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Publication numberUS20060213440 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/430,328
Publication dateSep 28, 2006
Filing dateMay 9, 2006
Priority dateAug 28, 2003
Also published asUS7422635, US20050045102, US20060205187
Publication number11430328, 430328, US 2006/0213440 A1, US 2006/213440 A1, US 20060213440 A1, US 20060213440A1, US 2006213440 A1, US 2006213440A1, US-A1-20060213440, US-A1-2006213440, US2006/0213440A1, US2006/213440A1, US20060213440 A1, US20060213440A1, US2006213440 A1, US2006213440A1
InventorsLingyi Zheng, Trung Doan, Lyle Breiner, Er-Xuan Ping, Kevin Beaman, Ronald Weimer, David Kubista, Cem Basceri
Original AssigneeMicron Technology, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Methods and apparatus for processing microfeature workpieces, e.g., for depositing materials on microfeature workpieces
US 20060213440 A1
Abstract
The present disclosure suggests several systems and methods for batch processing of microfeature workpieces, e.g., semiconductor wafers or the like. One exemplary implementation provides a method of depositing a reaction product on each of a batch of workpieces positioned in a process chamber in a spaced-apart relationship. A first gas may be delivered to an elongate first delivery conduit that includes a plurality of outlets spaced along a length of the conduit. A first gas flow may be directed by the outlets to flow into at least one of the process spaces between adjacent workpieces along a first vector that is transverse to the direction in which the workpieces are spaced. A second gas may be delivered to an elongate second delivery conduit that also has outlets spaced along its length. A second gas flow of the second gas may be directed by the outlets to flow into the process spaces along a second vector that is transverse to the first direction.
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Claims(22)
1-20. (canceled)
21. A microfeature workpiece processing system comprising:
a process chamber adapted to receive a plurality of transversely oriented microfeature workpieces spaced from one another in a longitudinal direction;
a first gas conduit extending longitudinally within the process chamber and having a plurality of outlets spaced longitudinally along a length of the first gas conduit, the outlets being oriented to direct a first gas flow transversely across surfaces of the microfeature workpieces;
a second gas conduit having a second outlet oriented to direct a second gas flow longitudinally within the process chamber;
a first gas supply line adapted to deliver a first gas to the first gas conduit; and
a second gas supply line adapted to deliver a second gas to the second gas conduit.
22. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 21 wherein the first gas and the second gas are the same and the first gas supply line and the second gas supply line are in communication with a common gas supply.
23. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 21 wherein the first gas is different from the second gas and the second gas supply line is independent of the first gas supply line.
24. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 21 wherein the first gas flow is generally perpendicular to the second gas flow.
25. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 21 wherein the second outlet is one of a plurality of second outlets arranged peripherally about a workpiece area of the process chamber, the workpiece area being adapted to receive the plurality of microfeature workpieces.
26. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 21 wherein the first outlets are oriented to direct the first gas flow toward centers of the microfeature workpieces.
27. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 21 further comprising a third gas supply line adapted to deliver a third gas to the process chamber.
28. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 21 further comprising a controller operatively coupled to the first gas supply line and the second gas supply line, the controller being programmed to terminate the first gas flow before initiating the second gas flow.
29. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 21 further comprising a controller operatively coupled to the first gas supply line and the second gas supply line, the controller being programmed to deliver the first gas flow to the process chamber while delivering the second gas flow to the process chamber.
30-43. (canceled)
44. A microfeature workpiece processing system, comprising:
a process chamber configured to receive a plurality of microfeature workpieces spaced from one another in a first direction to define process spaces between adjacent workpieces;
a first gas supply line;
a second gas supply line;
a first gas conduit in fluid communication with the first gas supply line and having an outlet length extending in the first direction within the process chamber, the first gas conduit having a plurality of first outlets spaced along the outlet length in the first direction, the first outlets being configured to direct a first gas flow from the first gas conduit transversely into the process spaces;
a second gas conduit having a second outlet oriented to direct a second gas flow in a direction generally transverse to the first gas flow; and
a controller operatively coupled to the first gas supply line and to the second gas supply line and configured to selectively control the first gas flow and the second gas flow.
45. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 44 wherein the first gas and the second gas are the same and the first gas supply line and the second gas supply line are in communication with a common gas supply.
46. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 44 wherein the first gas is different from the second gas and the second gas supply line is independent of the first gas supply line.
47. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 44 wherein the first gas flow is generally perpendicular to the second gas flow.
48. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 44 wherein the first outlets are oriented to direct the first gas flow toward centers of the microfeature workpieces.
49. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 44, further comprising a third gas supply line configured to deliver a third gas to the process chamber.
50. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 44 wherein the controller is programmed to terminate the first gas flow before initiating the second gas flow.
51. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 44 wherein the controller is programmed to deliver the first gas flow to the process chamber while delivering the second gas flow to the process chamber.
52. A microfeature workpiece processing system, comprising:
a process chamber having a workpiece area configured to receive a plurality of spaced-apart microfeature workpieces arranged relative to a longitudinal axis of the process chamber;
a first gas conduit extending longitudinally within the process chamber proximate the workpiece area, the first gas conduit having a plurality of first outlets spaced longitudinally along a length of the first gas conduit, the first outlets being oriented toward the workpiece area and configured to direct a first gas flow transverse to the longitudinal axis;
a second gas conduit having a second outlet oriented to direct a second gas flow generally parallel to the longitudinally axis within the process chamber;
a first gas supply line configured to deliver a first gas to the first gas conduit; and
a second gas supply line configured to deliver a second gas to the second gas conduit, the second gas supply line being independent of the first gas supply line and the second gas being different from the first gas.
53. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 52, further comprising a controller operatively coupled to the first gas supply line and the second gas supply line, the controller being programmed to terminate the first gas flow before initiating the second gas flow.
54. The microfeature workpiece processing system of claim 52, further comprising a controller operatively coupled to the first gas supply line and the second gas supply line, the controller being programmed to deliver the first gas flow to the process chamber while delivering the second gas flow to the process chamber.
Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention is related to equipment and methods for processing microfeature workpieces, e.g., semiconductor wafers. Aspects of the invention have particular utility in connection with batch deposition of materials on microfeature workpieces, such as by atomic layer deposition or chemical vapor deposition.

