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Publication numberUS20070026958 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/189,640
Publication dateFeb 1, 2007
Filing dateJul 26, 2005
Priority dateJul 26, 2005
Also published asWO2007016052A2, WO2007016052A3
Publication number11189640, 189640, US 2007/0026958 A1, US 2007/026958 A1, US 20070026958 A1, US 20070026958A1, US 2007026958 A1, US 2007026958A1, US-A1-20070026958, US-A1-2007026958, US2007/0026958A1, US2007/026958A1, US20070026958 A1, US20070026958A1, US2007026958 A1, US2007026958A1
InventorsMichael Barasch, Philip Auerbach
Original AssigneeBarasch Michael A, Auerbach Philip M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and system for providing web based interactive lessons
US 20070026958 A1
Abstract
An Internet compatible system for providing data representing golf instructions. The communication interface for receiving a message includes data representing a request for golf instruction. A message processor for examining the request provides an alert message to a worker alerting the worker to the received request. An input processor for receiving data comprises a response to the request alert message, and the distribution processor forwards the received response data to a destination system.
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Claims(44)
1. An interactive system for providing data representing instructions comprising:
a communication interface for receiving a message including data representing a request for instruction;
a message processor for examining the request providing an alert message to an instructor alerting the instructor to the received request;
an input processor for receiving data comprising a response to the request alert message from the instructor; and
a distribution processor for forwarding the received response data to a destination system via said communication interface.
2. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the instruction is related to at least one of golf, tennis, baseball, cooking, knitting, arts and crafts, home improvement, and automobile repair.
3. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the alert message provided to the instructor alerting the instructor to the received request is prepared by a subscriber.
4. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the communication interface further receives data including at least one of video, audio, graphic, and text information from the subscriber.
5. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the response data is formatted into an output format compatible with the destination system.
6. The interactive system of claim 4, wherein the response data forwarded to the destination system is instructional information responding to the at least one of video, audio, graphic, and text information received from the subscriber.
7. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the subscriber and the instructor communicate with one another in real time.
8. The interactive system of claim 1, further comprising an input device connected to the input processor, the input device including at least one of a keyboard, a mouse, a microphone, a touch pen, and a video camera.
9. The interactive system of claim 8, wherein the response data forwarded to a destination system is provided by the instructor via the input device.
10. The interactive system of claim 9, wherein the response data forwarded to the destination system includes at least one of video data, audio data, graphic data and text data.
11. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the distribution processor system includes at least one of a telephone modem, cable modem, and wireless transmitter.
12. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the system is at least one of Internet, LAN, and WAN compatible.
13. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the system further includes a central database for storing all data received by the communication interface and forwarded by the distribution processor.
14. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein an instructor can communicate with any of individual subscribers, a plurality of subscribers, or select subscriber at any one time.
15. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein a user is required to have a subscription to gain access.
16. The interactive system of claim 1, further comprising a memory for storing data received and transmitted by the communication interface wherein:
the memory is partitioned into a general memory section and individual memory section.
17. The interactive system of claim 16, wherein:
the general memory is accessible by all instructors and subscribers; and
the individual memory sections are accessible by respective individual subscribers.
18. The interactive system of claim 4, wherein the instruction concerns golfing and the received data includes requests for instruction including assistance with grip, foot position, head position, posture, swing plane angle, game plan, golf course conditions, and lie position of the golf ball.
19. The interactive system of claim 18, wherein the response data provides instruction and commentary concerning the received data.
20. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the request is received by a handheld device.
21. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the request is transmitted from a handheld device.
22. An interactive system for receiving data representing instructions comprising:
an input processor for receiving data representing a request for instruction entered by a user via said displayed image;
a display generator for generating a user interface display image enabling a user to enter a request to receive golf instructions;
a message processor for processing the received request to provide a formatted request message for communication and initiating communication of a formatted request message to a destination system; and
a communication interface for:
transmitting said request message to the destination;
receiving a message responsive to said communicated formatted request message from the destination system; and
initiating communication of said responsive message to said user.
23. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the instruction is related to at least one of golf, tennis, baseball, cooking, knitting, arts and crafts, home improvement, and automobile repair.
24. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the alert message provided to the subscriber alerting the subscriber to the received response is prepared by an instructor.
25. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the communication interface further receives data including at least one of video, audio, graphic, and text information from the subscriber.
26. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the response data to a request is formatted into an output format compatible with the destination system.
27. The interactive system of claim 25, wherein the response data received from a destination system is instructional information responding to the at least one of video, audio, graphic, and text information received from the subscriber.
28. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the subscriber and the instructor communicate with one another in real time.
29. The interactive system of claim 22, further comprising an input device connected to the input processor, the input device including at least one of a keyboard, a mouse, a microphone, a touch pen, and a video camera.
30. The interactive system of claim 29, wherein the response data to a request received from a destination system is provided by the instructor via the input device.
31. The interactive system of claim 30, wherein the response data forwarded to the destination system includes at least one of video data, audio data, graphic data, and text data.
32. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the distribution processor system comprises at least one of a telephone modem, cable modem, and wireless transmitter.
33. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the system is at least one of Internet, LAN and WAN compatible.
34. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the system further includes a central database for storing all data received by the communication interface and forwarded by the distribution processor.
35. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein an instructor can communicate with any of individual subscribers, a plurality of subscribers, or select subscribers at any one time.
36. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein a user is required to have a subscription to gain access.
37. The interactive system of claim 22, further comprising a memory for storing data received and transmitted by the communication interface wherein:
the memory is partitioned into a general memory section and individual memory sections.
38. The interactive system of claim 35, wherein:
the general memory is accessible by all instructors and subscribers; and
the individual memory sections are accessible by respective individual subscribers.
39. The interactive system of claim 25, wherein the instruction concerns golfing and the received data includes responses to requests for instruction including assistance with grip, foot position, head position, posture, swing plane angle, game plan, golf course conditions, and lie position of the golf ball.
40. The interactive system of claim 39, wherein the response data provides instruction and commentary concerning the received data.
41. The interactive system of claim 22, wherein the request is received by a handheld device.
42. The interactive system of claim 1, wherein the request is transmitted from a handheld device.
43. An interactive system for providing instruction comprising:
an instructor system including an interactive system for providing data representing instructions comprising:
a communication interface for receiving a message including data representing a request for instruction;
a message processor for examining the request providing an alert message to an instructor alerting the instructor to the received request;
an input processor for receiving data comprising a response to the request alert message from the instructor; and
a distribution processor for forwarding the received response data to a destination system via said communication interface;
a subscriber system including an input processor for receiving data representing a request for instruction entered by a user comprising:
an input processor for receiving data representing a request for instruction entered by a user via said displayed image;
a display generator for generating a user interface display image enabling a user to enter a request to receive golf instructions;
a message processor for processing the received request to provide a formatted request message for communication and initiating communication of a formatted request message to a destination system; and
a communication interface for:
transmitting said request message to the destination;
receiving a message responsive to said communicated formatted request message from the destination system; and
initiating communication of said responsive message to said user; and
a central database connected between the instructor system and subscriber system, further comprising:
a memory for storing data received and transmitted by the communication interface wherein the memory is partitioned into a general memory section accessible by all instructors and subscribers and individual memory sections accessible by respective individual subscribers.
44. A method of providing data representing instructions comprising:
receiving a message including data representing a request for instruction;
examining the request providing an alert message to an instructor alerting the instructor to the received request;
providing the user instruction options including live lesson, group lesson, and access database/archive;
providing the user live lesson options including connect to preselected instructor and choose instructor from list of all available instructors upon selection of live lesson;
connecting the user to the chosen instructor upon selection of live lesson option;
receiving data comprising a response to the request alert message from the instructor;
forwarding the received response data to a destination system via said communication interface;
connecting the instructor to the user upon accepting a request for live lesson;
providing the user group lesson options including connection to preselected group lesson and choose group lesson from list of all available group lessons upon selection of group lesson option;
connecting the user to a group lesson room including at least one instructor and at least one user upon selection of group lesson;
connecting the instructor to a group lesson room upon accepting a request for group lesson; and
connecting the user to the memory representing the database/archive upon selection of access database/archive;
storing the request data and response data at a central database, said stored request data and response data being accessible at least one of by a user at the destination system and the instructor.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a method and system for providing interactive golf lessons with a professional instructor.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

