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Publication numberUS20060259138 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/431,176
Publication dateNov 16, 2006
Filing dateMay 9, 2006
Priority dateApr 9, 2003
Also published asUS7341599, WO2007134105A2, WO2007134105A3
Publication number11431176, 431176, US 2006/0259138 A1, US 2006/259138 A1, US 20060259138 A1, US 20060259138A1, US 2006259138 A1, US 2006259138A1, US-A1-20060259138, US-A1-2006259138, US2006/0259138A1, US2006/259138A1, US20060259138 A1, US20060259138A1, US2006259138 A1, US2006259138A1
InventorsGholam Peyman
Original AssigneeMinu Telesystems Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intraocular lens for correcting presbyopia
US 20060259138 A1
Abstract
The present invention relates to an intraocular lens. The intraocular lens includes a lens having an opening therein and an ocular system capable of being inserted into the opening after implantation into an eye. Wherein the first lens is adapted to project a first image onto the retina and the second lens is adapted to project a second image onto the retina.
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Claims(20)
1. An intraocular lens, comprising:
a lens having an opening therein; and
an ocular system capable of being inserted into said opening after implantation into an eye;
wherein said first lens is adapted to project a first image onto the retina and said second lens is adapted to project a second image onto the retina.
2. An intraocular lens according to claim 1, wherein
said lens has a slit extending from said opening radially outwardly.
3. An intraocular lens according to claim 1, wherein
said ocular system includes a negative lens and a positive lens positioned in series.
4. An intraocular lens according to claim 1, wherein
said ocular system is configured such that it frictionally fits with said opening.
5. an intraocular lens according to claim 1, wherein
said ocular system is configured to be a telescopic lens system.
6. An intraocular lens according to claim 1, wherein
said lens is adapted to be adjusted after implantation.
7. An intraocular lens according to claim 6, wherein
said lens is at least partially formed of a silicone polymer with loose monomers.
8. An intraocular lens according to claim 1, wherein
said opening is substantially in the center of said lens.
9. An intraocular lens, comprising:
a lens having a peripheral portion substantially surrounding an opening, a slit extends from said opening and into said peripheral portion; and
a telescopic system configured to frictionally fit into said opening.
10. An intraocular lens according to claim 9, wherein
said telescopic system includes a negative lens and a positive lens positioned in series.
11. An intraocular lens according to claim 9, wherein
said lens is adapted to be adjusted after implantation.
12. An intraocular lens according to claim 11, wherein
said lens is at least partially formed of a silicone polymer with loose monomers.
13. An intraocular lens according to claim 9, wherein
said opening is substantially in the center of said lens.
14. An intraocular lens according to claim 9, wherein
said first lens is adapted to project a first image onto the retina and said second lens is adapted to project a second image onto the retina.
15. A method of altering vision of an eye, comprising the steps of
inserting a lens into the eye, said lens having an opening therein and adapted to project a first image on the retina,
inserting an ocular system in said opening, said ocular system adapted to project a second image on the retina, and
applying energy to said lens to alter the shape thereof.
16. A method according to claim 15, wherein
said step of inserting a lens into the eye includes inserting a lens having a slit extending from said opening in the direction of a peripheral portion of said lens.
17. A method according to claim 15, wherein
said step of inserting a lens into the eye includes inserting a lens at least partially formed of a silicone polymer with loose monomers.
18. A method according to claim 17, wherein
said step of applying energy to said lens includes irradiating said lens to polymerize a portion thereof.
19. A method according to claim 15, wherein
said step of inserting an ocular system in said opening includes frictional fitting said ocular system in said opening after said lens has been inserted into said eye.
20. A method according to claim 15, wherein
said step of inserting an ocular system in said opening includes an ocular system configured to be a telescopic lens system.
Description

This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 10/436,234, entitled “Intraocular Lens for Correcting Presbyopia”, filed May 13, 2003, which claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/461,194, filed on Apr. 9, 2003, the entire contents of both of which are incorporated herein by reference

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is related to U.S. Pat. No. 6,197,057 to Peyman et al. entitled “LENS CONVERSION SYSTEM FOR TELEDIOPTIC OR DIFFRACTIVE CONFIGURATIONS”, and copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/356,730 entitled “SUBEPITHILIAL IMPLANT AND METHOD OF TREATMENT OF PRESBYOPIAN AND OTHER REFRACTIVE ERRORS”, the entire contents of both of which are incorporated herein by reference

BACKGROUND

A normal ametropic eye includes a cornea, lens and retina. The cornea and lens of the normal eye cooperatively focus light entering the eye from a far point, i.e., infinity, onto the retina. However, an eye can have a disease known as macular degeneration which can greatly degrade vision.

