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Publication numberUS20060264267 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/431,214
Publication dateNov 23, 2006
Filing dateMay 10, 2006
Priority dateMay 10, 2005
Publication number11431214, 431214, US 2006/0264267 A1, US 2006/264267 A1, US 20060264267 A1, US 20060264267A1, US 2006264267 A1, US 2006264267A1, US-A1-20060264267, US-A1-2006264267, US2006/0264267A1, US2006/264267A1, US20060264267 A1, US20060264267A1, US2006264267 A1, US2006264267A1
InventorsAngela Fox
Original AssigneeFox Angela O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetic golf grip, club lifter and golf ball marker and turf repair tool keeper
US 20060264267 A1
Abstract
A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club includes a magnet positioned at a proximal end of the golf grip and a grip top to completely enclose the magnet in said golf grip. A cap to be worn by a user includes a brim attached to the cap to shade a face of the user and the brim including a magnet to attract a tool and being integral to the brim.
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Claims(28)
1. A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club, comprising:
a magnet positioned at a proximal end of said golf grip,
a grip top to completely enclose said magnet in said golf grip.
2) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said golf grip includes a hole for air to escape.
3) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said golf club is a putter.
4) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said golf grip includes internal grip material between said magnet and said shaft.
5) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said magnet attracts a metallic ball marker to said grip.
6) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said magnet attracts a metallic turf repair tool to said grip.
7) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 6, wherein said metallic turf repair tool includes two arms.
8) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 6, wherein said metallic turf repair tool includes only one arm.
9) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said grip includes a first area to attach a tool.
10) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 9, wherein said grip includes a second area to attach a tool.
11) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 10, wherein said grip includes a third area to attach a tool.
12) A cap to be worn by a user, comprising:
a brim attached to said cap to shade a face of the user;
said brim including a magnet to attract a tool and being integral to said brim.
13) A cap to be worn by a user as in claim 12, wherein said tool is a metallic ball marker.
14) A cap to be worn by a user as in claim 12, wherein said tool is a metallic turf repair tool.
15) A cap to be worn by a user as in claim 12, wherein said tool is a suction cup.
16) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said enclosed magnet can be used with one of a cap, a hat, a visor, a belt or any golf related clothing or equipment.
17) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein a turf repair tool is used from an end of said grip.
18) A cap to be worn by a user as in claim 12, wherein said magnet is integrated in said brim allowing for tool storage in a top surface or a bottom surface of said brim.
19) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said magnet counter balances said club.
20) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, where in a single prong tool is used to clean a groove of a golf club.
21) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein a turf tool can prop the grip off the green.
22) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein the suction cup is used with said magnet to pick up a golf ball.
23) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 22, wherein said section cup is removable.
24) A cap to be worn by a user as in claim 12, wherein a tee slot is integrated with one of a cap, a hat, a visor, a belt or any golf related clothes were equipment.
25) A cap to be worn by a user as in claim 12, wherein said cap includes a cap pocket.
26) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said magnet can be used to lift one of a club head or shaft.
27) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said magnet attracts to a club head.
28) A golf grip for a shaft of a golf club as in claim 1, wherein said magnet attracts to a shaft of a club.
Description
PRIORITY

The present invention claims priority under 35 USC section 119 based on a provisional application having a Ser. No. 60/679,590 which has a filing date of May 10, 2005.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to the accessories for a golf putter, and more particularly to a golf grip and an associated golf hat.

Grips of golf clubs are mostly formed by the laminating covering materials of synthetic resin or rubber. These materials are generally in a form of a slender and long strip of band formed around the shaft in a spiral form to a finite thickness because the grips of golf clubs need to be formed so as to be gripped comfortably by hands and to avoid slipperiness.

Golf is one of the most popular sports in the world. All lower handicapped golfers recognize that the main key of having a good golf swing mostly depends on whether the golfer correctly grips the golf club. No matter whether a golfer uses an interlocking grip, a natural grip or an overlapping grip, a proper grip is one of the most important fundamentals of the game. If the golfer grips his or her golf club too tight, his or her arms will be too loose to release the body twisting power to maximize the golf head speed at the impact of the golf ball through a golf swing. Also, the power from the uncoiling body will fail to be transmitted to the golf club through the golfer's hands. The flying trajectory such as straight, draw or fade of the golf ball can also be controlled by the gripping hands of the golfer. As a consequence, the grip of the golf putter is a very important aspect of the game.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,004,229 to Fazekas discloses a multi-purpose golf tool and method.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The grip of the present invention includes a powerful magnet housed inside the grip material. This design maintains the standard golf look of the putter grip but allows for several advantages. The enclosed magnet is sufficiently strong to hold, use, store, carry, and lift golf gear. The grip can lift a metallic golf ball marker, a golf club head, a golf club steel shaft, a metallic turf repair tool, a suction cup with a metallic base and other various devices. The grip of the present invention also allows a golfer to use a turf repair tool and golf ball suction cup from the end of the grip. The grip of present invention eliminates the need for bending which is part of the game of golf. Golfers with back, knee, or neck discomforts will undoubtedly benefit from the use of such a grip.

