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Publication numberUS20060281580 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/149,534
Publication dateDec 14, 2006
Filing dateJun 10, 2005
Priority dateJun 10, 2005
Publication number11149534, 149534, US 2006/0281580 A1, US 2006/281580 A1, US 20060281580 A1, US 20060281580A1, US 2006281580 A1, US 2006281580A1, US-A1-20060281580, US-A1-2006281580, US2006/0281580A1, US2006/281580A1, US20060281580 A1, US20060281580A1, US2006281580 A1, US2006281580A1
InventorsYeoung Kim, Maxwell Kim
Original AssigneeKim Yeoung H, Kim Maxwell S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Trajectory stability increased golf clubs with pluralities of holes
US 20060281580 A1
Abstract
A golf club head is provided, which has a number of holes developed on the head by installing a number of metal tubes of 3 mm diameter between the front face and rear face of the head. Another embodiment of the current application is a golf iron having a number of holes on the head. Air stream through the holes stabilizes the trajectory of the golf clubs at high speed of swing.
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Claims(7)
1. A golf club head, which has a number of holes, developed from the front face to the rear face, at the central part of the head by inserting a module, which is comprised of a number of metal tubes of 3 mm diameter and two circular metal plates which have same number of holes of 3 mm diameter to receive the tubes and welded to the metal tubes, inside of the head through the holes developed on the front and rear face and adhere the module to the front and rear faces for allowing air pass through the holes freely at T-off.
2. A golf club head of claim 1, wherein the golf club is a driver.
3. A golf club head of claim 1, wherein the number of metal tubes is 9.
4. A golf club head of claim 1, wherein the metal is titanium.
5. A golf club head, having a number of holes at the central part of on the head.
6. A golf club head of claim 5, wherein the golf club is iron.
7. A golf club head of claim 5, wherein the golf club is putter.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    Driving is known as the most important and frustrating part of golf game. If a golf ball is not hit at right angle and with the proper strength, the ball flies to a wrong direction and falls in a rough. However, most of golf drivers are designed to maximize a flying distance of a golf ball and focused on maximizing repulsion force. None of them concerns about a stability of the trajectory of a driver when a player does swing. When a player swings a driver for T-off, the speed of a driver club head reaches well over 40˜50 meter/second. This speed is over 150 km/hr. At this speed, the resistance of air to the club head is significant. Even a slight unbalance of the drag force shakes the trajectory of the club head and moves the hitting point of the golf club from the center of the club head. It is the purpose of the current application to provide a golf club head, including a driver's head, which increases the stability of the trajectory of the club head to increase the accuracy of the impact, especially at T-off moment.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    This invention relates to a golf club head designed especially for improving the accuracy of a T-off moment for an amateur golfer.
  • DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART
  • [0003]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,464,211 to Atkins, Sr. illustrates a hollow golf club head for a “metal wood” wherein an internally mounted backing plate gives strength and stability to the striking face of the club. Additionally, in the preferred embodiments, an internal apparatus is present whereby the backing plate is compressively loaded to more rigidly support the striking face of the club, thereby to make it more unyielding upon impact with a golf ball. There is no hole developed throughout the head from the face to the rear part.
  • [0004]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,944,515 to Shearer illustrates a cast metal hollow headed golf club head having there within at least one internal structural support member disposed between the rear of the club head and the face of the club head, a first end of the internal structural support member being positioned at the geometric center of the face of the club head and a second end of the structural support member opening through the rear surface of the hollow headed golf club and having an open bottom thereto which a bottom plate is permanently secured after the internal cavity of the hollow headed golf club is filled with a sound-proofing material, the internal structural member adapted to house additional metal or similar material to predetermine the resulting weight of the golf club head. However, there is no supporting structure having a hole developed throughout the club head.
  • [0005]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,535,990 to Yamada illustrates a golf club head that is hollowed out to provide desired lightweight characteristics. A tubular reinforcement material formed of plastic including reinforcement fibers, separate from the club head itself, is inserted into the cavity attached at the inner walls of the face and back, so as to span between them to prevent deformation of the head face and to hold the stiffness and mechanical strength required at its impact face. But, both of the ends of the tubular reinforcement are blocked.
  • [0006]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,461,481 to Kim illustrates a driver type of golf club, which includes a hollow metal head having integrally formed thereon a front striking face and a rear wall with interior flat portions, and a removable sole plate. A rod having a back plate integrally formed on the rear thereof has a cylindrical weight slidably mounted thereon.
