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Publication numberUS20060231445 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/404,395
Publication dateOct 19, 2006
Filing dateApr 15, 2006
Priority dateApr 15, 2005
Publication number11404395, 404395, US 2006/0231445 A1, US 2006/231445 A1, US 20060231445 A1, US 20060231445A1, US 2006231445 A1, US 2006231445A1, US-A1-20060231445, US-A1-2006231445, US2006/0231445A1, US2006/231445A1, US20060231445 A1, US20060231445A1, US2006231445 A1, US2006231445A1
InventorsRichard Watson
Original AssigneeWatson Richard W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Personally identifiable container and device
US 20060231445 A1
Abstract
A personally identifiable container and device is provided to help avoid confusion over beverage container identity. The identifying devices include various types of indicia including blank surface, color- and number-coded, user-selectable and user-customizable iterations in the forms of production and aftermarket container caps, production and aftermarket labels, and container stickers that a manufacturer can build into its products or a user can purchase and apply it to his/her container. User-selectable iterations involve letters, numbers, colors or other indicia which the user can mark to identify a container. User-customizable iterations include surface-malleable containers, container caps, labels, (rings and dials)) and stickers into which a user can scratch or otherwise imprint his/her name and/or specific indicia. Another embodiment allows users to burst dye packets within a container cap or label to mix a custom and identifying color combination.
Images(7)
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Claims(26)
1. A personally identifiable container comprising:
a) a container; and
b) a personal identification device attached to the container, the personal identification device including means for manipulation,
whereby a user of the container can manipulate the personal identification device such that the personal identification device identifies that particular container as belonging to the user.
2. The personally identifiable container of claim 1, wherein the personal identification device is a container cap.
3. The personally identifiable container of claim 2, wherein the means for manipulation is one or more rotatable rings connected to the container cap, the one or more rotatable rings containing indicia on the outer surface thereof.
4. The personally identifiable container of claim 3, wherein the container cap has one or more identification alignment marks on the outer surface thereof, whereby to allow a user to personally identify a container, a user can rotate the one or more rotatable rings to align the one or more identification alignment marks with indicia located on the outer surface of the one or more rotatable rings.
5. The personally identifiable container of claim 3, wherein the container has one or more identification alignment marks on the outer surface thereof, whereby to allow a user to personally identify a container, the user can rotate the one or more rotating rings to align the one or more identification alignment marks with indicia located on the outer surface of the one or more rotatable rings.
6. The personally identifiable container of claim 2, wherein the container cap has a semi-malleable surface embedded within its top surface for allowing a user to scratch identifying marks therein.
7. The personally identifiable container of claim 1, wherein the personal identification device is a sticker, where the sticker comprises an outer surface upon with the means for manipulation is located, and an inner surface which contains an adhesive surface which will adhere to the section of the container upon which the sticker is intended to be affixed.
8. The personally identifiable container of claim 7, wherein the means for manipulation is a semi-malleable surface residing on the outer surface of the sticker for allowing a user to scratch identifying marks therein.
9. The personally identifiable container of claim 7, wherein the means for manipulation is a semi-malleable surface embedded within the top surface of the sticker for allowing a user to scratch identifying marks therein.
10. The personally identifiable container of claim 7, wherein the means for manipulation comprises:
a) an enclosed capsule with a sticky portion on one side for the purpose of allowing the sticker to be adhered to the container, and a clear surface on the other side for the purpose of allowing a person to look into the capsule; and
b) one or more dye packets containing one or more colors located within the capsule,
whereby the one or more dye packets can be burst by a user by putting pressure on the one or more dye packets, wherein the dye packet will burst and mix with the surrounding fluid, thereby coloring the capsule in a certain and unique color designated by the user.
11. The personally identifiable container of claim 7, wherein the container additionally comprises a surface area which contains a recess, which consists of a section of the surface area which lies below the rest of the surface area, and is bounded by one or more sides, which connect the rest of the surface area to a bottom of the recess, wherein the sticker is adhered to the bottom of the recess.