Numerous ways for improving an individual's golf game exist in the prior art. Today, most golf instruction is accessed by taking a lesson with a golf instructor, watching an instructional video, or reading “self help” books and/or other periodicals. The benefits and shortcomings of each of the three main sources of golf instruction are obvious.

Taking lessons with a golf instructor is the most effective form; however, it is also the least practical. An individual is required to schedule a lesson at a time convenient for himself as well as the golf instructor. Additionally, the individual's choice of golf instructors is limited to the distance the individual is willing to travel to take his lesson. Furthermore, when an individual takes lessons from a golf instructor, he typically does not have the opportunity to write notes, nor is he allowed to video record the session. As a result, important points of the lesson may be forgotten as time passes.

Instructional videos, while easily accessible and relatively affordable, do not offer the same personalization that live instruction offers. While instructional videos address common faults in the golf swing, and offer instruction or drills to fix these faults, not all golfers are afflicted with the same swing faults. Thus, instructional videos are not useful in addressing swing flaws unique to a particular golfer. Additionally, with the number of instructional videos available, it is a challenge for a golfer to choose the appropriate video to correct flaws in their individual game and swing.

Self-help reading material, similarly to instructional videos, does not offer the personalization feature needed to address unique swing flaws of a particular golfer. Additionally, the number of books and periodicals available makes it challenging to choose the most effective one.

Many variations of interactive golf lessons have been disclosed. One U.S. patent (U.S. Pat. No. 5,486,001) describes an instructional aid for enabling and assisting a person to emulate a predetermined movement such as a golf swing including an image/data capturing device for scanning, capturing and storing the image/data signals of the person's golf swing or movement, and a transceiver for transmitting the image/data signals over a communications network to a remote computer. The remote computer contains a database which stores image signals and bio-mechanical data of a number of preselected swings or movements. The instructional aid may be used for analyzing or reporting on particular geographical regions or objects and provides a specialized presentation for development of that region or object from information stored in the computer database. While this design provides a remote instructional aid, this variation, does not disclose web based interactive golf lesson. Furthermore, this variation does not provide real time instruction from an instructor to a subscriber as instruction is provided from information already stored in the computer database.

Another U.S. Patent (U.S. Pat. No. 6,767,211) describes a system for improving and teaching decision making skills in a respective sporting activity, specifically golf. The system provides at least one of real or hypothetical situations and includes examples of different actions to be taken in those situations. The user responds to the situation and the actions chosen by the user are reviewable by an expert for evaluation thereof. The responses and evaluations are transmitted via a communication network between at least two personal computers. While this variation discloses features such as real-time professional assistance provided for improving a golf game, it does not disclose capturing video data that actually depicts a situation and transmitting the actual video data to be reviewed by a professional. Without the capturing and transmission of videos, the instructor is not able to utilize visual aids for the purpose of providing instructions. The utilization of visual aids is an essential aspect of the present invention. Furthermore, while multiple users may respond similarly to the real or hypothetical situations including examples of different actions to be taken in certain situations, not all of these users may have similar swings. Each user may have a unique swing fault that is not identifiable by analyzing the responses to hypothetical situations by these users. The present claimed invention captures and transmits videos thus allowing the instructor to utilize video representations of the user's swing for the purpose of analyzing the swing and providing individual personalized instruction.

Yet another U.S. Patent (U.S. Pat. No. 6,705,869) describes a system and method for interactive communication skill training. The system includes a user computer system having a memory, a display device, and input device, a video recording device and an audio device. The system also includes an e-learning web site with skill training software for interactively teaching a skill. The system further includes an expert's computer system. The method for interactive communications skill training includes the steps of accessing the e-learning website by the user, selecting a learning module for a communication skill by the user, interacting with the learning module and recording the user interaction using the video recording device. This variation, however, does not concern real-time video data capture for the purpose of at least one of teaching and improving a user's golfing ability. This variation performs analyses via a computer e-learning website. This system provides a computer analysis of the information provided and automatically produces a lesson based upon stored information. This system does not provide for live interactive personal lessons tailored specifically for a subscriber. Furthermore, this variation does not disclose capturing video data that actually depicts a situation and transmitting the actual video data to be reviewed by a professional. Without the capturing and transmission of videos, the instructor is not able to utilize visual aids for the purpose of providing instructions. The utilization of visual aids is an essential aspect of the present invention.

Another two U.S. Patents (U.S. Pat. No. 6,224,387 and 6,517,353) describe systems for collecting pictures to produce a pictorial tour of a golf course to be distributed over a communication network for the purpose of providing a visual tour of the course. This system is run by an intermediary service bureau that coordinates obtaining the pictures and providing the pictures to the golfers as well as controlling access thereto. This variation, however, only presents still picture visual data and is intended to give the golfer a shot-by-shot view of a golf course.

While these systems may be suitable for the purposes for which they were designed, they would not be as suitable for the purposes of the present invention, as hereinafter described.

SUMMARY OF PRESENT INVENTION

The present invention relates to an Internet compatible system for providing data representing golf instructions. A communication interface receives a message including data representing a request for golf instruction. A message processor for examining the request provides an alert message to an instructor alerting the instructor to the received request. An input processor receives data including a response to the request alert message, and the distribution processor forwards the received response data to a destination system.

Additionally, an interactive system receives data representing golf instructions. A display processor generates a user interface display image on a display device. An input device processor enables a user to enter a request to receive golf instructions. The message processor receives data representing a request for golf instruction entered by a user via the input device processor. A communication interface processes the request received from the distribution processor to provide a formatted request message for communication and initiates communication of a formatted request message to a destination system. The communication interface also receives a message responsive to the communicated formatted request message, and initiates the communication of the responsive message to the user.