Macular degeneration has become one of the leading causes of blindness in adults. This disease affects the central retinal area known as the macula, which receives light focused by the cornea and lens and acute vision. Macular degeneration can lead to a gradual or sudden loss of vision to the level of 20/200 or less. Commonly, loss of vision only affects the central retinal area of about 0.25 to 4 square millimeters, and does not usually progress beyond this area, thereby leaving 95-99% of the retina unaffected. Thus, reading and driving vision can be lost, while peripheral vision remains intact.

U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,666,446 and 4,581,031, both to Koziol and Peyman, and both of which are incorporated by reference herein, each disclose intraocular lenses which are implanted in the eye in place of the natural lens to redirect the rays of light to minimize the adverse affect on vision caused by the macular degeneration of the eye. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,666,446 discloses an intraocular lens comprising a first portion including a diverging lens and a second portion including a converging lens. The converging lens provides the eye with substantially the same focusing ability of the natural lens prior to implantation of the intraocular lens. Thus, the eye will have decreased visual acuity due to the macular degeneration, but will also have unrestricted peripheral vision. The diverging lens, on the other hand, when combined with a converging lens positioned outside of the eye (e.g., a spectacle lens), provides a magnified image with increased visual acuity but a restricted visual field. Therefore, this type of intraocular lens creates a teledioptic lens system, which provides the patient with the choice of unmagnified but peripherally unrestricted vision or magnified but peripherally restricted vision.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,581,031 discloses an intraocular lens including a convex portion and a prismatic portion. The combined convex/prismatic lens directs rays of light away from the center of the retina that has been damaged by macular degeneration, and focuses those rays onto an undiseased area of the retina, thus providing greater visual acuity.

As discussed above, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,666,446 and 4,581,031 clearly disclose that it is known to use particular types of intraocular lenses in place of the natural lens to reduce the adverse affect of macular degeneration on vision.

U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,098,444, 5,366,502, 5,358,520, and 4,932,971, as well as world patent application WO 94/07435, the entire contents of these documents being incorporated by reference herein, each disclose that it is known to attach a supplemental intraocular lens to an existing artificial intraocular lens to correct for ongoing degradation of vision. That is, if the ability of the eye to focus grows worse over time, instead of replacing the entire intraocular lens with a new intraocular lens having a different refractive power, a supplemental intraocular lens can be attached to the existing intraocular lens. This technique is less invasive and hence, less traumatic to the eye.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,197,057, the entire contents of which are herein incorporated by reference, relates to a lens system that combines a high plus lens with a plus and minus intraocular lens (IOL), so that the lens system works in a manner similar to a Galilean telescope. Generally, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the '057 patent, the high plus lens is outside the eye (i.e., in glasses or spectacles, or in a contact lens) and the plus and minus lens is an IOL that replaces or works in conjunction with the natural lens of the patient.

Additionally, if desired, the plus and minus lens can have a high minus portion in the center of the eye, while the portions surrounding the minus portion have no or substantially no refractive power, that is, the surrounding portion can be flat or substantially flat.

The Peyman '057 patent also discloses a supplemental intraocular lens that can be attached to the natural lens or an existing artificial lens to make the lens adaptable to function as a teledioptic or diffractive prismatic lens of the type described above.

Presbyopia, which is blurred vision of close up objects, for example, objects positioned for reading, typically occurs due to aging of the eye. A conventional method for correcting the refractive error in a cornea is keratophakia, that is, implantation of a lens inside the comea. Keratophakia uses an implant which is placed into the cornea approximately equidistant from the exterior and interior surfaces of the comea. The procedure is usually done by first preparing a lens from corneal donor tissue or synthetic material using a cryo-lathe. The lens is implanted by removing a portion of the cornea with a device called a microkeratome, and the tissue is sutured back into place over the lens. However, problems can arise when microkeratomes are used for cutting the comea. First, irregular keratectomies or perforations of the eye can result. Second, the recovery of vision can be rather prolonged.

Another surgical technique exists that uses a femtosecond laser to separate layers inside the stromal portion of the eye, at least two-thirds of the distance from the top surface of the cornea to the inside of the eye. An incision is made to access this area and a solid inlay is inserted to help correct myopia in the eye. By separating the layers in the bottom two-thirds of the stromal portion, it is difficult to access the separated area to insert the inlay and virtually impossible to change or modify the inlay without another extensive surgical procedure. This procedure requires making an incision which is parallel or substantially parallel to the visual axis and is limited in the lateral direction by a maximum size of 0.3 mm to encase a relatively rigid inlay that forces the tissue in the lateral direction.

Additional surgical techniques exist that use ultraviolet light and short wavelength lasers to modify the shape of the cornea. For example, excimer lasers, such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,840,175 to Peyman, which is incorporated herein by reference, emit pulsed ultraviolet radiation that can be used to decompose or photoablate tissue in the live cornea so as to reshape the comea.

