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Publication numberUS2006637 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1935
Filing dateFeb 27, 1933
Priority dateFeb 27, 1933
Publication numberUS 2006637 A, US 2006637A, US-A-2006637, US2006637 A, US2006637A
InventorsMichael Goldenberg
Original AssigneeMichael Goldenberg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Athletic shoe spike
US 2006637 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 2, 1935- M. GOLDENBERG ATHLETIC SHOE SPIKE Filed Feb. 27, 1933 INVENTOR. MICHAEL GOLDENBERG ATTORNEY.

Patented July 2, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 3 Claims.

This invention relates to athletic shoe spikes and has for its object the provision of a new and improved article of this class.

More particularly stated it is one of the objects of this invention to provide a shoe-spike for use in games such as baseball, which will permit its user to get a firmer grip upon the ground without materially afiecting his speed.

Another object of this invention is to provide a shoe-spike for use in games such as baseball, which will give its used better traction and firmer support in rounding a curve.

Another object of this invention is to provide a shoe-spike, for use in such games as baseball, which will give the user a better balance.

The above as well as other objects of this invention are attained in the structure more particularly described in the following specification and the drawing which forms a part thereof.

In the drawing Figure 1 represents the bottom View of the front portion of an athletic shoe with my novel spike attached thereto, the remaining portion of the shoe having been broken away to permit the presentation of the novel feature of my invention on a larger scale.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of my novel spike detached from the shoe.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary perspective View showing a modified toe-spike element.

Referring more particularly to the drawing wherein similar reference numerals denote similar parts, reference numeral I denotes a shoe to which is attached my novel spike member 2 by means of rivets 8 extending through apertures 4 formed in the body portion of the spike. The manner of attaching the spike member to the shoe does not form a part of my invention and is old and well known in the art and for these reasons will not be here further discussed.

The novel spike member 2 is composed of the downwardly extending rear spike elements 3 and the front or toe spike element 5. The spike elements 3 are of the form and type now generally used for baseball spikes and for that reason will not be here further described. The toe spike element 5 differs from the baseball spike elements now in general use in that it is approximately twice the width of an ordinary baseball spike element such as spike elements 3, in that it has been bent around a vertical axis extending through approximately its center to form the equal but diverging walls 6 and in that it has a V shaped notch 1 formed therein.

The increased width of the spike element 5 provides better traction and balance thus giving the athlete a firmer support and avoiding the twisting and spraining of his ankles.

The angularity of the walls 6 of the spike element 5 provides better support in the round- 5 ing of curves and thus makes the athlete more sure-footed in turning corners as when rounding the bases.

The notch increases the friction between the spike and the groundand makes possible the uti- 10 lization of the advantages of increased width without causing any appreciable diminution in the speed of the athlete.

The above disclosure is to be understood as being for the purpose of illustration only since 15 many changes may be made in the structure herein shown without departing from the spirit of my invention. For instance a structure may be made which has incorporated therein only one of my novel features. Such a modification is generically illustrated in Figure 3 wherein is disclosed a toe-spike element 9 which differs from spike element 3 in the fact that it is approximately twice the size of the latter and in the fact that its inwardly diverging walls are curved instead of straight: Or the width of the spike 5 may be decreased to approximately one and one-half times the width of the spike 3 or increased to approximately three times the width of the spike 3 if desired: Or the notch I may be varied in shape or depth even unto extending to the bottom of the member 5 thus forming in effect two equal but diverging spike elements of approximately the size of each spike element 3.

The above as well as other changes will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art in the light of my disclosure and for that reason it is my desire that the claims which are hereunto appended for the purpose of defining my invention be limited only by the prior art.

Having described my invention what I claim as new and useful is:

1. A spike member for use in combination with the sole portion of the shoes to be worn by an athlete engaged in a game such as baseball, consisting of a main body member having two downwardly extending rear spike elements and a downwardly extending toe spike element formed thereon the said toe spike element being of substantially greater width than either of the said rear spike elements, having a slot formed therein, and being constituted of two diverging walls.

2. A spike member for use in combination with the sole portion of the shoes to be worn by an athlete engaged in a game such as baseball,

the sole portion of the shoes to be worn by an athlete engaged in a game such as baseball, consisting of a main body member having two downwardly extending rear spike elements and a downwardly extending toe spike element formed thereon the said toe spike element being substantially twice the Width of either rear spike element having a downwardly extending V shaped notch formed therein centrally thereof, and bent around an axis extending through substantially its center to form two diverging walls. 1

MICHAEL GOLDENBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4974347 *Jul 11, 1988Dec 4, 1990Funderburk Leonard GBaseball shoe sole
US6041461 *Feb 25, 1998Mar 28, 2000Yugenkaisha Shinjo SeisakushoSpike for baseball shoes
US6101746 *Jul 22, 1998Aug 15, 2000Evans; AnthonyFootwear
US7428790 *Jan 26, 2001Sep 30, 2008Penquin Brands, Inc.Universal cleat
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R, 36/134
International ClassificationA43C13/00, A43C13/04
Cooperative ClassificationA43C13/04
European ClassificationA43C13/04