12. The personally identifiable container of claim 11, wherein the sticker is applied directly to the bottom of the recess through painting, spraying or other means of applying the sticker directly to the bottom of the recess.
13. The personally identifiable container of claim 11, wherein the one or more sides of the recess contain two or more protrusions which extend out from the sides of the recess away from the sides of the recess, and wherein the sticker is manufactured of plastic or some other suitable material with a thickness and suppleness sufficient to cause it to “snap” under the protrusions when a user pushes the sticker onto to the bottom of the recess.
14. The personally identifiable container of claim 7, wherein the recess is located on one or more locations selected from the container portion, the side of the container cap, and the top of the container cap.
15. The personally identifiable container of claim 1, wherein the personal identification device is a promotional label which can be affixed to the container and has means by which a user can selectively tear off or peel off indicia to identify that particular container as his or hers.
16. The personally identifiable container of claim 1, wherein the personal identification device is a label which is painted, sprayed, or adhered to the surface of the container by another more or less permanent means, and the label additionally comprises a semi-malleable surface attached to the top surface of the label for allowing a user to scratch identifying marks therein.
17. The personally identifiable container of claim 16, wherein the container additionally comprises a surface area which contains a recess, which consists of a section of the surface area which lies below the rest of the surface area, and is bounded by one or more sides, which connect the rest of the surface area to a bottom of the recess, wherein the label is applied to the bottom of the recess.
18. The personally identifiable container of claim 1, wherein the personal identification device is an indicia field having a combination of numbers, letters, or other symbols that can be used for identification purposes on the outer surface thereon.
19. The personally identifiable container of claim 19, wherein the means for manipulation is a rotatable tab having at least one identification arrow on the top surface thereof whereby to allow a user to personally identify a container, the user can rotate the rotatable tab to align the at least one identification arrow with indicia located on the outer surface of the indicia field.
20. A personal identification device for attachment to a container comprising:
a) a cap having means for engaging a container located on the inner surface thereof, the cap containing at least one identification arrow on the outer surface thereof; and
b) one or more rotating rings connected to the cap, the one or more rotatable rings containing indicia on the outer surface thereof,
whereby to allow a user to personally identify a container having the cap placed thereon, the user can rotate the one or more rotatable rings to align the at least one identification arrow with indicia located on the outer surface of the one or more rotatable rings.
21. The personal identification device for attachment to a container of claim 20, wherein the means for engaging a container is a plurality of threads.
22. A personal identification device for attachment to a container comprising:
a) an enclosed capsule with a sticky portion on one side for the purpose of allowing the device to be adhered to a container and a clear surface on the other side for the purpose of allowing a person to look into the enclosed container; and
b) one or more dye packets containing one or more colors located within the enclosed capsule
whereby the one or more dye packets can be burst by a user by putting pressure on the one or more dye packets, wherein the one or more dye packets will burst and mix with the surrounding fluid, thereby coloring the enclosed container in a certain and unique color designated by the user.
24. The personal identification device of claim 23, wherein the enclosed container further comprises one or more sparkle packets, wherein the one or more sparkle packets can be burst by the user to add additional personalization to the enclosed container.
25. A method for making a personally identifiable container comprising the steps of:
a) providing a container;
b) providing a personally identifiable device for attachment to the container, the personal identification device including means for manipulation; and
c) attaching the personally identifiable device to the container,
whereby a user of the container can manipulate the personally identifiable device such that the personally identifiable device identifies that particular container as belonging to the user.
26. The method for making personally identifiable containers of claim 25, wherein the personal identifying device is selected from the group of personal identifying devices consisting of a sticker, label, dye packet, container cap, a dial and a ring.
27. The method for making personally identifiable containers of claim 25, wherein the container additionally comprises a recessed portion, and the personally identifiable device is attached to the recessed portion of the container.
Description
PRIORITY