Specifically, the Peyman '175 patent discloses the laser surgical technique known as laser in situ keratomycosis (LASIK). In this technique, a portion of the front of the live cornea can be cut away in the form of a flap having a thickness of about 160 microns. This cut portion is removed from the live cornea to expose an inner surface of the comea. A laser beam is then directed onto the exposed inner surface to ablate a desired amount of the inner surface up to 150-180 microns deep. The cut portion is reattached over the ablated portion of the cornea and assumes a shape conforming to that of the ablated portion. Additionally, in the LASIK procedure, a femtosecond laser can be used to cut and separate the flap.

Other conventional methods that have been employed specifically to correct presbyopia have been unsuccessful. Some of those methods include using an excimer laser to ablate the peripheral part of the cornea, expanding the sclera behind the limbus area of the cornea, implanting a plus lens inside the comeal stroma, using a multifocal intraocular lens after removal of the cataractous lens, and using bifocal glasses and bifocal contact lenses.

However, because only certain amount of cornea can be ablated without the remaining cornea becoming unstable or experiencing outbulging (ectasia), this technique is not especially effective in correcting very high myopia. That is, a typical cornea is on average about 500 microns thick. The laser ablation technique requires that at least about 250 microns of the corneal stroma remain after the ablation is completed so that instability and outbulging do not occur. Also, these conventional implants, while correcting a refractive error of the patient, also distort the normal vision of the patient.

Additional methods for correcting the refractive error in the eye include inserting an implant in-between layers of the cornea. Generally, this is achieved using several different methods. The first method involves inserting a ring between layers of the comea, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,405,384 to Silvestrini, the entire contents of which is incorporated herein by reference. Typically, a dissector is inserted in the cornea and forms a channel therein. Once it is removed, a ring is then inserted into the channel to alter the curvature of the cornea. In the second method, a flap can be created similarly to the LASIK procedure and a lens can be inserted under the flap, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,102,946 to Nigam, the entire contents of which is incorporated herein by reference. The third method involves forming a pocket using an instrument, and inserting an implant into the pocket, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,655,774 to Choyce, the entire contents of which is incorporated herein by reference.

However, with the above described techniques, a knife or other mechanical instrument is generally used to form the channel, flap or pocket. Use of these instruments may result in damage or imprecision in the cut or formation of the desired area in which the implant is placed. Additionally, these conventional techniques do not include determination and testing of an appropriate implant for correcting a refractive error of a particular patient.

Also, prior methods for the treatment of presbyopia have been unsuccessful. One prior method involved implantation of a disc shaped inlay or lens over the central visual axis of the comea. The disc inlay had a high index of refraction to correct presbyopia and/or hyperopia. However, because the disc covered the center area around the visual axis, the patient's farsighted vision was blurred by the inlay. Another prior method involved a ring shaped inlay implanted around the visual axis. The ring inlay had a lower index of refraction or an index of refraction that is the same as the cornea and therefore corrected myopic refractive errors instead of hyperopic or presbyopic error.

Therefore, there exists a need for an IOL and improved method of correcting refractive error, particularly presbyopia, in the eye, that does not distort the normal vision of the eye, such as far sighted vision. Moreover, there exists a need for selecting the appropriate IOL for correcting the particular refractive error of the patient.

SUMMARY

In one embodiment an intraocular lens is provided. The intraocular lens, includes a lens having an opening therein and an ocular system capable of being inserted into the opening after implantation into an eye. The first lens is adapted to project a first image onto the retina and the second lens is adapted to project a second image onto the retina.

In another embodiment an intraocular lens is provided. The intraocular lens includes a lens having a peripheral portion substantially surrounding an opening, a slit extending from the opening and into said peripheral portion and a telescopic system configured to frictionally fit into said opening.

In another embodiment a method of altering vision of an eye is provided. The method includes the steps of inserting a lens into the eye, the lens having an opening therein and adapted to project a first image on the retina, inserting an ocular system in the opening, the ocular system adapted to project a second image on the retina, and applying energy to said lens to alter the shape thereof.

