Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20060204488 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/335,157
Publication dateSep 14, 2006
Filing dateJan 19, 2006
Priority dateJan 21, 2005
Also published asCA2593038A1, EP1846022A2, EP1846022A4, US8323643, US20090123454, US20130330320, WO2006078870A2, WO2006078870A3
Publication number11335157, 335157, US 2006/0204488 A1, US 2006/204488 A1, US 20060204488 A1, US 20060204488A1, US 2006204488 A1, US 2006204488A1, US-A1-20060204488, US-A1-2006204488, US2006/0204488A1, US2006/204488A1, US20060204488 A1, US20060204488A1, US2006204488 A1, US2006204488A1
InventorsMarie Badalamente
Original AssigneeBadalamente Marie A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
using collagenase injections to lyse the collagenous adhesions in the shoulder and treat adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder
US 20060204488 A1
Abstract
The invention relates to the discovery that collagenase injections are effective in lyse the collagenous adhesions in the shoulder and treat the disorder, adhesive capsulitis. As such, the invention relates to methods of treating or preventing adhesive capsulitis, or frozen shoulder, in a patient in need of such treatment comprising injecting or otherwise delivering an effective amount of collagenase to the collagenous adhesions in the shoulder. The invention also relates to the use of collagenase in the manufacture of a medicament to treat adhesive capsulitis.
Images(31)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(9)
1. A method of treating or preventing adhesive capsulitis in a subject in need of such treatment comprising delivering an effective amount of collagenase to collagenous adhesions in the shoulder.
2. The method according to claim 1, wherein the collagenase is derived from Clostridium histolyticum.
3. The method according to claim 2, wherein the collagenase is injected in a dose comprising at least about 700 SRC units.
4. The method according to claim 3, wherein the collagenase is injected in a volume of less than 0.5 ml.
5. The method according to claim 3, wherein the collagenase comprises collagenase I and collagenase II.
6. The method according to claim 4, wherein the injection is delivered in a single injection between the interval of the deltoid and pectoral muscles.
7. The method according to claim 1, wherein the subject is a human patient.
8. The method according to claim 7, wherein the patient is characterized by an active forward elevation of only 90 degrees and an active external rotation of less than 50 degrees.
9. The method according to claim 1, wherein after one month of receiving at least one administration of collagenase, the patient achieves an active external rotation of greater than 15°, as compared to baseline.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/645,772, filed on Jan. 21, 2005, U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/677,440, filed on May 3, 2005 and U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/719,470, filed on Sep. 22, 2005. The entire teachings of the above application(s) are incorporated herein by reference.

GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

The invention was supported, in whole or in part, by a grant MO1RR10710 from the National Institutes of Health. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) is a clinical syndrome of severe pain and significantly decreased shoulder motion which may occur idiopathically, after trauma or affect patients with diabetes and/or thyroid disorders. The duration of the disorder may be from months to years and severely affect the quality of life. Lengthy physical therapy, sometimes including cortisone injections and/or manipulation under anesthesia and/or shoulder arthroscopy, currently are the standards of orthopedic care. However, more effective therapies are needed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to the discovery that collagenase injections are effective in lyse the collagenous adhesions in the shoulder capsule and treat the disorder, adhesive capsulitis. As such, the invention relates to methods of treating or preventing adhesive capsulitis, or frozen shoulder, in a subject in need of such treatment comprising injecting or otherwise delivering an effective amount of collagenase to the collagenous adhesions in the shoulder. The invention also relates to the use of collagenase in the manufacture of a medicament to treat adhesive capsulitis.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a bar graph that reports the improved mobility, or active elevation, in twelve patients who received a third collagenase injection.

FIG. 2 is a line graph of the means of normal shoulder motion vs. collagenase dose groups.

FIG. 3 is a line graph of the means of shoulder motion after a 0.58 open label collagenase injection.

FIGS. 4A-4EE are line and bar graphs depicting the data obtained in the clinical trial described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to the discovery that collagenase injections are effective in lyse the collagenous adhesions in the shoulder capsule and treat the disorder, adhesive capsulitis. As such, the invention relates to methods of treating or preventing adhesive capsulitis, or frozen shoulder, in a subject in need of such treatment comprising injecting or otherwise delivering an effective amount of collagenase to the collagenous adhesions in the shoulder capsule. The invention also relates to the use of collagenase in the manufacture of a medicament to treat adhesive capsulitis.

Collagenase injections have been proposed for the treatment of diseases such as Duptyren's disease and Peyronie's disease. Both diseases are associated with collagen plaques or cords. Wegman, Thomas L., U.S. Pat. No. 5,589,171, Dec. 31, 1996, U.S. Pat. No. 6,086,872, Jul. 11, 2000 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,022,539, Feb. 8, 2000, which are incorporated herein by reference.

Collagenase is an enzyme that has the specific ability to digest collagen. A preferred form of collagenase is derived from fermentation by Clostridium histolyticum, and is purified by a chromatographic technique.

Sterilized lyophilized collagenase powder is commercially available having a minimum assay of 50 ABC units per mg. The assay may range considerably above that from batch to batch, but is taken into account in determining the weight of powder to use with a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier, e.g. normal saline, in preparing a desired concentration for treatment.

A preferred collagenase composition comprising a mixture of collagenase I and collagenase II in a mass ratio of about 1 to 1 and having specific activity of at least about 700 SRC units/mg, such as at least about 1000 SRC units/mg, more preferably at least about 1500 SRC units/mg. One SRC unit will solubilize rat tail collagen into ninhydrin reaction material equivalent to 1 nanomole of leucine per minute, at 25° C., pH 7.4. Collagenase has been described in ABC units as well. This potency assay of collagenase is based on the digestion of undenatured collagen (from bovine tendon) at pH 7.2 and 37 degrees C. for 20-24 hours. The number of peptide bonds cleaved are measured by reaction with ninhydrin. Amino groups released by a trypsin digestion control are subtracted. One net ABC unit of collagenase will solubilize ninhydrin reactive material equivalent to 1.09 nanomoles of leucine per minute. 1 SRC unit equal approximate 6.3 ABC unit or 18.5 GPA unit.

