Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20060186150 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/356,201
Publication dateAug 24, 2006
Filing dateFeb 15, 2006
Priority dateFeb 24, 2005
Publication number11356201, 356201, US 2006/0186150 A1, US 2006/186150 A1, US 20060186150 A1, US 20060186150A1, US 2006186150 A1, US 2006186150A1, US-A1-20060186150, US-A1-2006186150, US2006/0186150A1, US2006/186150A1, US20060186150 A1, US20060186150A1, US2006186150 A1, US2006186150A1
InventorsKeith Willows, Antonio Del Rosario, June Angus
Original AssigneeWillows Keith S, Antonio Del Rosario, June Angus
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Item carrier
US 20060186150 A1
Abstract
An improved holder for the purpose of securing a personal portable electronic item or other personal item on a person, person's limb, waist or item to be worn. An embodiment of the invention comprises a base panel having a first end and a second end, a front surface and a back surface. The base panel comprising attachment means whereby the item carrier can be attached to a person or personal item. The item carrier further comprises a substantially stretchy ring, offset at a distance from, substantially central to, and substantially parallel to the front surface of the base panel. A plurality of containment walls extend from the periphery of the ring to the base panel defining a containment space for holding an item therein. Whereby the ring can be stretched to let the held item pass through so that it can be housed in the containment space between the ring and the base panel.
Images(24)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
1. An item carrier comprising:
a base panel having a first end and a second end, a front surface and a back surface;
said base panel comprising a strap at its first end extending substantially to its second end forming a loop for encircling a user's limb to attach the item carrier thereon;
a substantially stretchy ring, offset at a distance from, substantially central to, and substantially parallel to the front surface of the base panel;
a plurality of containment walls extending from the periphery of the ring to the base panel defining a containment space for holding an item therein;
whereby the substantially stretchy ring can stretch to let the held item pass through to be contained in the containment space between the ring and the base panel and further the ring can stretch to provide a first adjustment means so that the containment space fits a variety of different held item shapes and sizes snugly.
2. The item carrier of claim 1, wherein the containment space has secondary adjustment means so that the item carrier can even more readily adapt to fit a variety of different held item shapes and sizes.
3. The item carrier of claim 2, wherein the containment walls comprise said secondary adjustment means.
4. The item carrier of claim 2, wherein the elastic ring includes cinching means which comprises said secondary adjustment means.
5. The item carrier of claim 1, wherein the substantially stretchy ring is a somewhat short length of stretch cord attached to itself in a substantially annular fashion
6. The item carrier of claim 1, further comprising a substantially stretchy, protective hood
7. The item carrier of claim 6, wherein the hood and the item carrier have matable fastening means such that the hood is removable by disengaging the said matable fastening means and replaceable by engaging said matable fastening means.
8. An item carrier comprising:
a panel having a first end and a second end, a front surface and a back surface, the base panel further comprising a strap at its first end extending substantially to its second end forming a loop for encircling a user's limb to attach the item carrier thereon;
an elastic ring attached at its perimeter to the base panel such that it is offset at a distance from, substantially central to, and substantially parallel to the front surface of the base panel defining a containment space for holding an item therein;
whereby the ring can stretch to let the held item pass through to be contained in the containment space between the ring and the base panel and further the ring can stretch to provide a first adjustment means so that the containment space fits a variety of different held item shapes and sizes snugly.
9. The item carrier of claim 8, wherein the elastic ring is attached at its perimeter to the base panel with a plurality of containment walls.
10. The item carrier of claim 8, wherein the elastic ring is attached at its perimeter to the base panel with a plurality of containment strips.
11. The item carrier of claim 8, wherein the containment space has secondary adjustment means so that the item carrier can even more readily adapt to fit a variety of different held item shapes and sizes.
12. The item carrier of claim 8, wherein the containment walls comprise secondary adjustment means so that the item carrier can even more readily adapt to fit a variety of different held item shapes and sizes.
13. The item carrier of claim 10, wherein one or more containment strips comprise secondary adjustment means so that the item carrier can more readily adapt to fit a variety of different held item shapes and sizes.
14. The item carrier of claim 11, wherein the elastic ring includes cinching means which comprises said secondary adjustment means.
15. An item carrier comprising:
a base panel having a first end and a second end, a front surface and a back surface, the base panel further comprising securing means whereby the item carrier can be secured to an item to be worn;
a length of substantially stretchy cord fastened to itself such that it defines a ring, said ring being offset at a distance from, substantially central to, and substantially parallel to the front surface of the base panel;
a plurality of containment walls extending from the periphery of the ring to the base panel defining a containment space for holding an item therein;
whereby the substantially stretchy ring can stretch to let the held item pass through to be contained in the containment space between the ring and the base panel and further the ring can stretch to provide a first adjustment means so that the containment space fits a variety of different held item shapes and sizes snugly.
16. The item carrier of claim 15, wherein the containment walls comprise a plurality of containment strips.
17. The item carrier of claim 15, wherein the containment space has secondary adjustment means so that the item carrier can even more readily adapt to fit a variety of different held item shapes and sizes.
18. The item carrier of claim 17, wherein the containment walls comprise said secondary adjustment means.
19. The item carrier of claim 16, wherein the containment strips comprise secondary adjustment means so that the item carrier can even more readily adapt to fit a variety of different held item shapes and sizes.
20. The item carrier of claim 15, wherein the elastic ring includes cinching means which comprises secondary adjusting means so that the item carrier can even more readily adapt to fit a variety of different held item shapes and sizes.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE—RELATED PROVISIONAL PATENT APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of Provisional Patent Application, No. 60/656,530, filed on Feb. 24, 2005, Titled: “Item Carrier”—Applicants Keith S. Willows, June A. Angus of Seattle, Wash. and Antonio Del Rosario of Bellevue, Wash.

I. BACKGROUND

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to a system used to hold an electronic device or other portable object used by athletes in competition, recreation or anywhere an electronic device or other portable object is required or desired.