Additional features and advantages are described herein, and will be apparent from, the following Detailed Description and the figures.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 illustrates an intraocular lens (IOL) according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates an IOL according to another embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 3 and 3A show front and cross-sectional views, respectively, of a lens portion for an IOL such as that shown in FIG. 1, that has diffractive optics to achieve a change in refractive power;

FIG. 4 shows a further configuration of a lens portion for the IOL of FIG. 1, wherein the lens portion is substantially ring-shaped and has a first portion, and a second portion with an edge that creates a gradual change in the refractive properties thereof;

FIG. 5 shows a lens similar to the lens in FIG. 2, with an edge that creates a gradual change in the refractive properties thereof;

FIG. 6 shows the presbyopia lens portion of FIG. 2 relative to the main optical axis of the eye, and having glare-free material disposed thereon;

FIG. 7 shows the presbyopia lens portion of FIG. 6 taken along lines 7-7 of FIG. 6, with glare-free material disposed on the peripheral edges thereof;

FIG. 8 shows the presbyopia lens portion of FIG. 1 relative to the main optical axis of the eye, and having glare-free material disposed thereon;

FIG. 9 shows the IOL of FIG. 1 implanted in the anterior chamber of the eye;

FIG. 10 shows the IOL of FIG. 1 implanted in the posterior chamber of the eye;

FIG. 11 shows an IOL of the type shown in FIG. 1 coupled to the iris;

FIG. 12 illustrates another embodiment of an IOL lens system for correcting presbyopia, which includes a lens portion that is movable with respect to the haptics;

FIG. 13 illustrates a further embodiment of an IOL lens system for correcting presbyopia, which includes a sectional lens portion that is movable with respect to the haptics;

FIG. 14 illustrates the IOL lens system shown in FIG. 13 in which the lens portions have been moved to increase the opening in the lens;

FIG. 15 illustrates the IOL lens system shown in FIG. 13 in which the lens portions have been moved to decrease the opening in the lens;

FIG. 16 illustrates variations to the haptics and lens of the lens system shown in FIG. 13;

FIG. 17 illustrates an IOL according to another embodiment of the present invention having a slit for ease of insertion of an ocular system into an opening therein;

FIG. 18 illustrates the IOL of FIG. 17 with an ocular system positioned within the opening therein;

FIG. 19 illustrates the IOL of FIG. 18 with substantially all of the peripheral portion being exposed to energy thus changing the refractive properties thereof;

FIG. 20 illustrates the IOL of FIG. 18 with on portion of the peripheral portion increasing in thickness and another portion of the peripheral portion decreasing in thickness; and

FIG. 21 illustrates the IOL of FIG. 18 inserted in an eye and in combination with external spectacles.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a lens system 100 according to an embodiment of the present invention includes an optical portion 102 for use in correcting presbyopia. In this example, the optical portion 102 is preferably circular, substantially circular or doughnut-shaped to act as a plus lens, but can be any shape desired. For instance, as shown in FIG. 2, the optical portion 102-1 can be semi-circularly shaped or crescent shaped. The optical portion 102 includes an opening 104 that can be centered or substantially centered in the optical portion 102, or can be located anywhere in the optical portion 102 as appropriate. Similarly, the optical portion 102-1 can be shaped such that the opening 104-1 is centered with respect to the optical portion 102-1 or such that the opening 104-1 is off-centered by a desired distance.

The optical portion 102 (102-1), which can also be referred to as a lens, is preferably made of synthetic material, organic material, or a combination of both synthetic and organic material. Additionally, the lens can be formed from any suitable material. For example the lens can be formed from collagen, copolymer collagen, polyethylene oxide, polypropylene, polyproledine or hydrogel, or cross-linked organic material such as collagen, hyaluronic acid, mucopolysacoharide, glycoprotein, polymethylmethacrylate or silcone, to name a few, or a combination thereof. Further details of types of lens materials and structures are described in U.S. patent application of Gholam A. Peyman, entitled “ADJUSTABLE INLAY WITH MULTIZONE POLYMERIZATION”, Ser. No. 10/272,402, filed Oct. 17, 2002, the entire contents of which are herein incorporated by reference.

It is noted that although this embodiment of the present invention includes a plus lens for the correction of presbyopia, the lens can be configured in any manner desired. For example, the lens can be a minus lens for correcting vision that is adversely affected by macular degeneration, or can have alternative shapes such as touric and the like for correcting astigmatism, or can be shaped and have suitable power and refractivity to correct for hyperopia, myopia and the like.

As further shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the lens systems 100 includes haptics 106 and 108 have foot plates 110 and 112, respectively, for mounting the lens systems 100 in the eye 116. The diameter of the hole 104 in the lens 102 is preferably between about 0.5 mm to about 5 mm, but can have any suitable size. It is also noted that it is not necessary to have a hole 104 or opening in the lens 102. For example, the hole 104 or opening can be replaced with a thin transparent portion that does not alter the path of light therethrough. In other words, the thin transparent portion can be nonrefractive or substantially nonrefractive. The thickness of the lens 102 is preferably within the range of at or about 0.025 mm to at or about 3 mm, and more preferably about 0.07 mm. However, the lens 102 can have any other suitable thickness. The diameter of the lens 102 is preferably within the range of at or about 0.5 mm to at or about 6 mm, but can be any suitable diameter.