The collagenase is preferably administered via injection in a liquid carrier that is pharmaceutically acceptable. Preferably the carrier does not interact or deactivate the collagenase. Examples are normal saline, aqueous NaCl/CaCl2 buffer (e.g., containing 0.9% NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2), aqueous dextran solution, and aqueous hetastarch solution. For example, the lyophilized formulation can contain 0.1 mg lactose monohydrate per 1,000 ABC units. Each glass vial used below contained 5,150 ABC units of enzyme.

In accordance with the invention, collagenase in a liquid carrier is injected into a collagen adhesion within the shoulder capsule. The amount and concentration of collagenase used are effective to soften and relax or rupture the adhesion.

The total volume of liquid injected preferably does not exceed about 0.50 ml. A smaller volume down to about 0.25 ml to about 0.1 ml is usually more preferred.

Preferably, the injection is a sterile one given between the interval of the deltoid and pectoral muscles. An anesthesia injection of 5-10 ml sterile 1% lidocaine preferably precedes the collagenase injection for the comfort of the patient.

The total dosage is preferably injected in one portion, although two or more portions at the same or different points into the shoulder capsule are possible, preferably intralesionally, or intra-adhesionally. The objective of these procedures is to assure good distribution of the collagenase within a small volume of the adhesion. Preferably, the patient wears a sling to immobilize the shoulder for approximately 5-6 hours post injection. Patients perform at home physical therapy for at least one month to assist in the return of normal range of shoulder motion.

In other embodiments, the collagenase can be administered locally and topically (e.g., via a transdermal patch or topical cream or ointment), preferably at site proximal to the affected shoulder or can be administered via an implant (e.g., microcapsules or microspheres which release the collagenase over time).

The subject can be any animal, preferably a mammal or human patient. Examples of animals that can be treated according to the invention include domestic animals (such as cats, dogs, etc.), farm animals (such as horses, cows, pigs, etc.) and exotic animals (such as monkeys, apes, etc.). Preferred human patients are those that have decreased shoulder motion which occurred idiopathically, after trauma or patients with diabetes and/or thyroid disorders.

In one embodiment, the patient is characterized as having extremely decreased shoulder motion in all planes to include active elevation, active internal rotations (spine level reached by the thumb behind the back), active external rotation, passive elevation, passive external rotation at the side, passive external rotation at 90 degrees, function scores. Pain is increased to a level where it interferes with activities of daily living and diminishes the quality of life. The invention can achieve improvement in all planes of motion of the shoulder or decreased pain or alleviation of another symptom of the disorder.

In cases where results of a single treatment are considered inadequate, the same procedures, total amount of collagenase and concentration may be repeated. Successful clinical results were achieved with repeated injections at 4 to 6 week intervals.

EXPERIMENTAL Example 1

Methods

Forty patients entered the study protocol, 11 males and 29 females, mean age 52±8.9 years. At the time of initial presentation, the mean length of time that all patients had adhesive capsulitis was 16 months (range 2-144 mo). Eighteen patients were idiopathic, six patients were Type 1 and six patients were Type 2 diabetics, five patients had hypothyroidism, three patients had hypothyroidism and diabetes, and two patients were affected by post-traumatic adhesive capsulitis. Following a 10 ml 2% lidocaine injection for local anesthesia, all patients received a first, random placebo controlled double blind injection of either 0.145 mg, 0.29 mg or 0.58 mg Clostridial collagenase or placebo (0.9% saline containing 2 mM calcium) directed at the anterior capsule, 0.5 ml total volume. Patients were evaluated serially for one month based on the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Evaluation form which scores pain, shoulder motion, strength, stability and function. Shoulder motion evaluations were measured in degrees and consisted of: active/passive elevation, active/passive external rotation, passive external rotation at 90 degrees and active internal rotation (spine level reached by thumb posteriorly). If the shoulder motion scores or pain scores were not statistically significant from baseline values, patients had the option of proceeding to additional open label 0.58 mg collagenase injection(s) administered at 4-6 week intervals. Nine patients received only one (random placebo double blind) injection, 30patients received a second open label 0.58 mg collagenase injection. The control treatment code for the first random placebo double blind injection (dose response) may not be unmasked until the total of 60 patients has been enrolled. However, the results of the open label collagenase injections have shown clear and significant merit. All patients were followed, using the shoulder evaluation form, at two, three, six, nine, 12 and 24 months post their last injection. Mean length of follow-up was 10.8±8.2 months. Statistical analysis consisted of testing the mean change from baseline shoulder evaluations by the student's t test.

Results

Thirty of the 40 patients required a short series of repeat open label 0.58 mg collagenase injections after a first random, placebo, double blind injection. Table 1 shows the mean increases in should range of motion, function and pain in the affected shoulders comparing baseline parameters to the one month post 2nd and 3rd injection follow-ups. All increases were statistically significant, p<0.0001. Diabetic patients (n=15) showed smaller increases from baselines in active and passive external rotation, internal rotation (spine level) and passive elevation when compared to idiopathic patients (n−18). For example, for active external rotation at one month post the second injection, the mean increase in idiopathic patients was 31.4°±14.1° but only 20.5°±15.50 in diabetic patients (p=0.02). Patients with hypothyroidism and post-trauma patients showed equal rates of recovery of shoulder motion compared to idiopathic patients. Improvements in should motion, pain and function were sustained in the longer term, mean length of follow up 10.8±8.2 months.

Adverse effects of injections included tenderness at the injection site in all patients and biceps ecchymosis in approximately two-thirds of patients. These resolved without even in 7-14 days.

TABLE 1
Treated shoulder and contralateral shoulder at baseline
2nd Injection 3rd Injection
(n = 30) (n = 12)
Active elevation 30.8° ± 15.7° 36.8° ± 13.5°
Passive elevation 25.4° ± 16.5° 25.8° ± 17.5°
Active external rotation 27.4° ± 15.4° 39.0° ± 16.3°
Passive external rotation 37.2° ± 22.0° 40.3° ± 22.2°
Passive external rotation at 90° 21.8° ± 18.9° 27.8° ± 15.6°
Internal rotation (spine level) +5 levels ± 3.8 +6 levels ± 4.8
levels levels
Function +20 points ± 8 +23.5 points ± 11
points points
Pain 4 (slight) 4 (slight)

Conclusions

After a first random, placebo, double blind injection, the majority of patients (30 of 40) required a short series of open label (0.58 mg) collagenase injections before significant improvements were seen in shoulder motion, pain and function. Therefore, despite the fact that the first injection treatment code for dose response is still masked to the investigators, it is clear that collagenase injection of adhesive capsulitis has shown significant merit. Open label collagenase treatment resulted in significantly reduced time in return to pain free function when compared to the standard Orthopaedic care, which can last for many months or even years. This Phase 2 study has shown that collagenase injection of the shoulder capsule is a safe and effective method of treatment for adhesive capsulitis, which warrants continued investigation within the FDA regulatory process.