2. Background

Sport, travel and general merchandise stores commonly sell articles for holding music players, cell phones and other portable electronic or other personal items for use during a variety of activities to enable the user to keep one's personal items on one's person during various activities. Personal item carrying pockets, pouches and other carriers are used often during, activities from leisurely walking and everyday use to hiking and more endurance sports or activities such as running, in-line skating, etc. The pockets, pouches, etc. with integrated belt loops and straps, depending on their configuration, provide varying levels of comfort and convenience relative to the intended activity and unique/varying activity variables. During exercise, physical activity or other activities where a person is actively moving around or needs to hold an item for ready-access without being unduly encumbered there is a need for a carrier that holds an item such as a music play, cell phone, or other personal electronic device etc., securely and reliably for a number of shapes, sizes and configurations while allowing on-the-go ready-access to features on the carried item such as buttons, knobs, screens etc.

There has now been developed, and disclosed herein a new and carrier which has a number of advantages not possessed by the products of this type known to heretofore be available.

III. OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

The novel item holding system described and example of embodiments shown in figures included is believed to offer many benefits over existing carriers.

A confluence of geometry elements and materials provide for a versatile, readily accessible, more comfortably worn, lighter, manufacturable item holding system. Important to this design is its ease of manufacturing, versatility and access to the item to be carried. The item carrier can be constructed using inexpensive and easily obtained materials, assembled using conventional manufacturing equipment, produced easily and inexpensively as well as with light and comfortable readily available materials giving an aesthetically pleasing highly functional, versatile solution that fits a variety of shapes and sizes of items to be carried while allowing good access to various areas of the item to be carried.

IV. SUMMARY

In accordance with the present invention the following discloses an item carrying system for holding electronics, personal items and the like.

Disclosed is a preferable item carrier (with detachable protective hood and an integrated or associated adjustable limb, waist or the like strap or the like). The item carrier element of the invention is preferably incorporated into a band or the like also, but less preferable, it can be incorporated into a belt loop (or loops) or the like instead of directly affixed to a belt. This allows the item carrier system to be assembled to a belt so that the item carrier holding capability can be added to any belt or belt like system by the user at any time. Also less preferably, the item carrying system can be integrated with a clip or the like similar to those found on personal radios, mp3 carriers, cell phones and/or the like, in some cases, this could be preferable.

The item carrier holding element(s) can also less preferably be applied, affixed, attached, sewed, grommetted, attached with integrally molded/formed fastening receptacle(s)/stud(s), and/or otherwise affixed to other forms of clothing/gear such as shirts, singlets, shorts, waist packs/bags, water bottle packs, water bottle belt systems, hydration reservoir systems or other fanny packs, back packs or the like.

These item holding elements again less preferably can be incorporated into a number of items to be worn by a user either permanently affixed to that item or removably affixed via loops, snaps, tabs and snaps, studs, or the like, but one of the benefits of the disclosed invention is its ability to hold an electronic device or the like in place on a user's worn item in an ultra-light weight extremely low impact manner. This ability to integrate the invention in such a lightweight low impact manner lends itself to be integrated in some cases permanently affixed to the item worn which in some cases could be preferable.

V. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING FIGURES

The invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 shows a front view of a preferred embodiment of the disclosed invention.

FIG. 1 a shows a front three-quarter view of a mirror image version of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1. This figure also shows optional cord retainer flap in use.

FIG. 2 shows preferred item carrier 200 with optional hood or the like 100 attached.

FIG. 2 a shows the back side of the assembly shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 3 shows an inside view of optional attachable hood or the like 100.

FIG. 3 a shows an outside view of optional attachable hood or the like 100.

FIG. 4 shows a top perspective view of an optional novel adjustment feature for adjusting the length of a limb or waist strap integrated with the item carrier

FIG. 4 a shows a cross-section view of the optional novel adjustment feature shown in FIG. 4. The cross section is taken substantially through the center of the strap along the center line of the length of the adjustment strap orthogonal to the front face of the strap.

In FIGS. 5 and 5 a show an embodiment of the preferred invention with a cut-out hole on the top and bottom band retainers

FIG. 6 shows a preferred item carrier with optional integrated limb strap using an integrated ladder-lock adjuster to adjust the strap length.

FIG. 7 shows a preferred item carrier with optional integrated limb strap using an integrated double fold-over adjustment or just one side can be adjusted.

FIG. 8 shows a preferred item carrier with optional integrated limb strap using a simple overlap of extensions of the side to side containment strips preferably made from stretch webbing or the like with a simple velcro or the like overlap adjustment.

FIG. 9 shows a preferred item carrier with optional integrated limb strap using an integrated plastic buckle or the like system used to connect the limb/waist band recloseably.

FIG. 10 shows a preferred item carrier with optional integrated limb strap using another optional band configuration

FIG. 11 shows a preferred item carrier with optional integrated limb strap using yet another optional band configuration

FIG. 12 shows a preferred item carrier with optional integrated limb strap using yet another optional band configuration

FIG. 13 shows a preferred item carrier with optional integrated limb strap using yet another optional band configuration

FIG. 14 shows three containment strips/parts instead of four configured in and inverted peace sign format.

FIG. 15 shows a less preferable embodiment of a configuration of the item containment portion of the carrier in a 3-quarter view.

FIG. 16 shows a 3-quarter view of the outer cover system element of the described invention. The embodiment in this view is shown constructed preferably of neoprene.

FIG. 17 shows a 3-quarter view of another variation of the outer cover system element of the described invention. The shown mesh area is a pocket closure of the pocket can be accomplished with a zipper, velcro or some other known closure system.

FIG. 18 shows a less preferable embodiment of the item holding portion of the item carrier, one or more containment strips having velcro or the like mating portions which mate when the containment strip is folded over cord 18 to hold cord 18 recloseably instead of sewing a line parallel to the fold line to provide a place to contain 18.

FIG. 19-21 show how the stretch cord can conform to different sizes and shapes of players/held items, the disclosed carrier can adjust to fit a variety of player sizes and shapes.

FIG. 22 shows another (though in many cases less preferable) embodiment of the item holding portion of the invention with containment strips. The free ends (the ends that are not attached to foundation pad) that confine cord 18, containment strips having cut-outs for access to the item they hold.

FIG. 23 shows another (though in many cases less preferable) embodiment of the item holding portion of the invention with containment strips primarily made from stretch webbing or the like.