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,067,572 to Coleman illustrates a golf club having a shaft and a club head, the club head comprising a stationary, main body portion, and a face portion which is movable with respect to the stationary portion to vary the angular disposition of the face portion with respect to the stationary portion and the shaft of the club.
  • [0008]
    None of the prior art teaches a club head having pluralities of holes developed from the face thereof to the rear end of the club, including driver, to allow air pass through the club head to stabilize the trajectory of the club head.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0009]
    It is an object of the present invention to provide a golf club head having increased stability of its swing trajectory. The golf club driver head of the current application, with increased trajectory stability, has a number of holes developed on the head by installing a number of metal tubes of 3 mm diameter between the front face and rear face of the head. The holes developed on the club head allow air pass through and the air stream stabilizes the trajectory of the club head's swing. This stabilized swing trajectory increases the possibility of a golf ball hit at the right point and stay on the green of the golf course. Other golf clubs, irons, also have pluralities of holes on the head developed by punching holes with drills. When a player swings a driver for T-off, the speed of a driver club head reaches well over 40˜50 meter/second. This speed is over 150 kmn/hr. At this speed, the resistance of air to the club head is significant. Even a slight unbalance of the drag force shakes the trajectory of the club head and moves the hitting point of the golf club from the center of the club head. Irons are usually used on the fair way of a golf course for medium range hitting. High-speed swing is not necessary in such situation. However, some player T-off with an iron. In that case, the player needs an iron with stable swing trajectory. It is the purpose of the current application to provide a golf club head, including a driver's head, which increases the stability of the trajectory of the club head to increase the accuracy of the impact, especially at T-off moment.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0010]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic exploded drawing of a golf club driver's head in prior arts.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective view of the airflow surrounding the club head of the prior art.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 3 is an exploded view of the club head of the current application.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 4 is a front face view of the club head of the current application.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 5 is a rear view of the club head of the current application.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 6 is a cross sectional drawing of the club head along the line A-A′ in FIG. 5 showing the arrangement of the metal tubes in the club head of the current application
  • [0016]
    FIG. 7 is a cross sectional drawing of the club head along the line A-A′ in FIG. 5 showing the securing mechanism of the metal plates into the front and rear faces of the club head of the current application when the materials for the faces and metal plates are different.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 8 is a rear view of the club head of the current application showing the locking key when the materials for the faces and metal plates are different.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 9 is a schematic perspective view of the airflow surrounding the club head of the current application.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 10 is a perspective view of an iron head having pluralities of holes thereon.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0020]
    FIG. 1 is an exploded view of a golf driver club head 5 of the prior art. The golf club head 5 is shown comprised of a casing 10, an axle tube 20, a packing plate 30, and a cover plate 40. The casing 10 is made of a compound material subject to a predetermined shape. The casing 10 has a front face 11, a bottom face 12, a back face 13, a toe 14, a heel 15, and a neck 16. The inside of the casing 10 is hollow. The topside of the casing 10 is opened. The axle tube 20 is a stepped metal tube fitted into the neck 16 of the casing 10 for receiving a club shaft (not shown). The packing plate 30 is a substantially L-shaped thin sheet of metals fixedly fastened to the front face 11 and bottom face 12 of the casing 10, forming the face panel 31 and sole 32 of the golf club head 5. The face panel 31 has a plurality of hitting grooves 311 thereon. The primary role of these hitting grooves is to increase a contact area. The second role of these hitting grooves is to distribute air to both sides of the face panel 31 to maintain a balance of air resistance to the club head 5.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective view of the airflow surrounding the club head 5 of the prior art. When the club head 5 proceeds along the trajectory 6, the air 7, in front of the club head, meets the club head 5 on the face panel 31. At this moment, the air 7 flows around the head in every direction. The hitting grooves 311; formed on the front face panel 31, guide the air to flow side way horizontally. These horizontally flowing side streams of the air 8-L and 8-R prevent the club head 5 from oscillating up and down. However, when the balance between the horizontally flowing side streams 8-L and 8-R is lost, the club head 5 will oscillate horizontally.