Example 2

The purpose of this FDA regulated, prospective, Phase II, random, placebo controlled, double blind, dose response study was to develop a nonoperative method for treatment of adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) using collagenase injection therapy.

Sixty patients entered the study protocol, 47 females and 13 males, mean age 52 years, mean duration of adhesive capsulitis, 17 months. All patients received a first, random, placebo controlled, double blind, extra-articular injection of either physiologic saline (n=15), or 0.145 mg (n=16), or 0.29 mg (n=15), or 0.58 mg (n=14) collagenase, 0.5 ml total volume, directed at the anterior shoulder capsule. Patients were serially evaluated for 1 month for shoulder range of motion in all planes, pain, and function. At 1 month, if motion, pain and functional scores were not significantly different from baseline, patients had the option of receiving up to four additional 0.58 mg collagenase injections, given six weeks apart.

In the open-label portion of the study, for the first open-label course, n=13, 12, 9, and 10 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 unit, 5,000 unit, and 10,000 unit treatment groups, except for active elevation and passive elevation for which n=9 for the 5,000 unit group. For the second open label course, n=7, 7, 4, and 6 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 unit, 5000 unit, and 10,000 unit treatment groups. For subjects with the contralateral shoulder measured at baseline, in the first open label course, n=10, 8, 8, and 8 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 unit, 5000 unit, and 10,000 unit treatment groups. For the second open label course, n=4, 5, 3, and 5 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 unit, 5000 unit, and 10,000 unit treatment groups for subjects with contralateral shoulder measurements at baseline. Three subjects in the data received had data for a third.

Results of the random placebo controlled, dose response study showed that there were statistically significant differences in drug treatment vs. placebo in restoration of normal shoulder motion and function, with minimal pain and the 0.58 mg dose trending to be the most efficacious. A majority of patients required second (n=19) and third (n=19), open label 0.58 mg collagenase injections and continued to show significant improvements in motion, function and pain. This study has shown that a short series of collagenase injections of the shoulder capsule for adhesive capsulitis is a safe and effective method of treatment which warrants continued investigation within the FDA regulatory process.

Sixty subjects completed the nominal day 30 visit in the double-blind phase and provided data for statistical analysis. The sample sizes for placebo, 2500 units, 5,000 units, and 10,000 units treatments were, respectively, 15, 16, 15, and 14. Of those 60 subjects, 46 had data for the contralateral shoulder at baseline: 12, 10, 12, and 12 subjects for, respectively, the placebo, 2,500 units, 5,000 units, and 10,000 units treatment groups.

TABLE 1
Treated shoulder and contralateral shoulder at baseline
Contralateral Treated
shoulder shoulder
(n = 46) (n = 60)
Active elevation (degrees) 166.9 ± 12.4  112.1 ± 19.6 
Active external rotation (degrees) 77.1 ± 14.0 26.6 ± 16.7
Active internal rotation (spine level) 14.4 ± 3.6   5.3 ± 2.34
Passive elevation (degrees) 175.3 ± 8.1  130.4 ± 17.2 
Passive external rotation (degrees) 86.1 ± 10.0 28.0 ± 18.0
Passive external elevation @ 90° 103.8 ± 11.1  69.4 ± 15.3
(degrees)
Function score (0-60 scale) 60.0 ± 0   32.0 ± 7.6 
Pain score (0-5 scale) 5.0 ± 0   2.0 ± 0.9

For the protocol-defined success criteria, none of the outcome measures approached statistical significance for any active treatment compared to placebo. One might wonder if the protocol-defined success criteria, drawn from published standards, are too strict for the population in this study. Comparison of the contralateral shoulder means to the published standards seems to not support that. For example, the protocol-defined criteria for active elevation and active internal rotation (spine level) are 160 degrees and 10 degrees, respectively, but, from Table 1, the subjects in this study had better functionality at baseline in the contralateral shoulder for these two outcome measures than the published standards stipulate.

TABLE 2
Means at the 30-day double-blind visit adjusted
for baseline of treated shoulder
Placebo 2,500 u 5,000 u 10,000 u
(n = 15) (n = 16) (n = 15) (n = 14)
Active elevation 124.5 131.9 130.2  139.7
(degrees)
Active external rotation 42.4 42.3   52.6 * 48.6
(degrees)
Active internal rotation 8.0 8.4  8.4 7.9
(spine level)
Passive elevation 145.5 145.2 148.6  145.9
(degrees)
Passive external rotation 44.5 49.3 55.6 59.5
(degrees)
Passive external elevation 83.8 81.7 89.4 87.9
@ 90° (degrees)
Function score 43.0 44.2 48.6 49.8
(0-60 scale)
Pain score 3.3 3.4  3.9 3.4
(0-5 scale)

* p ≦ 0.05

The analysis of covariance adjusted the double-blind phase treatment means for their different baseline values so that, in effect, each treatment had the same mean for the treated shoulder at baseline. With that adjustment, four of the eight outcome measures analyzed showed activity for the 5,000 unit or 10,000 unit treatments (Table 2). The 10,000 unit dose showed activity, relative to placebo, for active elevation, passive elevation, and function score. The 5,000 unit treatment showed activity for active external rotation. It is worth noting that for each of those four outcome measures, subjects in the placebo group had, on average, less favorable or just about less favorable, outcomes than any group receiving active treatment.

The exploratory analyses of the open-label data supported results of the analysis of covariance of the double-blind data.