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/671,767 filed on Apr. 15, 2005.

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

None.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

This invention was not federally sponsored.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

The present invention relates to the field of beverage containers. More particularly, this invention is directed toward a customizable identifying device for a beverage container. 2. Description of the Related Art

While drink containers have been around since ancient times, it was only in 1892 that William Painter patented the crown bottle cap. 1934 was the first year in which color labels were used on soft drink bottles. These color labels were first baked on the face of the bottle, and have undergone substantial improvements in technology since then.

While improvements have been made consistently in the field of packaging and promotion of drinks, a major problem has remained unsolved: when a group of people are all using the same drink container, how does each person keep track of which drink is his or hers? In sports events, very frequently an entire team will be given the same water bottles. In many bars and other “mixer” environments, there are only a limited number of types of beverages sold with a few very popular ones taking up the lion's share of the orders. In such situations, once a person opens a bottle or can and sets it down, it is likely that the person will encounter some confusion over which bottle or can is his/hers, and which belongs to another person.

The reasons for wanting to avoid drinking from another person's drink container are obvious and do not need substantial explanation. Suffice to say that in addition to not wanting to take another's drink, most people are concerned over picking up germs and diseases from another person's mouth, and therefore do not wish to unwittingly drink from another person's container. This invention also helps control waste by eliminating owner confusion and preventing the premature disposal of half consumed products.

The prior has several examples of attempts to resolve this problem. For example, wine glass trinkets have become a big business. These include butterflies, beads, and other unique items that a host hands out to his/her guests for each guest to place in his/her wine glass, thereby to avoid confusion over whose glass is whose. A problem with this idea, however, is that each guest must memorize and remember the color of butterfly or the bead pattern that the host has given to him or her for the evening, which can add to the problem of identifying one's own drink.

The use of color-coded bottle caps and labels is, of course, not novel, and the prior art has several examples of medical product dispensing devices which utilize some combination of bottle caps with electronic sensors and monitors, such as the inventions of Weiner (U.S. Pat. No. 6,545,592 and 20010040500), Adams (U.S. Pat. No. 5,358,117) and Wallace (U.S. Pat. No. 6,735,497). None of these inventions, however, deal with the purpose of the current invention, which is to identify a drink container either through user-selected or user-customized criteria.

Thus there has existed a long-felt need for a device and method for allowing a user to identify his or her container such that he or she does not pick up a similar drink container belonging to another person and drink from it.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is a principal object of the invention to provide a device by which a food or beverage manufacturer, container manufacturer, or consumer can allow for a consumer to identify his or her own container from other similar containers.

It is an object of the invention to provide a container cap with numbers and/or letters on it where the user can scratch or otherwise identify which combination of letters and/or number he or she selects for identification purposes.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a container cap having rotating circles of numbers and/or letters such that a user can rotate the wheel to the appropriate space and thereby identify the bottle as belonging to the user.

It is also an object of this invention to provide bottle caps that are suitable, under the constraints and teachings of this application, to be manufactured by the food or beverage manufacturer or a container manufacturer.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide a container sticker with numbers and/or letters on it where the user can scratch or otherwise identify which combination of letters and/or number he or she selects for identification purposes.

It is a further object of this invention to provide bottle cap stickers that can be manufactured by a food or beverage manufacturer, or a container manufacturer, and either sold with the container or be available for the user to purchase separately from the container and attach to the container as needed.

It is another object of the invention to provide a label with various indicia on it wherein the user can scratch or otherwise select which indicia he or she wants for identification purposes.

A further object of the invention is to provide a promotional or other label that a user of the invention could selectively tear off or peel off some indicia.

It is still yet another object of this invention to provide a label that has a blank, scratch able surface that the user can scratch, peal, or otherwise mark as he or she desires to create a personalized identifier.

It is a further an object of this invention to provide labels can be manufactured by the food and beverage manufacturer or a label manufacturer.

It is an additional object of the invention to provide a label, which may or may not be peelable, with indicia on it wherein the user can scratch or otherwise identify which indicia he or she selects for identification purposes.

It is also an object of this invention to provide label stickers that can be manufactured by the food or beverage manufacturer or a label manufacturer, and either sold with the container or be available for the user to purchase separately from the container and attach to the drink container as needed.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an enclosed sticker or capsule inside of which are placed small packets of different types of dye in a matrix of water or some other liquid into which the dye is dissolvable, such that a user can selectively burst individual packets to form his or her “unique color combination”, but which he or she can identify his or her own container.

