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Publication numberUS20060265929 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/137,624
Publication dateNov 30, 2006
Filing dateMay 25, 2005
Priority dateMay 25, 2005
Publication number11137624, 137624, US 2006/0265929 A1, US 2006/265929 A1, US 20060265929 A1, US 20060265929A1, US 2006265929 A1, US 2006265929A1, US-A1-20060265929, US-A1-2006265929, US2006/0265929A1, US2006/265929A1, US20060265929 A1, US20060265929A1, US2006265929 A1, US2006265929A1
InventorsJames Haney
Original AssigneeHaney James R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gun practice device using laser indicator
US 20060265929 A1
Abstract
A practice device for use with a gun includes a laser-producing mechanism for producing a laser beam simulating a fired-bullet pathway. The device includes a bore insert with a striker member which the firing pin of the gun impacts and moves during a firing movement thereof. The movement of the striker member moves an electrical switch mounted on the bore insert to form a closed electrical circuit to activate the laser-producing mechanism. The electrical switch automatically returns to an open-circuit position to turn the laser beam off. A support which preferably includes resilient plastic bristles extends radially outwardly from the bore insert to prevent damage to the gun bore inner surface and to allow for use with guns having different bore sizes. The laser-producing mechanism is pivotally mounted on the bore insert to provide alignment thereof.
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Claims(20)
1. A practice device for use with a gun having a firing pin and a barrel defining a bore, the device comprising:
a bore insert adapted to fit in the bore of the gun;
a striker member which is mounted movably on the bore insert between a non-fired position and a fired position and which is adapted to be moved by the firing pin of the gun to the fired position; and
a laser-producing mechanism mounted on the bore insert for producing a laser beam when the striker member is in the fired position.
2. The device of claim 1 wherein an electrical switch is mounted on the bore insert and operatively connected to the striker member; and wherein the switch has open-circuit and closed-circuit positions associated respectively with the non-fired and fired positions of the striker member.
3. The device of claim 2 wherein the electrical switch is biased toward the open-circuit position whereby the electrical switch is configured to automatically return to the open-circuit position from the closed-circuit position.
4. The device of claim 1 further including an alignment mechanism for aligning the laser-producing mechanism.
5. The device of claim 1 wherein the laser-producing mechanism is pivotally mounted on the bore insert for aligning the laser-producing mechanism.
6. The device of claim 1 wherein a bore-receivable barrel-engageable support is mounted on and extends radially outwardly from the bore insert and is adapted to prevent damage to an inner surface of the barrel when the bore insert is mounted within the bore.
7. The device of claim 6 wherein the support is formed of a resilient material.
8. The device of claim 7 wherein the support includes a plurality of plastic bristles which extend radially outwardly from the bore insert.
9. The device of claim 6 wherein the support has a barrel-engaging surface which is movable in a radially inward direction from a resting position to a barrel-inner-surface-engaging position.
10. The device of claim 1 wherein a securing mechanism is mounted on the bore insert and adapted to secure the device on the barrel of the gun.
11. The device of claim 10 wherein the securing mechanism includes a magnet which is mounted on the bore insert and has a sliding mode and a secured mode; wherein the magnet is slidable along the bore insert in the sliding mode and fixed with respect to the bore insert in the secured mode whereby the magnet is adapted to magnetically connect to the barrel of the gun.
12. The device of claim 11 wherein the securing mechanism includes a bore-receivable barrel-engageable support which is mounted on and extends radially outwardly from the bore insert and is adapted to prevent damage to an inner surface of the bore when the bore insert is mounted within the bore.
13. The device of claim 1 wherein the striker member is formed of a resilient material.
14. The device of claim 1 wherein the striker member is formed of a material including a foam.
15. The device of claim 1 wherein a bore-receivable barrel-engageable support is mounted on and extends radially outwardly from the bore insert; wherein the support has an outer surface which is movable between a first substantially cylindrical shape having a first diameter and a second substantially cylindrical shape having a second diameter different from the first diameter whereby the support is adapted for mounting within gun bores having different diameters.
16. A practice device for use with a gun having an impact member and a barrel defining a bore, the practice device comprising:
an impact-member-movement sensing mechanism for sensing movement and producing a corresponding signal; the movement sensing mechanism being adapted to mount on the gun and sense firing movement of the impact member;
a laser-producing mechanism for selectively producing a laser beam which simulates a fired-bullet pathway; the laser-producing mechanism being adapted to mount on the gun;
a firing-movement-signal communicating mechanism for communicating the signal from the movement sensing mechanism to the laser-producing mechanism to cause production of the laser beam.
17. The device of claim 16 wherein the movement sensing mechanism is configured to sense an impact thereon in order to sense movement whereby the movement sensing mechanism is adapted to sense an impact thereon by the impact member.
18. The device of claim 16 wherein at least a portion of the movement sensing mechanism is movable in response to an impact whereby the at least a portion is adapted to move in response to the firing movement of the impact member.
19. The device of claim 16 wherein the signal-communicating mechanism includes a selectively closeable electrical circuit wherein when the electrical circuit is closed, the laser-producing mechanism produces the laser beam.
20. In combination, a practice device and a gun having an impact member and a barrel defining a bore wherein the gun is capable of firing a bullet via the bore in response to a firing movement of the impact member, the practice device comprising:
a laser-producing mechanism mountable on the gun for producing a laser beam for simulating a fired-bullet pathway; and
an activating mechanism for activating production of the laser beam in response to a firing movement of the impact member when the gun is not loaded.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Technical Field