In addition, the lens 102 (lens 102-1) is preferably curved (instead of flat) and has the center portion thicker than the edges. However, if desired, the edges can be thicker than the center. It is noted that the lens can have any shape that would improve the vision in the eye of a particular patient. Furthermore, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 3A, the lens 102 can be configured as a diffractive lens 102-2, if desired. For example, the lens can have grooves 102-21 at different diameters along the surface thereof. These grooves, along with the multiple zones 102-22 separated by the grooves, act as prisms in the diffractive technology discussed above. Specifically, the multiple zones 102-22 can be recessed, or bumps, and have different refractive powers, such as +3 diopters, +6 diopters, or any other suitable power which can enable the lens to correct for hyperopia, myopia, presbyopia, or astigmatism.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the edges of the lens portion can be configured to effect a gradual change in the refractive power thereof. For example, as shown in FIG. 4, the lens 102 can be configured as lens 102-3 having a first portion 102-31 that can have little or no refractive power, and a second portion 102-32 that has a varying thickness or shape so that its refractive power gradually changes. As shown in FIG. 5, the semicircularly shaped lens 102-1 shown in FIG. 2 can be configured as lens 102-4 having first portions 102-41 that can have little or no refractive power, and a second portion 102-42 that has a varying thickness or shape so that its refractive power gradually changes. For a further discussion of this type of configuration, see copending U.S. application Ser. No. 10/356,730 entitled “SUBEPITHILIAL IMPLANT AND METHOD OF TREATMENT OF PRESBYOPIAN AND OTHER REFRACTIVE ERRORS”, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

Furthermore, as shown in FIGS. 6-8, the edges of the lenses 102, 102-1 and all other lenses discussed above, as well as the haptics 106 and 108, can be pigmented or painted with a suitable light absorbing material 103 of a suitable color, such as black, to prevent light reflection and glare. A more detailed description of glare free IOLs is set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,277,146 and 6,280,471 both to Peyman et al., which are incorporated herein by reference.

As shown in FIG. 9, the lens system 100 can be positioned either in the anterior chamber 118 of the eye 116 in front of the iris 120 and behind the cornea 122. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 10, the lens system 100 can be positioned in the posterior chamber 124 of the eye 116 behind the iris 120 and in front of the natural lens 124 or another artificial lens (not shown). Specifically, the lens system 100 can be positioned such that the lens 102 (102-1) is spaced from the front of the natural lens 124 (or artificial lens), or can be positioned in contact with the front of the natural lens 124 (or artificial lens) as a piggyback lens. Also, the lens system 100 can be implanted in place of the natural lens 124 of the eye 116 as shown in FIG. 11. The lens is coupled to the interior portion of the eye using haptics having a footplate or with any type of haptics or in any manner desired. For a further discussion of acceptable haptics, see U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,277,146 and 6,280,471 discussed above. As shown in FIGS. 3-6 and 8-11, the lens 102 (and all the variations discussed above) is positioned with the radial center of the lens 102 positioned to coincide with the main optical axis of the eye 116. The positioning allows the center portion to be used for far vision and the outer lens portion to be used for near vision, such as reading. Since there is no refractive portion in the center, there is no correction for far vision, while the outer portion of the lens corrects for presbyopia or any other vision problems desired.

Additionally, the lens shape and size can be altered (i.e., the lens can increase in size and/or volume or decrease in size and/or volume when exposed to the appropriate energy or altered in a desired manner) as described in U.S. patent application of Gholam A. Peyman entitled “A METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CORRECTING THE REFRACTION OF AN INTRAOCULAR LENS AFTER IMPLANTATION IN THE EYE”, Ser. No. 10/197,885, filed Jul. 19, 2002, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,436,092 to Gholam A. Peyman ENTITLED “ADJUSTABLE UNIVERSAL IMPLANT BLANK FOR MODIFYING CORNEAL CURVATURE AND METHODS OF MODIFYING CORNEAL CURVATURE THEREWITH”, the entire contents of both of which are herein incorporated by reference.

Another embodiment of a lens system 200 for correcting presbyopia is shown in FIGS. 12-15. Specifically, lens system 200 includes an optical portion 202 that can be preferably ring or doughnut shaped and has an opening 204 therein. However, the lens 202 can have any desired shape and the features of lenses 102, 102-1 and their variations discussed above, and can be made of any of the materials discussed above. The lens 202 can have no refractive power or any degree of refractive depending on the application in which it is used. The lens can also have diffractive optical characteristics, and thus can be made very thin. Furthermore, the lens 202 can be adjustable by light as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,436,092 to Peyman, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. In addition, as discussed above and is shown in FIGS. 9-11, the lens can be a piggy-back type lens, or can be placed in the anterior chamber of the eye 116, or in the posterior chamber of the eye 116 along with or in place of the natural lens 124 or another artificial lens in the eye 116.

