can be used to prevent the silicone from sticking to the spherical mating surfaces of the disks 170. The small mandrel springs 172 will be wound to leave a small gap (instead of solid height) to provide room for shrinking as the wrist 160 bends. The silicone desirably is bonded sufficiently well to the disks 170 to provide torsional stiffness to the bonded assembly of the disks 170 and springs 172, 174. The insulative silicone material may serve as cautery insulation for a cautery tool that incorporates the wrist 160.

G. Wrist Having Disks Separated by Elastomer Members

FIG. 18 shows a wrist 180 having a plurality of disks 182 separated by elastomer members 184. The elastomer members 184 may be annular members, or may include a plurality of blocks distributed around the circumference of the disks 182. Similar to the wrist 140 of FIG. 14, an interior spring 186 is provided in the interior space of the disks 182 and the elastomer members 184, while a plurality of cables or wires 188 are used to bend the wrist 180 in pitch and yaw. The disks 182 are threaded or coupled onto the inner spring 184, which acts as a lumen for pulling cables for an end effector. The inner spring 184 provides axial stiffness, so that the forces applied through the pulling cables to the end effector do not distort the wrist 180. The configuration of this wrist 180 is more analogous to a human spine than the wrist 140. The elastomer members 184 resiliently deform to permit bending of the wrist 180 in pitch and yaw. The use of the elastomer members 184 eliminates the need for mating surfaces between the disks 182 and the associated frictional forces.

H. Wrist Having Alternating Ribs Supporting Disks for Pitch and Yaw Bending

FIG. 19 shows a wrist 190 including a plurality of disks 192 supported by alternating beams or ribs 194, 196 oriented in orthogonal directions to facilitate pitch and yaw bending of the wrist 190. The wrist 190 may be formed from a tube by removing cut-outs between adjacent disks 192 to leave alternating layers of generally orthogonal ribs 194, 196 between the adjacent disks 192. The disks 192 have holes 198 for actuation cables to pass therethrough. The disks 192 and ribs 194, 196 may be made of a variety of material such as steel, aluminum, nitinol, or plastic. In an alternate embodiment of the wrist 200 as illustrated in FIG. 20, the disks 202 include slots 204 instead of holes for receiving the cables. Such a tube is easier to extrude than a tube with holes for passing through cables. A spring 206 is wound over the disks 202 to support the cables.

In FIG. 21, the wrist 210 includes disks 212 supported by alternating beams or ribs 214, 216 having cuts or slits 217 on both sides of the ribs into the disks 212 to make the ribs 214, 216 longer than the spacing between the disks 212. This configuration may facilitate bending with a smaller radius of curvature than that of the wrist 190 in FIG. 19 for the same wrist length, or achieve the same radius of curvature using a shorter wrist. A bending angle of about 15 degrees between adjacent disks 212 is typical in these embodiments. The disks 212 have holes 218 for receiving actuation cables.

I. Wrist Employing Thin Disks Distributed Along Coil Spring

FIG. 22 shows a portion of a wrist 220 including a coil spring 222 with a plurality of thin disks 224 distributed along the length of the spring 222. Only two disks 224 are seen in the wrist portion of FIG. 22, including 224A and 224B which are oriented with tabs 226 that are orthogonal to each other, as illustrated in FIGS. 23 and 24. The spring 222 coils at solid height except for gaps which are provided for inserting the disks 224 therein. The spring 222 is connected to the disks 224 near the inner edge and the tabs 226 of the disks 224. The disks 224 may be formed by etching, and include holes 228 for receiving actuation cables. The tabs 226 act as the fulcrum to allow the spring 222 to bend at certain points during bending of the wrist 220 in pitch and yaw. The disks 224 may be relatively rigid in some embodiments, but may be flexible enough to bend and act as spring elements during bending of the wrist 220 in other embodiments. A silicone outer cover may be provided around the coil spring 222 and disks 224 as a dielectric insulator. In addition, the spring 222 and disks 224 assembly may be protected by an outer structure formed, for example, from outer pieces or armor pieces 250 FIGS. 25 and 26. Each armor piece 250 includes an outer mating surface 252 and an inner mating surface 254. The outer mating surface 252 of one armor piece 250 mates with the inner mating surface 254 of an adjacent armor piece 250. The armor pieces 250 are stacked along the length of the spring 222, and maintain contact as they rotate from the bending of the wrist 220.