A primary object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons that overcome the shortcomings of the prior art.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby a subscriber communicates directly with a golf instructor.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby a subscriber selectively captures video data representing the subscriber's golf swing.

Still yet another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby a subscriber logs onto a central server uploading the captured video data for viewing by the instructor.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby the subscriber receives real time and/or delayed instruction from a golf instructor.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby the golf instructor is able to selectively edit the video data representing the subscriber's golf swing and provide the edited video data to the subscriber.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby the golf instructor compares video data of the subscriber to archived video data of professionals and/or archived video data of the subscriber.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby the golf instructor selectively edits the video data representing the subscriber's golf swing by adding alignment lines to the subscriber's video data.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby each subscriber is provided with a unique storage area for retaining data representing previous lessons and instruction for later review.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons whereby the instructor creates a game plan for the subscriber based on the subscriber's skill level and the important swing thoughts taught in prior lessons.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a web based interactive golf lessons including a handheld device able to communicate with the central server and receive instantaneous information.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a web based interactive golf lessons including a handheld device able to communicate with the central server and receive information including club selection and the type of swing the subscriber should take.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons for a group of subscribers using video conferencing.

Still yet another object of the present invention is to provide a system and method for providing web based interactive golf lessons for a group of subscribers using video conferencing whereby transmission of video and audio is performed in real time.

Additional objects of the present invention will appear as the description proceeds.

The present invention overcomes the shortcomings of the prior art by providing web based interactive golf lessons. By enabling the transmission of video. data representing a subscriber's swing and the golf instructor's ability to receive the video data and provide comments thereon via the internet in real time at a time of choosing by the subscriber and/or at a later arranged time. The present invention provides for customized lessons on demand. The efficiency of these customized lessons is far superior to that of instructional videos, books and periodicals as personalized instruction is provided at any time in almost any place. Additionally, the use of web based interaction provides a level of flexibility in terms of time and location that on site golf instruction from a teaching professional does not offer. Furthermore, the time savings from the flexibility of scheduling, and the subscriber not having to travel to a golf instructor to take lessons, provides the subscriber more time to spend playing golf on a course.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages will appear from the description to follow. In the description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, which forms a part hereof, and in which is shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. These embodiments will be described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, and it is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and that structural changes may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. In the accompanying drawings, like reference characters designate the same or similar parts throughout the several views.

The following detailed description is, therefore, not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the present invention is best defined by the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

In order that the invention may be more fully understood, it will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is an illustrative view of the present invention in use;

FIG. 2 is an illustrative view of the subscriber's camera and computer setup;

FIG. 3 is an illustrative view of the golf instructor's computer setup;

FIG. 4 is a detailed view of the display screen;

FIG. 5 is a flow chart of the present invention in use;

FIG. 6 is an illustrative view of a handheld device used for communicating with the central server and receiving information concerning golfing;

FIG. 7 is an illustrative view of a video conferencing setup for providing web based interactive group golf lessons;

FIG. 8 is a flow chart of the game plan structure of the present invention;

FIG. 9 is a chart of the membership structure of the present invention;

FIG. 10 is a diagram of the Internet compatible system for providing data representing golf instructions of the present invention; and

FIG. 11 is a diagram of the interactive system for receiving data representing golf instructions of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The following discussion describes in detail one embodiment of the invention. This discussion should not be construed, however, as limiting the invention to those particular embodiments. Practitioners skilled in the art will recognize numerous other embodiments as well. For definition of the complete scope of the invention, the reader is directed to appended claims.

The present invention relates to a method and system for providing interactive lessons, and more specifically web based interactive golf lessons with a golf instructor. The system includes a central server which subscribers and golf instructors can log on to and communicate with one another. A subscriber to the system selectively captures video data representing the subscriber's golf swing and logs onto the central server to upload the captured video data. A golf instructor is able to then download and analyze the swing and provide real time and/or delayed instruction to the subscriber through the central server. Alternatively, the user may obtain analysis and/or instruction in real time using a web camera to display their swing live to an instructor. Furthermore, a handheld device can be used by a subscriber to communicate with the central server to receive information concerning golfing anywhere, even while on the course. Another aspect of the present invention is to provide a video conferencing method and apparatus for providing web based interactive group golf lessons. Alternatively, users may schedule lessons at predetermined times and/or with specific instructors. A further aspect of the present invention provides personalized game plans for each type of shot and club which will be stored in a subscriber's personalized storage area. Each subscriber is provided a personalized storage area for retaining data representing previous lessons, instructions, analysis and game plans.

Turning now descriptively to the drawings, in which similar reference characters denote similar elements throughout the several views, FIGS. 1-7 illustrate the web based interactive golf lesson system of the present invention indicated generally by the reference numeral 10.