FIG. 24 shows an embodiment of the item containment portion of the carrier made preferably of hypalon or the for holding personal radios, personal items, other items and the like. This embodiment of the containment module portion may be desirable in some cases though in others less desirable.

FIG. 25 shows the embodiment of the item containment portion of the carrier shown in FIG. 24 with stretch band stretched open

FIG. 26 shows the containment module as described in FIG. 24 with a music player or other device held in the containment module.

FIG. 27 shows shows a less preferably embodiment of the item containment portion of the carrier in a 3-quarter view. In this example, die-cut neoprene with stretchy edging is preferred but this material can also be stretch mesh, spandex or the like.

FIG. 27 a shows an embodiment of the item containment portion of the carrier similar to the one shown in FIG. 27 in a front/plan view

FIG. 28 shows another less preferable embodiment of the item containment portion of the carrier in a 3-quarter view. In this version, elastic strap is preferred but this material can also be neoprene, spandex or the like. In this figure, the item carrier is holding an electronic device and shows how the stretch straps leaves areas for easy access to the controls of the electronic device while still securing it.

FIG. 29 shows another less preferable embodiment of the item containment portion of the carrier in front/plan view similar to the embodiment in FIG. 28.

FIG. 30 shows an embodiment of the item containment portion of the carrier similar to the one shown in FIG. 27 in a front/plan view

FIG. 31 shows an embodiment of the item containment portion of the invention similar to the one shown in FIG. 22.

FIG. 32 shows a less preferable embodiment of the item containment portion of the invention. Although in some cases this embodiment may be preferable.

FIG. 33 shows a less preferable embodiment of the item containment portion of the invention. Although in some cases this embodiment may be preferable.

FIG. 34 a shows a close-up view of the cord adjuster portion of the embodiment shown in FIG. 34.

FIG. 34 shows a preferable embodiment of the item containment portion of the invention with an cord adjuster to adjust the length of the stretch or other cord.

FIG. 35-38 show different embodiments of the item containment portion of the invention with various style containment straps with various shape cut-outs.

FIG. 39 shows a less preferable embodiment of the item containment portion of the invention. Although in some cases this embodiment may be preferable.

FIG. 40 shows a less preferable embodiment of the item containment portion of the invention holding a small music or other electronic device. Although in some cases this embodiment may be preferable. FIG. 40 a is a top view of the embodiment shown if FIG. 40; the stretch cord is slightly stretched open.

FIG. 41 shows an embodiment of the item containment portion of the invention with music/electronic player installed.

FIG. 42 shows an embodiment of the item containment portion of the invention with music/electronic player installed.

FIG. 43 shows how sizing adjustment tabs are used to size the containment area of the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 44 shows further graphic explanation how sizing adjustment tabs are used to size the containment area of the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 45 shows further graphic explanation how sizing adjustment tabs are used to size the containment area of the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 45 shows how the novel item carrier can be worn on a belt or a limb like an arm.

FIG. 46 shows further graphic explanation how sizing adjustment tabs are used to size the containment area of the preferred embodiment.

FIGS. 47 and 48 shows a player or the like item being placed inside the containment area of the preferred embodiment

FIG. 49 shows how loosening of the limb/arm strap for the preferable item carrier can be accomplished. Tightening can be accomplished on this preferred embodiment by pulling on the free tail end of the limb strap.

FIG. 50 shows how a preferable crimp can be hidden in a loop in on of the containment strips (19 a shows a preferable hidden position)

FIG. 51 shows a preferable crimp (like a common hair band) for connecting the preferable elastic loop 18.

VI. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

References will now be made to the drawings in which the various elements of the present invention will be given reference designations and in which the invention will be discussed so as to enable one skilled in the art to make and use the invention. It is to be understood that the following description is only exemplary of the principles of the present invention, and should not be viewed as narrowing the pending claims.

FIG. 1 shows a front view of a preferred embodiment of the disclosed invention. The invention preferably has a foundation pad or the like, which is appropriately shaped to fit the preferred item to be carried cushioning the item from the wearer as well as protecting the item from being in direct contact with the user's body which can be sweaty. The shape of this pad can be a variety of shapes from somewhat square to round, oval, somewhat octagon-shaped, etc. The preferable foundation pad can be formed/constructed from a variety of different materials made of one piece of neoprene or the like material die cut from sheet, a composite of more than one material, layered with a back, an internal pad and a front, etc. or just with a back and front material. In FIG. 1 the front of the foundation pad is labeled 3. Somewhat from the perimeter of the preferable foundation pad base four or more containment strips/walls or the like (FIG. 1, labeled 5, 6, 7 a and 8/15 in combination) extend upward and terminate with item holding means element 18, elastic band/loop. 7 a is shown holding 18 but also extending after folding and affixing to itself to form cord holder means which is shown in FIG. 1 a. The containment strips or the like which terminate in elastic containment loop holding means are preferably configured at approximately 90 degrees from each other if there are four containment strips or they are spaced appropriately to hold the item desired to be held (FIG. 14 shows an embodiment employing three containment strips/walls. More than four or less than three containment strips/walls may be desirable in some instances, though in most cases this is less preferable (see FIG. 33 for an example of a containment module with two containment walls). The Elastic band/loop or the like which is held in place by the upwardly extending containment strips or the like is preferably made from a length of preferably elastic cord or the like which has its ends fastened to themselves with a metal or the like crimp 19 (commonly found on a hair band for holding hair in a pony tail) see FIG. 51 for a drawing of a preferable crimp. The crimp is preferably held in one of the loops of the folded-over containment strips so that it is hidden and does not come in contact with the item/player being held (see FIG. 50, item labeled 19 a shows a possible position of the hidden crimp trapped in the folded over containment strip.) Although a crimp is preferred, the two ends of the cord or the like can be affixed to form a loop with a knot, formed together integrally in a ring, glued together, melted together, held with heat shrink, fastened with a cord lock/slider or the like. Although elastic cord or the like material is preferred for the cord loop, non-stretchy cord, string, webbing or the like material can be used and a cord lock can be used to adjust the size of the loop to fit different sized/shaped items to be carried. The preferable elastic cord loop 18 can also be made from an o-ring made of appropriate material like silicon rubber, rubber or the like or other preferably stretchy material (although it could be made with a plastic loop or the like and access to the item(s) held in the carrier could be accomplished by a refastenable fastener which fastens around/to or the like to the loop-snaps, velcro, button, and button hole could be integrated to the containment strips to attach removably to the loop or the like (see FIG. 35 which shows an example of snaps or potentially rivets). The limb/waist band or the like band or the like 16 is fastened to the base pad at opposite ends so that it forms a loop through which you can put a limb/waist to attach to the user. A radio, player or the like item being held can be put through the loop of preferable stretch cord or the like 18 and when the stretch cord stretches back into its relaxed state pulls containment strips around the item being held, holding it in place to be accessed by the user on the user's limb/waist or other item in which ready access to a personal, electronic or other item is useful.