J. Wrist Having Outer Braided Wires

The flexible wrist depends upon the stiffness of the various materials relative to the applied loads for accuracy. That is, the stiffer the materials used and/or the shorter the length of the wrist and/or the larger diameter the wrist has, the less sideways deflection there will be for the wrist under a given surgical force exerted. If the pulling cables have negligible compliance, the angle of the end of the wrist can be determined accurately, but there can be a wandering or sideways deflection under a force that is not counteracted by the cables. If the wrist is straight and such a force is exerted, for example, the wrist may take on an S-shape deflection. One way to counteract this is with suitable materials of sufficient stiffness and appropriate geometry for the wrist. Another way is to have half of the pulling cables terminate halfway along the length of the wrist and be pulled half as far as the remaining cables, as described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/187,248. Greater resistance to the S-shape deflection comes at the expense of the ability to withstand moments. Yet another way to avoid the S-shape deflection is to provide a braided cover on the outside of the wrist.

FIG. 27 shows a wrist 270 having a tube 272 that is wrapped in outer wires 274. The wires 274 are each wound to cover about 360 degree rotation between the ends of the tube 272. To increase the torsional stiffness of the wrist 270 and avoid S-shape deflection of the wrist 270, the outer wires 274 can be wound to form a braided covering over the tube 272. To form the braided covering, two sets of wires including a right-handed set and a left-handed set (i.e., one clockwise and one counter-clockwise) are interwoven. The weaving or plaiting prevents the clockwise and counterclockwise wires from moving radially relative to each other. The torsional stiffness is created, for example, because under twisting, one set of wires will want to grow in diameter while the other set shrinks. The braiding prevents one set from being different from the other, and the torsional deflection is resisted. It is desirable to make the lay length of the outer wires 274 equal to the length of the wrist 270 so that each individual wire of the braid does not have to increase in length as the wrist 270 bends in a circular arc, although the outer wires 274 will need to slide axially. The braid will resist S-shape deflection of the wrist 270 because it would require the outer wires 274 to increase in length. Moreover, the braid may also protect the wrist from being gouged or cut acting as armor. If the braided cover is non-conductive, it may be the outermost layer and act as an armor of the wrist 270. Increased torsional stiffness and avoidance of S-shape deflection of the wrist can also be accomplished by layered springs starting with a right hand wind that is covered by a left hand wind and then another right hand wind. The springs would not be interwoven.

K. Wrist Cover

The above discloses some armors or covers for the wrists. FIGS. 28 and 29 show additional examples of wrist covers. In FIG. 28, the wrist cover 280 is formed by a flat spiral of non-conductive material, such as plastic or ceramic. When the wrist is bent, the different coils of the spiral cover 280 slide over each other. FIG. 29 shows a wrist cover 290 that includes bent or curled edges 292 to ensure overlap between adjacent layers of the spiral. To provide torsional stiffness to the wrist, the wrist cover 300 may include ridges or grooves 302 oriented parallel to the axis of the wrist. The ridges 302 act as a spline from one spiral layer to the next, and constitute a torsional stabilizer for the wrist. Add discussion of nitinol laser cover configured like stents.

Thus, FIGS. 1-30 illustrate different embodiments of a surgical instrument with a flexible wrist. Although described with respect to certain exemplary embodiments, those embodiments are merely illustrative of the invention, and should not be taken as limiting the scope of the invention. Rather, principles of the invention can be applied to numerous specific systems and embodiments.