The grip design is visually maintained to the golf game standards and allows for additional functions to be carried out.

The invention including the improved golf grip has a strong permanent magnet enclosed in the grip end which allows the user to store, carry and use the metallic turf repair tool, store carry and use a metallic golf ball marker, store use and carry a golf ball suction cup with a metallic base, lift a golf club by the steel shaft or club head, or lift a putter by means of a club head to the putter grip and lift.

The invention also allows user to prop the putter grip off the ground by means of attaching the turf tool and laying it on the ground with the prong or prongs pointing downward.

This keeps putter grip lifted off the turf as to not get the turf chemicals, morning dew, or any other foreign matter or debris on the grip.

The magnet within the invention also acts as integrated counter balance for a more even stroke which is important to the putting aspect of the game of golf.

The tools mentioned above may also be easily carried by means of a secondary device. Such magnets are integrated into a cap, visor, hat, belt or any other golf related clothing or golf equipment.

The tee slots are a great convenience for a user to carry tees at all times. Tee slots can be integrated into a cap, visor, hat, belt or any other golf related clothing or golf equipment.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention may be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which, like reference numerals identify like elements, and in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of the grip of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates an exploded view of the grip of the present invention;

FIG. 3 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the grip top and magnet;

FIG. 4 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the grip top and magnet;

FIG. 5 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the surfaces of the grip and the grip top;

FIG. 6 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the metallic ball marker;

FIG. 7 illustrates a perspective view of the metallic ball marker and grip of the present invention;

FIG. 8 illustrates a perspective view of the metallic ball marker and the grip of the present invention;

FIG. 9 illustrates another perspective view of the metallic ball marker and grip;

FIG. 10 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the metallic turf repair tool;

FIG. 11 illustrates a perspective view of the metallic turf repair tool and grip;

FIG. 12 illustrates another perspective view of the metallic turf repair tool and grip;

FIG. 13 illustrates another perspective view of the metallic turf repair tool and grip;

FIG. 14 illustrates a perspective view of the metallic turf repair tool being extended;

FIG. 15 illustrates a side view of the metallic turf repair tool and grip;

FIG. 16 illustrates a cross-sectional view of two metallic ball markers and the end of the grip;

FIG. 17 illustrates a cross-sectional view of two metallic ball markers in a different location;

FIG. 18 illustrates a perspective view of the movement of the metallic ball marker;

FIG. 19 illustrates the grip attracting a golf head;

FIG. 20 illustrates the grip attracting a golf shaft;

FIG. 21 illustrates a sectional view of the grip and magnet;

FIG. 22 illustrates an exploded view of the grip, magnet and grip top;

FIG. 23 illustrates an exploded view of the grip, magnet and grip top;

FIG. 24 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the suction cup of the present invention;

FIG. 25 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the suction cup and grip with a golf ball;

FIG. 26 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the brim and cap with enclosed magnets

FIG. 27 illustrates a side view of the brim and cap;

FIG. 28 illustrates another side view of the brim and cap;

FIG. 29 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a single prong turf tool;

FIG. 30 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the grip having a ridge;

FIG. 31 illustrates a cross-sectional top view of the turf tool attached to the end of the grip;

FIG. 32 illustrates a cross-sectional side view of the turf tool attached to the end of the grip;

FIG. 33 illustrates the operation of the turf tool on turf;

FIG. 34 illustrates the putter of the present invention being propped up off the ground; and

FIG. 35 illustrates lifting a putter by means of a club head.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of the grip 24 and the shaft 23 of the golf putter. The grip 24 does not necessarily extend the entire length of the shaft 23 and is usually formed from flexible material. The grip top 21 which acts as a cover for the grip 24 may include a hole 25 to allow air to escape while the grip 24 is being placed on the shaft 23.

FIG. 2 illustrates a exploded view of the grip 24 and the shaft 23. FIG. 2 additionally illustrates that the shaft 23 of the golf putter does not extend to the grip top 21 of the grip 24. A magnet 22 which is shown as an approximate rectangle is shown as being integral with the grip 24. The magnet 22 is positioned at proximal end of the grip 24, is under the grip top 21 and is completely enclosed by the grip 24. Internal grip materials 24 a is positioned between the magnet 22 and a proximate end of the shaft 23 of the golf putter to insulate the magnet 22 from the shaft 23, preventing the magnet 22 at the shaft 23 from interacting and making distracting sounds. FIG. 2 additionally illustrates a hole 25 to allow air to escape while the grip 24 is being inserted on the shaft 23 of the golf putter.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the grip 24 showing the grip top 21 and the magnet 22 in phantom line. The magnet 22 enclosed within the grip 24 can be used as a lifting device for lifting metal objects such as the metallic ball marker 26, the metallic turf repair tool 27, the suction cup 102 and other metallic items. This allows the grip 24 and the golf putter to be used by the user to pick up metallic items without bending over or significantly reducing bending over but maintaining a traditional appearance for the grip 24 by having the magnet 22 completely enclosed within the grip 24.