FIG. 1 a shows the preferred item carrier with a music player installed and cord management flap 7 b holding the excess cord from headphones or the like in place.

FIG. 2 shows preferred item carrier 200 with optional hood or the like 100 attached. FIG. 2 a shows the back side of the assembly shown in FIG. 2. Hood or the like 100 is attached to carrier 200 with hook velcro or the like component 10 c on top tab area of 100 (FIG. 3), the tab or the like affixing to the back of the base pad 4, the surface of 4 on which has velcro or the like compatible loop material to mate with 10 c. The bottom portion of hood 100 is held down on carrier 200 by the mating of velcro loop compatible material or the like 10 b on the hood on the bottom inside portion of 100 and hook compatible material or the like 10 a affixed, glued, heat bonded, sewed or the like to outside surface of containment strip 6 which extends from the lower perimeter of the base pad or the like of carrier 200.

FIG. 3 shows optional attachable-hood or the like 100. Hood or the like 100 is made from front cover 1 (preferably stretchy neoprene or the like material) which is sized to cover the item being carried in 200. In FIG. 3, front cover 1 is shown somewhat rectangular in shape although it could be round or any other shape appropriate to its use as a cover. Preferably stretchy neoprene or the like hood extension/shroud 2 is affixed (sewn, glued, formed integrally or the like with front cover 1—but preferably affixed in a way to allow this part to stretch and conform to the item being held in 200) to the perimeter of front cover 1 so that it substantially extends away from front cover 1 somewhat perpendicular to its face. Hood extension/shroud 2 is sized so that when it is removeably affixed to carrier 200 in combination with front cover part 1, the resulting hood substantially or somewhat protects the item carried in carrier 200. FIG. 3 shows three of four potential walls formed by 2 somewhat perpendicular to the face of 1 so that the item carried in 200 can vary in size somewhat and still be at least partially shrouded by hood 100 (the combination of this geometry and the preferably somewhat stretchy cover 100 allows for the cover to conform to a variety of different sizes and shapes of items being held in 200). This substantially “U” or “C” shaped side shroud can be extended so that it completely encircles the perimeter of front cover 1 although this is less preferable in some cases for fitting a variety of sizes and shapes of items held in carrier 200. On the inside surface of front cover 1 somewhat towards the bottom is affixed, glued, heat bonded, sewed or the like loop velcro or the like element 10 b and somewhat opposite this is hook velcro or the like element 10 c affixed, glued, heat bonded, sewed or the like to the inside top area of shroud 2 on somewhat of a projection so that this tab or projection can serve to wrap around and removeably affix to carrier 200 as it is intended. Preferably hypalon or the like grab feature 9 is preferably affixed, glued, heat bonded, sewed or the like to the inside bottom edge of front cover 1 to facilitate removal/access to the item(s) carried in carrier 200. Logo or the like element 11 a can also be formed integrally with grab feature 9 and serve dually as a logo/grab element affixed to the bottom edge of front cover 1. It can also be attached, affixed, glued, heat bonded, sewed or the like separately to front cover 1. Preferably hook velco or the like 10 c is preferably sewn, glued heat bonded or the like to elongated preferably neoprene or the like shroud 2, on the underside surface of a preferably somewhat central projection 2 a. As mentioned preferably neoprene or the like front cover 1 is sized and shaped appropriately to cover what is preferably held in carrier 200 (in FIG. 3 shown somewhat rectangular-shaped). Preferably loop velcro or the like 10 b is preferably sewn, glued heat bonded or the like to one end of the back side of front cover 1; the front side has logo or the like 11 a preferably sewn, glued heat bonded or the like preferably opposite 10 b. Construction of the preferred item carrier as shown in FIGS. 1 and 1 a will now be detailed. Preferably cut-out hypalon or the like containment strip or the like 6 is preferably substantially hour-glass shaped, truncated on one side and opposite the truncated side cut out portion, a hole or holes that will allow access to buttons/cords/feature of the item being held in 200. Containment strip/wall 6 is folded at the waist of the hour-glass shape or the like and sewn in this position with preferably hook velcro or the like 10 a preferably sewn, glued or otherwise affixed somewhat above the preferable cut-out hole. Upper containment element made up of preferably stretchy webbing or the like 15 which is preferably edge bound at one end with preferably hypalon end/stretch cord holding 8 leaving a space to slide cord 18 through. This top containment element or any other of the side containment elements for that matter could be made solely from stretch webbing or the like and folded over and preferably sewn at their free end to serve to hold preferable stretch ring or the like 18. Although folding over a short, somewhat squat hour-glass shaped hypalon or the like part and sewing or the like to a free end of webbing or the like 15 that cord 18 can be fed through and held is preferable in many cases. In some cases it may be desirable for the top containment strip/wall to be made out of a single material such as hypalon with cut-out access hole(s) instead of a combination of stretchy and non-stretchy materials as shown and described. The bottom and top containment strips are sewn or the like to the perimeter, opposite one another to foundation pad shown as preferably neoprene or the like front of foundation pad 3 and back part 4 preferably veltex or the like sewn together at their perimeter. Foundation pad (3 and 4) can be made in a variety of ways. It can be one piece of neoprene or the like with selectively placed materials added as needed to serve its purpose (for example velcro or the like loop selective element(s) could be added to mate with 10 c). It can be made of two or more pieces layered together to provide the appropriate thickness, padding, water protection, etc. as desired. After the containment strips are sewn to the perimeter top and bottom of the foundation pad, sewn inside out like you would a pillow case with the containment strips sewn inside and then flipped right side out using a slit in one of the foundation pad sides (preferably on the front and centrally located so that this slit/hole or the like can be covered by 12 a), this slit is covered with loop velcro or the like strip 12 a (preferably sewn glued or the like in place) somewhat centrally to foundation pad as shown, the length of velcro or the like strip 12 a somewhat perpendicular to top and bottom containment strips as shown. One end of limb/waist band or the like 16 with preferably somewhat hourglass shape preferably hypalon or the like containment strip/cord keeper 7 a preferably sewn as an extension to 16 with the base of the preferably hourglass shaped 7 a fixed parallel to the edge of the end of strap 16. One side of 7 a has mating velcro or the like 7 b and 10 d spaced so that when preferably