BACKGROUND

Thin film deposition techniques are widely used in the manufacturing of microfeatures to form a coating on a workpiece that closely conforms to the surface topography. In the context of microelectronic components, for example, the size of the individual components in the devices on a wafer is constantly decreasing, and the number of layers in the devices is increasing. As a result, the density of components and the aspect ratios of depressions (e.g., the ratio of the depth to the size of the opening) are increasing. The size of such wafers is also increasing to provide more real estate for forming more dies (i.e., chips) on a single wafer. Many fabricators are currently transitioning from 200 mm to 300 mm workpieces, and even larger workpieces will likely be used in the future. Thin film deposition techniques accordingly strive to produce highly uniform conformal layers that cover the sidewalls, bottoms, and corners in deep depressions that have very small openings.

One widely used thin film deposition technique is chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In a CVD system, one or more precursors that are capable of reacting to form a solid thin film are mixed in a gas or vapor state, and then the precursor mixture is presented to the surface of the workpiece. The surface of the workpiece catalyzes the reaction between the precursors to form a solid thin film at the workpiece surface. A common way to catalyze the reaction at the surface of the workpiece is to heat the workpiece to a temperature that causes the reaction.

Although CVD techniques are useful in many applications, they also have several drawbacks. For example, if the precursors are not highly reactive, then a high workpiece temperature is needed to achieve a reasonable deposition rate. Such high temperatures are not typically desirable because heating the workpiece can be detrimental to the structures and other materials already formed on the workpiece. Implanted or doped materials, for example, can migrate within silicon workpieces at higher temperatures. On the other hand, if more reactive precursors are used so that the workpiece temperature can be lower, then reactions may occur prematurely in the gas phase before reaching the intended surface of the workpiece. This is undesirable because the film quality and uniformity may suffer, and also because it limits the types of precursors that can be used.

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is another thin film deposition technique. FIGS. 1A and 1B schematically illustrate the basic operation of ALD processes. Referring to FIG. 1A, a layer of gas molecules A coats the surface of a workpiece W. The layer of A molecules is formed by exposing the workpiece W to a precursor gas containing A molecules, and then purging the chamber with a purge gas to remove excess A molecules. This process can form a monolayer of A molecules on the surface of the workpiece W because the A molecules at the surface are held in place during the purge cycle by physical adsorption forces at moderate temperatures or chemisorption forces at higher temperatures. The layer of A molecules is then exposed to another precursor gas containing B molecules. The A molecules react with the B molecules to form an extremely thin layer of solid material C on the workpiece W. The chamber is then purged again with a purge gas to remove excess B molecules.