It is still another an object of this invention to provide glitter packets, dye packets, and other novelty items such that a user can even further customize his or her container or label.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a container identifying device that a user shall not need to use a pen, permanent felt-tipped marker, pencil, jackknife, or other marking tools to mark.

It is yet another object of this invention that the invention be suitable for mass production and lends itself easily to the concept of sponsorship, where companies pay for the right to put the stickers, container caps, or labels onto a food or beverage container.

A personally identifiable container and device is provided to help avoid confusion over beverage container identity. The identifying devices include various types of indicia including blank surface, color- and number-coded, user-selectable and user-customizable iterations in the forms of production and aftermarket container caps, production and aftermarket labels, and container stickers that a manufacturer can build into its products or a user can purchase and apply it to his/her container. User-selectable iterations involve letters, numbers, colors or other indicia which the user can mark to identify a container. User-customizable iterations include surface-malleable containers, container caps, labels, and stickers into which a user can scratch or otherwise imprint his/her name and/or specific indicia. Another embodiment allows users to burst dye packets within a container cap or label to mix a custom and identifying color combination.

There has thus been outlined, rather broadly, the more important features of the invention in order that the detailed description thereof may be better understood, and in order that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are additional features of the invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject matter of the claims appended hereto.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and form a part of this specification, illustrate embodiments of the invention and together with the description, serve to explain the principals of this invention.

FIG. 1 shows a front view of the preferred embodiment of the personally identifiable container.

FIG. 2 shows a front view of the preferred embodiment of the personally identifiable container with the upper cap portion removed.

FIG. 3 shows a front view of the cap portion of the personally identifiable container.

FIG. 4 shows a bottom view of the cap portion of the personally identifiable container, illustrating the gripping prongs.

FIG. 5 shows a top view of an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container having an identification tab and indicia field.

FIG. 6 shows an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container having a malleable top cap surface and side surface. It is envisioned that a manufacturer of this iteration of the invention could choose one or both locations for the personally identifiable materials.

FIG. 7 shows an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container having a malleable label or sticker. This figure also shows an iteration of the invention where the personally identifiable materials are located in a cavity or depression manufactured into the top of the container cap, container side and container cap side, where the recessed cavity provides protection for the malleable surface.

FIG. 8 shows an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container having a sticker with a pouch containing dye and/or sparkle packets. In this figure the sticker is shown on the side of the bottle, the side of the cap, and the top of cap, with the understanding that a manufacturer of this invention could select one or more locations. FIG. 8 also shows a recess, cavity, or depression into which the personally identifiable materials can be placed.

FIG. 9 shows an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container having a sticker with a pouch containing dye and/or sparkle packets, with the dye and/or sparkle packets burst. In this figure the sticker is shown on the side of the cap of the bottle, affixed to the cap, and on the side of the bottle as well, or recessed into a cavity built into either the side of the container, the side of the cap of the bottle, or the top of the cap of the bottle.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows a front view of the preferred embodiment of the personally identifiable container 10. Container 10 includes a storage portion 20 and a cap portion 30. Container 10 can be any type of container that utilizes a cap, including soft drink and water bottles. Cap portion 30 includes an upper cap portion 32 and a lower cap portion 34. Upper cap portion 32 preferably contains inner threads for attachment to storage portion 20, but can also contain a smooth inner surface for frictional attachment to storage portion 20. Lower cap portion 34 includes identification indicia 36 on the outer surface thereof. Lower cap portion 34 is preferably a rotatable ring that can be detachable from upper cap portion 32. Lower cap portion 34 preferably contains a plurality of gripping prongs 37 (see FIG. 4) to enable lower cap portion 34 to be detached from upper cap portion 32 and still remain attached to storage portion 20. Upper cap portion 32 can include an identification arrow 38 that points to one or more identification indicia 36. Similarly, storage portion 20 can include an identification mark 22, here shown as an arrow, that points to one or more identification indicia 36. Storage portion 20 can be comprised of plastic, glass, or other material as would be recognized by one with ordinary skill in the art. Cap portion 30 can be comprised of plastic, metal, or other material as would be recognized by one with ordinary skill in the art.