FIG. 4 illustrates a cross-sectional view of FIG. 3 showing the enclosed magnet 22 positioned within the grip top 21.

FIG. 5 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the proximate end of the grip 24 which shows three surfaces 28, 29, 30 which may attract metal objects such as the metallic ball marker 26, the metallic turf repair tool 27 and the suction cup apparatus 102. The first surface 28 is substantially the left-hand surface of the grip 24 from centerline to centerline; the second surface 29 is substantially the right hand surface of the grip 24 from centerline to centerline; and the third surface 30 corresponds to the grip top 21.

FIG. 6 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the metallic ball marker 26 which is shown as a cylinder and which could be a rectangle or any suitable shape. In one embodiment, the metallic golf ball marker 26 measures approximately three quarters of an inch across.

FIG. 7 illustrates the grip 24 and grip top 21 and the metallic golf ball marker 26 positioned on one of the first surface 28, the second surface 29 or the third surface 30.

FIG. 8 illustrates a perspective view of the grip 24, the grip top 21 and the metallic golf ball marker 26 again positioned on one of the first surface 28, the second surface 29 or the third surface 30.

FIG. 9 illustrates a perspective view of the grip 24 at a different position, showing that the magnet 22 retains the metallic ball marker 26 despite the fact that the grip 24 is positioned substantially in the horizontal.

FIG. 10 illustrates a cross-sectional view of the metallic turf repair tool 27 which is substantially U-shaped having a first arm 27 a and a second arm 27 b. In one embodiment, the metallic turf repair tool 27 may be approximately three quarters of an inch in width and 2 inches in length.

FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrates the metallic turf repair tool 27 attached to one of the first surface 28, second surface 29 or third surface 30 at the end of the grip 24 and being held at an angle.

FIG. 13 illustrates the metallic turf repair tool 27 attached to one of the first surface 28, the second surface 29 or the third surface 30 with the grip 24 being held in a substantial horizontal plane.

FIG. 14 illustrates the metallic turf repair tool 27 attached to one of the first surface 28, the second surface 29, the third surface 30 with the metallic turf repair tool 27 having the first arm 27 a and the second arm 27 b extending beyond the end of the grip 24 to repair the turf or ground.

FIG. 15 illustrates a side view of the grip 24 and the metallic turf repair tool 27 and the first and second arms 27 a, 27 b. The metallic turf repair tool 27 can have a single arm design, be used to clean club face grooves, be used to bring the putter grip 24 up off the ground, can be used from the end of the grip 24 to repair ball marks and can be stored on the first surface 28, the second surface 29, the third surface 30 and the fourth surface 21.

FIG. 16 illustrates a top view of the grip 24 showing the grip top 21 with the metallic ball marker 26 positioned on the first surface 28 and the metallic turf repair tool 27 positioned on the second surface 27. There is no tool on the third surface 30.

FIG. 17 illustrates a top view of the grip 24 showing the grip top 21 with the metallic ball marker 26 positioned on the third surface 30, and the metallic turf repair tool 27 positioned on the first surface 28. The second surface 29 has no tool attached to it. By virtue of the magnetic attraction, the metallic ball marker 26 and the metallic turf repair tool 27 are detachability connected to the grip 24.

FIG. 18 illustrates the operation of the grip 24 with the metallic ball marker 26 a at a first position without being influenced by the effect of the magnet 22 and with the metallic ball marker 26 b at a second position on the second surface 29 which shows the influence of the magnet 22 attracting the metallic ball marker 26 b.

FIG. 19 illustrates that the club head 31 is drawn to the magnet 22 encased in the grip 24. This allows the user of the club head 31 to avoid bending over to pick up the club head 31.

FIG. 20 illustrates an alternate use of the magnet 22 (not shown in FIG. 20) and the grip 24. In this case, the user uses the magnet 22 (not shown in FIG. 20) to pick up the club shaft 32 by placing the grip top 21 in the approximate vicinity of the club shaft 32.

FIG. 21 illustrates the cylindrical magnet 2122 encased within the grip 2124 and having a hole 2125 to allow the air to escape from the grip 2124.

FIG. 22 illustrates an exploded view of the grip 24, the cylindrical magnet 2222 and the grip top 21.

FIG. 23 illustrates an exploded view of the grip 2324, the cylindrical magnet 2322 and the grip top 2321.