FIG. 2 illustrates the stages of one cycle for forming a thin solid layer using ALD techniques. A typical cycle includes (a) exposing the workpiece to the first precursor A, (b) purging excess A molecules, (c) exposing the workpiece to the second precursor B, and then (d) purging excess B molecules. The purge process typically comprises introducing a purge gas, which is substantially nonreactive with either precursor, and exhausting the purge gas and excess precursor from the reaction chamber in a pumping step. In actual processing, several cycles are repeated to build a thin film on a workpiece having the desired thickness. For example, each cycle may form a layer having a thickness of approximately 0.5-1.0 Å, and thus it takes approximately 60-120 cycles to form a solid layer having a thickness of approximately 60 Å.

One drawback of ALD processing is that it has a relatively low throughput compared to CVD techniques. For example, ALD processing typically takes several seconds to perform each A-purge-B-purge cycle. This results in a total process time of several minutes to form a single thin layer of only 60 Å. In contrast to ALD processing, CVD techniques only require about one minute to form a 60 Å thick layer. In single-wafer processing chambers, ALD processes can be 500%-2000% longer than corresponding single-wafer CVD processes. The low throughput of existing single-wafer ALD techniques limits the utility of the technology in its current state because the ALD process may be a bottleneck in the overall manufacturing process.

One promising solution to increase the throughput of ALD processing is processing a plurality of wafers (e.g., 20-250) simultaneously in a batch process. FIG. 3 schematically illustrates a conventional batch ALD reactor 10 having a processing enclosure 20 coupled to a gas supply 30 and a vacuum 40. The processing enclosure 20 generally includes an outer wall 22 and an annular liner 24. A platform 60 seals against the outer wall 22 or some other part of the processing enclosure 20 via a seal 62 to define a process chamber 25. Gas is introduced from the gas supply 30 to the process chamber 25 by a gas nozzle 32 that introduces gas into a main chamber 28 of the process chamber 25. Under influence of the vacuum 40, the gas introduced via the gas nozzle 32 will flow through the main chamber 28 and outwardly into an annular exhaust 26 to be drawn out with the vacuum 40. A plurality of workpieces W, e.g., semiconductor wafers, may be held in the processing enclosure 20 in a workpiece holder 70. In operation, a heater 50 heats the workpieces W to a desired temperature and the gas supply 30 delivers the first precursor A, the purge gas, and the second precursor B as discussed above in connection with FIG. 2.

However, when depositing material simultaneously on a large number of workpieces in an ALD reactor 10 such as that shown in FIG. 3, it can be difficult to uniformly deposit the precursors A and B across the surface of each of the workpieces W. Removing excess precursor from the spaces between the workpieces W can also be problematic. In an ALD reactor 10 such as that shown in FIG. 3, diffusion is the primary mechanism for removing residual precursor that is not chemisorbed on the surface of one of the workpieces. This is not only a relatively slow process that significantly reduces the throughput of the reactor 10, but it also may not adequately remove residual precursor. As such, conventional batch ALD reactors may have a low throughput and form nonuniform films.

In U.S. Patent Application Publication 2003/0024477 (the entirety of which is incorporated herein by reference), Okuda et al. suggest a system that employs a large plenum extending along the interior wall of a reaction tube. This plenum has a series of slots along its length with the intention of flowing gas parallel to the surfaces of the substrates treated in the tube. Although Okuda et al. suggest that this system may be used in both CVD and ALD applications, using such a system in ALD systems can be problematic. If a second precursor is introduced into the plenum before the first precursor is adequately purged from the plenum, the two precursors may react within the plenum. As a consequence, sufficient purge gas must be delivered to the plenum to adequately clear the first precursor, which may require even longer purge processes between delivery of the precursors. Such extended purges will reduce throughput and increase manufacturing costs. Throughput may be maintained by selecting less reactive precursors, but such precursors may require higher workpiece temperatures or preclude the use of some otherwise desirable precursors.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1A and 1B are schematic cross-sectional views of stages in ALD processing in accordance with the prior art.

FIG. 2 is a graph illustrating a cycle for forming a layer using ALD techniques in accordance with the prior art.

FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of a system including a reactor for depositing a material onto a microfeature workpiece in accordance with the prior art.

FIG. 4 is a schematic longitudinal cross-sectional view, taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 5, of a microfeature workpiece processing system in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a schematic transverse cross-sectional view of the microfeature workpiece processing system of FIG. 4, taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a schematic transverse cross-sectional view of a microfeature workpiece processing system in accordance with a modified embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a schematic longitudinal cross-sectional view, taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 8, of a microfeature workpiece processing system in accordance with another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a schematic transverse cross-sectional view of the microfeature workpiece processing system of FIG. 7, taken along the line 8-8 in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a schematic longitudinal cross-sectional view of a microfeature workpiece processing system in accordance with still another embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A. Overview