The invention relates generally to guns and devices used therewith. More particularly, the invention relates to a practice device to assist in the practicing of shooting a gun. Specifically, the invention relates to such a practice device which is mountable on a gun and simulates the pathway of a fired bullet with a laser beam.

2. Background Information

Laser-producing devices have been used in various ways to increase accuracy of pistols and rifles. For example, laser boresighters are used in the alignment of the sights of a gun. Such boresighters are mounted on a gun in order to produce a laser beam which shines on a target to provide a reference point against which the sights of the gun may be adjusted. Some boresighters are configured to fit within the bore of a gun barrel. The laser beams of these boresighters are turned on and off manually. In addition, laser-producing devices have been incorporated as part of a gun or mounted thereon in order to illuminate a target to aid in night hunting.

In addition, laser-producing practice guns are known such as those used in laser tag. Laser tag guns are configured so that when their trigger is pulled, a laser beam is produced typically by closing an electrical circuit. However, such laser guns are not configured to fire actual bullets and thus do not include a firing pin, hammer or the like.

Thus, there is a need in the art for a practice device which is capable of mounting on a bullet-firing gun in order to allow the user to practice shooting an actual gun without firing bullets.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a practice device for use with a gun having a firing pin and a barrel defining a bore, the device comprising a bore insert adapted to fit in the bore of the gun; a striker member which is mounted movably on the bore insert between a non-fired position and a fired position and which is adapted to be moved by the firing pin of the gun to the fired position; and a laser-producing mechanism mounted on the bore insert for producing a laser beam when the striker member is in the fired position.

The present invention also provides a practice device for use with a gun having an impact member and a barrel defining a bore, the practice device comprising an impact-member-movement sensing mechanism for sensing movement and producing a corresponding signal; the movement sensing mechanism being adapted to mount on the gun and sense firing movement of the impact member; a laser-producing mechanism for selectively producing a laser beam which simulates a fired-bullet pathway; the laser-producing mechanism being adapted to mount on the gun; a firing-movement-signal-communicating mechanism for communicating the signal from the movement sensing mechanism to the laser-producing mechanism to cause production of the laser beam.

The present invention further provides in combination, a practice device and a gun having an impact member and a barrel defining a bore wherein the gun is capable of firing a bullet via the bore in response to a firing movement of the impact member, the practice device comprising a laser-producing mechanism mountable on the gun for producing a laser beam for simulating a fired-bullet pathway; and an activating mechanism for activating production of the laser beam in response to a firing movement of the impact member when the gun is not loaded.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the practice device of the present invention in use with a gun.

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the practice device.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an end elevational view as indicated at line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional view of the laser-producing mechanism and alignment mechanism.

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of the gun with portions cut away showing the barrel of a gun in section with the practice device inserted in the gun barrel.