FIGS. 31-34 illustrate different embodiments of a surgical instrument (e.g., an endoscope and others) with a flexible wrist to facilitate the safe placement and provide visual verification of the ablation catheter or other devices in Cardiac Tissue Ablation (CTA) treatments. Some parts of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 31-34 are similar to their corresponding counterparts in FIGS. 1-30 and like elements are so indicated by primed reference numbers. Where such similarities exist, the structures/elements of the invention of FIGS. 31-34 that are similar and function in a similar fashion as those in FIGS. 1-30 will not be described in detail again. It should be clear that the present invention is not limited in application to CTA treatments but has other surgical applications as well. Moreover, while the present invention finds its best application in the area of minimally invasive robotic surgery, it should be clear that the present invention can also be used in any minimally invasive surgery without the aid of surgical robots.

L. Articulate/Steerable and Endoscope

Reference is now made to FIG. 31 which illustrates an embodiment of an endoscope 310 used in robotic minimally invasive surgery in accordance with the present invention. The endoscope 310 includes an elongate shaft 14′. A flexible wrist 10′ is located at the working end of shaft 14′. A housing 53′ allows surgical instrument 310 to releasably couple to a robotic arm (not shown) located at the opposite end of shaft 14′. An endoscopic camera lens is implemented at the distal end of flexible wrist 10′. A lumen (not shown) runs along the length of shaft 14′ which connects the distal end of flexible wrist 10′ with housing 53′. In a “fiber scope” embodiment, imaging sensor(s) of endoscope 310, such as Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), may be mounted inside housing 53′ with connected optical fibers running inside the lumen along the length of shaft 14′ and ending at substantially the distal end of flexible wrist 10′. The CCDs are then coupled to a camera control unit via connector 314 located at the end of housing 53′. In an alternate “chip-on-a-stick” embodiment, the imaging sensor(s) of endoscope 310 may be mounted at the distal end of flexible wrist 10′ with either hardwire or wireless electrical connections to a camera control unit coupled to connector 314 at the end of housing 53′. The imaging sensor(s) may be two-dimensional or three-dimensional.

Endoscope 310 has a cap 312 to cover and protect endoscope lens 314 at the tip of the distal end of flexible wrist 10′. Cap 312, which may be hemispherical, conical, etc., allows the instrument to deflect away tissue during maneuvering inside/near the surgery site. Cap 312, which may be made out of glass, clear plastic, etc., is transparent to allow endoscope 310 to clearly view and capture images. Under certain conditions that allow for clear viewing and image capturing, cap 312 may be translucent as well. In an alternate embodiment, cap 312 is inflatable (e.g., to three times its normal size) for improved/increased viewing capability of endoscope 310. An inflatable cap 312 may be made from flexible clear polyethylene from which angioplasty balloons are made out or a similar material. In so doing, the size of cap 312 and consequently the minimally invasive surgical port size into which endoscope 310 in inserted can be minimized. After inserting endoscope 310 into the surgical site, cap 312 can then be inflated to provide increased/improved viewing. Accordingly, cap 312 may be coupled to a fluid source (e.g., saline, air, or other gas sources) to provide the appropriate pressure for inflating cap 312 on demand.

Flexible wrist 10′ has at least one degree of freedom freedom to allow endoscope 310 to articulate and maneuver easily around internal body tissues, organs, etc. to reach a desired destination (e.g., epicardial or myocardial tissue). Flexible wrist 10′ may be any of the embodiments described relative to FIGS. 1-30 above. Housing 53′ also houses a drive mechanism for articulate the distal portion of flexible wrist 10′ (which houses the endoscope). The drive mechanism may be cable-drive, gear-drive, belt drive, or other types of mechanism. An exemplary drive mechanism and housing 53′ are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,394,998 which is incorporated by reference. That exemplary drive mechanism provides two degrees of freedom for flexible wrist 10′ and allows shaft 14′ to rotate around an axis along the length of the shaft. In a CTA procedure, the articulate endoscope 310 maneuvers and articulates around internal organs, tissues, etc. to acquire visual images of hard-to-see and/or hard-to-reach places. The acquired images are used to assist in the placement of the ablation catheter on the desired cardiac tissue. The articulate endoscope may be the only scope utilized or it may be used as a second or third scope to provide alternate views of the surgical site relative to the main image acquired from a main endoscope.