hour-glass shaped 7 a is folded upon itself using the waist of the hour glass shape as a fold line the velcro or the like mates. On the opposite side of 7 a, hook velcro or the like flap 12 b is sewn or the like at one end somewhat centrally in the area between the “waist” fold line and the attachement to 16 band such than the free end of the flap faces away from the “waist” fold line with the hook of the velcro or the like facing towards 7 a. Containment strip/cord keeper 7 a is folded upon itself along the “waist” fold line so that 10 d and 7 b mate, then 7 a is sewn, affixed or the like to itself in a line parallel to the “waist” fold line somewhat at a distance from this line but close to the fold line so that cord 18 can pass through the resulting tube with some friction (so that it is preferably not too loose). A short length of ribbon or the like strip or the like 17 is folded over itself and preferably sewn to form a belt loop or band and then slid onto the band 16. Also the end opposite or the like assembly is turned over itself and sewn or the like to finish the end. Preferably hypalon or the like containment strip/band trapper 5 has a preferably somewhat milk bottle shaped profile. 5 is folded over at the “neck” of it's preferably milk bottle shaped form upon preferably velcro or the like hook flap 12 b (shown as a separate part as the other above mentioned 12 b part, but labeled the same because they could be similar if not identical to each other). Hook flap 12 b is faced preferably with its hook side toward the preferably hypalon or the like 5 and then preferably sewn with one end trapped in the folded over at the “neck” line. Containment strip 5 is sewn parallel to this “neck” fold line at a slight distance so that cord 18 can be threaded through the resulting looped over and affixed or the like to itself 5. The preferable stitch being somewhat parallel to the “neck” fold line somewhat at a distance from this line but close to the fold line so that cord 18 can pass through the resulting tube with some friction (so that it is preferably not too loose). As can be seen in FIG. 4 and cross-section FIG. 4 a hypalon or the like containment strip/band/trapper 5, the end opposite the loop for holding cord 18 is folded over itself (base of preferable milk bottle shape or the like) threading one outside rung of tri-glide or the like 14 in this folded over portion and containment strip 5 is preferably sewed in place with this end folded over and trapping an outside rung of tri-glide 14 in the folded and sewn loop formed therein. The free end of limb/waist band 16 (opposite preferably hypalon-ended other side) is threaded around the middle rung of triglide 14 over and back on itself (see FIGS. 4 and 4 a). As can be seen in FIG. 4 and FIG. 4 a the free end of containment strip 5 (with loop for holding 18) is then threaded over the middle rung of tri-glide 14 and through the second slot in 14 (the first slot being the one closest to the end of 14 that is affixed to containment strip 5). The finished belt assembly has ends for holding cord 18 on either side and adjustment tail in between. The finished belt assembly is preferably sewn or the like to the foundation pad somewhat at the pad's perimeter spaced substantially between top and bottom containment strips so that the band with the pad are continuous to form a complete band to enwrap a limb or waist, etc. Containment strips 5 and 7 a are preferably sewn or affixed so that the cord 18 holding end is free to extend up and away from the foundation pad a distance that will be favorable for holding an item to be carried in 200. 7 a is preferably sewn to the pad's perimeter somewhat parallel to its folded over line and at a distance such that the cord 18 holding end is free to extend up and away from the foundation pad a distance that will be favorable for wrapping around and holding an item to be carried in 200. 5 is preferably sewn to the pad's perimeter opposite 7 a somewhat parallel to its folded over line and at a distance (next to the non-enwrapped rung of tri-glide or the like 14) such that the cord 18 holding end is free to extend up and away from the foundation pad a distance that will be favorable for wrapping around and holding an item to be carried in 200. Preferably stretchy cord or the like 18 is fed through all of the containment strip loops and fastened to itself somewhat in a ring preferably with a metal or the like crimp 19 that can commonly be found on a hair band used for making a pony tail. The length of preferably stretchy cord 18 is fastened to itself to define a loop, said loop being offset at a distance from, substantially central to, and substantially parallel to the front surface of the base panel.

FIG. 4, FIG. 4 a, and FIG. 49 show how the adjustment feature of the preferred embodiment of the invention is preferably assembled to act to adjust the limb/waist band or the like. As described above and shown in FIG. 4 a but reversing the assembly explanation for clarification purposes, an extension of containment strip 5 after it has been sewed or the like to base pad or the like on carrier 200 is fed under the first bar, through the first of two slots of tri-glide or the like 14, then up over the next two rungs, around the last rung and up through the second slot in tri-glide or the like 14, here containment strip 5 is preferably affixed (preferably sewed, though it could be glued, heat bonded, etc.) to itself in this folded under itself and trapped position. The above order of these steps is for explanation purposes only and can be reordered as is previously described if desired. After the containment strip 5 extension has trapped the tri-glide 14 in the above described manner, an end of limb/waist band or the like 16 can be fed under the tri-glide through the first slot as defined above, over the middle rung and down through the second slot as shown in FIG. 4 a. If the doubled over band or the like 16 is pulled in a manner that opposes strip 5 as it is attached to the base pad of carrier 200 this strap assembly acts to lock the strap in place. Lifting up on the hypalon or the like covered rung allows the strap to loosen (see FIG. 49). The assembly as described and integrated into the belt/band or the like is suitable to function as a belt or limb-band with adjusting means to change the size and make putting the band on a limb/waist easier. It should also be noted that the before mentioned trapping/adjusting assembly as described and shown in FIG. 4 and FIG. 4 a is believed to be novel in itself and can be incorporated into other belt/band/straps or the like to function as an adjustment feature. The disclosed novel trapping/adjusting assembly allows a tri-glide to hold fast to a adjust a belt to different sizes without slipping. FIG. 4 a shows a section view of the strap assembly element of the described invention. Hypalon is preferred for strip 5, but can be replaced with rubber, leather, webbing or the like. Stretch webbing is preferred for the strap material but can also be replaced with non-stretch webbing, strip material or the like. The hypalon strap 5 acts as a strap lock on the stretch strap once outward tension is applied to the strap. This use of the adjuster in a non-obvious way reduces the bulk of the plastic part needed to adjust the stretch strap.