Various embodiments of the present invention provide microfeature workpiece processing systems and methods for depositing materials onto microfeature workpieces. Many specific details of the invention are described below with reference to exemplary systems for depositing materials onto microfeature workpieces. The term “microfeature workpiece” is used throughout to include substrates upon which and/or in which microelectronic devices, micromechanical devices, data storage elements, read/write components, and other features are fabricated. For example, microfeature workpieces can be semiconductor wafers such as silicon or gallium arsenide wafers, glass substrates, insulative substrates, and many other types of materials. The microfeature workpieces typically have submicron features with dimensions of 0.05 microns or greater. Furthermore, the term “gas” is used throughout to include any form of matter that has no fixed shape and will conform in volume to the space available, which specifically includes vapors (i.e., a gas having a temperature less than the critical temperature so that it may be liquefied or solidified by compression at a constant temperature). Moreover, the term “transverse” is used throughout to mean oblique, perpendicular, and/or not parallel. Several embodiments in accordance with the invention are set forth in FIGS. 4-9 and the following text to provide a thorough understanding of particular embodiments of the invention. A person skilled in the art will understand, however, that the invention may have additional embodiments, or that the invention may be practiced without several of the details of the embodiments shown in FIGS. 4-9.

Some embodiments of the invention provide microfeature workpiece processing systems. In one such embodiment, a microfeature workpiece processing system includes a process chamber, a first gas conduit, a second gas conduit, a first gas supply line, and a second gas supply line. The process chamber has a workpiece area adapted to receive a plurality of spaced-apart microfeature workpieces arranged relative to a longitudinal axis of the process chamber. The first gas conduit extends longitudinally within the process chamber proximate the workpiece area. This first gas conduit may have a plurality of first outlets spaced longitudinally along a length of the first gas conduit. The first outlets may be oriented toward the workpiece area and adapted to direct a first gas flow transverse to the longitudinal axis. In one embodiment, the second gas conduit may also extend longitudinally within the process chamber proximate the workpiece area and include a plurality of second outlets spaced longitudinally along a length of the second gas conduit. The second outlets may be oriented toward the workpiece area and adapted to direct the second gas flow transverse to the longitudinal axis. The direction of the second gas flow may be transverse to the direction of the first gas flow. The first gas supply line may be adapted to deliver a first gas to the first gas conduit, and the second gas supply line may be adapted to deliver a second gas to the second gas conduit. The second gas supply line may be independent of the first gas supply line, and the second gas may be different from the first gas.

A microfeature workpiece processing system in accordance with another embodiment of the invention includes a process chamber, a first gas conduit, a second gas conduit, a first gas supply line, and a second gas supply line. The process chamber may be adapted to receive a plurality of transversely oriented microfeature workpieces spaced from one another in a longitudinal direction. The first gas conduit may extend longitudinally within the process chamber and include a plurality of outlets spaced longitudinally along a length of the first gas conduit; each of the outlets is oriented to direct a first gas flow transversely across a surface of one of the workpieces. The second gas conduit may have a second outlet oriented to direct a second gas flow longitudinally within the process chamber, e.g., generally perpendicular to the direction of the first gas flow. The first gas supply line is adapted to deliver a first gas to the first gas conduit, and the second gas supply line is adapted to deliver a second gas to the second gas conduit.

An alternative embodiment of the invention provides a method of depositing a reaction product on each of a batch of microfeature workpieces. In accordance with this method, a plurality of workpieces may be positioned in the process chamber, with the workpieces spaced from one another in a first direction to define a process space between each pair of adjacent workpieces. A first gas may be delivered to an elongate first delivery conduit that has a length in the first direction and may direct a first gas flow of the first gas into at least one of the process faces from each of a plurality of outlets spaced in the first direction along the length of the first delivery conduit. Each of the first gas flows is directed to flow along a first vector transverse to the first direction. A second gas may be delivered to an elongate second delivery conduit that has a length in the first direction. A second gas flow of the second gas may be directed into at least one of the process spaces from each of a plurality of outlets spaced in the first direction along the length of the second delivery conduit. Each of the second gas flows may be directed to flow along a second vector that is transverse to the first direction and may also be transverse to the first vector.

An alternative embodiment of the invention provides a method of depositing a reaction product that includes positioning a plurality of microfeature workpieces similar to the previous method. A first gas may be delivered to a first delivery conduit and directed into process spaces between the workpieces as in the prior embodiment. In this embodiment, however, a second gas is delivered to a second delivery conduit and a second gas flow of the second gas is directed in the first direction, which may be substantially perpendicular to the first gas flow.