M. Articulating Endoscope with Releasably Attached Ablation Catheter/Device

As an extension of the above articulate endoscope, a catheter may be releasably coupled to the articulate endoscope to further assist in the placement of the ablation catheter on a desired cardiac tissue. FIG. 32 illustrates catheter 321 releasably coupled to endoscope 310 by a series of releasable clips 320. Other types of releasable couplings (mechanical or otherwise) can also be used and are well within the scope of this invention. As shown in FIG. 32, clips 320 allow ablation device/catheter 321 to be releasably attached to endoscope 310 such that ablation device/catheter 321 follows endoscope 310 when it is driven, maneuvered, and articulated around structures (e.g., pulmonary vessels, etc.) to reach a desired surgical destination in a CTA procedure. When articulate endoscope 310 and attached ablation device/catheter 321 reach the destination, catheter 321 is held/kept in place, for example by another instrument connected to a robot arm, while endoscope 310 is released from ablation device/catheter 321 and removed. In so doing, images taken by endoscope 310 of hard-to-see and/or hard-to-reach places during maneuvering can be utilized for guidance purposes. Moreover, the endoscope's articulation further facilitates the placement of ablation device/catheter 321 on hard-to-reach cardiac tissues.

In an alternate embodiment, instead of a device/catheter itself, catheter guide 331 may be releasably attached to endoscope 310. As illustrated in FIG. 33, catheter guide 331 is then similarly guided by articulate endoscope 310 to a final destination as discussed above. When articulate endoscope 310 and attached catheter guide 331 reach the destination, catheter guide 331 is held/kept in place, for example by another instrument connected to a robot arm, while endoscope 310 is released from catheter guide 331 and removed. An ablation catheter/device can then be slid into place using catheter guide 331 at its proximal end 332. In one embodiment, catheter guide 331 utilizes releaseably couplings like clips 320 to allow the catheter to be slid into place. In another embodiment, catheter guide 331 utilizes a lumen built in to endoscope 310 into which catheter guide 331 can slip and be guided to reach the target.

N. Articulating Instrument With Lumen To Guide Endoscope

In yet another embodiment, instead of having an articulate endoscope, an end effector is attached to the flexible wrist to provide the instrument with the desired articulation. This articulate instrument was described for example in relation to FIGS. 1-2 above. However, the articulate instrument further include a lumen (e.g., a cavity, a working channel, etc.) that runs along the shaft of the instrument into which an external endoscope can be inserted and guided toward the tip of the flexible wrist. This embodiment achieves substantially the same functions of the articulating endoscope with a releasably attached ablation catheter/device or with a releasably attached catheter guide as described above. The difference is that the ablation catheter/device is used to drive and maneuver with the endoscope being releasably attached to the ablation device through insertion into a built-in lumen. With the built-in lumen, the realeasable couplings (e.g., clips) are eliminated.

Reference is now made to FIG. 34 illustrating a video block diagram illustrating an embodiment of the video connections in accordance to the present invention. As illustrated in FIG. 34, camera control unit 342 controls the operation of articulate endoscope 310 such as zoom-in, zoom-out, resolution mode, image capturing, etc. Images captured by articulate endoscope 310 are provided to camera control unit 342 for processing before being fed to main display monitor 343 and/or auxiliary display monitor 344. Other available endoscopes 345 in the system, such as the main endoscope and others, are similarly controlled by their own camera control units 346. The acquired images are similarly fed to main display monitor 343 and/or auxiliary display monitor 344. Typically, main monitor 343 displays the images acquired from the main endoscope which may be three-dimensional. The images acquired from articulate endoscope 310 (or an endoscope inserted into the lumen of the articulate instrument) may be displayed on auxiliary display monitor 344. Alternately, the images acquired from articulate endoscope 310 (or an endoscope inserted into the lumen of the articulate instrument) can be displayed as auxiliary information on the main display monitor 343 (see a detail description in n U.S. Pat. No. 6,522,906 which is herein incorporated by reference).