FIG. 24 b illustrates a top view, and FIG. 24 a illustrates a side view of the suction cup tool 102 which includes a suction cup 2402 which may be formed from a flexible material, a suction cup base 2404 which is coupled to the suction cup 2402 and the metallic base 2404 which allows the magnet 22 to attract the suction cup tool 102. The suction cup tool 102 can be pressed against a golf ball and the golf ball will remain attached to the section cup tool 102. In turn, either one of the first surface 28, the second surface 29 or the third surface 30 can be used to attract the metallic base 2404.

FIG. 25 illustrates that the suction cup tool 102 has been attached to a golf ball 2502 and that the suction cup tool 102 has been placed on one of the first surface 28, the second surface 29 or the third surface 30. The metallic base 2406 which is coupled to the suction cup base 2404 is detachably connected to the grip 24 by virtue of the attraction of the magnet 22 to the grip 24. The user has picked up the golf ball 2502 by the suction cup 2402, eliminating the need for the user to bend over and pick up the golf ball 2502 by hand.

The metallic ball marker 26, the metallic turf repair tool 27 and the suction cup 102 are removable or detachably connected to the grip 24 and are used and stored at the proximal end of the grip 24.

FIG. 26 illustrates a brim 2602 to shade the face of the user and to be used in conjunction with a cap 2606 which together form for example a traditional baseball cap. Positioned within the brim 2606 are magnets 2604 to hold the various tools 26, 27 and 102 described above.

The magnets 2604 are embedded within the brim 2602 and covered with fabric for appearance. FIG. 26 shows the metallic ball marker 26 held in place by magnet 2604.

FIG. 29 illustrates the metallic turf tool 2027 with a single arm 2927 a.

FIG. 30 illustrates the top of the grip 21 having a ridge 2021 to support the metallic turf tool 2027 when the metallic turf tool 2027 is in operation.

FIG. 31 illustrates the top of grip 21 with the metallic turf tool 2027 positioned on top of the grip 21 and adjacent to the ridge 2021.

FIG. 32 illustrates a grip 21, the metallic turf tool 2027 and a ridge 2021 in substantially a horizontal position.

FIG. 33 illustrates the operation of the grip 21 and the metallic turf tool 2021 on the turf.

FIG. 33 illustrates the grip 21 and metallic turf tool 2027 propped on the ground.

FIG. 27 illustrates a side view of the brim 2702 and the cap 2706 with a T holder 2710 to hold golf tees. FIG. 27 shows sewing lines 2708 in the shape of a rectangle or other suitable shape to hold a single golf tee 2714 and a opening 2712 to allow the golf tee 2714 to be placed in the T holder 2710. The user can carry tees at all times for convenience.

FIG. 28 illustrates a brim 2802 and cap 2806 with a zipper pocket 2816 which is formed by sewing lines 2808 which are formed in a proximate rectangular shape or other suitable shape and a zipper 2810 to close the zipper pocket 2816. The zipper pocket 2816 can be used to store tools between rounds of golf and to store miscellaneous items during the game of golf.

The above description shows how integrated magnets, tee slots or cap pockets can be used in a cap, a hat, a visor, a belt or any golf related clothing or equipment. Magnets are integrated into the article brim allowing the freedom of choice for tool storage on either the top surface or the bottom surface of the brim. The magnet enclosed within the putter grip acts as an integrated counterbalance for the putter. The single prong turf tool can be used to clean the grooves of a club face. The suction cup is removable from the grip but when attached, may pick up a golf ball.

The tee slots can be integrated into any cap, hat, visor, belt or golf related clothing or equipment. The cap pocket provides for a convenient tool storage between rounds of golf and storage of miscellaneous items during golf play. By virtue of the magnet, the putter grip can lift golf clubs by the club head or steel shaft.

Another use for the magnets 22 is that they can hold fishing gear such as hooks, flies, fishing lures and other metallic base fishing gear.

While the invention is susceptible to various modifications and alternative forms, specific embodiments thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and are herein described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the description herein of specific embodiments is not intended to limit the invention to the particular forms disclosed.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7658682 *Apr 13, 2007Feb 9, 2010Jason HoiumGolf club handle grip with ball marker
US8424943May 19, 2011Apr 23, 2013Terry HarrisMagnetic retrieval system for a golf club
US20100050390 *Aug 26, 2009Mar 4, 2010Robert WuGrip member and method for installing the grip member onto a shaft
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/300
International ClassificationA63B53/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/0068, A63B47/02, A63B57/0075, A42B1/24, A63B53/14, A42B1/062, A63B55/10, A63B2209/08, A63B57/0031
European ClassificationA42B1/24, A42B1/06B2, A63B53/14, A63B57/00G
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 13, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: MAGNETIC GOLF SOLUTIONS, INC., TEXAS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FOX, ANGELA O.;REEL/FRAME:020950/0397
Effective date: 20071013