After one open-label course, subjects had received a total of 10,000 units, 12,500 units, 15,000 units, or 20,000 units of collagenase, depending on their treatment group in the double-blind phase. For active elevation, the change from the treated shoulder baseline or the contralateral shoulder baseline is consistent with an active collagenase treatment. For example, relative to the treated shoulder baseline, active elevation improved by 43.6 degrees for the 10,000 unit group but only 28.3 degrees for the placebo group. For function score, the improvement for the 10,000 unit group was 21.6 points on the 60-point scale versus an improvement of 20.6 points for the placebo group. Some outcome measures did show more improvement for the placebo group than for the collagenasetreated groups. For example, for active external rotation, the group that received placebo in the double-blind phase (n=15) had a change from baseline of 35.2 degrees after one course of open-label treatment (n=13 subjects continued from the double-blind phase) but the group that received 10,000 units in the double-blind phase (n=14) had a change from baseline after an additional 10,000 units of only 27 degrees (n=10 continued from the double-blind phase).

Discussion

The study set out to demonstrate that a single collagenase injection of 2,500, 5,000, or 10,000 units is more efficacious than placebo injection for adhesive capsulitis. The protocol stipulates dichotomous “success” criteria for 11 outcome measures and those clearly were not met. The protocol also stipulates a more sensitive analysis of the data using the analysis of covariance and that approach does provide evidence that collagenase had activity in this study.

Eight of the outcome measures were analyzed with the analysis of covariance and four of the eight did present evidence of collagenase activity. Active elevation, passive elevation, and function score had p-values <0.05 for the comparison of placebo to the 10,000 unit treatment. For active external rotation, the 5,000 unit treatment had a p-value <0.05, although the 10,000 unit dose did not. For passive external elevation at 90°, placebo has an adjusted mean of 83.8 degrees versus an adjusted mean of 87.9 for the 10,000 unit treatment although the p-value for this difference is not less than 0.05. The remaining three outcome measures: active internal rotation (spine level), passive elevation, and pain score were not at all sensitive to any collagenase effect, with placebo and collagenase very similar.

The gold standard in clinical trials is protocol-specified analysis of data collected in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study and with that gold standard, as discussed above, there is evidence that collagenase has activity in adhesive capsulitis.

Aside from evidence collected with the gold standard, supportive or exploratory analysis can provide important corroboration. The open-label portion of this study, particularly for active elevation and function score, does corroborate the double-blind portion. The open label portion of the study suggests that additional injections may be of benefit.

Conclusion

The outcome measures of active elevation, active external rotation, passive elevation, and function score, as analyzed in the analysis of covariance of the double-blind data, do show evidence of activity in adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. The three collagenase doses administered in this study did not meet the protocol-defined criteria for “success” therefore it cannot be concluded that a single injection of collagenase, even at the highest dose of 10,000 units, is efficacious.

Example 3

At one month after the first random, placebo controlled, double blind injection in all 60 patients, shoulder motion was improved, but not to normal values. The highest collagenase dose (0.58 mg) trended as the most effective (FIG. 2). Function scores were 70% of normal for placebo, 73% for 0.145 mg collagenase, 81% for 0.29 mg and 83% for 0.58 mg. Pain scores were 66% of normal for placebo and the 0.145 mg dose and 74% of normal for both the 0.29 mg and 0.58 mg doses. The spine levels reached behind the back (active internal rotation) were L3 for placebo and L2 for all collagenase doses. Normal spine level was T8. Fourteen patients required only the first injection because they responded to normal after one month.

Twenty three patients had a second open label injection consisting of 0.58 mg collagenase. Improvements in active elevation, active external rotation, active internal rotation, passive elevation, passive elevation at the side, passive elevation at 90 degrees, function and pain score were significant (p<0.O1) and dramatic, beginning atone day post the open label injection (FIG. 3). Baseline values are denoted in FIG. 3 at day 0. Normal values are on the y axis. At one month post injection, all parameters reached normal values, based on the means of the unaffected contralateral side. Slight improvements in all parameters occurred throughout the succeeding months of follow-up. Twenty patients went on to a third open label, 0.58 mg collagenase injection. Results in all parameters after one year were similar to those who received a second injection as delineated in FIG. 2. None of these patients were lost to 12 month follow-up.

Adverse events were local and minimal consisting of injection area tenderness and biceps ecchymosis. These resolved well in 7-14 days. There were no adverse immune events.

Discussion

This study has shown that collagenase injection for adhesive capsulitis is a novel method for early restoration of shoulder motion, function and pain resolution. The highest dose used (0.58 mg) trended to be the most effective in controlled study. However, it was apparent that a short series of injections using the 0.58 mg dose was more effective in open label study.

Additional Results

It is noted that the use of separate examples is not intended to imply that separate and distinct studies, rather than separate analysis of the results. The invention, of course, also relates to the use the collagenase formulations of the invention to achieve the results described in these results. The results of these studies also include the data presented in the following tables:

TABLE 1
Means ± standard deviation for endpoints at baseline and at the 30-day double-blind visit
Placebo 2,500 u 5,000 u 10,000 u
(n = 15) (n = 16) (n = 15) (n = 14)
Active elevation Treated shoulder at baseline 112.9 ± 21.8 115.0 ± 16.2  109.1 ± 21.4  111.1 ± 20.3 
(degrees) Contralateral Shoulder at baseline § 168.0 ± 9.6  162.4 ± 14.2  170.8 ± 9.0  165.8 ± 16.0 
30-day, double-blind observation 125.2 ± 23.6 134.1 ± 22.8  127.8 ± 19.0  139.0 ± 22.1 
Active external Treated shoulder at baseline  25.2 ± 15.3 20.9 ± 17.1 29.7 ± 18.9 31.3 ± 14.6
rotation (degrees) Contralateral Shoulder at baseline § 81.7 ± 6.5 73.0 ± 19.8 78.5 ± 11.9 74.7 ± 16.0
30-day, double-blind observation  41.4 ± 17.4 38.2 ± 20.5 54.8 ± 14.9 52.0 ± 16.2
Active internal Treated shoulder at baseline  4.9 ± 1.8 5.1 ± 2.4 5.3 ± 2.4 5.9 ± 2.8
rotation (spine level) Contralateral Shoulder at baseline § 15.3 ± 3.2 12.9 ± 4.1  13.8 ± 4.1  15.4 ± 2.8 
(degrees) 30-day, double-blind observation  7.5 ± 2.6 8.3 ± 3.6 8.3 ± 4.0 8.6 ± 4.0
Passive elevation Treated shoulder at baseline 127.7 ± 19.5 132.7 ± 17.7  125.6 ± 16.3  135.9 ± 14.4 
(degrees) Contralateral Shoulder at baseline § 175.2 ± 7.9  173.9 ± 9.0  176.2 ± 6.8  175.6 ± 9.4 
30-day, double-blind observation 143.3 ± 21.8 147.0 ± 20.6  144.9 ± 16.4  150.3 ± 21.4 
Passive external Treated shoulder at baseline  32.8 ± 22.3 23.3 ± 15.5 29.5 ± 14.8 26.7 ± 18.9
rotation (degrees) Contralateral Shoulder at baseline § 89.6 ± 1.4 80.3 ± 17.1 87.9 ± 5.8  85.8 ± 9.3 
30-day, double-blind observation  47.3 ± 19.8 46.6 ± 22.9 56.5 ± 22.2 58.7 ± 22.0
Passive external Treated shoulder at baseline  68.0 ± 16.1 70.3 ± 14.5 67.0 ± 18.1 72.3 ± 13.2
elevation @ 90° Contralateral Shoulder at baseline § 102.1 ± 5.1  99.6 ± 15.4 110.7 ± 12.6  102.3 ± 7.6 
(degrees) 30-day, double-blind observation  83.3 ± 13.6 82.1 ± 13.5 88.7 ± 11.8 88.9 ± 10.1
Function score (0-60 Treated shoulder at baseline 31.2 ± 9.3 32.0 ± 7.1  32.9 ± 7.5  31.9 ± 6.8 
scale) Contralateral Shoulder at baseline § 60.0 ± 0.0 60.0 ± 0.0  60.0 ± 0.0  60.0 ± 0.0 
30-day, double-blind observation  42.4 ± 12.4 44.2 ± 9.8  49.3 ± 8.8  49.7 ± 7.5 
Pain score (0-5 Treated shoulder at baseline  2.0 ± 0.8 1.9 ± 0.9 1.9 ± 0.8 2.3 ± 1.0
scale) Contralateral Shoulder at baseline §  5.0 ± 0.0 5.0 ± 0.0 5.0 ± 0.0 5.0 ± 0.0
30-day, double-blind observation  3.3 ± 0.9 3.8 ± 0.9 3.9 ± 0.9 3.5 ± 0.9

§ For contralateral shoulder at baseline, n = 12, 10, 12, and 12 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 u, 5000 u, and 10,000 u treatments.

TABLE 2
Means ± standard deviation for endpoints at the 30-day
visit after the first and second open-label treatments
Open-label
treatment of Randomization group
10,000 u Placebo 2,500 u 5,000 u 10,000 u
Active elevation First § 143.6 ± 24.5  146.8 ± 15.5  143.2 ± 18.8 148.8 ± 13.2
(degrees) Second ‡ 141.7 ± 18.3  144.1 ± 12.7  152.5 ± 8.7  155.2 ± 4.3 
Active external First § 60.2 ± 20.1 46.8 ± 17.1  64.8 ± 18.7  54.8 ± 14.7
rotation (degrees) Second ‡ 62.6 ± 19.2 47.1 ± 16.6  61.3 ± 12.2  62.0 ± 13.7
Active internal First § 10.2 ± 3.6  9.2 ± 5.2  9.8 ± 4.2 10.7 ± 4.9
rotation (spine level) Second ‡ 10.4 ± 4.5  8.4 ± 3.6 12.0 ± 7.6  9.2 ± 2.3
(degrees)
Passive elevation First § 156.7 ± 22.7  154.3 ± 16.1  156.1 ± 19.8 158.1 ± 12.6
(degrees) Second ‡ 158.7 ± 16.5  152.9 ± 14.0  167.0 ± 9.5  164.8 ± 8.5 
Passive external First § 69.5 ± 22.1 56.9 ± 24.7  68.9 ± 20.5  60.9 ± 17.5
rotation (degrees) Second ‡ 74.0 ± 22.2 53.9 ± 22.5  64.0 ± 16.8 62.3 ± 7.7
Passive external First § 93.7 ± 15.9 86.5 ± 9.7  96.6 ± 9.9  93.4 ± 14.0
elevation @ 90° Second ‡ 95.7 ± 16.4 85.7 ± 8.4  101.8 ± 7.9  90.7 ± 5.6
(degrees)
Function score (0-60 First § 51.4 ± 9.1  51.2 ± 6.3  51.2 ± 8.5 52.4 ± 7.0
scale) Second ‡ 52.6 ± 9.9  53.4 ± 3.8   52.0 ± 10.8 57.7 ± 2.7
Pain score (0-5 scale) First § 3.9 ± 1.0 4.3 ± 0.5  4.1 ± 0.3  4.1 ± 0.9
Second ‡ 3.7 ± 1.0 4.1 ± 0.7  4.0 ± 0.8  4.3 ± 0.5

§ For first open label treatment, n = 13, 12, 9, and 10 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 u, 5000 u, and 10,000 u treatments, except for active elevation and passive elevation for which n = 9 for the 5000 u group.

‡ For second open label treatment, n = 7, 7, 4, and 6 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 u, 5000 u, and 10,000 u treatments.

TABLE 3
Mean change from baseline contralateral shoulder for endpoints at
the 30-day visit after the first and second open-label treatments
Open-label
treatment of Randomization group
10,000 u Placebo 2,500 u 5,000 u 10,000 u
Active elevation First § −13.9 −18.1 −24.1 −12.4
(degrees) Second ‡ −13.5 −15.2 −10.0 −9.0
Active external First § −15.6 −32.1 −9.6 −15.6
rotation (degrees) Second ‡ −15.5 −26.8 −18.0 −6.8
Active internal First § −3.7 −3.0 −3.3 −5.4
rotation (spine level) Second ‡ −3.3 −4.6 −1.0 −5.6
(degrees)
Passive elevation First § −7.8 −21.5 −14.1 −17.3
(degrees) Second ‡ −5.0 −19.2 −7.0 −9.6
Passive external First § −11.0 −28.1 −16.4 −23.3
rotation (degrees) Second ‡ −2.5 −21.0 −18.0 −20.2
Passive external First § −1.9 −11.6 −14.1 −6.0
elevation @ 90° Second ‡ 0.5 −11.2 −16.0 −6.6
(degrees)
Fraction score (0-60 First § −4.6 −9.5 −5.4 −8.1
scale) Second ‡ −3.0 −7.0 −2.7 −2.6
Pain score (0-5 scale) First § −0.8 −0.8 −0.9 −0.9
Second ‡ −0.8 −0.6 −0.7 −0.8

§ For first open label treatment, n = 10, 8, 8, and 8 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 u, 5000 u, and 10,000 u treatments.