The articulate instruments/endoscopes described above may be covered by an optional sterile sheath much like a condom to keep the articulate instrument/endoscope clean and sterile thereby obviating the need to make these instruments/endoscopes sterilizable following use in a surgical procedures. Such a sterile sheath needs to be translucent to allow the endoscope to clearly view and capture images. Accordingly, the sterile sheath may be made out of a latex-like material (e.g., Kraton®, polyurethane, etc.). In one embodiment, the sterile sheath and cap 312 may be made from the same material and joined together as one piece. Cap 312 can then be fastened to shaft 14′ by mechanical or other type of fasteners.

Hence, FIGS. 31-34 illustrate different embodiments of a surgical instrument (e.g., an endoscope and others) with a flexible wrist to facilitate the safe placement and provide visual verification of the ablation catheter or other devices in Cardiac Tissue Ablation (CTA) treatments. Although described with respect to certain exemplary embodiments, those embodiments are merely illustrative of the invention, and should not be taken as limiting the scope of the invention. Rather, principles of the invention can be applied to numerous specific systems and embodiments.

FIGS. 35-37 illustrate an articulate/steerable and swappable endoscope in accordance to the present invention. Some parts of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 35-37 are similar to their corresponding counterparts in FIGS. 1-34 as well as in other figures described in the incorporation by references and like elements are so indicated by double-primed reference numbers. Where such similarities exist, the structures/elements of the invention of FIGS. 35-37 that are similar and function in a similar fashion as those in FIGS. 1-34 will not be described in detail again.

O. Articulate/Steerable and Swappable Endoscope

Reference is now made to FIG. 35 which illustrates an embodiment of an articulate and swappable endoscope 310″ used in robotic minimally invasive surgery in accordance with the present invention. The endoscope 310″ includes an elongate shaft 14″. A flexible wrist 10″ is located at the working end of shaft 14′. A housing 53′allows surgical instrument 310 to releasably couple to a robotic arm (not shown), such as that described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,331,181 and 6,394,998, located at the opposite end of shaft 14″. Unlike the robotic arm described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,451,027 which is designed to hold a more heavy and bulky endoscope camera, the robotic arm described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,331,181 and 6,394,998, which are incorporated by reference in their entirety, is designed for lighter surgical instruments. To achieve interchangeability/swappability, a robotic arm design similar to that described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,331,181 and 6,394,998 is to be used for all the arms of the surgical robot. In other words, instead of using a robotic arm designed primarily to carry a surgical endoscope, a universal/standard robotic arm designed for a smaller load is used to carry all types of surgical instruments including a surgical endoscope. In so doing, a surgical endoscope can be mounted onto any of the plurality of surgical robotic arms of the surgical robot thereby allowing the surgical endoscope to be swapped between different surgical arms as required during a procedure. As a result, surgeons can now exchange the endoscope between ports as typically occurred in conventional laparoscopy. The exchange can easily be performed by releasing and detaching the endoscope from one arm and then attaching and locking the endoscope to a different arm which allows the endoscope to be inserted into a different surgical port in the patient's body. Additionally, the mechanical and architectural design of the robotic surgical system can be simplified because it is no longer necessary to accommodate different types of instrument arms.

To achieve this objective, the endoscope needs to be made smaller and lighter. In accordance to the present invention, an endoscopic camera lens is implemented at the distal end of flexible wrist 10″. A lumen (not shown) runs along the length of shaft 14″which connects the distal end of flexible wrist 10″ with housing 53″. In the preferred “chip-on-a-stick” embodiment, the imaging sensor(s) of endoscope 310″ may be mounted at the distal end of flexible wrist 10′ with either hardwire or wireless electrical connections to a camera control unit coupled to connector 314″ at the end of housing 53″. The imaging sensor(s) may be two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D). Some sophisticated signal processing technology can be used to derive a 3D image from a 2D imaging sensor(s). Some exemplary commercially available chip-on-a-stick endoscope solutions include Olympus America, Inc. of Melville, N.Y., Visionsense of Petach Tiqua, Israel, and others. Such a chip-on-a-stick embodiment may reduce the size of the endoscope to a fraction of its former size and reduce its weight by an order of magnitude. Accordingly, the size and weight of the endoscope no longer presents difficulty in mounting/dismounting as well as maneuvering the endoscope. In an alternate “fiber scope” embodiment, imaging sensor(s) of endoscope 310″, such as Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), may be mounted inside housing 53″ with connected optical fibers running inside the lumen along the length of shaft 14″ and ending at substantially the distal end of flexible wrist 10″.