For ease of understanding, the following discussion is subdivided into two areas of emphasis. The first section discusses microfeature workpiece processing systems in accordance with selected embodiments of the invention. The second section outlines methods in accordance with other aspects of the invention.

B. Microfeature Workpiece Processing System

FIGS. 4 and 5 schematically illustrate a microfeature workpiece processing system 100 in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. The processing system 100 includes a reactor 110 adapted to receive a plurality of microfeature workpieces W, which may be carried in a workpiece holder 70. The reactor 110 generally includes an enclosure 120 defined by an outer wall 122 and a platform 160 (FIG. 4) upon which the workpiece holder 70 may be supported. The outer wall 122 may sealingly engage the platform 160 (schematically illustrated in FIG. 4 as an O-ring seal 162). This will define a process chamber 125 within which the workpiece holder 70 and microfeature workpieces W may be received. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the workpieces W are positioned in a workpiece area of the process chamber 125 that is substantially centered about a longitudinal axis A of the process chamber 125.

This particular reactor 110 includes an annular liner 124 that may functionally divide the process chamber 125 into a main chamber 128 and an annular exhaust 126. The annular exhaust 126 may be in fluid communication with a vacuum 170, e.g., a vacuum pump, via a vacuum line 172. During the pumping phase of the purge process noted above in connection with FIG. 2, the vacuum 170 may exhaust gas from the main chamber 128 via this annular exhaust 126.

The reactor 110 may also include a heater 150. The heater 150 can be any conventional design. In one exemplary embodiment, the heater 150 may comprise an induction heater. Other suitable heaters 150 for use in connection with particular processes to be carried out in the processing system 100 will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art.

The processing system 100 also includes a first gas conduit 140 a and a second gas conduit 140 b that extend longitudinally within the main chamber 128 of the process chamber 125. The gas conduits 140 a-b are positioned proximate the workpiece area where the workpieces W are received. Each of the gas conduits 140 includes a plurality of outlets 142 spaced longitudinally along its length and oriented toward the workpieces W. In the illustrated embodiment, the outlets 142 of each of the gas conduits 140 are adapted to direct a flow of gas from one of the gas supplies 130 a-c (discussed below) transverse to the longitudinal axis A of the process chamber 125. In one specific implementation, the outlets 142 may be oriented to direct a flow of gas perpendicular to this axis A. The first and second gas conduits 140 a and 140 b may be positioned within the main chamber 128 of the enclosure 120 in any suitable relative orientation. In the illustrated embodiment, the gas conduits 140 a and 140 b are substantially parallel to one another and oriented at an angle less than 180 degrees from one another. If so desired, the outlets 142 of the first gas conduit 140 a may be oriented to direct a flow of gas generally parallel to the direction in which the outlets 142 of the second gas conduit 140 b direct the flow of gas from the second gas conduit 140 b. In the illustrated embodiment, the outlets 142 of the first gas conduit 140 a may direct a first gas flow along a flow vector F1 (FIG. 5) oriented generally toward the longitudinal axis A of the chamber 125, which may substantially coincide with the center of each workpiece W. The outlets 142 of the second gas conduit 140 b may orient a second flow of gas along a second flow vector F2 (FIG. 5) that is also oriented toward the longitudinal axis A. These two flow vectors F1 and F2 may be oriented transverse to one another. In CVD applications or in the purge processes of ALD, such transverse flow may facilitate high throughput without unduly compromising quality and uniformity.

The outlets 142 can also be positioned relative to the orientation of the workpieces W. The workpieces W are spaced apart in the workpiece holder 70 and oriented generally parallel to one another such that a process space S separates each pair of adjacent workpieces W. The outlets 142 can be configured to direct a flow of gas from respective gas conduit 140 a or 140 b transversely into each process space S. As a consequence, a flow of gas can be established transversely across a surface of each workpiece W. If the gas conduits 140 a and 140 b are used to deliver precursor gases in an ALD or CVD process, this transverse flow through the process spaces and across the surfaces of the workpieces W is expected to enhance the uniformity of material deposition on the surfaces of the workpieces W. If a purge gas is delivered through one or both of the gas conduits 140 a and 140 b, this transverse flow of gas along the flow vectors F1 and/or F2 can efficiently purge the process spaces S of any excess precursor gas.

