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Publication numberUS20060272979 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/422,825
Publication dateDec 7, 2006
Filing dateJun 7, 2006
Priority dateJun 7, 2005
Publication number11422825, 422825, US 2006/0272979 A1, US 2006/272979 A1, US 20060272979 A1, US 20060272979A1, US 2006272979 A1, US 2006272979A1, US-A1-20060272979, US-A1-2006272979, US2006/0272979A1, US2006/272979A1, US20060272979 A1, US20060272979A1, US2006272979 A1, US2006272979A1
InventorsLawrence Lubbers, Robert Davlin
Original AssigneeLubbers Lawrence M, Davlin Robert A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical Tray
US 20060272979 A1
Abstract
A surgical tray for operations on a patient's limb or extremity generally comprises a surgical site board adapted to support a portion of the patient's body. The site board includes a plurality of apertures. A retention device or retraction device is removably securable in at least one of the apertures and configured to retain a portion of the extremity being operated upon or retract tissue from the intended surgical site.
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Claims(36)
1. A surgical tray, comprising:
a surgical site board adapted to support a portion of a patient's body, the site board having a plurality of apertures therein; and
a retention device removably securable in at least one of the apertures and configured to overlap and retain a portion of the patient's body.
2. The surgical tray of claim 1, wherein the retention device is moldable to a desired shape.
3. The surgical tray of claim 2, wherein the retention device includes a body portion formed from a malleable sheet of material and an anchor configured to be inserted into one of the apertures.
4. The surgical tray of claim 2, wherein the retention device comprises a wire.
5. The surgical tray of claim 4, wherein the retention device further comprises a cushioning layer surrounding at least a portion of the wire.
6. The surgical tray of claim 1, further comprising:
a housing configured to support the surgical site board.
7. The surgical tray of claim 6, wherein the housing defines a bottom surface, the site board being inclined relative to the bottom surface.
8. The surgical tray of claim 6, further comprising:
a flange coupled to at least one of the housing and the site board and having a plurality of spaced apart notches formed therein.
9. The surgical tray of claim 8, wherein the flange is pivotally coupled to at least one of the housing and the site board, the at least one flange being moveable between a closed position in which the flange is generally planar with the site board and an open position in which the flange is angled relative to the site board.
10. The surgical tray of claim 6, wherein the housing includes one or more storage compartments.
11. The surgical tray of claim 6, further comprising:
a foam pad received in the housing.
12. The surgical tray of claim 6, wherein the housing defines a basin positioned below the site board and configured to collect fluids, the plurality of apertures communicating with the basin so that fluids can drain into the basin during a surgical operation.
13. The surgical tray of claim 12, wherein the housing further defines a drainage slot adjacent the site board, the drainage slot communicating with the basin.
14. The surgical tray of claim 13, further comprising:
a drape adapted to be secured to a portion of the housing and wrapped around a portion of the patient's body, the drape further adapted to direct fluids into at least one of the drainage slot and apertures.
15. The surgical tray of claim 6, wherein the housing includes a reservoir configured to receive irrigation fluid for a surgical operation.
16. The surgical tray of claim 6, wherein the tray is used during a surgical operation that requires surgical instruments, the housing or the site board further including a plurality of pre-formed slots for receiving the surgical instruments.
17. The surgical tray of claim 16, further comprising:
a needle cover;
wherein at least one of the plurality of pre-formed slots is configured to removably secure the needle cover.
18. The surgical tray of claim 6, further comprising
a removable sharps pad supported by the housing and having a suture count printed thereon.
19. A surgical tray, comprising:
a surgical site board adapted to support a portion of a patient's body, the site board having a plurality of apertures therein; and
a retraction device removably securable in at least one of the apertures and configured to retract a portion of the patient's body during a surgical operation.
20. The surgical tray of claim 19, wherein the retraction device comprises a post member configured to be retained in one of the apertures and a surgical stay configured to be secured to the post member.
21. The surgical tray of claim 20, wherein the post member includes a body having edges and a plurality of notches spaced along the edges, the notches being configured to retain a portion of the surgical stay during a surgical operation.
22. The surgical tray of claim 20, wherein the post member is moldable to a desired position.
23. The surgical tray of claim 19, further comprising:
a housing configured to support the surgical site board.
24. The surgical tray of claim 23, wherein the housing defines a bottom surface, the site board being inclined relative to the bottom surface.
25. The surgical tray of claim 23, further comprising:
a flange coupled to at least one of the housing and the site board and having a plurality of spaced apart notches formed therein.
26. The surgical tray of claim 25, wherein the flange is pivotally coupled to at least one of the housing and the site board, the flange being moveable between a closed position in which the flange is generally planar with the site board and an open position in which the flange is angled relative to the site board.
27. The surgical tray of claim 23, wherein the housing includes one or more storage compartments.
28. The surgical tray of claim 23, further comprising:
a foam pad received in the housing.
29. The surgical tray of claim 23, wherein the housing defines a basin positioned below the site board and configured to collect fluids, the plurality of apertures communicating with the basin so that fluids can drain into the basin during a surgical operation.
30. The surgical tray of claim 29, wherein the housing further defines a drainage slot adjacent the site board, the drainage slot communicating with the basin.
31. The surgical tray of claim 30, further comprising:
a drape adapted to be secured to a portion of the housing and wrapped around a portion of the patient's body, the drape further adapted to direct fluids into at least one of the drainage slot and apertures.
32. The surgical tray of claim 23, wherein the housing includes a reservoir configured to receive irrigation fluid for a surgical operation.
33. The surgical tray of claim 23, wherein the tray is used during a surgical operation that requires surgical instruments, the housing or the site board further including a plurality of pre-formed slots for receiving the surgical instruments.
34. The surgical tray of claim 33, further comprising:
a needle cover;
wherein at least one of the plurality of pre-formed slots is configured to removably secure the needle cover.
35. The surgical tray of claim 23, further comprising
a removable sharps pad supported by the housing and having a suture count printed thereon.
36. A surgical tray, comprising:
a housing;
a surgical site board supported by the housing and adapted to support a portion of a patient's body, the site board having a plurality of apertures therein;
a retention device removably securable in at least one of the apertures and configured to overlap and retain a portion of the patient's body; and
a retraction device removably securable in at least one of the apertures and configured to retract a portion of the patient's body during a surgical operation.
Description