FIG. 5 and FIG. 5 a show a version of the preferred embodiment with cut-outs for access in containment strips 15 a and 6 to provide access to different areas on the object being held in item carrier 200. When a cord is wound up it can be held trapped under containment strip fold-over 7 a, between mating preferably hook and loop fasteners dispose on the containment strip portion and folded over flap created by the extension of 7 a after it has been preferably sewn to itself to create loop to entrap cord 18 (FIG. 1 a). The excess wire or the like holder for cabling, remote, etc. as shown in FIG. 1 a is preferably made from hypalon with hook and loop fasteners, but in this area rubber, stretch elastic, vinyl or plastic with snaps, buttons, etc. are also suitable, though will yield varying degrees of durability and usability.

FIG. 6 through FIG. 13 show how the preferred item carrier 200 can be configured with different strap assemblies to function as is desired as a carrier to be held on a limb/waist. These strap assemblies are generally less desirable in many cases than the before detailed preferred embodiment. FIG. 7 shows that plastic loops or the like can be attached to opposite sides of the foundation pad with a tail end of the containment strips 5 and 7 a and/or with tail ends protruding from either side of foundation pad, folded over and preferably sewn to entrap these plastic loops or the like. A belt or the like can be fed through these loops and folded over itself on one or both sides adjusting with hook and loop, tri-glide or other adjustment methods that are commonly used in the industry for similar purposes. If one side and not both is adjustable the other can be fixed similar to FIG. 6. FIG. 6 shows one side of limb/waist band or the like fixed to foundation pad and the other end fed through a ladder-lock or the like which is preferably sewn to a tail end of the opposite containment strip after it has been preferably sewn down to the foundation pad. FIG. 8 shows a simple overlap of extensions of the side to side containment strips preferably made from stretch webbing or the like with a simple velcro or the like overlap adjustment. FIG. 9 shows a less preferable plastic buckle or the like system used to connect the limb/waist band recloseably with plastic tri-glide adjuster for adjustment. FIG. 10 shows one side of limb/waist band or the like fixed to foundation pad and the other end fed through a plastic loop or the like which is preferably sewn to a tail end of the opposite containment strip after it has been preferably sewn down to the foundation pad. Adjustment is accomplished with overlap of webbing or the like which is fed through a tri-glide which moves to accommodate variable sizes. FIG. 11 shows one side of limb/waist band or the like fixed to foundation pad and the other end fed through a plastic loop or the like which is preferably sewn to a tail end of the opposite containment strip after it has been preferably sewn down to the foundation pad. Adjustment is accomplished with overlap velcro or the like (which can be done in a number of ways including discretely sewn on velcro or the like, velcro compatible stretch webbing with a mating end component preferably sewn to mate with it to serve to size the band, etc. FIG. 12 shows one side of limb/waist band or the like fixed to foundation pad and the other end fed through a plastic loop or the like which is preferably sewn to a tail end of the opposite containment strip after it has been preferably sewn down to the foundation pad. Adjustment is accomplished with overlap of webbing or the like which is fed through a tri-glide which moves to accommodate variable sizes. A break in the strap is provided with a hook and loop overlap closure to allow the band to be completely undone simply. FIG. 13 shows ladder lock adjusters disposed on both sides of the foundation pad like FIG. 6 (which has one instead of two). The ladder locks or the like are preferably sewn to a tail end of the opposite containment strip after they have been preferably sewn down to the foundation pad. FIG. 14 shows three containment strips/parts instead of four configured in and inverted peace sign format.

FIG. 15 shows another less preferable embodiment of the carrier in a 3-quarter view. In this example, a preferable combination of neoprene and stretch cord is preferred but the neoprene can be replaced with stretch mesh, spandex or the like. The stretch cord can be replaced with stretch strap, spandex, non-stretch cord or the like. In this figure, the item carrier is holding an electronic device and shows how the stretch straps contoured in a manner similar to the front of two bikini bottom halves mirrored about a horizontal center about the base pad with the crotch areas sewn into foundation pad top and bottom perimeters and the sides sewn into the perimeter sides of the foundation pad. This configuration leaves areas for easy access to the controls of the electronic device while still securing it.

FIG. 16 shows a 3-quarter view of the outer cover system element of the described invention. This view shows the outer cover is constructed of preferably neoprene. Although neoprene is preferred in this area, other substitutes for this material include leather, molded plastic, ballistic or ripstop nylon, hypalon or other like materials.

FIG. 17 shows a 3-quarter view of another variation of the outer cover system element of the described invention. This view shows how a mesh or the like outer pocket can be incorporated by adding a panel or panels parallel with front cover 1 and preferably sewn somewhat around the periphery such that a pocket or pockets are formed with front panel 1. The pocket can have closure means such as zipper or zippers disposed at a mouth of the opening to the pocket or pockets. A pocket formed from a panel parallel to panel 1 and fastened appropriately around its periphery is preferably made out of stretch mesh or non-stretch mesh or non-mesh material like nylon fabric or the like.

FIG. 18 shows a less preferable embodiment of the item holding portion of the item carrier, one or more containment strips having velcro or the like mating portions which mate when the containment strip is folded over cord 18 to hold cord 18 recloseably instead of sewing a line parallel to the fold line to provide a place to contain 18. FIG. 19-21 show how the stretch cord can conform to different sizes and shapes of players/held items along with adjustment tabs which is discussed in FIG. 43, FIG. 44 and FIG. 46, the disclosed carrier can adjust to fit a variety of player sizes and shapes.