‡ For second open label treatment, n = 4, 5, 3, and 5 for, respectively, placebo, 2,500 u, 5000 u, and 10,000 u treatments.

TABLE 4
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Active elevation
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs Median vs Mean vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo (degrees) placebo (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 6.7 9.0 12.27
1 2,500 16 12.5 1.00 19.5 0.15 19.13 0.19
1 5,000 15 0.0 1.00 22.0 0.30 18.73 0.25
1 10,000 14 14.3 0.60 26.0 0.02 27.79 0.02
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 45 35.0 33.98
3 10,000 24 42.0 39.08
4 10,000 3 17.0 28.33
5 10,000 2 17.5 17.50

TABLE 5
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Passive elevation
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs Median vs Mean vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo (degrees) placebo (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 26.7 15.0 15.67
1 2,500 16 31.3 1.00 17.0 0.77 14.31 0.79
1 5,000 15 20.0 1.00 20.0 0.87 19.27 0.53
1 10,000 14 28.6 1.00 16.5 0.66 14.43 0.83
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 30.0 27.56
3 10,000 24 35.5 31.00
4 10,000 3 17.0 25.67
5 10,000 2 20.5 20.50

TABLE 6
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Active ER at side
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs Median vs Mean vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo (degrees) placebo (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 46.7 10.0 16.20
1 2,500 16 37.5 0.72 19.0 0.62 17.25 0.80
1 5,000 15 73.3 0.26 27.0 0.12 25.13 0.08
1 10,000 14 71.4 0.26 18.5 0.41 20.71 0.44
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 28.0 30.55
3 10,000 24 34.0 36.79
4 10,000 3 36.0 36.33
5 10,000 2 30.5 30.50

TABLE 7
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Passive ER at side
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs Median vs Mean vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo (degrees) placebo (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 60.0 7.0 14.47
1 2,500 16 56.3 1.00 20.5 0.28 23.31 0.27
1 5,000 15 66.7 1.00 26.0 0.13 27.00 0.11
1 10,000 14 71.4 0.70 31.5 0.05 32.00 0.03
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 34.5 35.80
3 10,000 24 31.5 35.54
4 10,000 3 21.0 23.33
5 10,000 2 19.5 19.50

TABLE 8
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
IR spinal level
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs Median vs Mean vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo (degrees) placebo (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 26.7 3.0 2.67
1 2,500 16 50.0 0.27 4.0 0.56 3.13 0.60
1 5,000 15 40.0 0.70 2.0 0.88 3.07 0.66
1 10,000 14 42.9 0.45 2.0 0.88 2.64 0.98
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 5.0 5.16
3 10,000 24 5.0 5.50
4 10,000 3 4.0 6.33
5 10,000 2 3.5 3.50

TABLE 9
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Passive ER at 90°
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs Median vs Mean vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo (degrees) placebo (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 46.7 15.0 15.33
1 2,500 16 37.5 0.72 14.5 0.83 11.75 0.53
1 5,000 15 66.7 0.46 20.0 0.22 21.67 0.30
1 10,000 14 57.1 0.72 15.0 0.73 16.57 0.82
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 21.0 23.80
3 10,000 24 20.0 23.17
4 10,000 3 15.0 20.33
5 10,000 2 15.0 15.00

TABLE 10
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Strength
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs vs vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo Median placebo Mean placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 100.0 0 0
1 2,500 16 100.0 0 1.00 0
1 5,000 15 100.0 0 0.18 0.33 0.16
1 10,000 14 100.0 0 0.16 −0.43 0.16
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 0 −0.05
3 10,000 24 0 −0.08
4 10,000 3 0 0
5 10,000 2 0 0

TABLE 11
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Stability
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs vs vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo Median placebo Mean placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 100.0 0 0
1 2,500 16 100.0 0 1.00 0
1 5,000 15 100.0 0 1.00 0
1 10,000 14 100.0 0 0.34 −0.21 0.31
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 0 −0.07
3 10,000 24 0 0
4 10,000 3 0 0
5 10,000 2 0 0

TABLE 12
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Function
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs vs vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo Median placebo Mean placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 26.7 10.0 11.20
1 2,500 16 25.0 1.00 13.0 0.72 12.19 0.73
1 5,000 15 46.7 0.45 18.0 0.17 16.40 0.11
1 10,000 14 42.9 0.45 19.0 0.06 17.79 0.04
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 22.0 20.50
3 10,000 24 25.5 22.88
4 10,000 3 26.0 23.67
5 10,000 2 20.5 20.50

TABLE 13
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Pain
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs vs vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo Median placebo Mean placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 86.7 1.0 1.33
1 2,500 16 87.5 1.00 1.0 0.65 1.44 0.69
1 5,000 15 93.3 1.00 2.0 0.05 2.00 0.05
1 10,000 14 85.7 1.00 1.0 0.78 1.21 0.75
Open-label study phase
2 10,000 44 2.0 2.16
3 10,000 24 2.0 2.13
4 10,000 3 4.0 3.00
5 10,000 2 2.5 2.50

TABLE 14
Change from baseline (except success rate) at the 30-day study visit
Satisfaction
Protocol-
defined p-value p-value p-value
Treatment Incremental success vs vs vs
cycle dose n rate (%) placebo Median placebo Mean placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 15 53.3
1 2,500 16 68.8 0.47
1 5,000 15 66.7 0.71
1 10,000 14 78.6 0.25
Open-label study phase
2 10,000
3 10,000
4 10,000
5 10,000