The present application claims the filing benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/688,036, filed Jun. 7, 2005, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to medical equipment, and more particularly, to a surgical tray for operations on a patient's limb or extremity.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Many emergency room and other surgical operations require a doctor to operate on a patient's limb or extremity. Hands are some of the most commonly operated upon extremities because they are required to complete many tasks and activities and are thus highly at risk to injury. For example, approximately 10 percent or more of typical emergency room operations involve some form of acute hand surgery. Operating on a hand requires a great deal of care because tendons, nerves, and blood vessels must all be meticulously rejoined to assure proper alignment of any lacerated tissues. Additionally, microsurgical techniques are generally required because the tissues that make the functions of the hand possible are small by nature. Control of the position of a patient's hand and fingers during surgery is therefore an important aspect of a successful operation.

Current techniques for performing hand surgery in the emergency room and elsewhere are inefficient and frustrating. For example, when a patient is rushed into the emergency room with deep laceration or similar hand injury, a surgeon must arrange the patient in the proper position for surgery and gather the necessary materials. Typically this requires positioning the hand on an arm table adjacent to a hospital bed and arranging it in a manner that provides the surgeon with easy access to the intended surgical site. Maintaining the hand in a desired position can be a difficult task when qualified assistants are not readily available, which is often the case during late-night, weekend, or very busy emergency room situations.

Additionally, gathering the necessary supplies from various areas in the emergency room prior to operation can be a burdensome task. Due to a lack of centralized storage, the surgeon may find himself or herself walking back and forth between the patient and various areas of the room to gather surgical tools, sutures, needles, gauze, and other items required to complete the surgery. The surgeon may experience additional frustration if supply amounts have not been maintained or if items have changed locations.

As a result of the manner by which items are gathered for surgery, the surgical operation itself becomes more difficult. For example, the various items are typically contained in individual packages and are not designed to be collectively organized in any particular manner. After all of the packages are opened and the items are placed together on a separate instrument table or the like, the surgeon may have to sort through any resulting clutter on the table to find the instrument he or she is looking for. The clutter typically increases throughout the operation as surgeon uses different tools and instruments and places them back on the table. Any increased operating time resulting from the lack of instrument management increases the overall cost of the surgery and can compromise the quality of the operation. Additionally, the lack of instrument management increases the potential of accidental injury from exposed scalpel blades and the like.