FIG. 22 shows another (though in many cases less preferable) embodiment of the item holding portion of the invention with containment strips. The free ends (the ends that are not attached to foundation pad) that confine cord 18, containment strips having cut-outs for access to the item they hold. FIG. 23 shows another (though in many cases less preferable) embodiment of the item holding portion of the invention with containment strips primarily made from stretch webbing or the like. The free end of the stretch webbing or the like is edge bound with preferably hypalon or the like folded over and fastened to itself to make loops for 18. Also the free ends of the stretch webbing or the like can be folded over and fastened, sewn or the like to itself to make loops for 18 instead of using hypalon or the like to edge it.

FIG. 24 and FIG. 25 discloses a way that the containment strips can be incorporated into primarily one preferably hypalon component or the like preferably somewhat 4-armed starfish or the like shaped 25 c in which a 4-armed starfish shaped hypalon or the like component and is preferably sewn or the like down to a preferably neoprene or the like foundation pad or the like 25 p similar to the previously disclosed foundation pad, 25 c and 25 p joined along a stitch line 25 s or the like which is suitable for connecting preferably hypalon starfish part 25 c to pad 25 p. FIG. 24 shows stretch cord un-stretched and FIG. 25 shows stretch cord or the like 18 stretched open to accept a radio, cell phone or other item. The tips of the arms of preferably starfish shaped 25 c are folded over themselves and sewn folded over to form a loop that stretch cord or the like 18 can be fed through to contain the item being held. A radio, player or the like item being held can be put through the loop of preferable stretch cord or the like 18 and when the stretch cord stretches back into its relaxed (FIG. 24) state pulls arms of containment module up around the item being held, holding it in place. Added containment module sizing means is also shown with preferably loop velcro or the like fastener 25L and sizing tabs, preferably hook velcro or the like tabs 25 t. Loop fastener or the like 25L is preferably sewn, glued, heat bonded or the like somewhat centrally to the front side of hypalon starfish part 25 c. Preferably hook velcro or the like tabs 25 t are preferably trapped under the fold over and sewing of starfish shaped arm tips on opposing arms on the front side of 25 c with the hook preferably facing towards 25 c and free end of tab of 25 t extending somewhat in a central direction so that the free end of these tabs can turn outward and mate with 25L providing further sizing and confining means for the item containment module (see FIG. 43, FIG. 44 and FIG. 46 also for further explanation of this system for further sizing means for the containment module and FIG. 44 for a very descriptive picture of how the preferable tabs can function). This embodiment of the containment module portion may be desirable in some cases though in others less desirable. FIG. 26 shows a preferable containment module with a music player or other device held in the containment module. This containment module would be attached to a band or have integrated belt attachment means. FIG. 27 and FIG. 27 aa show a less preferably embodiment of the carrier portion. In this example, die-cut neoprene with stretchy edging is preferred but this material can also be stretch mesh, spandex or the like. In this figure, the carrier is holding an electronic device and shows how the die-cut pattern leaves areas for easy access to the controls of the electronic device while still securing it.

FIG. 28 shows another less preferable embodiment of the carrier in a 3-quarter view. In this version, elastic strap is preferred but this material can also be neoprene, spandex or the like. In this figure, the item carrier is holding an electronic device and shows how the stretch straps leaves areas for easy access to the controls of the electronic device while still securing it.

FIG. 29 shows a front view of another less preferable embodiment of the item carrier. In this example, hypalon and stretch cord is preferred but these materials can also be rubber, spandex, stretch webbing, nylon cord or the like. In this figure, the item carrier is holding an electronic device and shows how the stretch straps leave areas for easy access to the controls of the electronic device while still securing it. A cord lock or the like can be used as shown to adjust the size of the cord loop providing more security for different size shapes of held items.

FIG. 30 shows a front view of another less preferable embodiment of the item carrier similar to the one shown in FIG. 27. In this example, hypalon and stretch cord is preferred but these materials can also be rubber, spandex, stretch webbing, neoprene or the like.

FIG. 31 through FIG. 42 show a number of less preferable embodiments of the item carrier portion (with FIG. 34 a being a close up of an adjustable cord lock portion). In these examples, hypalon and stretch cord are preferred for the retainment walls/strips and elastic band/loop respectively, but these materials can also be rubber, spandex, stretch webbing, nylon cord or the like. In FIG. 39 through FIG. 42, the item carrier is holding an electronic device and shows how the stretch straps leave areas for easy access to the controls of the electronic device while still securing it. A cord lock or the like can be used as shown in FIG. 34 and FIG. 34 a to adjust the size of the cord loop providing more security for different size shapes of held items.

FIG. 32 shows a front view of another less preferable embodiment of the item carrier. In this example, hypalon and stretch cord is preferred but these materials can also be rubber, spandex, stretch webbing, nylon cord, gros grain ribbon or the like. In this figure, the item carrier is holding an electronic device and shows how the stretch straps leave areas for easy access to the controls of the electronic device while still securing it. A cord lock or the like can be used as shown to adjust the size of the cord loop providing more security for different size shapes of held items.

FIG. 35 shows a front views of other, less preferable embodiments of the item carrier. In this example, hypalon and stretch for the retainment walls/strips and elastic band/loop respectively, but these materials can also be rubber, spandex, stretch webbing, nylon cord, gros grain ribbon or the like. Snaps are also shown here instead of stitching as a recloseable way of fastening containment strip end in a loop to accept stretch cord or the like 18.

FIG. 39 shows how a device/player or the like could fit in an, in most cases less preferable, embodiment of the item carrying module.