FIG. 1 is an illustrative view of a preferred embodiment of the web based interactive golf lesson system of the present invention in use. The system 10 of the present invention allows for at least one subscriber 12 to communicate with and obtain advice and instruction from an instructor 14 at any time and place of the subscriber's 12 choosing. The system includes a first computer 18 on the subscriber end linked to a second computer 20 on the golf instructor end via a communications link.

The subscriber's computer 18 is connected to the Internet via a telecommunications link such as a telephone line, a cable line, or a wireless connection. As is known in the art, the Internet includes providers such as internet access providers and internet service providers and network service providers and routers that provide wired and wireless digital telecommunications throughout the world using TCP/IP networking protocol. It should be appreciated that the computer may access the Internet directly, or may be operatively connected to a local area network (LAN) over which information is transmitted to other computers on the same LAN or to computers on other LANs through a localized Intranet. The information can be transmitted between the user and the Internet via the Intranet.

Alternatively, a local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN) or other type of network may be used to connect subscribers 12 with instructors 14. The system 10 is able to function using any means for connection including but not limited to dial-up, broadband, and satellite internet connections. Furthermore, the system is optimized to operate using hardwired and wireless connection to the internet. A video camera or webcam 16 is connected to the first computer 18. The subscriber 12 orients the video camera 16 to capture video data representing at least a portion of a golf swing. The video camera 16 can also be oriented to capture video data of the subscriber's 12 swing from different angles to provide different perspectives as well as close up views of different parts of the subscriber's body (e.g. grip, foot position, head position, posture, swing plane angle, etc.). The captured video data is uploaded to the first computer 18 for processing thereof. Processing of the video data includes but is not limited to conversion from analog to digital format as well as compression of the video data for transmission thereof. When the data is in digital format on the first computer 18, the subscriber 12 can log onto the central server and upload the data representing the at least one golf swing to the central server 21. Alternatively, the subscriber 12 may first log onto the central server and establish a connection with an instructor 14. The subscriber 12 may then display a golf swing live to a golf instructor 14 at the opposite end of the connection. The camera 16 may be adjusted or zoomed in to view any portion of the subscriber's swing such as the grip or foot position, or the camera 16 may be zoomed out to allow the viewing of the entire swing sequence.

The central server 21 provides connectivity between subscribers 12 and golf instructors 14. Subscribers 12 and golf instructors 14 log onto the central server 21 to communicate with one another. In order to log on, subscribers 12 and golf instructors 14 must provide a username and password. This security feature prevents unauthorized use by non-subscribing parties. The central server 21 also serves as a storage medium to which subscribers 12 and golf instructors 14 upload data. Such data may include but is not limited to video data and time delayed text or voice messages. Additionally, previous lessons may also be stored on the central server 21 to be retrieved by the subscriber 12 or golf instructor 14 for review at any time. Upon logging onto the central server 21, the subscriber 12 may be connected with a golf instructor 14 at random or select an available golf instructor 14. If the subscriber 12 has a preference for a particular golf instructor 14, the subscriber 12 may choose that golf instructor 14 if available or schedule a lesson at a time when that golf instructor 14 is available.

Once data is uploaded by the subscriber 12, the golf instructor 14 is able to download the data from the central server 21, and view and analyze the data representing the subscriber's swing using the second computer 20. The golf instructor 14 is able to provide real-time instruction to the subscriber 12. Such instruction may include but is not limited to altering the subscriber's 12 posture, stance, grip, tempo, and swing plane. Alternatively, the subscriber 12 can also choose to receive instruction through time delayed mediums when it's inconvenient for the subscriber 12 and golf instructor 14 to communicate in real time. Additionally, the golf instructor 14 can also upload further video data onto the central server 21 for the subscriber 12 to view. This further video data includes but is not limited to marked up versions of the subscriber's original video data to highlight swing faults, or archived video data of swings with proper form for the subscriber 12 to use as visualization tools. Instruction may also be provided in real time via live video cameras 16 connected at each end of the communication link. The golf instructor 14 will thus be able to provide real time instruction to the subscriber 12 concerning grip, stance and swing as the subscriber 12 is practicing.