  • [0022]
    It is the purpose of the current application to provide a club head that is stable when a player doing T-off, i.e., high speed hitting.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 3 is an exploded view of the driver club head (55) of the current application. The driver club head (55) of the current application has a number of holes (56) developed on the center of the front face (51). A module (57-1), which is comprised of a number of metal tubes (57) of 3 mm diameter and two circular metal plates of (58-F) and (58-R), to which the number of metal tubes (57) are welded and have the same number of holes of 3 mm to receive the metal tubes (57), is inserted to the inside of the club head (55) through the holes of (51-1) and (59-1), which are developed at the center of the front face (51) and the rear face (59), respectively. The two circular metal plates (58-F) and (58-R) are welded again to the front face (51) and the rear face (59), respectively. One end of each metal tube (57) is open to the front face (51) to form the hole (56). The other end of each metal tube (57) is open to the rear face (59). Therefore, the holes (56) are open from the front face (51) to the rear face (59). FIG. 4 and FIG. 5 are a front face view and a rear view of the club head of the current application, respectively. The holes (56) allow air pass through the driver club head (51) when a player swings.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 6 is a cross sectional drawing of the club head (55) along the line A-A′ in FIG. 4 showing the arrangement of the metal tubes (57) in the club head of the current application. The metal tubes (57) are placed between the metal plates (58-F) and (58-R). Each end of the tubes (57) are inserted to the holes (56) and (56′), developed on the metal plates (58-F) and (58-R) respectively, that they are facing. After that the metal plates (58-F) and (58-R) and the tubes (57) are welded along the perimeter of the hole (56) and (56′). The welding points are indicated as (60) and (61). The metal plates (58-F) and (58-R) are again welded to the front face (51) and rear face (59) respectively along the perimeter of the plates as indicated as (62) and (63).
  • [0025]
    Material for the front face (51), rear face (59), circular plates (58-F), (58-R) and metal tubes (57) may be the same. The preferred material is Titanium.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 7 is a cross sectional drawing of the club head (55) along the line A-A′ in is FIG. 4 showing the securing mechanism of the metal plates into the front (51) and rear faces (59) of the club head of the current application when the materials for the faces and metal plates (58-F) and (58-R) are different. If the material of the front and rear face, (51) and (59), are different from that of the metal plates, (58-F) and (58-R), the metal plates are engaged to the front and rear face via screws indicated as (62′) and (63′). FIG. 8 is a rear view of the club head of the current application showing the locking key (64) when the materials for the faces and metal plates are different. A locking key (64) is installed on the rear face (59) and rear metal plate (58-R).
  • [0027]
    FIG. 9 is a schematic perspective view of the airflow surrounding the club head (55) of the current application. As the club head (55) moves at high speed along the trajectory (66), the air meets club head. The air meet the center part of the club head (55) pass through the holes (57) and the air meet the side part of the club head pass along the grooves (511) and develop air streams (65-L) and (65-R). In addition to the balance of the air streams (65-L) and (65-R), another air stream (67) that pass through the tubes (57) develops a steady force that prevents the club head from shaking and holds the club head (55) remains on the trajectory (66). As a result, the stability of the trajectory of the club head remarkably increased.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 10 is a perspective view of an iron head (68) having pluralities of holes (69) thereon. The holes (69) on the iron are formed by drilling. The principles of stabilizing the trajectory of the club head at high-speed swing are the same as those introduces for the driver head case.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3003768 *Aug 14, 1959Oct 10, 1961Clements BenGolf club head
US3468544 *Oct 22, 1965Sep 23, 1969Antonious A JGolf club of the wood type with improved aerodynamic characteristics
US3794328 *Dec 1, 1972Feb 26, 1974E GordonGolf club head
US3819180 *Jun 26, 1972Jun 25, 1974T MurphyPerforated golf putter
US4461481 *Jan 31, 1983Jul 24, 1984Kim Sunyong PGolf club of the driver type
US5054784 *Sep 24, 1990Oct 8, 1991Collins Frank TGolf club head
US5158296 *Sep 16, 1991Oct 27, 1992Kunsam LeeGolf club
US5529303 *Jun 20, 1995Jun 25, 1996Cherng Horng Metal Industry Corp.Golf club head
US5807187 *Oct 21, 1996Sep 15, 1998Longball SportsAir channeling golf club head
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7794333Feb 21, 2008Sep 14, 2010Sri Sports LimitedStrike face insert
US7942757Jul 27, 2010May 17, 2011Sri Sports LimitedStrike face insert
US8105181Apr 8, 2011Jan 31, 2012Sri Sports LimitedStrike face insert
US20080102979 *Oct 25, 2006May 1, 2008Ddk, LlcGolf Putter
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/342
International ClassificationA63B53/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B60/50, A63B53/0475, A63B53/04, A63B2225/01, A63B53/0466, A63B53/047, A63B2053/0416, A63B2209/00
European ClassificationA63B53/04