FIG. 8 is similar to FIG. 7 and shows the practice device being activated to produce a laser beam hitting a target.

Similar numbers refer to similar parts throughout the specification.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The practice device of the present invention is indicated generally at 10 in FIGS. 1-5. FIG. 1 shows device 10 in use with a gun 12 and more particularly with device 10 inserted into a barrel 14 of gun 12. Gun 12 further includes a hand grip 16, a trigger 18 and a hammer 20. While gun 12 is shown as a pistol, gun 12 is also meant to represent a rifle or any hand held weapon with a firing pin/hammer and a bore through which bullets may be fired. In general, device 10 is configured to produce a laser beam to simulate the pathway of a fired bullet upon activation by the movement or impact of hammer 20, which is typically activated by trigger 18.

With reference to FIG. 2, practice device 10 includes a bore insert 22, a striker member 24, a pair of bore-receivable barrel-engageable supports 26, a slidable magnet 28, a laser-producing mechanism 30 and an alignment mechanism 32 for aligning laser-producing mechanism 30. Bore insert 22 has a first or insertion end 34 and a second end 36 opposed thereto and is elongated in a longitudinal direction therebetween. Bore insert 22 has a tubular configuration and includes a substantially cylindrical sidewall 38 which extends from first end 34 to second end 36 and defines an interior chamber or passage 40 which likewise extends from first end 34 to second end 36. Side wall 38 has an outer surface 42 and an inner surface 44 which bounds passage 40.

With continued reference to FIG. 2, device 10 further includes an electrical switch 46 which includes a housing 48 which is mounted on bore insert 22 within passage 40 adjacent first end 34 of bore insert 22. Switch 46 further includes a contact member 50 moveably mounted on housing 48 with a portion thereof disposed within housing 48 and a portion extending outwardly from housing 48 and outwardly from first end 34 of bore insert 22 in the longitudinal direction. Contact member 50 is moveable between an open position as shown in FIGS. 2, 5 and 6 and a closed position as shown in FIG. 7. Electrical switch 46 further includes a spring member 52 for biasing contact member 50 to the open position. Striker member 24 is mounted on contact member 50 and is movable along with contact member 50 in the direction indicated at Arrow A. More particularly, striker member 24 is moveable between a non-fired position shown in FIGS. 2, 5 and 6 and a fired position shown in FIG. 7. Thus, the non-fired position of striker member 24 is associated with or corresponds to the open position of contact member 50 or switch 46 and the fired position of striker member 24 is associated with or corresponds to the closed position of contact member 50 or switch 46.

Because striker member 24 is intended to be impacted by a firing pin 120 (FIG. 6) of a gun as detailed below, the striker member is preferably formed of a material which is softer than the firing pin. In addition, striker member 24 is preferably formed of a resilient material such that impact from the firing pin may be absorbed to a certain degree by deformation of striker member 24, which is then able to return to its original configuration. Preferably, striker member 24 is formed of a material which includes a foam or foam rubber of a suitable density for the purpose. While striker member 24 may have a variety of configurations, one desirable configuration includes an annular concave outer surface which gives striker member 24 somewhat of a hyperbolic shape when viewed from the side. In this configuration, striker member 24 has an outermost surface comprising a pair of spaced annular edges 59 respectively adjacent outer and inner ends 56 and 57. This shape accommodates impact on an outer end 56 of striker member 24 to allow striker member 24 to expand radially outwardly in the central portion of the annular outer surface without causing an interference with gun barrel 14 which might otherwise hinder or prevent striker member 24 from moving in the direction indicated at Arrow A during operation of device 10.