TABLE 15
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Active elevation
Open-label study phase
Mean change
Randomization from baseline
Treatment cycle treatment arm n (degrees) p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 28.3 <.0001
2 2,500 12 32.4 <.0001
2 5,000 10 33.6 0.0007
2 10,000 10 43.6 <.0001
3 0 (Placebo) 7 34.3 0.0008
3 2,500 7 34.1 0.0023
3 5,000 4 43.8 0.0089
3 10,000 6 47.3 0.0002

TABLE 16
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Passive elevation
Open-label study phase
Mean change
Randomization from baseline
Treatment cycle treatment arm n (degrees) p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 29.2 0.0001
2 2,500 12 23.9 0.0002
2 5,000 10 30.4 0.0022
2 10,000 10 26.9 0.0002
3 0 (Placebo) 7 32.7 0.0008
3 2,500 7 25.7 0.0125
3 5,000 4 33.3 0.0078
3 10,000 6 33.6 0.0020

TABLE 17
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Active ER at side
Open-label study phase
Mean change
Randomization from baseline
Treatment cycle treatment arm n (degrees) p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 35.2 <.0001
2 2,500 12 29.0 <.0001
2 5,000 9 29.8 0.0035
2 10,000 10 27.0 0.0014
3 0 (Placebo) 7 38.2 0.0004
3 2,500 7 37.1 0.0002
3 5,000 4 33.7 0.0230
3 10,000 6 36.6 0.0015

TABLE 18
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Passive ER at side
Open-label study phase
Mean change
Randomization from baseline
Treatment cycle treatment arm n (degrees) p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 39.6 <.0001
2 2,500 12 31.3 0.0005
2 5,000 9 32.6 0.0008
2 10,000 10 39.1 0.0007
3 0 (Placebo) 7 41.1 0.0064
3 2,500 7 26.9 0.0064
3 5,000 4 32.2 0.0259
3 10,000 6 41.3 0.0030

TABLE 19
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
IR spinal level
Open-label study phase
Mean change
Randomization from baseline
Treatment cycle treatment arm n (degrees) p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 5.2 <.0001
2 2,500 12 4.3 0.0043
2 5,000 9 5.7 0.0013
2 10,000 10 5.7 0.0010
3 0 (Placebo) 7 5.0 0.0067
3 2,500 7 4.7 0.0080
3 5,000 4 8.8 0.0635
3 10,000 6 4.8 0.0081

TABLE 20
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Passive ER at 90°
Open-label study phase
Mean change
Randomization from baseline
Treatment cycle treatment arm n (degrees) p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 26.4 <.0001
2 2,500 12 17.3 0.0056
2 5,000 9 28.8 0.0012
2 10,000 10 23.7 0.0060
3 0 (Placebo) 7 30.4 0.0030
3 2,500 7 16.0 0.0491
3 5,000 4 29.2 0.0157
3 10,000 6 19.0 0.0058

TABLE 21
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Strength
Open-label study phase
Randomization Mean change
Treatment cycle treatment arm n from baseline p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 0
2 2,500 12 −0.3 0.3388
2 5,000 9 0.2 0.3466
2 10,000 10 0
3 0 (Placebo) 7 0
3 2,500 7 −0.3 0.3559
3 5,000 4 0
3 10,000 6 0

TABLE 22
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Stability
Open-label study phase
Randomization Mean change
Treatment cycle treatment arm n from baseline p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 0
2 2,500 12 −0.3 0.3388
2 5,000 9 0
2 10,000 10 0
3 0 (Placebo) 7 0
3 2,500 7 0
3 5,000 4 0
3 10,000 6 0

TABLE 23
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Function
Open-label study phase
Randomization Mean change
Treatment cycle treatment arm n from baseline p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 20.6 <.0001
2 2,500 12 21.0 <.0001
2 5,000 9 18.4 0.0006
2 10,000 10 21.6 <.0001
3 0 (Placebo) 7 22.7 0.0037
3 2,500 7 23.1 <.0001
3 5,000 4 15.8 0.1151
3 10,000 6 27.5 0.0002

TABLE 24
Open-label phase change from baseline at the 30-day study visit
Pain
Open-label study phase
Randomization Mean change
Treatment cycle treatment arm n from baseline p-value
2 0 (Placebo) 13 2 <.0001
2 2,500 12 2.3 <.0001
2 5,000 9 2.4 <.0001
2 10,000 10 1.9 0.0007
3 0 (Placebo) 7 1.9 0.0004
3 2,500 7 2.3 0.0007
3 5,000 4 2.0 0.0917
3 10,000 6 2.3 0.0001

TABLE 25
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Active elevation
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 −35.6
1 2,500 10 −33.8 0.8269
1 5,000 12 −38.0 0.7652
1 10,000 12 −26.9 0.3834
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 −13.9 −20.9
2 2,500 8 −18.1 −24.2
2 5,000 8 −24.1 −29.6
2 10,000 8 −12.4 −18.5
3 0 (Placebo) 4 −13.5 −25.5
3 2,500 5 −15.2 −20.7
3 5,000 3 −10.0 −10.0
3 10,000 5 −9.0 −20.4

TABLE 26
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Passive elevation
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 −24.4
1 2,500 10 −30.6 0.3050
1 5,000 12 −26.8 0.6892
1 10,000 12 −25.3 0.9127
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 −7.8 −11.9
2 2,500 8 −21.5 −27.7
2 5,000 8 −14.1 −20.2
2 10,000 8 −17.3 −22.9
3 0 (Placebo) 4 −5.0 −12.9
3 2,500 5 −19.2 −24.2
3 5,000 3 −7.0 −15.2
3 10,000 5 −9.6 −18.4

TABLE 27
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Active ER at side
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 −35.8
1 2,500 10 −40.8 0.5358
1 5,000 12 −20.0 0.0120
1 10,000 12 −19.8 0.0255
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 −15.6 −21.8
2 2,500 8 −32.1 −39.2
2 5,000 7 −9.6 −13.7
2 10,000 8 −15.6 −23.3
3 0 (Placebo) 4 −15.5 −29.9
3 2,500 5 −26.8 −42.1
3 5,000 3 −18.0 −24.6
3 10,000 5 −6.8 −12.7