Use of the tools themselves can also be a challenging task. In particular, areas of tissue on the hand typically obstruct access to the surgical site being operated upon. As a result, surgical stays and retractors are used to pull the tissue back. Because assistants are not always available to hold the stays during an operation, many surgeons place some sort of retractor frame around the surgical site. The frames typically include notches that are spaced about a peripheral edge and adapted to secure a portion of the surgical stays, as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 4,274,398. Although such frames may slightly facilitate the surgical operation, they are better suited for (and were originally developed for) areas of the body other than limbs and merely represent an improvised solution for hand surgeries. The ability to use a stay to retract tissue in a desired three-dimensional direction is limited by the spacing of the notches and their position relative to the tissue.

During the course of the operation, the surgeon must take measures to maintain a sterile surgical site. This typically involves disinfecting and irrigating the surgical site and draining any resulting fluids. Oftentimes the drainage is done in an ad-hoc manner by merely placing a plastic bin or basin under the patient's hand. Such a technique, however, may not sufficiently capture the fluids due to splashing while the fluids are being applied. Moreover, the bin or basin may not be large enough to cover the entire area where drainage is likely to occur and can create a mess when attempting to dispose of its contents. As a result, the surgeon has a more difficult time maintaining a sterile surgical site and reducing his or her own exposure to potentially contaminated and biohazardous fluids.

Although several attempts have been made to facilitate surgical operations on a patient's extremities, these attempts merely focus on one or few of the challenges associated with the operations and do not adequately ease the burden on surgeons. For example, many surgeons use a sheet of metal (typically aluminum or lead) cut into the shape of a hand to help stabilize and position a patient's extremities. After using straps or the like to attach the patient's hand to the metal sheet, the sheet can be bent into desired positions by applying sufficient force. Variations of this type of hand device are shown in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,798,195, 5,560,375, and 5,855,209. Despite the improvements in stability, however, such devices do not adequately address the challenges associated with tissue retraction, instrument management, and fluid management. Indeed, assistants are still typically required to keep an incision open or to hold nerves, blood vessels, and tendons or the like during surgery.

The same can be said with respect to various surgical tables or trays that have been developed facilitate surgery on a patient's extremities. In particular, although most of the tables provide some means for securing a hand or the like during surgery, the tables still limit the manner by which surgical stays may be used to retract tissue. As shown in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,779,211, 4,082,257, 4,807,864, and 6,077,221, the tables typically include notches around a peripheral edge to secure a portion of the surgical stays. This row of notches, or “Scott fencing,” suffers from the same drawbacks as the notched framing discussed above—the desired direction of retraction is limited by the spacing of the notches and their position in 3 dimensions relative to the tissue. If blood vessels need to be held in a particular manner or if tissue needs to be retracted in a direction away from the plane formed by the fencing and surgical table, one or more assistants will be needed to manually complete these tasks.

As can be appreciated, there is a need for a surgical tray that helps reduce the frustration surgeons currently experience when attempting to operate on a patient's limb or extremity. A surgical tray is needed to address the issues of hand positioning, tissue retraction, instrument and sharps management, and irrigation/waste fluids management without significantly compromising the comfort and wellbeing of the patient.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention overcomes the foregoing and other shortcomings and drawbacks of surgical trays heretofore known. While the invention will be described in connection with certain embodiments, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to these embodiments. On the contrary, the invention includes all alternatives, modifications and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the present invention.

The present invention provides a surgical tray that facilitates surgical operations on a patient's limb or extremity. In particular, the surgical tray is configured to retain a patient's limb and retract tissue or the like to reduce the surgeon's reliance upon medical assistants to complete a surgical operation. The surgical tray is also configured to provide an organized, sterile field for an operation by incorporating integral irrigation/waste fluids management, instrument management, and sharps management.

To this end, a surgical tray according to the invention generally comprises a surgical site board adapted to support a portion of a patient's body, such as a hand. The site board also includes a plurality of apertures. A retention device or retraction device is removably securable in at least one of the apertures to retain or retract a portion of the patient's body. More specifically, a retention device is configured to overlap and retain a portion of the patient's body, such as the patient's fingers. The retention device may therefore be a rigid component shaped for this purpose or a component moldable to a desired shape. For example, the retention device may include an anchor configured to be inserted into one of the apertures and a body portion formed from a malleable sheet of material. Alternatively, the retention device may comprise a pliable wire configured to be at least partially inserted into one of the apertures and a cushioning layer surrounding at least a portion of the wire.