The golf instructor 14 is able to verbally communicate with the subscriber 12 by telephone or through online voice communication. The second computer 20 may have a second video camera 16 connected thereto and the golf instructor 14 can communicate with the subscriber 12 via video conferencing. The golf instructor 14 can also use online text or instant messaging to converse with the subscriber 12. If the subscriber 12 chooses to receive instruction through a time delayed medium, then the golf instructor 14 can send an instructional email or leave a voicemail for the subscriber 12. The golf instructor 14 may also replay the swing of the subscriber 12 and provide audio and visual instruction and commentary to the subscriber 12 during the replay of the swing. All communication between the subscriber 12 and the instructor 14 is stored on the central server 21 and is selectively accessible by each for later use. A benefit of utilizing web based communication is the ability to archive the conversations and lessons on a computer. By having previous conversations and video data archived, the subscriber 12 can review past golf lessons administered by the golf instructor 14. This allows the subscriber 12 to quickly remedy a swing fault that has been addressed by the golf instructor 14 in a previous lesson. This would also make golf lessons more efficient as the golf instructor 14 may review the previous lessons and thereby eliminate the need for the golf instructor 14 to repeat previous lessons with the subscriber 12 during a current session. Alternatively, the golf instructor 14 may use the review of lessons to reinforce previous instruction as a review in a subsequent lesson to ensure the subscriber 12 has made the necessary correction and also to compare the prior swing of the user to a current swing. The instructor 14 may also provide voice, text and/or video messages in the storage area for the subscriber 12 for later viewing in response to a request for instruction. The subscriber 12 can be notified of the stored message via telephone call, pager or email.

FIG. 2 is an illustrative view of the subscriber's camera 16 and computer 18 setup. Herein, two cameras 16 are connected to the first computer 18. Two cameras are shown for purposes of example. However, in practice any desired number of cameras 16 may be used to provide a full view of all angles of the swing of the subscriber 12. The subscriber 12 sets up the video camera 16 to capture video data of the subscriber's swing. The plurality of video cameras 16 can be oriented to capture video data representing the subscriber's swing from different angles to provide different perspective to the golf instructor 14. The subscriber 12 uploads the videos onto his computer 18. When the video is in digital format on the subscriber's computer 18, the subscriber 12 can log on to the central server 21 and upload the captured video data of the golf swing onto a central server 21 for the golf instructor 14 to download and analyze. The subscriber 12 can use the keyboard 22 and/or mouse 23 as input devices for logging onto the central server 21, generating messages to transmit to the central server 21 and instructor 14, editing video captured by the cameras 16 and navigating around and accessing data stored on the central server 21. The microphone 26 is provided for transmitting verbal messages to the central server 21 and communicating verbally with the instructor 14. The speakers 24 are provided to generate audible signals received from the instructor 14 and/or central server 21.The central server 21 also serves as a storage medium from which the subscriber 12 can download data. Such data may include previous lessons and other instructions provided by the golf instructor 14. The subscriber 12 can access the central server 21 to retrieve previously administered golf lessons for review at any time.

The central server 21 provides connectivity between subscribers 12 and golf instructors 14. Subscribers 12 and golf instructors 14 log onto the central server 21 to communicate with one another. The subscriber 12 may establish a live connection with a golf instructor 14 after logging onto the central server, thus allowing the subscriber 12 to display a golf swing live to a golf instructor 14 at the opposite end of the connection. The camera 16 may be adjusted or zoomed in to view any portion of the subscriber's swing such as the grip or foot position, or the camera 16 may be zoomed out to allow the viewing of the entire swing sequence. The golf instructor 14 may offer instruction to the subscriber 12 while viewing the video data in a live format.

The subscriber 12 can communicate with the golf instructor 14 by telephone or through online voice and/or text communication. To communicate by voice over the communications link, the subscriber 12 utilizes a microphone 26 and speakers 24 connected to the first computer 18. The microphone 26 will capture a voice message from the subscriber 12 for transmission of the message to the central server 21 and/or instructor 14. The speaker 24 will audiblize a message received from the central server and/or instructor. The subscriber 12 can also use online text messaging such as using an instant messaging software application to converse with the golf instructor 14 by utilizing the keyboard 22 and/or mouse 23. The subscriber 12 can also choose to send comments and questions, and receive instruction, through a time delayed medium such as email. The instructor may have an identical setup at the opposite end of the communication thereby allowing the instructor to communicate in a similar medium as the subscriber.

By taking videos from multiple angles, the subscriber 12 provides the golf instructor 14 with a more detailed representation of his swing. For example, a video from a side view shows shoulder alignment and tilt, head position, width of stance, ball position relative to the subscriber's stance, and the club's shaft tilt. A video from the rear view reveals the golfer's spine angle, swing plane, knee flex, and arm position relative to the body. With this information, the golf instructor could more easily identify swing faults to provide more specific and accurate instruction to the subscriber 12. Additionally, videos from multiple angles also allow the subscriber 12 to see his own swing from different perspectives. Upon receiving the data representing multiple swing angles the instructor 14 can more completely aid the subscriber 12 and provide more complete instruction. As these different angles provide full views of each body part and swing, the golf instructor 14 is able to review each camera angle numerous times concentrating on different body portions and club positions during each viewing. This improves over live lessons as the golf instructor 14 is only able to view the swing once live or the subscriber 12 must repeat the swing numerous times. The subscriber 12 is also able to edit the video captured by the cameras 16 to provide views such as a split screen showing all views at once, zooming in on a particular portion of the user's body, hands, arms, feet, legs, etc., by manipulating the keyboard 22 and/or mouse 23.