Supports 26 (FIG. 2) are spaced from one another along the longitudinal direction of device 10. Each support 26 preferably extends all the way around side wall 38 of bore insert 22 and is mounted on outer surface 42 and extends radially outwardly therefrom. Each support 26 is most preferably formed of a resilient material whereby portions of each support 26 may move inwardly in response to pressure thereon and move outwardly to return to an original position when the pressure is removed. More particularly, each support member 26 includes a base 61 and outwardly extending bristles 58 (FIGS. 3 and 5) which are preferably formed of a resilient plastic material. Base 61 is typically formed of a flexible material which is adhered by an adhesive or any other suitable means to outer surface 42 of bore insert 22. Bristles 58 are cantilevered from base 61 and have outermost ends or edges which form an outer surface 60 of each support 26. Outer surface 60 is substantially cylindrical and is movable between a first substantially cylindrical shape having a first diameter D1 (FIG. 5) inwardly to a second substantially cylindrical shape having a second diameter D2 (FIG. 7). Bristles 58 can have a variety of configurations. For example, bristles 58 may be in the form of the hook portion of a hook-and-loop fastener wherein the hooks have a free end but are curved so that the free ends generally extend radially inwardly toward side wall 38 with the outermost edge thereof disposed along a curved portion of each bristle 58. Alternately, bristles 58 may extend substantially radially outwardly with their free ends forming the outer surface 60 of support 26. Another possibility would be bristles which are connected at both ends to a base analogous to base 61 of support 26 such that curved lengths of the respective bristles would form outer surface 60.

With reference to FIGS. 2, 3 and 5, magnet 28 is an annular-shaped magnet defining a central hole 62 (FIG. 5) for receiving bore insert 22 whereby magnet 28 is slidable along bore insert 22 in the longitudinal direction thereof. More particularly, magnet 28 has a substantially cylindrical inner surface 64 which defines central hole 62 and which has a diameter which is slightly larger than that of outer surface 42 of bore insert 22 whereby magnet 28 is slidable as indicated at Arrow B when in a sliding mode. Magnet 28 further defines a threaded hole 66 with a threaded set screw 68 threadably engaging hole 66 in order to selectively set the position of magnet 28 along bore insert 22. Other suitable mechanisms may be used for setting the position of magnet 28 and thus placing it in a secure mode in which it is not slidable. Magnet 28 and supports 26 are a part of a securing mechanism for securing device 10 to gun 12 as will be detailed further below. It has been found that supports 26 are generally effective without the use of magnet 28. However, magnet 28 provides additional security especially when gun 12 undergoes relatively rapid movements which might tend to allow device 10 to slide out of barrel 14.

With reference to FIGS. 2, 5 and 6, laser-producing mechanism 30 is selectively pivotally mounted on bore insert 22 via alignment mechanism 32. Alignment mechanism 32 includes a mounting member 70, first and second outwardly extending flanges 72 and 74, and three threaded adjustment screws 76. Mounting member 70 has a first end 78 and a second end 80 (FIG. 6) opposed thereto and defines a passage 82 extending from first end 78 to second end 80. Mounting member 70 is rigidly mounted on bore insert 22 adjacent second end 36 thereof with a portion of mounting member 70 disposed within passage 40 of bore insert 22. Mounting member 70 has a generally dome-shaped outer surface 84 (FIG. 6) adjacent second end 80. This generally dome-shaped outer surface may be, for example, a semi-spherical surface or a parabolic surface.

First flange 72 is rigidly mounted on bore insert 22 adjacent second end 36 thereof and on mounting member 70. First flange 72 extends radially outwardly from bore insert 22 and mounting member 70 and defines three holes 86 (only two shown in FIGS. 5-6) for respectively receiving screws 76. First flange 72 is a substantially flat plate-like structure. Alternately, a plurality of flanges may extend outwardly in place of first flange 72, for instance, three flanges each defining one of holes 86.

Second flange 74 is a substantially flat plate-like structure which defines a central hole 88 (FIG. 6) and three threaded holes 90 spaced radially outwardly from central hole 88. As with first flange 72, second flange 74 may be replaced by a plurality of flanges which extend outwardly and define the respective holes 90. Adjustment screws 76 respectively threadably engage threaded holes 90 in order to adjust second flange 74 and in turn adjust the alignment of laser producing mechanism 30. More particularly, second flange 74 extends radially outwardly from and is in moveable engagement with dome-shaped outer surface 84 of mounting member 70. Thus, dome-shaped outer surface 84 is disposed within central hole 88 of second flange 74. More particularly, second flange 74 is pivotally mounted on mounting member 70 and adjustable as indicated by Arrows C in FIG. 6 via adjustment of screws 76. Said adjustment of screws 76 causes the pivotal movement of laser-producing mechanism 30 as indicated at Arrows D in FIG. 6 whereby laser-producing mechanism 30 may be aligned by alignment mechanism 32. The movement of second flange 74 and laser-producing mechanism 30 is indicated by the dot-dashed lines in FIG. 6.