The retraction device, on the other hand, is configured to retract tissue or the like to provide the surgeon with increased access to the intended surgical site on the patient's extremity. In general, the retraction device comprises a post member configured to be retained in one of the apertures and a surgical stay configured to be secured to the post member. Similar to the retention device, the post member may be a rigid component or a component moldable to a desired shape. For example, in one embodiment, the post member includes a body having edges and a plurality of notches spaced along the edges. The notches are configured to retain a portion of the surgical stay during a surgical operation. Thus, the surgical stay may be secured to the appropriate notch depending upon the desired angle of retraction in each of the x, y, and z planes.

In another aspect of the invention, the surgical tray further includes a housing configured to support the surgical site board. The housing defines a basin positioned below the site board for collecting any fluids that may drain through the plurality of apertures during a surgical operation. For example, irrigation fluid applied to the surgical site, or bodily fluids, may drain through the apertures into the basin. Gutters and run-off guides may be provided around the site board to direct drainage fluids into the basin as well. The basin may be drained manually after an operation, using an integrated pour spout or aperture, or continuously during the operation by attaching a vacuum hose or drain to a port communicating with the basin. Thus, in addition to helping prevent the spillage of blood, disinfectants, and washes, the integrated fluid management system of the surgical tray may retain waste liquids and other fluids for convenient disposal.

The housing may also include one or more storage compartments positioned proximate to the site board. The storage compartments may contain all of the medications and instruments commonly needed for surgery on a patient's extremity, including sutures, disinfectants, dressing materials, anesthetics, and the retention and retraction devices discussed above. Thus, the surgical tray reduces the need for a surgeon to walk back and forth between various areas in an operating room to gather the necessary materials for a surgical procedure. If desired, the storage compartments may be sterilized and sealed when the surgical tray is produced so that the surgeon need only open the compartments to make sterile surgical instruments readily available for use.

During an operation, the surgical instruments and suture needles may be inserted into one or more foam pads received by the housing. For example, one or more foam islands may be received by the housing adjacent to the site board. Scalpels, scissors, forceps, and other surgical instruments are supported by the foam when inserted therein so that they are readily available for use or reuse during an operation. Alternatively, the foam islands, other areas of the housing, or the site board itself may include a plurality of pre-formed holes or slots for receiving the surgical instruments.

By virtue of the foregoing, there is thus provided a surgical tray that reduces the time and frustration occasionally experienced by surgeons when preparing for and performing a surgical operation on a patient's limb or extremity. The retention and retraction devices cooperate with the apertures in the site board to secure the extremity and provide the surgeon with visual access to the intended surgical site without relying upon additional personnel. Integrated fluid management improves overall cleanliness during operations and facilitates disposal of contaminated waste liquids, while integrated sharps and instrument management helps increase overall efficiency and prevents misplacement of items. In addition, safety is promoted by providing containment of biohazardous liquids and protection from exposure to needles, scalpels, and other sharps.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will be made apparent from the accompanying drawings and the description thereof.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate embodiments of the invention and, together with a general description of the invention given above, and the detailed description given below, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a surgical tray according to one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of the surgical tray in FIG. 1 showing a removable sharps pad and integrated needle covers;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing one embodiment of a retention device according to the invention;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing another embodiment of a retention device according to the invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing another embodiment of a retention device according to the invention;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing another embodiment of a retention device according to the invention;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing one embodiment of a retraction device according to the invention;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view showing another embodiment of a retraction device according to the invention;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 showing various aspects of fluid management;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional perspective view taken along line 10-10 in FIG. 9; and

FIGS. 11 and 12 are perspective views illustrating a disposal bag included in the tray of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

With reference to FIG. 1, a surgical tray 10 according to one embodiment of the invention is shown. The surgical tray 10 generally comprises a surgical site board 12 adapted to support a portion of a patient's body and a housing 14 configured to support the site board 12. Although FIG. 1 illustrates the site board 12 being used to support a patient's hand 16, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the tray 10 may also be used during surgical operations on other areas of the patient's body or on small animals. Additionally, although the surgical tray 10 may be particularly advantageous for emergency-room situations, the tray 10 may also be utilized for small outpatient operative areas, treatment rooms, minor surgical procedure rooms, clinics, military field hospitals, and anywhere extremity surgery can be done. In such environments the tray 10 may be secured to an operating table 18 by one or more straps 22 connected to the housing 14. The straps 22 may be secured by locking devices 19, velcro, knots, a pin and belt holes, or any other suitable method.