As will now be further described, the lens system 200 can be made adjustable so that the hole 204 in the center of the lens 202 can be increased or decreased in size. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 12, the lens 202 has a tube arrangement 206 and 208 that can receive the ends of haptics 210 and 212, respectively. Similar to haptics 106 and 108 discussed above, haptics 210 and 212 have foot plates 214 and 216, respectively. As indicated, the ends of the haptics 210 and 212 can be received in the tube arrangements 206 and 208 or the pulled out of the tube arrangements 206 or 208 to increase the overall lens of the lens system 200. Furthermore, in order to adjust the position of the opening 204 with regard to the optical axis of the eye 116, the lens 202 can be moved in a upward direction along arrow A so that the end of haptics 210 is received into tube arrangement 206 while the end of haptics 212 is moved in a direction out of tube arrangement 208. Likewise, the lens 202 can be moved down in a direction along arrow B so that the end of haptic 212 is further received into tube arrangement 208 while allowing the end of haptic 210 to move in the direction out of tube arrangement 206. This movement can be effected by inserting a small surgical tool into an opening in the eye 116, and then using the tool to move the haptics 210 and 212 as appropriate. Furthermore, an adhesive can be used, if desired, to more permanently attach the haptics 210 and 212 to the lens 202 once the lens has been positioned as appropriate and the desired overall length of the lens system 200 has been established.

As further shown in FIGS. 13-15 specifically, the lens 202 can be configured as lens 202-1 which includes a top portion 202-11 and a bottom portion 202-12. As indicated, the lens 202-1 (as well as lens 202 shown in FIG. 12) can have a glare-free material 203 on its edges, such as pigmented edge or any of the glare free materials discussed above. Accordingly, by moving the top portion 202-11 and bottom portion 202-12 up or down with respect to the haptics 210-1 and 212-1 as shown in FIG. 14, the portions 202-11 and 202-12 of the lens 202-1 can be moved away from each other and therefore increase the size of opening 204-1. This movement can be effected by inserting a small surgical tool into an opening in the eye 116, and then using the tool to move the portions 202-11 and 202-12 as appropriate. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 15, the upper portion 202-11 and lower portion 202-12 can be moved closer to each other to make the opening 204-1 smaller. As further discussed above, the lens portions 202-11 and 202-12 can have no refractive properties or any refractive properties as discussed above.

In addition, as shown in FIG. 16, the haptics 210, 210-1, 212 and 212-1 and engaging portions of the lens 204 or 204-1 can have any particular configuration. For example, the haptics 210, 210-1, 212 and 212-1 need not be tube-shaped. Rather, they can be slotted, or the haptics and engaging portions of the lens 204 or 204-1 have a tongue and groove arrangements or any other type of arrangement that allows for mating and movement between the lens and the haptics. Furthermore, the anterior of the haptics 210, 210-1, 212 and 212-1 can have a serrated portion 213 which can mate with a serrated portion 205 of the engaging portions of the optic lens 204-1 so as to allow the mating portion to gradually mate with the haptics as shown in FIG. 16.

It should be understood that various changes and modifications to the presently preferred embodiments described herein will be apparent to those skilled in the art. Such changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present subject matter and without diminishing its intended advantages. It is therefore intended that such changes and modifications be covered by the appended claims.

FIGS. 17-20

FIGS. 17-20 illustrate another embodiment of the present invention wherein an IOL 300 includes a lens 302 with opening 304 that is adapted to receive an ocular system 306. Each lens prefereably has a refractive index of about 1.48, but can have any suitable refractive index.

Lens 302 preferably has a peripheral portion 308 and an opening 304 that are generally defined by an inner wall or edge 303 and an outer wall or edge 305. This configuration allows lens 302, when not in combination with ocular system 306, to have two different zones for focusing light; however, it is noted that lens 302 can have any number of zones of portions capable of focusing, including one or more than two. The peripheral portion can be any suitable configuration desired and/or be adapted to change or correct the refractive properties of the eye in any manner desired or have no corrective properties, thus allowing light to merely pass therethrough. Lens 302 is preferably formed from PHMA (HEMA), but can be formed from any suitable material(s). Preferably, lens 302 is formed from flexible material so that it can be folded when inserted into the eye to reduce any incisions made therein; however, if desired the lenses described herein can be formed from any material desired.

Peripheral portion 308 of lens 302 is a generally a converging lens (i.e., a biconvex asphere) and preferably has a diameter about 6.0 mm; but it can be any suitable type of lens or any number of lenses and have any suitable diameter.

Opening 304 preferably has a diameter of about 1.0 mm to about 1.5 mm, but can have any suitable diameter. Additionally, it is noted that the opening can be a substantially non-refractive portion, such that light passing therethrough is unaltered.