Endoscope 310″ may have a cap 312″ to cover and protect endoscope lens 314″ at the tip of the distal end of flexible wrist 10″. Cap 312″, which may be hemispherical, conical, etc., allows the instrument to deflect away tissue during maneuvering inside/near the surgery site. Cap 312″, which may be made out of glass, clear plastic, etc., is transparent to allow endoscope 310″ to clearly view and capture images. Under certain conditions that allow for clear viewing and image capturing, cap 312″ may be translucent as well. In an alternate embodiment, cap 312″ is inflatable (e.g., to three times its normal size) for improved/increased viewing capability of endoscope 310″. An inflatable cap 312″ may be made from flexible clear polyethylene from which angioplasty balloons are made out or a similar material. In so doing, the size of cap 312″ and consequently the minimally invasive surgical port size into which endoscope 310″ is inserted can be minimized. After inserting endoscope 310″ into the surgical site, cap 312″ can then be inflated to provide increased/improved viewing. Accordingly, cap 312″ may be coupled to a fluid source (e.g., saline, air, or other gas sources) to provide the appropriate pressure for inflating cap 312″ on demand.

Flexible wrist 10″ provides additional degrees of freedom to allow endoscope 310 to articulate and maneuver easily around internal body tissues, organs, etc. to reach a desired destination (e.g., epicardial or myocardial tissue). Flexible wrist 10″ may be any of the embodiments described relative to FIGS. 1-30 above, or described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,817,974, other embodiments having a plurality of joints, etc. Housing 53″ also houses a drive mechanism for articulating the distal portion of flexible wrist 10″ (which houses the endoscope). The drive mechanism may be cable-drive, gear-drive, belt drive, or other types of mechanism. An exemplary drive mechanism and housing 53″ are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,394,998 which is incorporated by reference. That exemplary drive mechanism provides two degrees of freedom for flexible wrist 10″ (pitch and yaw) and allows shaft 14″ to rotate around an axis along the length of the shaft (roll). The pitch and yaw degrees of freedom, which are the bending of wrist 10″ just proximal to the tip of the endoscope lens about an imaginary horizontal axis and vertical axis, respectively) are in addition to an insertion/extraction motion (e.g., x, y, and z Cartesian motion) and instrument shaft rotation (e.g., roll motion). As such, endoscope 310″ is provided with the same degrees of freedom as other robotic surgical instruments (e.g., graspers, etc.) which pose the question of how to give surgeons intuitive methods to control the endoscope's additional degrees of freedom.

P. Camera-Reference Control Paradigm of Slave Instruments

It is desirable to provide surgeons with intuitive methods to control complex surgical robots. As a surgeon becomes engrossed in a delicate and complex surgical procedure, he needs not be aware of how a surgical robot performs its duties and perhaps sometimes forgets that he is using a robot to perform the surgical procedure due to the intuitiveness of the way the robot manipulates and performs its tasks as directed by the surgeon. As a simplistic exemplary illustration of intuitive versus counter-intuitive, consider FIG. 36 which illustrates that when the endoscope has a level gaze pointed straight ahead, there is no difference between world-reference (a.k.a. image-reference) control and camera-reference (e.g., the frame attached to the distal tip of the endoscope) control. However, when the camera rotates, for example, 90 degrees clockwise, basing the slave instrument movement in the camera reference frame makes a big difference in keeping the instrument motion intuitive to the surgeon because if the instrument is based in a world-reference, a left-right motion of the surgeon's hand would appear to cause an up-down motion of the surgical instrument. Accordingly, U.S. Pat. No. 6,364,888 (hereinafter the '888 Patent) and U.S. Pat. No. 6,424,885 (hereinafter the '885 patent), which are incorporated by reference in its entirety, describe controlling all slave instrument motions and orientations in the endoscope camera-reference frame to provide such intuitiveness. However, the endoscope described in the '888 patent and '885 patent does not have the pitch and yaw degrees of freedom as the endoscope in the present invention. Hence, the challenges and consequently paradigm associated with these degrees of freedom are unexpected.