Both the site board 12 and housing 14 may be constructed from plastic, although other materials are possible as well. For example, the site board 12 or housing 14 may alternatively be constructed from foam or a similar material. In one embodiment, the housing 14 is adapted to receive one or more foam pads or islands 20 for the management of sharps and other surgical instruments. The foam islands 20 may be a polyurethane, polyethylene, or similar foam having a density sufficient to support the instruments at the angles with which they are inserted therein. For example, FIG. 1 shows scissors 24 and a surgical knife 26 inserted into the foam islands 20 at various angles. Because the instruments are inserted at angles with their respective grip portions 28, 30 elevated off the site board 12 and housing 14, a surgeon can quickly and easily grab the instruments when they are needed during an operation. The foam islands 20 may be coupled to the housing 14 or may be removable components inserted into corresponding pockets (not shown) formed in the housing 14. The foam islands 20 may also have different configurations and be located in various areas on the housing 14. Thus, although FIG. 1 shows first and second foam islands 20 on opposite sides of the site board 12, a foam island may alternatively extend substantially around the periphery of the site board 12 to form a “racetrack” (not shown) or may be positioned in a localized area of the tray 10, such as in a base area 32 of the housing 14.

To further facilitate instrument management during surgical operations, the housing 14 may also include a plurality of pre-formed slots or holes 36 adapted to receive scissors 38 and other surgical instruments. The slots 36 may be provided in a predetermined matrix array and at desired angles in the housing 14. Preferably the slots 36 are formed in a compressible material such as foam and define openings sized to provide a close fit for the common instruments provided with the tray 10 or commonly used during surgery. Although FIG. 1 only shows the housing 14 and foam islands 20 incorporating the pre-formed slots 36, similar slots or holes may also be provided in the site board 12.

In one embodiment, a special type of foam island and slot array is provided in the housing 14 to manage sharps (including suture needles, scalpel blades, and other sharp objects) during a surgical operation. More specifically and with reference to FIG. 2, the housing 14 may receive a removable sharps pad 40 and include one or more needle covers or protective shields 42 molded, pressed, or otherwise secured in specially designated slots 36. The sharps pad 40 is preferably formed from foam, but may alternatively be constructed from other materials pierceable by suture needles 43, such as elastomeric sheets, penetrable films, felts, and the like. A suture count is printed on the sharps pad 40 to identify the type and number of sutures used during the surgical procedure. Upon completing an operation, the sharps pad 40 may be removed intact for disposal in a designated sharps container (not shown) provided by the hospital or clinic. FIG. 2 also illustrates how a syringe 46 may be docked in one of the integrated needle covers 42 to protect the associated needle 44 during an operation.

Referring back to FIG. 1, the housing 14 may also include one or more storage compartments 48 for storing various surgical tools and accessories. For example, in a manner not shown herein, the compartments 48 may store surgical gloves, syringes, needles, gauze, irrigation splash guards, and other items often used in surgical operations. The compartments 48 may also store specific modules or packages containing the various items needed to complete a particular step of the surgical operation, such as a pre-prep module (not shown) containing an alcohol-prewetted swab, a pre-filled anesthetic syringe, and other materials. To prevent contamination prior to use, the compartments 48 may be sealed by a removable cover (not shown), such as a removable sheet of sterile material, that may be peeled off of the housing 14 to expose the contents of the associated compartment 48.