FIG. 3 is an illustrative view of the golf instructor's computer setup. The golf instructor 14 uses the second computer 20 to download data representing a subscriber's golf swing over the internet from the central server 21. The golf instructor 14 can then view the data representing the subscriber's golf swing on a display screen 28 connected to the second computer 20. The golf instructor 14 analyzes the video data and provides comments thereon. Alternatively, the instructor 14 may utilize a software application directed towards golf swing analysis when providing comments and/or instruction to the subscriber 12. The golf instructor 14 may provide written commentary on the video of the subscriber's 12 golf swing along with audio commentary describing the faults in the swing of the subscriber 12. The commentary may be provided in real time over the established connection or recorded for later viewing by the subscriber 12.

A video camera or webcam 16 is connected to the second computer 18. The golf instructor 14 orients the video camera 16 to capture video data representing a golf swing, body position, a stance or a golf grip. The video camera 16 can also be oriented to capture video data of the golf instructor 14 from different angles to provide different perspectives. The captured video data is uploaded to the second computer 20 for processing thereof. Processing of the video data includes but is not limited to conversion from analog to digital format as well as compression of the video data for transmission thereof. When the data is in digital format on the second computer 20, the golf instructor 14 uploads the video data along with commentary and/or instructions to the central server 21 for viewing by the subscriber. The cameras 16 may be used by the instructor 14 to capture video of the instructor's wing or may simply capture the instructor 14 positioned at the computer 20 to conduct a video conference with the subscriber 12.

The central server 21 provides connectivity between golf instructors 14 and subscribers 12. Golf instructors 14 and subscribers 12 log onto the central server 21 to communicate with one another. The golf instructor 14 may establish a live connection with a subscriber 12 after logging onto the central server, thus allowing the golf instructor to display a golf position, grip or swing live to a subscriber 12 at the opposite end of the connection. The camera 16 may be adjusted or zoomed in to view any portion of the golf instructor's swing such as the grip or foot position, or the camera 16 may be zoomed out to allow the viewing of the entire swing sequence. The subscriber may ask questions to the golf instructor 14 while viewing the video data in a live format. Golf instructors 14 may be continually connected to the central server 21 during times they are available to conduct lessons thereby allowing subscribers to know exactly which instructors are available at any particular time and provide for immediate contact with a desired instructor.

Similarly, as discussed above regarding FIG. 2, a microphone 26, a keyboard 22, a mouse 23, and speakers 28 are connected to the second computer 20. The instructor 14 further has an electronic touch pen 25. The instructor 14 is able to utilize these elements to selectively communicate with the subscriber 12 and provide instructional comments and analysis thereto. The microphone 26 and speakers 28 are provided to establish audible communication between the instructor 14 and golfer. The keyboard 22 and mouse 23 can be used to log on and off the server, send text messages and emails, and edit the display as well as provide written commentary and analysis. The instructor 14 further has an electronic touch pen 25 that is utilized to draw on a touch sensitive screen to highlight certain parts of the screen to aid in instructing.

FIG. 4 is a detailed view of a display screen 28 illustrating a split screen showing an image of a golfer, possibly the subscriber 12, taking a swing and a view of a golfer illustrating a swing on the left side. The left side image is being analyzed during the lesson to show the proper form to be used. These images can be shown on both the displays of the first computer 18 and the second computer 20. After the subscriber 12 uploads the video data representing the subscriber's golf swing onto the first computer 18, the subscriber then logs onto the central server 21 and uploads the captured video data representing the subscriber's swing to the central server 21 for the golf instructor 14 to download and analyze. The golf instructor 14 sets up the second computer 20 to download the subscriber's video data from the central server 21. The golf instructor 14 can then watch the video data representing the subscriber's golf swing on the display screen 28 of the second computer 20.

FIG. 4 shows an exemplary view of the display which may be used by the instructor 14 during a lesson. In this view, the left side of the display screen 30 is dedicated to the professionals. The golf instructor 14 has the functionality of accessing digital frame by frame swings of PGA Tour players from different angles. The golf instructor 14 also has access to biodynamic statistics and measurements that mathematically describe the movement of the professional's swing. The right side of the display screen 31 is provided for amateurs. Depending on the level of membership, different features will be made available. Along the bottom of display screen 30 a rectangular information box 33 containing account information is provided. Account information includes but is not limited to the subscriber's 12 name, address, account balance, lesson timer and hyperlinks to golf instructions. Additionally, the information box 33 may be used to provide textual commentary during a comparison of the swings in the split screen.