The processing system 100 also includes at least two gas supplies. In particular, a first gas supply 130 a of a first gas (GAS1) is coupled to the first gas conduit 140 a by a first gas supply line 132 a. Similarly, a second gas supply 130 b of a second gas (GAS2) is coupled to the second gas conduit 140 b by a second gas supply line 132 b. If so desired, a first gas supply valve 134 a may be provided in the first gas supply line 132 a and a second gas supply valve 134 b may be provided in the second gas supply line 132 b. The processing system 100 may also include a third gas supply 130 c adapted to provide a third gas (GAS3), e.g., a purge gas, via a third gas supply line 132 c. The third gas supply line 132 c may be in fluid communication with the first gas supply line 132 a and/or the second gas supply line 132 b. This would permit delivery of the third gas (GAS3) from the third gas supply line 130 c to the process chamber 125 via one or both of the gas conduits 140 a and 140 b. A third gas supply valve 134 c may be provided in the third gas supply line 132 c.

The gas supply valves 134 a-c may be operated to selectively introduce the desired process gas (e.g., GAS1, GAS2, GAS3) under the direction of a controller 180. In one embodiment, the controller 180 comprises a computer having a programmable processor programmed to control operation of the processing system 100 to deposit material on the workpieces W. The controller 180 may be coupled to the vacuum 170 to control its operation. The controller 180 may also be operatively connected to the heater 150 to control the temperature of the workpieces W and/or an actuator (not shown) to move the platform 160 toward or away from the outer wall 122, as suggested by the arrow L, to allow the workpieces W to be loaded into or moved from the process chamber 125.

The composition of the gases in the gas supplies 130 a-c can be varied depending on the process to be carried out in the processing system 100. If the processing system 100 is used in an ALD process, for example, the first gas supply 130 a may contain a first precursor (e.g., precursor A discussed above in FIGS. 1 and 2) and the second gas supply 130 b may contain a second precursor (e.g., precursor B in FIGS. 1 and 2). The reaction tube suggested by Okuda et al. in U.S. Patent Application Publication US 2003/0024477 delivers all the gases to a relatively large common plenum. As discussed above, this plenum arrangement can have a number of disadvantages, including longer purge times, decreased throughput, and increased manufacturing costs. In contrast, the microfeature workpiece processing system 100 of FIGS. 4 and 5 may deliver the reaction precursors through separate gas conduits 140. Using separate gas conduits 140 permits a transverse flow of gas through the process spaces S to enhance product uniformity and throughput, but avoids the problems expected to be encountered in a system that employs a single common plenum such as that suggested by Okuda et al.

FIG. 6 schematically illustrates a microfeature workpiece processing system 102 in accordance with another embodiment of the invention. This processing system 102 may be similar in many respects to the processing system 100 of FIGS. 4 and 5 and like reference numbers are used to indicate like elements in FIGS. 4-6. The processing system 100 of FIGS. 4 and 5 includes a single first gas conduit 140 a and a single second gas conduit 140 b, each of which is adapted to deliver a separate gas, i.e., GAS1 or GAS2, respectively. The processing system 102 of FIG. 6, however, includes several first gas conduits 140 a and several second gas conduits 140 b. In the specific implementation shown in this figure, three first gas conduits 140 a are spaced approximately equiangularly about the periphery of the workpiece area where the workpieces W are received. Each of the first gas conduits 140 a is adapted to direct a flow of gas along a flow vector F1 that is oriented toward and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis A of the process chamber (125 in FIG. 4). As a consequence, each of the first gas flow vectors F1 are transverse to one another, as well. The three second gas conduits 104 b of FIG. 6 also may be spaced approximately equiangularly about the periphery of the workpiece area. Each of the second gas conduits 140 b is adapted to direct a second flow of gas along a second gas flow vector F2 that is oriented toward and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis A of the process chamber 125 and transverse to one another. It is anticipated that the use of multiple flow vectors for each gas supply can further enhance uniformity of gas distribution across the surfaces of the workpieces W.

FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate a microfeature workpiece processing system 200 in accordance with another embodiment of the invention. Many of the elements of the processing system 200 may be substantially the same as elements of the processing system 100 of FIGS. 4 and 5 and like reference numbers are used in both pairs of drawings to indicate like elements.

The microfeature workpiece processing system 200 of FIGS. 7 and 8 includes a single longitudinally extending gas conduit 240 deposed within the main chamber 128 of the enclosure 120. A number of outlets 242 may be spaced longitudinally along a length of the gas conduit 240, with at least one outlet 242 associated with each process space S defined by the workpieces W. The construction and orientation of the gas conduit 240 may be substantially the same as that of the first or second gas conduit 140 a or 140 b of FIGS. 4 and 5. As a consequence, the outlets 242 of the gas conduit 240 are adapted to direct a flow of gas along a transverse flow vector FT, which may be oriented generally toward the center of an associated process space S and generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis A of the process chamber 125.