As shown in FIG. 1, the surgical site board 12 includes a plurality of apertures 34 for the selective placement and positioning of various retention devices 50, 52, 54 and/or retraction devices 56, 58, 60. The retention and retraction devices are each removably securable in at least one the apertures 34 and configured to retain a portion of the patient's body or retract tissue or the like during a surgical operation, as will be described in greater detail below. A wrist restraint 62 and one or more positioning blocks 64 (FIG. 9) may also be secured into the apertures 34 to further immobilize and position the patient's hand 16 during an operation. The positioning blocks 64 may have different shapes, sizes, and contours to provide the surgeon with many options. Additionally, the positioning blocks 64 may alternatively rest upon the site board 12 without being secured to the apertures 34. In such an embodiment the positioning block may be designed with one or more textured surfaces adapted to create friction between the block 64 and the site board 12, thereby preventing the positioning block 64 from sliding relative to the site board 12.

Still referring to FIG. 1, one or more flanges 66 having spaced apart notches or fencing 68 may be provided on the housing 14 or site board 12 to secure surgical stays 70, which also retract tissue during an operation. Similar flanges 74 and 76 may be pivotally coupled to the housing 14 or site board 12 so as to be movable between a closed position in which the flange is generally planar with the site board 12 and an open position in which the flange is angled relative to the site board 12. FIG. 1 illustrates flange 74 in the closed position and flange 76 in the open position.

Now referring to FIGS. 3-8, the retention devices and retraction devices are shown in further detail. The retention devices 50, 52, 54 are configured to overlap and retain a portion of the patient's body, such as the patient's fingers 80 (FIG. 1). Accordingly, the retention devices may be shaped for this purpose or may be moldable to a desired shape. FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate exemplary embodiments of the latter, where the retention device 50 comprises an L-shaped post 86 (FIG. 3) or a J-shaped post 88 (FIG. 4). A collar 90 may be integrally formed with or provided on the posts 86, 88 to ensure that the retraction devices 50 do not extend past a certain depth in the apertures 34.

Meanwhile, FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate exemplary embodiments of moldable retention devices. The retention device 52 (FIG. 5) comprises a wire 96 having a portion 98 configured to be inserted into one of the apertures 34 and a foam or other cushioning layer 100 surrounding at least a portion of the wire 96. The wire may be bent to a desired position upon the application of force, but has sufficient rigidity to hold the shape while retaining fingers 80 or other body parts during a surgical operation. In one embodiment, the gauge of the wire 96 is sized to provide a slight interference fit with the apertures 34 in the site board 12. Also, if desired, a collar 90 may be provided on the wire 96 much like the retention device 50. And finally, in another embodiment, the wire 96 may be pre-formed in plastic or metal to fit around the finger.

The retention device 54 (FIG. 6) includes a body portion 106 formed from a malleable sheet of material and an anchor 108 configured to be inserted into one of the apertures 34. For example, the body portion 106 may be formed from a bendable sheet of metal such as aluminum or lead, or from a cold-forming plastic. To provide additional comfort for the patient, the retention device 54 may also include a foam or other cushioning layer 110 on one or both sides of the formable sheet. Alternatively, the device may be pre-formed of plastic or metal to fit over the finger.

FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate the retraction devices 56, 58 in further detail. As shown in FIG. 7, the retraction device 56 comprises a post member 116 configured to be retained in one of the apertures 34 and a surgical stay 118 secured to the post member. Like the retention device 50, a collar 90 may be integrally formed with or provided on the post member 116 to ensure that the retraction device 56 does not extend past a certain depth in the apertures 34. Additionally, post members of various heights and shapes may be provided with the tray 10 so that the surgeon can select the retraction device 56 and secure it into the appropriate aperture 34 according to the desired 3-dimensional angle and position of retraction.

The retraction device 58 of FIG. 8 includes a body 126 having edges 128 and plurality of notches 130 spaced along the edges. The notches 130 are configured to retain a portion of a surgical stay 132, much like the notches 68 in the flanges 66, 74, and 76. If desired, the body 126 may be formed from a malleable sheet of material so that the retention device 58 is moldable to a desired shape. Accordingly, the retraction device 58 may further include a foam or cushioning layer 127 on one or both sides of the body 126 and therefore be constructed in substantially the same manner as the retention device 54, with the addition of the notches 130 for securing the surgical stay 132.