Lens 302 can replace the natural and/or existing artificial lens or it can be used in conjunction with the natural and/or artificial lens(es) (i.e., a piggyback lens). For example, lens 302 can attach to the posterior surface, the anterior surface or any other suitable portion of an existing natural lens, an existing artificial lens or lens that is being implanted at about the same time. Lens 302 can be positioned in any suitable portion of the eye, including but not limited to the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye.

Lens 302 preferably has an a slit 309 that extends from the inner edge 303 radially outwardly toward the outer edge 305 and is preferably about 0.1 mm in length; however, it is noted that the slit can be positioned in any suitable position on the lens 302, extend in any suitable direction and be any suitable length. For example, the slit can extend from inner edge 303 to outer edge 305. Slit 309 facilitates insertion of ocular system 306 into the opening. Slit 309 facilitates insertion of ocular system 306 into opening 304. It is noted that lens 302 does not necessarily need a slit therein and slit 309 is merely to assist in insertion of system 306. Preferably, the slit is not visible to the patient after implantation. If desired after insertion of ocular system 306 or if an ocular system is not implanted in the eye, the slit can be sealed or closed in any suitable manner.

Ocular system 306 preferably includes a first lens 310 and a second lens 312; however it is noted that ocular system 306 can have any suitable number of lenses, including one lens or more than two lenses. Lens 310 is prefereably a diverging lens with a high negative refractive index (i.e. a biconcave lens having a power of about −790 diopters) and has a diameter of about 1.0 mm to about 1.5 mm, but can have any suitable diameter and/or power or any number or combination of lenses. However, it is noted that lens 310 can be any suitable configuration desired and/or be adapted to change or correct the refractive properties of the eye in any manner desired or have no corrective properties, thus allowing light to merely pass therethrough. Lens 310 is preferably formed from PHMA (HEMA), but can be formed from any suitable material(s).

Lens 312 is prefereably a preferably a converging lens (i.e., a biconvex asphere having a power of about 250 diopters) and has a diameter of about 1.0 mm to about 1.5 mm, but can have any suitable diameter and/or power. However, it is noted that lens 312 can be any suitable configuration desired and/or be adapted to change or correct the refractive properties of the eye in any manner desired or be any number or combination of lenses or have no corrective properties, thus allowing light to merely pass therethrough. Lens 312 is preferably formed from PHMA (HEMA), but can be formed from any suitable material(s).

Lens 310 and 312 are preferably coupled together using a sleeve 314 or any other device, such as a strut or multiple struts. Prefereably, sleeve 314 or the struts allow aqueous fluid to pass between lens 310 and lens 312 and fill the space therebetween. However, any desired substance (e.g., gas, liquid or solid) or a vacuum can fill the space between lens 310 and 312. Prefereably, sleeve 314 and/or the struts connecting lens 310 and 312 are formed from a flexible material, so that the ocular system can be folded and more easily be inserted into the eye, but they can be formed of any suitable material. It is noted that lenses 302, 310 and 312 do not each need to be coupled together as described herein and any one of each lens can be coupled to any other lens or coupled to no lenses.

Ocular system 306 is preferably inserted into opening 204 before, after or during the surgical procedure. Additionally, ocular system 306 can be inserted into opening 304 before or after lens 302 has been inserted therein. Once inserted into the opening, ocular system 306 preferably is held in a static position by friction, but can be held in any suitable manner, for example (but not limited to), adhesives. Furthermore, ocular system 306 can be removed and replaced with any other suitable device or similar system with different refractive powers and/or capabilities at anytime before after or during surgery. For example, as the patient ages, the patient may require an optical system 306 with different refractive properties.

Prefereably, portion 308 has about the same refractive properties as a normal or natural lens and operates by itself or in conjunction with the natural lens to focus the peripheral light passing therethrough onto the retina to allow a patient to view far objects; however, it is noted that portion 308 can operate in any suitable manner, including focusing on close objects.

While focusing on far objects, preferably the image produced by lenses 310 and 312 is diverged and does not produce a suitable image on the retina. However, it is noted that if desired, the image produced by lenses 310 and 312 and the image or images produced by lens 308 can by projected onto the retina at substantially the same time to form a substantially continuous image or any other suitable combination of images.

Similarly, when focusing on near objects through lenses 310 and 312, the imaged produced by lens 308 is converged such that the image is not suitably projected onto the retina, and the image produced by lenses 310 and 312 is an enlarged or magnified image that is projected onto the retina. However, as described above, any suitable combination of images can be produced.