FIG. 43 shows preferably hypalon or the like containment module for holding personal radios, personal items, other items and the like similar to FIG. 25. FIG. 25 and FIG. 43 discloses a way that the containment strips can be incorporated into primarily one component hypalon or the like 4-armed starfish or the like shaped 25 c (see FIG. 25) in which a 4-armed starfish shaped hypalon or the like component is preferably sewn or the like down to a preferably neoprene or the like foundation pad or the like 25 p similar to the previously disclosed foundation pad, 25 c and 25 p joined along a stitch line 25 s or the like which is suitable for connecting 25 c to 25 p. The containment module shown in FIG. 43 and FIG. 25 are similarly shaped and would be similarly incorporated into a band or the like for carrying an item to be worn on a user. The tips of the arms of preferably starfish shaped containment module as shown in 43 are folded over themselves and sewn folded over to form a loop that stretch cord or the like 18 can be fed through to contain the item being held. A radio, player or the like item being held can be put through the loop of preferable stretch cord or the like 18 and when the stretch cord stretches back into its relaxed state pulls arms of containment module up around the item being held, holding it in place. Added containment module sizing means is shown with preferably loop velcro or the like fastener area positioned somewhat centrally in the starfish-shaped component and sizing tabs, preferably hook velcro or the like tabs disposed (preferably sewn or the like) to the inside of two or more arms of the containment arms/strip portions. Loop fastener or the like 25L is preferably sewn, glued, heat bonded or the like somewhat centrally to the front side of 25 s. Preferably hook velcro or the like tabs 25 t are preferably trapped under the fold over and sewing of starfish shaped arm tips on opposing arms on the front side of 25 s with the hook preferably facing towards 25 s and free end of tabs of 25 t extending somewhat in a central direction so that the free end of these tabs can turn outward and mate with 25L providing further sizing and confining means for the item containment module (see FIG. 25 for further explanation of this system for further sizing means for the containment module). FIG. 44 shows the containment module as described in FIGS. 25 and 43 with a foundation pad or the like (see FIG. 25 for preferably how this can be done) and for incorporation of limb/waist bands see FIGS. 25, 6 through 13 and FIG. 45 (see other figures on how a band/belt can be incorporated—there are many ways with various advantages and drawbacks, although the band system as disclosed in FIG. 1 and FIGS. 4-8 is preferable). FIG. 45 view shows the attached to a waist belt or a belt for an appendage.

FIG. 46 shows how sizing adjustment tabs are used to size the containment area of the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 47 and FIG. 48 show a player or the like item being placed inside the containment area of the preferred embodiment

FIG. 49 shows how loosening of the limb/arm strap for the preferable item carrier can be accomplished (arrow 49 a showing how the preferable ladder lock assembly as described in FIG. 4 and FIG. 4 a can be pulled out away from the band to allow loosening the band). Tightening can be accomplished on this preferred embodiment by pulling on the free tail end of the limb strap 49 b.

FIG. 50 shows how a preferable crimp can be hidden in a loop in on of the containment strips (19 a shows a preferable hidden position)

FIG. 51 shows a preferable crimp (like used in a common hair band) for connecting the preferable elastic loop 18 although the loop can be integrally connected (like an o-ring), tied to itself, fixed to itself with a cordlock, although the disclosed crimp connection is preferable.

Although the description above contains many specificities, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. The embodiments detailed in the figures and described herein can be combined in a variety of manners with varying success.

Also, while the invention has been described by reference to illustrative embodiments, it is not intended that the novel device be limited thereby, but that modifications thereof are intended to be included as falling within the broad spirit and scope of the foregoing disclosure, the following claims and the appended drawings.

Operation

See FIG. 1 a and FIGS. 43-49. To put an item like a music player in the novel “item holder” the user would first adjust the adjustment tabs (see FIGS. 43, 44 and 46) in or out depending on the size and shape of the item to be carried then push the item through the preferably stretchy ring 18 (see FIG. 47) so that the item to be carried is trapped therein. A radio, cell phone, player or the like item being held can be put through the loop of preferable stretch cord or the like 18 and when the stretch cord stretches back into its relaxed state pulls containment strips around the item being held, holding it in place to be accessed by the user on the user's limb/waist or other item in which ready access to a personal, electronic or other item is useful. The optional hood can be attached by affixing the preferably hook velcro on the top, inside surface of the hood shroud to the preferably velcro loop compatible back panel of item carrier (foundation pad) labeled 4 in FIG. 2 a. The bottom of the hood can hang loose or be affixed via mating the preferably loop fastener on the bottom of the inside hood front cover to a preferably hook component on the front of the lower containment strip/wall fastening the hood so that it can be simply disengaged from the bottom portion and flipped up to access the player housed within.

Summary Ramifications, and Scope

Accordingly the reader will see that there are a number of advantages of the disclosed “item carrier” which can provide an effective, easily adjustable, intuitive to use, comfortable, lightweight, chafe-free, versatile and simple to manufacture, method holding an item on a person.

Although the description above contains many specificities, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention, but merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention.

Thus the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than by examples given.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7848093 *Feb 6, 2007Dec 7, 2010Hardson Winston BDigital video and music player belt buckles
US7848512Sep 29, 2006Dec 7, 2010Kurt EldracherPersonal audio device accessory
US7996922Dec 12, 2007Aug 16, 2011South Mill Design, LLCCuff for storing object around wrist
US8056780Jan 8, 2008Nov 15, 2011Bruns Judi LBelt buckle with compartment for portable device
US8132699 *Dec 19, 2007Mar 13, 2012Three Point Ventures LlcShoulder strap for bag
US8474669 *Sep 4, 2007Jul 2, 2013Apple Inc.Armband for holding an electronic device
US8747284 *Nov 28, 2006Jun 10, 2014Mccrane, Inc.Lifting strap with enhanced gripping properties
US20110062203 *Sep 17, 2009Mar 17, 2011Weger Kenneth JDisk carrier and method
US20110088132 *Oct 19, 2010Apr 21, 2011Mcnamee-Sollars BettyCough cuff
US20130032618 *Aug 4, 2011Feb 7, 2013Terry Henry JamesSurf wax carrier
US20130256346 *May 22, 2013Oct 3, 2013Apple Inc.Armband for holding an electronic device
Classifications
U.S. Classification224/222, 224/237, 224/255, 224/660, 224/676, 224/267, 224/250
International ClassificationA45F5/00, A45F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45F3/005, A45F2200/0516, A45F2200/0508, A45F5/00, A45F5/02, A45F2005/008, A45F3/00, A45C2011/002, A45F2003/006
European ClassificationA45F5/00, A45F3/00