The specific microfeature workpiece processing system 200 shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 includes the single gas conduit 240. It should be understood, though, that any number of gas conduits 240 may be employed. By analogy to the plurality of first gas conduits 140 a in FIG. 6, for example, a series of gas conduits 240 having a common gas supply (discussed below) may be spaced about the periphery of the workpiece area.

In addition to the gas conduit 240, the processing system 200 of FIGS. 7 and 8 includes one or more longitudinal conduits or nozzles 250 adapted to direct a flow of gas along a longitudinally oriented flow vector FL. This flow vector FL may be substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis A of the process chamber 125 and generally perpendicular to the transverse flow vectors FT from the outlets 242 of the gas conduit 240. In one embodiment, a single longitudinal nozzle 250 is positioned in the main chamber 128 of the enclosure 120. As best seen in FIG. 8, though, the illustrated embodiment utilizes a number of longitudinal nozzles 250 arranged peripherally about the workpiece area in which the workpieces W are received. The particular implementation shown in FIG. 8 positions five longitudinal nozzles 250 substantially equiangularly about this periphery, but any suitable number of longitudinal nozzles 250 may be employed.

The microfeature workpiece processing system 200 of FIGS. 7 and 8 includes a plurality of gas supplies 230 a, 230 b, and 230 c coupled to a common gas supply manifold 236. A separate gas supply valve 234 a, 234 b, or 234 c may be associated with each of the gas supplies 230 a, 230 b, and 230 c, respectively. These gas supply valves 234 may be operatively coupled to the controller 180 to control the flow of gas through the common gas supply manifold 236. The common gas supply manifold 236 may deliver a gas from one or more of the gas supplies 230 a-c to the longitudinally extending gas conduit(s) 240 and the longitudinal nozzle(s) 250. When the controller 180 opens one or more of the gas supply valves 234 a-c, a gas can be delivered through the common gas supply manifold 236 simultaneously to the gas conduit 240 and each of the longitudinal nozzles 250. This can enhance the bulk flow rate of the desired gas into the main chamber 128 of the enclosure 120 while establishing sufficient transverse flow of the gas through the process spaces S to achieve the necessary uniformity of gas distribution across the surfaces of the workpieces W or an appropriately swift purging of the process spaces S.

FIG. 9 schematically illustrates a microfeature workpiece processing system 300 in accordance with yet another embodiment of the invention. Many of the elements of this processing system 300 may be substantially the same as the elements of the processing system 200 shown in FIG. 7; like reference numbers are used in FIGS. 7 and 9 to indicate like elements.

One difference between the processing systems 200 and 300 of FIGS. 7 and 9 relates to the gas supply. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 7, the gas conduit 240 and the longitudinal nozzles 250 share a common gas supply manifold 236. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 9, the longitudinal nozzle(s) 250 is in fluid communication with a gas supply manifold 336. This gas supply manifold 336 is coupled to a first gas supply 330 a by a first gas supply valve 334 a and a second gas supply 330 b by a second gas supply valve 334 b. The gas supply valves 334 a and 334 b are operatively connected to the controller 180 to control the composition and flow rate of gas delivered to the longitudinal nozzle(s) 250.

The longitudinally extending gas conduit 240 is connected to an independent gas supply 330 c via a third gas supply line 332 c. A third gas supply valve 334 c may be operatively connected to the controller 180 to control the flow of the third gas (GAS3) delivered to the gas conduit 240.

The composition of the gasses (GAS1, GAS2, and GAS3) can be varied to achieve different process objectives. In one embodiment, the first gas supply 330 a contains a first precursor A, the second gas supply 330 b contains a second precursor B, and the third gas supply 330 c includes a purge gas. This enables the precursors A and B to be delivered to the main chamber 128 of the enclosure 120 in a relatively conventional fashion. Delivering the purge gas (GAS3) transversely through the outlets 242 can fairly rapidly purge any excess precursor in the process spaces S between the workpieces W. In contrast with the conventional ALD reactor 10 shown in FIG. 3, which relies primarily on diffusion to purge excess precursor from the process spaces S, the transverse flow of purge gas through the process spaces S can significantly reduce the time needed to conduct the purge cycle without adversely affecting quality of the deposited material.

C. Methods of Depositing Materials on Microfeature Workpieces

As noted above, other embodiments of the invention provide methods of processing microfeature workpieces. In the following discussion, reference is made to the particular microfeature workpiece processing system 100 shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. It should be understood, though, that reference to this particular processing system is solely for purposes of illustration and that the methods outlined below are not limited to any particular processing system shown in the drawings or discussed in detail above. In addition, the following discussion focuses primarily on ALD. It should be recognized, however, that the processes outlined below are not limited to ALD and may have utility in CVD applications and in connection with processes other than material deposition.