As shown in FIG. 21, lens 340 is preferably used in conjunction with lens system 300; however it is noted that lens system 300 can operate without an external lens if desired. Lens 340 can be any suitable external lens, such as spectacles, glasses, contact lenses or any other suitable lens that is easily positioned in front of or proximal to the eye. Preferably lens 340 is a converging lens with a power of about 20 diopters, but lens 340 can have any suitable power or no power. Additionally, lens 340 can be partially or fully implanted into the cornea or other portion of the eye is desired. For example, intrastromal corneal inlays and subepithelial corneal onlays and other suitable lenses are suitable for use in conjunction with lenses 302, 310 and 312.

Lens 340 is preferably a plus lens or converging lens that is configured to facilitate focusing of light through lens 310 and lens 312. In other words, when lens 340 is positioned adjacent or in front of the eye, light is focused through lens 310 and lens 312, thus forming an image on the retina that is magnified about 3.5×; however, it is noted that any suitable combination of lenses can be used to great any magnification desired. When lens 340 is removed, light passes through the cornea and is focused on the retina by peripheral portion 308, as described above.

In another embodiment, lens 310 and lens 312 can be polarized to permit light oriented in a first direction to pass therethrough and portion 308 can be polarized to permit light oriented in a second to pass therethrough. Prefereably, the polarized first direction is 90° offset from the polarized second direction.

Additionally, lens 340 can have a first portion 342 and a second portion 344 that are similarly polarized. That is, for example, second portion 344 can be polarized to permit light having substantially the same orientation as lens 310 and lens 312 and first portion 342 can be polarized to permit light having substantially the same orientation as portion 308. Therefore, when the patient views an object through the first portion 342 the object is projected onto the retina through portion 308 and substantially no light passes through lens 310 and lens 312. Conversely, when an object is viewed through second portion 344 the object is projected onto the retina through lens 310 and lens 312 and substantially no light passes through portion 308. It is noted that is not necessary for lens 340 to merely have two portions. Lens 340 can have any number of portions desired, including one and more than two. For example, if lens 340 has only one portion, lens 310 and lens 312 can be polarized to substantially match the polarization of lens 340. In this instance, when the lens is adjacent the eye the light would be polarized and pass through lens 310 and lens 312, and when the lens 340 is removed or not adjacent the eye the light would pass through portion 308. Portion 308 can be the polarized portion (i.e., lens 310 and lens 312 would not be polarized) in this example, if desired.

Furthermore, lens 302 preferably has haptics 311 extending therefrom to couple the lens system 300 in the eye. Haptics are merely exemplary and lens system 300 can be positioned in the eye in any suitable manner.

Preferably, lens 310 and lens 312 are coupled together prior to insertion into the eye and/or prior to examination a patient. By fixing these lenses together, it is possible to determine the optimal distance to produce a telescopic effect. Additionally, lens 302 can be coupled substantially at the same time to accurately fix the optimal distance. However, it is noted that the lenses 302, 310 and 312 can be coupled together at anytime before or after examination of the patient.

It should be understood that various changes and modifications to the presently preferred embodiments described herein will be apparent to those skilled in the art. Such changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention and without diminishing its intended advantages. It is therefore intended that such changes and modifications be covered by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8152302Feb 7, 2011Apr 10, 2012Aaren Scientific, Inc.System for characterizing a cornea and obtaining an ophthalmic lens
US8167941Dec 23, 2008May 1, 2012Forsight Labs, LlcIntraocular, accommodating lens and methods of use
US8292952Mar 4, 2010Oct 23, 2012Aaren Scientific Inc.System for forming and modifying lenses and lenses formed thereby
US8414646Dec 22, 2008Apr 9, 2013Forsight Labs, LlcIntraocular, accommodating lens and methods of use
US8568627Feb 18, 2011Oct 29, 2013Perfect Ip, LlcMethod for forming and modifying lenses
US8646916Mar 4, 2010Feb 11, 2014Perfect Ip, LlcSystem for characterizing a cornea and obtaining an opthalmic lens
US8715346Apr 8, 2013May 6, 2014Forsight Labs, LlcIntraocular, accommodating lens and methods of use
US20130268072 *Sep 27, 2012Oct 10, 2013Bausch & Lomb IncorporatedOptical Hydrogel Material with Photosensitizer and Method for Modifying the Refractive Index
EP2319457A1 *Nov 10, 2009May 11, 2011Lenspecial S.r.L.Vision aiding system comprising at least one intraocular dioptric lens
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/6.22, 623/6.28, 623/6.34
International ClassificationA61F2/16
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2250/0053, A61F2/1613, A61F2/1602, A61F2/1648
European ClassificationA61F2/16B8, A61F2/16B, A61F2/16A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 7, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: MINU TELESYSTEMS, LLC, NORTH CAROLINA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PEYMAN, GHOLAM A.;REEL/FRAME:018069/0229
Effective date: 20060602