Laser-producing mechanism 30 is situated to produce a low-power laser beam to simulate a fired-bullet pathway of gun 12. A suitable laser-producing mechanism is manufactured by Opcom O.E. (Xiamen) Inc. of Xiamen, China, although any suitable laser-producing mechanism may be used. Laser-producing mechanism 30 includes a housing 92 having a first end 94 and second end 96 opposed thereto. Housing 92 is internally threaded adjacent first end 94 so that housing 92 threadably engages an externally threaded mounting structure 98 which is rigidly mounted on second flange 74 whereby mechanism 30 is rigidly and removably mounted on second flange 74. Mounting structure 98 defines a central hole 99. Housing 92 defines a laser-emitting aperture 100. Housed within housing 92 is a laser-producing device 102, an electrical pathway 104 including a contact spring 106, and a pair of batteries 108 which are in electrical communication with laser-producing device 102 via electrical pathway 104. An electrical contact 110 in the form of a contact plate is also disposed within housing 92 and is in electrical contact with one of batteries 108. An electrical insulator 112 abuts electrical contact 110 opposite batteries 108 and defines a central hole 114. A first wire 116 is connected to electrical contact 110 and electrical switch 46 so that contact 110 and switch 46 are in electrical communication with one another. A second wire 118 is connected to mounting structure 98 and switch 46 to provide electrical communication between structure 98 and switch 46. As seen in FIG. 5, wires 116 and 118 extend from switch 46 through passage 40 of bore insert 22 and passage 82 of mounting member 70. First wire 116 further extends through hole 99 of mounting structure 98 and hole 114 of insulator 112. Second wire 118 further extends into hole 99 of mounting structure 98 where it is connected to mounting structure 98.

Thus, device 10 includes a selectively closeable electrical circuit for activating laser-producing mechanism 30 when closed. More particularly, when striker member 24 and contact member 50 are moved to put electrical switch 46 in the closed circuit position thereof, electricity is able to flow sequentially from contact member 50 of switch 46 through first wire 116, contact 110, batteries 108, electrical pathway 104, laser-producing device 102, housing 92, mounting structure 98 and second wire 118 back to contact member 50 of switch 46.

With reference to FIGS. 7 and 8, the operation of device 10 will be described after briefly providing additional details of gun 12. It is first noted that gun 12 includes a firing pin 120. For the purpose of the present application, each of hammer 20 and firing pin 120 is considered to be an impact member. Hammer 20 is movable as indicated at Arrow E (FIG. 7) in a pivotal manner and firing pin 120 is movable as indicated at Arrow F in a linear fashion. More particularly, hammer 20 is movable between a cocked position (FIG. 7) and a firing position (FIG. 8). Firing pin 120 is movable between a non-fired position (FIG. 7) and a fired position (FIG. 8) which is associated with the firing position of hammer 20. Barrel 14 also defines a bore 122 defined by an inner surface of barrel 14. Inner surface 124 and bore 122 are substantially cylindrical.

To use device 10, it is first mounted on gun 12 as shown in FIG. 7. More particularly, bore insert 22 is inserted as indicated at Arrow G in FIG. 7 into bore 122 of barrel 14 so that striker member 24 is disposed closely adjacent or in contact with firing pin 120. The outermost surface of striker member 24 has an outer diameter which is preferably disposed fairly close to inner surface 124 of barrel 14. Striker member 24 will contact inner surface 124 of barrel 14 only adjacent outer end 56 and inner end 57 along respective annular edges 59 if at all. This minimal surface area for contact with inner surface 124 ensures that striker member 24 is easily moved within barrel 14. In addition, this small portion of striker member 24 which may contact inner surface 124 may help prevent any wobbling of striker member 24 in order to prevent undue stress on or misalignment of contact member 50 of switch 46.