TABLE 28
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Passive ER at side
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 −35.7
1 2,500 10 −37.0 0.8546
1 5,000 12 −27.5 0.2663
1 10,000 12 −26.3 0.2017
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 −11.0 −16.9
2 2,500 8 −28.1 −37.3
2 5,000 7 −16.4 −25.5
2 10,000 8 −23.3 −30.8
3 0 (Placebo) 4 −2.5 −10.3
3 2,500 5 −21.0 −32.2
3 5,000 3 −18.0 −24.6
3 10,000 5 −20.2 −27.8

TABLE 29
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
IR spinal level
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 −6.9
1 2,500 10 −5.8 0.4766
1 5,000 12 −4.5 0.0917
1 10,000 12 −7.3 0.7881
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 −3.7 −5.9
2 2,500 8 −3.0 −5.7
2 5,000 7 −3.3 −4.8
2 10,000 8 −5.4 −7.5
3 0 (Placebo) 4 −3.3 −6.6
3 2,500 5 −4.6 −7.1
3 5,000 3 −1.0 −2.1
3 10,000 5 −5.6 −7.5

TABLE 30
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Passive ER at 90°
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 −16.2
1 2,500 10 −22.1 0.4676
1 5,000 12 −20.9 0.4260
1 10,000 12 −13.6 0.6256
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 −1.9 −5.7
2 2,500 8 −11.6 −20.5
2 5,000 7 −14.1 −19.6
2 10,000 8 −6.0 −13.2
3 0 (Placebo) 4 0.5 −6.2
3 2,500 5 −11.2 −21.9
3 5,000 3 −16 −27.3
3 10,000 5 −6.6 −14.6

TABLE 31
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Strength
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 0
1 2,500 10 0
1 5,000 12 0
1 10,000 12 −0.5 0.1775
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 0 0
2 2,500 8 0 0
2 5,000 7 0 0
2 10,000 8 0 0
3 0 (Placebo) 4 0 0
3 2,500 5 −0.4 −1.0
3 5,000 3 0 0
3 10,000 5 0 0

TABLE 32
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Stability
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 0
1 2,500 10 0
1 5,000 12 0
1 10,000 12 −0.3 0.3282
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 0 0
2 2,500 8 0 0
2 5,000 7 0 0
2 10,000 8 0 0
3 0 (Placebo) 4 0 0
3 2,500 5 0 0
3 5,000 3 0 0
3 10,000 5 0 0

TABLE 33
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Function
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 −14.9
1 2,500 10 −16.3 0.7725
1 5,000 12 −7.3 0.0546
1 10,000 12 −10.8 0.3246
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 −4.6 −7.1
2 2,500 8 −9.5 −12.4
2 5,000 7 −5.4 −8.7
2 10,000 8 −8.1 −11.9
3 0 (Placebo) 4 −3.0 −4.8
3 2,500 5 −7.0 −9.9
3 5,000 3 −2.7 −4.9
3 10,000 5 −2.6 −4.6

TABLE 34
Change from contralateral shoulder baseline for the 30-day study visit
Pain
Mean change from
Treatment Randomization contralateral p-value vs
cycle treatment arm n baseline (degrees) placebo
Placebo-controlled, double-blind study phase
1 0 (Placebo) 12 −1.5
1 2,500 10 −1.8 0.4508
1 5,000 12 −0.8 0.0580
1 10,000 12 −1.5 1.0000
Open-label study phase
Lower limit of
one-sided 90% CI
2 0 (Placebo) 10 −0.8 −1.1
2 2,500 8 −0.8 −1.0
2 5,000 7 −0.9 −1.1
2 10,000 8 −0.9 −1.4
3 0 (Placebo) 4 −0.8 −1.2
3 2,500 5 −0.6 −1.0
3 5,000 3 −0.7 −1.3
3 10,000 5 −0.8 −1.1

While this invention has been particularly shown and described with references to preferred embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and details may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention encompassed by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7811560 *Jan 29, 2007Oct 12, 2010Auxilium Us Holdings, LlcCompositions and methods for treating collagen-mediated diseases
US7824673Sep 28, 2005Nov 2, 2010Advance Biofactures CorporationSupplying collagenase, protease to tissue; for removing excess amounts of unaesthetic and/or redundant subcutaneous adipose tissue; lipomas
US20110158972 *Aug 30, 2010Jun 30, 2011Sabatino Gregory LCompositions and methods for treating collagen-mediated diseases
US20110189153 *Apr 12, 2011Aug 4, 2011Sabatino Gregory LCompositions and Methods for Treating Collagen-Mediated Diseases
US20110189163 *Apr 12, 2011Aug 4, 2011Sabatino Gregory LCompositions and Methods for Treating Collagen-Mediated Diseases
US20110243908 *Apr 12, 2011Oct 6, 2011Sabatino Gregory LCompositions and Methods for Treating Collagen-Mediated Diseases
US20110243909 *Apr 12, 2011Oct 6, 2011Sabatino Gregory LCompositions and Methods for Treating Collagen-Mediated Diseases
US20110243919 *Apr 12, 2011Oct 6, 2011Sabatino Gregory LCompositions and Methods for Treating Collagen-Mediated Diseases
US20110243920 *Apr 12, 2011Oct 6, 2011Sabatino Gregory LCompositions and methods for treating collagen-mediated diseases
US20140004094 *Dec 13, 2012Jan 2, 2014Gregory L. SabatinoCompositions and methods for treating collagen-mediated diseases
WO2013034416A1Aug 16, 2012Mar 14, 2013Unilever N.V.Antimicrobial method and composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification424/94.63
International ClassificationA61K38/48
Cooperative ClassificationA61K38/4886
European ClassificationA61K38/48N
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 12, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: BIOSPECIFICS TECHNOLOGIES CORP., NEW YORK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ADVANCE BIOFACTURES CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:021820/0771
Effective date: 20081028
May 19, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH), U.S. DEPT. OF
Free format text: CONFIRMATORY LICENSE;ASSIGNOR:THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK;REEL/FRAME:020962/0994
Effective date: 20061006
Nov 28, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BIOSPECIFICS TECHNOLOGIES CORP.;REEL/FRAME:018558/0848
Effective date: 20061121
May 22, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: ADVANCE BIOFACTURES CORPORATION, NEW YORK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BADALAMENTE, MARIE A.;REEL/FRAME:017659/0501
Effective date: 20060308