FIG. 2 shows a front view of the preferred embodiment of personally identifiable container 10 with the upper cap portion 32 removed. In this figure, lower cap portion 34 is detached from upper cap portion 32 and is positioned around cap receiving portion 24 of storage portion 20. Cap receiving portion 24 preferably includes threads 26 to allow the removable attachment of upper cap portion 32.

FIG. 3 shows a front view of cap portion 30 removed from storage portion 20, including upper cap portion 32 and lower cap portion 34. Cap portion 30 can be various sizes and shapes depending on the size and shape of cap receiving portion 24 of storage portion 20.

FIG. 4 shows a bottom view of cap portion 30 removed from storage portion 20, illustrating the positioning of gripping prongs 37. Gripping prongs 37 are preferably angled to allow the rotation of lower cap portion 34 around cap receiving portion 24, such that identification arrow 22 and/or 38 point to a user determined identification indicia 36. Gripping prongs 37 can be comprised of plastic, metal, or other material as recognized by one with ordinary skill in the art.

FIG. 5 shows a top view of an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container 100 having an identification tab 110 and indicia field 120. Identification tab 110 is preferably a standard rotatable tab found on soft drink cans. Identification tab 110 includes an identification arrow 112 that can be aligned by a user to match up with various indicia 122 located on indicia field 120. Indicia 122 can include any combination of numbers, letters, or other symbols that can be used for identification purposes. Identification arrow 112 and indicia field 120 can be formed within container 100 or can be a sticker for attachment to container 100, located in or out of a recess which may or may not be manufactured into the top of the can, or could be engraved, embossed or printed upon the top of the container.

FIG. 6 shows an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container 200. It is envisioned that a manufacturer of this iteration of the invention could choose one or both locations for the personally identifiable materials. Container 200 includes a cap portion 210 and a storage portion 220. Cap portion 210 includes a malleable top surface 212 for allowing a user to scratch or otherwise mark identification indicia 214 therein to allow the user to personally identify their container. In an additional or alternative embodiment of the invention, depending on the desires of the manufacturer, one the side 217 of the cap portion 210 there can be affixed a malleable side surface 216 for allowing a user to scratch or otherwise mark identification indicia 215 therein to allow the user to personally identify their container. The same iteration can provide a malleable side surface 219 on the side of the storage container.

FIG. 7 shows an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container 300. This figure also shows an iteration of the invention where the personally identifiable materials are located in a cavity or depression manufactured into the top of the container cap. Container 300 includes a cap portion 310 and a storage portion 320. Storage portion 320 includes a label 330 having a malleable surface 332 thereon for allowing a user to scratch or otherwise mark identification indicia 334 therein to allow the user to personally identify their container. Cap portion 310 provides two possible surfaces for attaching a label: a top surface which has an encircling rim 340 which defines a recess or cavity into which the personally identifiable materials 341 are placed, and a side surface 350, which defines a recess or cavity 352 into which the personally identifiable materials 353 are placed. Labels preferably contain a sticky surface for allowing attachment to storage portions and caps. However, personally identifiable materials can be also formed within recesses by spraying, painting, pouring, or otherwise covering the bottom of the recess with the personally identifiable materials. Alternatively, a label of personally identifiable materials can be manufactured separately from materials such as plastic and “snapped” into the recess, providing that the edges of the recess had adequately steep sides or slight protrusions on the edges such that once the label was pushed toward the bottom of the recess it would not pop back up toward the surface. Labels can be placed anywhere on storage portion, and the side and top portions of the cap, and can vary in size to accommodate various sized storage portions or bottling requirements.

Positioning the label or sticker in a recessed cavity allows for greater protection of the personally identifiable materials at several stages in the life of a container utilizing one or more aspects of this invention. During shipping and transportation of mass quantities of containers by rail or truck, a recessed label is less like be damaged by other containers. Likewise, when a cooler is loaded with containers, those with recessed personally identifiable materials are more likely to retain the personally identifiable materials in pristine condition than will a container with non-recessed labels. Finally, a container taken by an individual and used during a sporting event is less likely to have its personally identifiable materials damaged, unintentionally modified, or obscured by the inadvertent touching by another person or another person's container if the personally identifiable materials are recessed. This is true whether the personally identifiable materials are recessed into the top or side of a container top, or upon the side of the container itself.