Although specific embodiments of retention and retraction devices according to the invention are described above, those skilled in the art will appreciate that a wide variety of shapes and configurations are possible for such devices. For example, the retraction device 60 (FIG. 1) may be constructed substantially the same as the retraction device 58 but have a semi-circular configuration. The variety of retention and retraction devices and various locations to which they can be secured to the site board 12 helps enable the surgeon to retain the hand 16 in a particular manner or retract tissue in a particular direction without relying upon medical assistants. Also note that the retention and retraction devices, along with the other components of the surgical tray 10, may be made radiolucent so that x-rays may be taken after the patient's hand 16 is positioned or any time during or after the surgical operation. Such an embodiment provides a “hands-free” radiologic positioner that allows x-rays in various planes—anterior, posterior, lateral, or obliques—while providing safety to the operator.

FIGS. 9 and 10 illustrate various fluid management aspects incorporated into the tray 10. In particular, FIG. 9 illustrates how one of the storage compartments 48 may be used as an instrument cleaning station. Thus, during an operation, the compartment 48 may be filled with cleaning solution 140 and include a foam pad or abrasive material 142 on which to wipe surgical instruments. FIG. 9 also illustrates an irrigation squirt gun 144 configured to draw irrigation fluid 146 from a reservoir 148 within the housing 14. The reservoir 14 in such an embodiment is a closed storage compartment formed in the housing 14 and may be filled with irrigation fluid prior to use by opening a lid, door, or port (not shown) on the a surface 150 of the housing 14 and subsequently pouring the fluid in. In other embodiments, the reservoir 148 may be an open storage compartment and the squirt gun may be configured to manually draw fluid from the reservoir 148. Such a squirt gun may require additional manipulation to dispense the fluid 146 and thus operate much like a syringe. Traditional techniques for irrigating a surgical site may also be used with the invention.

No matter which manner of irrigating the surgical site is employed, however, the irrigation fluid 146 and bodily fluids may drain through the apertures 34 into a basin 160 (FIG. 10) defined by the housing 14. The basin 160 is positioned below the site board 12 and may include one or more ports (not shown) at a bottom end 162 communicating with a portion 164 of a vacuum or drainage hose 165. The hose 165 is connected to a collection system 167 so that collected fluids are drawn away from the tray 10 for safe and convenient disposal. Alternatively, the hose 165 may rely upon the force of gravity to direct fluids to a container or area below the operating table 18. To further facilitate drainage into the basin 160 and towards the bottom end 162, the site board 12 may be inclined relative to a bottom surface 166 defined by the housing 14. Additionally, a drape 168 (FIG. 1) may be provided with the tray to wrap around the patient's arm 170 and direct fluids to a drainage slot 172 or absorbent material (not shown) positioned at a lower end of the site board 12.

FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate a further aspect to assist cleanup of the tray 10 and waste fluids after an operation. As shown in the figure, the tray 10 may include a biohazard waste bag 180 attached to the bottom or side of the housing 14. Thus, when a surgical operation has been completed, the bag 180 may be pulled out from the tray 10 and turned inside out while being pulled back over the exterior of the tray 10. A sealing surface or strip 184 may be provided on the bag 180, along with appropriate biohazard markings 186.

While the invention has been illustrated by the description of one or more embodiments thereof, and while the embodiments have been described in considerable detail, they are not intended to restrict or in any way limit the scope of the appended claims to such detail. Additional advantages and modifications will readily appear to those skilled in the art. The invention in its broader aspects is therefore not limited to the specific details, representative apparatus and methods and illustrative examples shown and described. Accordingly, departures may be made from such details without departing from the scope or spirit of Applicants' general inventive concept.

Referenced by
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US8177064Apr 21, 2008May 15, 2012Doheny Eye InstituteSurgical pack and tray
US8177776 *Apr 21, 2008May 15, 2012Doheny Eye InstituteIndependent surgical center
US8323271Oct 22, 2008Dec 4, 2012Doheny Eye InstituteSterile surgical tray
US8381912 *May 26, 2010Feb 26, 2013Coni DalhamerTray for retaining food items during transportation
US8568391Dec 6, 2011Oct 29, 2013Doheny Eye InstituteSterile surgical tray
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/557
International ClassificationB65D1/34
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/02, A61B19/0256
European ClassificationA61B19/02H, A61B17/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 8, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: LUBBERS, LAWRENCE M., OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DAVLIN, III, MR. ROBERT A.;REEL/FRAME:017748/0037
Effective date: 20060607
Jun 7, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: LUBBERS, LAWRENCE M., OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:DAVLIN, III, MR. ROBERT A.;REEL/FRAME:017740/0379
Effective date: 20060607