The first of such paradigm is discussed next. When the endoscope in accordance to the present invention undergoes a pitching or yawing motion, if the image is viewed from the camera-reference frame, the view may be counterintuitive to a surgeon. This is because if the endoscope is pitched up, the view from the camera-reference frame appears to be a look-down rather than a look-up view that the surgeon intuitively expects. If the endoscope is pitched down, the view from the camera-reference frame appears to be a look-up rather than a look-down that the surgeons intuitively expects. Similarly, if the endoscope is yawed left, the view from the camera appears to be a look-right rather than a look-left that the surgeons intuitively expects. If the endoscope is yawed right, the view from the camera appears to be a look-left rather than a look-right that the surgeon intuitively expects. Such counter-intuitiveness is unexpected and requires a change of reference frame for the slave surgical instruments from a camera-reference frame to that of a world/image-reference for the endoscope's pitching and yawing motion to retain the intuitiveness desired in the present invention. The reference frame for the slave surgical instruments remains the camera-reference frame for all other endoscope's degrees of freedom (e.g., x, y, and z Cartesian insertion/extraction motion and instrument shaft roll motion) in the present invention. In other words, the reference frame for the additional degrees of freedom is decoupled from that for the traditional degrees of freedom associated with a surgical robotic endoscope. Nevertheless, it is to be appreciated that in accordance to the present invention, for some applications it may be advantageous to afford a choice between a camera-reference frame and an world-reference frame for controlling each and any of the six degrees of freedom of the articulating/steerable and swappable endoscope. In other words, any or all of the six degrees of freedom of the articulating/steerable and swappable endoscope can be controlled in either the camera reference frame or the world reference frame.

In a master-slave surgical robotic system such as the da Vinci® system, if any (or all) of the six degrees of freedom is controlled in the camera-reference frame, then the reference frame is changing along with the camera movement in terms of position and/or orientation. In other words, the master (i.e., surgeon's eye) relationship relative to the slave (e.g., endoscope camera) is changing due to the camera's movement which may adversely effect the intuitiveness of the surgeon's perception relative to his input unless such change is compensated. This compensation is performed by repositioning the master input device through control transformations. More specifically, the master/eye transform is adjusted to match the changing slave/camera transform. Preferably, such master alignment compensation is carried out continuously and incrementally (via incremental transforms) during camera control (i.e., in or near real-time) rather than making larger compensation following camera control (i.e., sequential) because the associated lag time is minimized. It is appreciated that such master alignment compensation is not required in non-flexible and non-steerable endoscopic systems or in the case in which all six degrees of freedom are controlled in the world-reference frame because the reference frame is constant in these cases.

A master input device such as that described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,714,839, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, can be maneuvered with at least six (6) degrees of freedom. If a separate master input device is used for a user's left and right hand as shown in FIG. 38, a total of at least twelve (12) degrees of freedom are available from virtually combining the two master input devices for controlling the endoscope camera's positions and orientations as well as functions such as focus, aperture, etc. FIG. 38 illustrates the two master input devices virtually combined to operate in a similar fashion to a bicycle handle bar. Since the camera can move along as well as rotate about the X, Y, and Z axes, six (6) degrees of freedom from the virtually combined master input devices are required to command these six positions and orientations using either velocity (a.k.a. rate) or position control. Additionally, three (3) degrees of freedom from the virtually combined master input devices are needed to implement/handle geometric constraints of the combined master input devices. Accordingly, at least three (3) spare degrees of freedom remain available to command other camera functions (e.g., focus, aperture, etc.). In a preferred embodiment, the three degrees of freedom use to command these other camera functions are: twisting the handle bar (i.e., two master input devices), bending the handle bar, and rolling each master input device in opposite directions.