One embodiment of the invention provides a method of depositing a reaction product on each of a batch of microfeature workpieces. A plurality of microfeature workpieces W may be positioned in a workplace area of the process chamber 125. In one embodiment, the workpieces W are held by a workpiece holder 70 in a spaced-apart relationship. In the embodiments illustrated above, the workpiece holder 70 orients the workpieces W generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis A of the process chamber 125, defining a series of transversely oriented process spaces S between the workpieces W.

A first gas may be delivered to the process chamber 125. Using the processing system 100 of FIG. 4 as an example, the first gas (GAS1) may be delivered from the first gas supply 130 a to the first gas conduit 140 a by the first gas supply line 132 a. This may be accomplished by the controller 180 sending a signal to open the first gas supply valve 134 a. The first gas (GAS1) is delivered transversely into the processing spaces S along a series of generally parallel first transverse flow vectors F1. This first gas (GAS1) may comprise a first precursor for the ALD reaction. Once a sufficient quantity of this precursor is delivered to the process spaces S to chemisorb a layer of the precursor on the surface of the workpiece W, the first gas supply valve 134 a may be closed by the controller 180. Thereafter, a purge gas (GAS3) can be delivered through the first gas conduit 140 a and/or the second gas conduit 140 b. This transverse flow of purge gas through the process spaces S will fairly rapidly remove any excess precursor from the process spaces S. Either during the delivery of the purge gas or after the flow of the purge gas is terminated by closing the third gas supply valve 134 c, the vacuum 170 may be actuated to exhaust gas from the process chamber 125 via the annular exhaust 126. The vacuum 170 can continue to operate after the third gas supply valve 134 c is closed by the controller 180 until a desired reduced pressure is achieved.

The controller 180 may open the second gas supply valve 134 b to deliver a second precursor gas (GAS2) from the second gas supply 130 b via the second gas conduit 140 b. The outlets 142 of the second gas conduit 140 b will deliver a transverse flow of this second precursor to the process spaces S, facilitating reaction with the previously chemisorbed first precursor to yield the desired reaction product. After a sufficient quantity of the second precursor gas (GAS2) is delivered to the process chamber 125, the process chamber 125 may again be purged by delivering the purge gas (GAS3) and pumping down the process chamber 125 using the vacuum 170. This process can be repeated as many times as necessary to achieve a layer of material on the surfaces of the workpieces W having the desired thickness.

Unless the context clearly requires otherwise, throughout the description and the claims, the words “comprise,” “comprising,” and the like are to be construed in an inclusive sense as opposed to an exclusive or exhaustive sense, that is to say, in a sense of “including, but not limited to.” Words using the singular or plural number also include the plural or singular number, respectively. When the claims use the word “or” in reference to a list of two or more items, that word covers all of the following interpretations of the word: any of the items in the list, all of the items in the list, and any combination of the items in the list.

The above-detailed descriptions of embodiments of the invention are not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed above. While specific embodiments of, and examples for, the invention are described above for illustrative purposes, various equivalent modifications are possible within the scope of the invention, as those skilled in the relevant art will recognize. For example, whereas steps are presented in a given order, alternative embodiments may perform steps in a different order. The various embodiments described herein can be combined to provide further embodiments.

In general, the terms used in the following claims should not be construed to limit the invention to the specific embodiments disclosed in the specification, unless the above-detailed description explicitly defines such terms. While certain aspects of the invention are presented below in certain claim forms, the inventors contemplate the various aspects of the invention in any number of claim forms. Accordingly, the inventors reserve the right to add additional claims after filing the application to pursue such additional claim forms for other aspects of the invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7422635 *Aug 28, 2003Sep 9, 2008Micron Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing microfeature workpieces, e.g., for depositing materials on microfeature workpieces
US8211235 *Mar 4, 2005Jul 3, 2012Picosun OyApparatuses and methods for deposition of material on surfaces
US8366868 *Jun 5, 2012Feb 5, 2013Hitachi Kokusai Electric Inc.Substrate processing apparatus
US20120240348 *Jun 5, 2012Sep 27, 2012Kazuyuki OkudaSubstrate processing apparatus
US20130133696 *Jan 25, 2013May 30, 2013Hitachi Kokusai Electric Inc.Substrate processing apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/715
International ClassificationC23C16/00, C23C16/44, C23C16/458, C23C16/455
Cooperative ClassificationC23C16/45546, C23C16/45578, C23C16/4583
European ClassificationC23C16/455F2D2, C23C16/455K14, C23C16/458D2