The invention also contemplates a container with more than one recessed cavity into which a personally identifiable material or a promotional material could be placed, such that the container could both be personally identifiable and promotional at the same time.

FIG. 8 shows an alternate embodiment of the personally identifiable container 400. In this figure the sticker is shown on the side of the bottle, the side of the cap, and the top of cap, with the understanding that a manufacturer of this invention could select one or more locations. FIG. 8 also shows a recess, cavity, or depression 431 into which the personally identifiable materials can be placed. Container 400 includes a cap portion 410 and a storage portion 420. Storage portion 420 includes a capsule 430 having a transparent surface 432 on the front thereof. Capsule can be placed anywhere on storage portion 420 and can vary in size to accommodate various sized storage portions 420 or bottling requirements. Capsule 430 contains a plurality of dye packets 434 and/or sparkle packets 436 interspersed within a liquid 438. Dye packets 434 can be comprised of dye of various colors or dissolution characteristics. Sparkle packets 436 can be comprised of sparkle having various colors, sizes, or shapes. Liquid 438 is preferably water, but can include any other liquid that allows the mixture of dye packets 434 and/or sparkle packets 436. One or more dye packets 434 and/or sparkle packets 436 can be burst by a user to produce a capsule 430 having a personally identifiable dye/sparkle combination (see FIG. 9). The same iteration of the invention as described in detail for the capsule 430 on the side of the storage portion 420 can be applied to the side 411 of the cap portion 410, and to the top of the cap portion, where an encircling lip 452 defines a recess into which the capsule 451 is inserted.

FIG. 9 shows an alternate embodiment of personally identifiable container 400, with the dye packets 434 and/or sparkle packets 436 burst within capsule 430 to produce a personally identifiable dye/sparkle combination 440. In this figure the sticker is shown on the side of the bottle, affixed to the cap, and on the side of the bottle as well. In this iteration of the invention, the capsule 450 of the top portion of the cap is not recessed, but rather is laid across the entire top surface.

It is intended that the various types of stickers show in the above figures can be interchanged, such that all of the various identifiable labels can be applied to the different parts of the containers as described above, and in both recessed and non-recessed locations.

With respect to the above description it is to be realized that the optimum dimensional relationships for the parts of the invention, including variations in size, materials, shape, form, function and manner of operation, assembly, and use, are deemed readily apparent and obvious to one skilled in the art, and all equivalent relationships to those illustrated in the drawings and described in the specification are intended to be encompassed by the present invention. Therefore, the foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described. Accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents fall within the scope of the present invention.

The above description, together with the accessories of the invention and the various features of novelty which characterize the invention, are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this disclosure. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and the specific advantages attained by its uses, reference should be made to the accompanying drawings and descriptive matter in which there are illustrated preferred embodiments of the invention.

Further, the purpose of the foregoing abstract is to enable the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the public generally, and especially the scientists, engineers, and practitioners in the art who are not familiar with patent or legal terms or phraseology, to determine quickly from a cursory inspection the nature and essence of the technical disclosure of the application. The abstract is neither intended to define the invention of the application, which is measured by the claims, nor is it intended to be limiting, as to the scope of the invention in any way.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8003182Jul 22, 2008Aug 23, 2011David HarruffCustomizable container identification device
US8426000Jul 15, 2011Apr 23, 2013David HarruffCustomizable container identification device
DE102010024909A1 *Jun 24, 2010Dec 29, 2011Alexander BonarDevice for displaying volume of container, comprises scale which is attached to container, where display element is moved on scale, and material strip is provided for device, where material strip is divided in two strips in its length
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/459.1
International ClassificationB65D85/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09F23/08, B65D23/14, G09F3/04
European ClassificationB65D23/14, G09F23/08, G09F3/04