It should be clear to person of ordinary skill in the art that any mathematical changes (e.g., reference frame position/orientation transformation) as well as control system changes (e.g., control algorithm) associated with such a frame of reference change can be derived and implemented in view of the relevant detailed descriptions of the '888 patent and '885 patent. Accordingly, for the sake of brevity and clarity no additional discussion on this is provided herein.

Q. Point of Rotation for Pitch and Yaw Motion

A second control paradigm involves the selection of a point of rotation for the articulating/steerable and swappable endoscope. The point of rotation is a point about which the reference frame of an endoscopic image view rotates. This point of rotation is selected to provide a sense of intuitiveness as well as the most optimal view of the surgical site for surgeons. For the articulating and swappable endoscope in accordance to the present invention, the additional pitch and yaw motions (whether individually or both simultaneously) of the camera lens in combination with a properly selected point of rotation can be used to maneuver the endoscope (possibly in combination with other degrees of freedom) to provide an orbital view of an anatomy (similar to the view observed by a satellite orbiting a planet) inside a surgical site relative to the camera-reference frame. It is noted that such a selection of a point of rotation is not required for traditional robotic surgical endoscopes (e.g., an endoscope without the pitch and yaw motions) and is therefore not anticipated. The point of rotation candidates include: an assumed center of the surgical site which may be a point within the maximum working range of an endoscope (e.g., approximately thirty-eight (38) mm from the distal tip of an Olympus endoscope), a point in the proximate area of flexible wrist 10″, the endoscope surgical site entry point, etc.

Reference is now made to FIG. 37 illustrating the different potential points of rotation for endoscope 310″ in accordance to the present invention. As shown in FIG. 37, endoscope 310″ has been inserted into port 371 at a surgical site around organ 372. Point 373 is the assumed center, point 374 is the point adjacent to or on flexible wrist 10″, and point 375 is the point at which endoscope 310″ enters the surgery site.

The assumed center point of rotation may be the most logical because most activities in a surgical site will likely occur in the proximate area surrounding the tip of the endoscope and given the six degrees of freedom of the articulating/steerable endoscope of the present invention together with zooming capability, minor adjustments can be made quickly to obtain the desired optimal view. However, there is a drawback in such selection involving the over-active motion associated with the proximal end (back end) of endoscope 310″ and more significantly the robot arm that the endoscope is releasably coupled to when a pitching and/or yawing motion of the camera lens is made. The over-active motion of the robot arm carrying endoscope 310″ may be undesirable as it may get in the way of other robot arms of the system all of which may be moving concurrently during a procedure resulting in an arm collision.

Moving the point of rotation to the endoscope surgical site entry point appears to attenuate robot arm motion because the distance between the point of rotation and the robot arm is greatly reduced (by reducing the amount of coupled rotation and translation motion) but also appears to produce less optimal viewing images of the surgical site due to physical and geometric constraints. In comparison, with the point of rotation being around the center of flexible wrist 10″, the distance between the point of rotation and the robot arm is reduced thereby the arm motion is also attenuated but with improved viewing images due to fewer physical and geometric constraints. Hence, a point about the center of flexible wrist 10″ is the preferred point of rotation for the articulating swappable endoscope of the present invention. An exemplary implementation of a point of rotation is provided in the '885 patent which describes the mapping of master control point to slave control point.

The above-described arrangements of apparatus and methods are merely illustrative of applications of the principles of this invention and many other embodiments and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the claims. The scope of the invention should, therefore, be determined not with reference to the above description, but instead should be determined with reference to the appended claims along with their full scope of equivalents.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification600/102
International ClassificationA61B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B2019/223, A61B1/0058, A61B1/0055, A61B2017/00243, A61B1/00142, A61B2019/2238, A61B2019/2223, A61B1/00149, A61B1/008, A61B19/2203, A61B1/018, A61B2017/00323, A61B2019/2234, A61B2019/2242, A61B2019/2211, A61B2017/003
European ClassificationA61B1/00P1, A61B19/22B, A61B1/008, A61B1/005B6
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