As bore insert 22 is inserted into barrel 14, outer surfaces 60 of supports 26 contact inner surface 124 of barrel 14, which forces outer surface 60 radially inwardly from first diameter D1 (FIG. 5) to second diameter D2 (FIG. 7). Thus, resilient bristles 58 are moved radially inwardly to move outer surface 60 as described. As a result, bristles 58 provide a radially outward pressure against inner surface 124 in order to secure device 10 within barrel 14 of gun 12. Typically, the use of supports 26 is sufficient to secure device 10 on gun 12. However, for greater security magnet 28 may be slid as indicated by Arrow H to magnetically engage the end of barrel 14 and set screw 68 may then be tightened to secure magnet 28 to bore insert 22 whereby magnet 28 further secures device 10 on gun 12. Alignment mechanism 32 may be used as previously described with reference to FIG. 6 in order to align laser-producing mechanism 30 as needed.

Once device 10 is secured on gun 12 and with reference to FIG. 8, the user then aims gun 12 at a target 126 and pulls trigger 18 as indicated by Arrow J in order to move hammer 20 to the firing position and firing pin 120 to the fired position as indicated at Arrow K to activate laser-producing mechanism 30 to produce a laser beam 128. Laser beam 128 simulates a fired-bullet pathway which is substantially along the center line of gun bore 122. More particularly, when hammer 20 moves to its firing position, it impacts firing pin 120 which impacts striker member 24. In response to this impact, striker member 24 moves from the non-fired position (FIG. 7) to the fired position (FIG. 8) along with contact member 50 so that contact member 50 closes the electrical circuit to activate laser-producing mechanism 30 so that laser-producing device 102 produces laser beam 128. As previously noted, contact member 50 is spring-biased by spring member 52 to the open position of spring member 50 so that after striker member 24 has moved to the fired position, it automatically returns to the non-fired position shown in FIG. 7 so that mechanism 30 is deactivated whereby no laser beam is produced. Thus, mechanism 30 is preferably configured to produce laser beam 128 only when strike member 24 and associated members are in the fired position when device 10 is being used in a practice mode. Target 126 may have a laser or light-sensing portion 130 which reacts to contact by laser beam 128 in order to indicate that portion 130 has been hit by laser beam 128. Thus, the user can receive feedback from target 126 as to whether the user's aim is accurate. However, device 10 may be used without such a laser or light-sensing portion because the user can often see where laser beam 128 has hit on a target.

Device 10 allows a user thereof to practice shooting with a real gun without firing bullets therefrom. Thus, device 10 is useful in eliminating additional expenditures on ammunition while allowing the user to become more familiar with aiming the gun. In addition, the user may practice at home or another suitable place instead of, for instance, going to a firing range. A highly desirable feature of device 10 is that it allows a user to actually pull the trigger of the gun and allow the impact members to move so that the simulation of firing is more accurate than would be simply for a device operated without the movement of hammer 20 and firing pin 120. In addition, device 10 allows the user to practice with his or her own gun in order to gain familiarity with that weapon as opposed to some sort of practice weapon or a weapon belonging to someone else. In addition, the use of support 26 allows the mounting of device 10 within bore 122 without damage to inner surface 124 so that the rifling within barrel 14 is not damaged. Further, because supports 26 are movable between diameters D1 and D2 as previously described, device 10 may be used with different guns having different sized bores.

Device 10 thus provides an impact-member-movement sensing mechanism for sensing movement and producing a corresponding signal corresponding to a firing movement of the impact member, which may be hammer 20 and/or firing pin 120. Although striker member 24 is positioned to sense the impact of firing pin 120 directly in order to sense the movement thereof, striker member 24 also senses the movement of hammer 20. Thus, this movement sensing mechanism both senses movement and produces a signal which is communicated to the laser-producing mechanism 30 in order to produce the laser beam which simulates the fired-bullet pathway. Thus, device 10 includes a firing-movement-signal communicating mechanism for communicating a signal from the sensing mechanism to the laser-producing mechanism to cause production of the laser beam. The firing-movement-signal communicating mechanism of device 10 includes the electrical circuit previously described which communicates the signal when the circuit is closed. While the signal is communicated via an electrical circuit, as previously noted, other wireless mechanisms may be used for this purpose. In short, device 10 provides a laser-producing mechanism which is mountable on gun 12 for producing a laser beam which simulates a fired-bullet pathway and an activating mechanism for activating production of the laser beam in response to a firing movement of an impact member when the gun is not loaded.

A variety of changes may be made to device 10 which are within the scope of the present invention. For example, the bore insert need not be a hollow or tubular structure. In addition, the bore insert may be configured to fit within the gun bore without the use of supports 26. More particularly, a bore insert may be configured with an outer surface that matches the bore diameter of a particular gun so that the bore insert is in contact with the inner surface of the gun barrel. In this case, the bore insert should be made of a material which would not damage the inner surface of the gun barrel, such as a suitable plastic material. Such a configuration may make the use of a slidable magnet such as magnet 28 more desirable as a securing mechanism. In addition, such a configuration may eliminate the need for an alignment mechanism such as mechanism 32 in order to align laser-producing mechanism 30. Such a bore insert may also be used with one or more sleeves wherein the bore insert is insertable within one or more of the sleeves and the sleeves are configured to have an outer surface which mates with the inner surface of the gun barrel in order to allow the use of the device with a variety of different caliber guns.

In addition, a switch analogous to switch 46 need not be disposed adjacent the insert end of the bore insert. For example, movement of the striker member may be translated to a contact member analogous to contact member 50 via an elongated translating rod which may extend along the entire length of the bore insert or along any portion of that length.

Further, the striker member may be a pressure sensitive structure such as a piezoelectric member which sends an electrical signal in response to pressure applied by the firing pin in order to close an electrical circuit to activate the laser beam. This is in contrast to a striker member which is physically moved in order to close the electrical circuit. Further, the striker member may conceivably be replaced by a motion sensor which senses motion of the hammer or firing pin in order to activate a laser-producing mechanism to produce the laser beam. Other changes which are within the scope of the present invention will be evident to one skilled in the art.

In the foregoing description, certain terms have been used for brevity, clearness, and understanding. No unnecessary limitations are to be implied therefrom beyond the requirement of the prior art because such terms are used for descriptive purposes and are intended to be broadly construed.

Moreover, the description and illustration of the invention is an example and the invention is not limited to the exact details shown or described.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7677893 *Oct 12, 2005Mar 16, 2010Matvey LvovskiyTraining simulator for sharp shooting
US7900391 *Apr 3, 2009Mar 8, 2011The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyBore sight apparatus
US8132354 *Aug 6, 2008Mar 13, 2012Sellmark CorporationUniversal bore sight
US8445776Jun 1, 2009May 21, 2013E I Du Pont De Nemours And CompanySolar cell module having a low haze encapsulant layer
US8484880Mar 6, 2012Jul 16, 2013Sellmark CorporationUniversal bore sight
US8485858 *Oct 7, 2010Jul 16, 2013Ho-Sheng WeiToy gun having a laser sight
US8602784 *Dec 4, 2009Dec 10, 2013Vojtech DvorakApparatus for converting a pistol into a weapon simulator
US8646201 *Aug 23, 2010Feb 11, 2014Nextlevel Training, LlcShot indicating resetting trigger firearm training system
US8657993Dec 13, 2011Feb 25, 2014E I Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyArticles such as safety laminates and solar cell modules containing high melt flow acid copolymer compositions
US8691372Feb 6, 2008Apr 8, 2014E I Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyArticles comprising high melt flow ionomeric compositions
US20110047847 *Aug 23, 2010Mar 3, 2011Hughes Michael FShot indicating resetting trigger firearm training system
US20120085015 *Oct 7, 2010Apr 12, 2012Ho-Sheng WeiToy gun having a laser sight
US20120129136 *Dec 4, 2009May 24, 2012Vojtech DvorakApparatus for converting a pistol into a weapon simulator
US20130227872 *Feb 27, 2013Sep 5, 2013Ching-Li TSAILaser Sight Firing Device Mountable To An Air Gun
US20130319216 *May 31, 2013Dec 5, 2013Northern Optotronics Inc.Blank firing laser attachment
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/116, 434/21
International ClassificationF41G1/00, F41G3/26
Cooperative ClassificationF41G3/2655, F41A33/02
European ClassificationF41G3/26C1E, F41A33/02