Additionally, the golf instructor 14 is capable of making detailed analysis of the form of the subscriber's swing on a display screen 28. One way to critique the subscriber's swing with golf swing analysis software is to draw alignment lines 34 to analyze the deviation from ideal positions. The golf instructor 14 can supplement his verbal or text instructions to the subscriber 12 by utilizing the alignment lines 34. Alternative golf swing analysis methods compare and contrast the subscriber's swing on the left side of the display screen 30 with that of an ideal form swing on the right side of the display screen 32. By putting the two video images side by side, the golf instructor 14 can not only easily point out swing faults, but he can also show the subscriber what is needed to correct the swing fault.

Additionally, the subscriber 12 can take videos of his swing from multiple angles. By taking videos from multiple angles, the subscriber 12 provides the golf instructor with a more detailed representation of his swing. A video from a side view shows shoulder alignment and tilt, head position, width of stance, ball position relative to the subscriber's stance, and the club's shaft tilt. A video from the rear view reveals the golfer's spine angle, swing plane, knee flex, and arm position relative to the body. With this information, the golf instructor 14 could more easily identify swing faults to provide more specific and accurate instruction to the subscriber 12. Additionally, videos from multiple angles also allow the subscriber 12 to see his own swing from different perspectives. The split screen may be used to show images from each angle together and synchronized on the screen 28.

FIG. 5 is a flow chart describing the method of imitating the interactive golf lesson system of the present invention in use. In step S101 the subscriber 12 logs onto the central server 21 by entering a usename and password to access the system. After logging onto the central server 21, the subscriber 12 chooses one of numerous instruction options in step S102. The choices include but are not limited to a live lesson, a group lesson, accessing the database/archive, schedule future lesson, download video for later analysis, on-the-run advice, etc. Items such as on-the-run advice are provided for users to obtain quick answers to specific questions. Such advice may be useful during a round of golf when a subscriber needs advice on how to hit specific types of shots with specific clubs (i.e. driving, hitting fairway woods and irons, putting, chipping, bunker shots, etc.) in different types of conditions (weather, type of lie, condition of greens, fairways, and rough). The on the run advice selection will allow either interactive advice from an instructor or access to the archives for a refresher lesson or a review of a lesson on the particular situation being encountered. When selecting a lesson, the lesson may provide a selection such as swing advice which will provide a professional's suggestion of a particular swing and aid a golfer in establishing a “game plan” tailored to the skill level and abilities of the subscriber for best results on the course. This selection will provide both standard game plans for a course or may involve a subscriber and instructor establishing a personal game plan. This option will also help a subscriber learn how to best prepare a game plan tailored to their skill level, the course to be played, and the course and weather conditions for the day on which the subscriber plays the course.

When the subscriber 12 selects the live lesson option, the subscriber is brought to step S103. At step S103, the subscriber 12 is provided two options. If the subscriber 12 had previously scheduled a live lesson with a particular golf instructor 14, the subscriber 12 selects the option to be directly linked to the live lesson with the scheduled golf instructor 14 in step S104. If the subscriber 12, however, has not previously scheduled a lesson, the subscriber 12 can select from a list of golf instructors 14 presently available to administer a lesson at the time the subscriber 12 is logged onto the central server 21 in step S105. The list of available instructors 14 is sorted by expertise. For example, one instructor may specialize in short game while another specializes in putting. Additionally, if the subscriber 12 is unfamiliar with the instructors 14 available, the subscriber 12 may click on a link to read a bio of the instructor(s) 14 as well as comments from other subscribers who have taken lessons from the instructor. After the subscriber 12 selects a golf instructor 14, the subscriber 12 is connected to a live lesson with the selected instructor 14 in step S106.

When the subscriber 12 selects the group lesson option in step S107, the subscriber 12 is provided two options. Similarly to the live one-on-one lessons, if the subscriber 12 scheduled a group lesson ahead of time, the subscriber 12 selects the option to be directly linked to the group lesson with the scheduled group and golf instructor 14 in step S108. If the subscriber 12, however, does not have a previously scheduled group lesson, the subscriber 12 can select an option from a list of group lessons that are available at the time the subscriber 12 is logged onto the central server 21 in step S109. The list of available lessons is sorted by in categories such as skill level and area of game covered. For example one group lesson my cover iron play for advance golfers while another specializes on gripping a golf clubs for beginners. If the subscriber 12 is unfamiliar with the lesson being offered, the subscriber 12 clicks on a link to read a brief description of the offered lesson as well as comments from other subscribers who have taken that particular group lesson. After the subscriber 12 chooses a group lesson to participate in, the subscriber 12 is connected to the group lesson in step S110.

If the subscriber 12 selects access the database/archive for general information or archived video data from previous lessons, the subscriber 12 is subsequently connected to the database/archive containing the information the subscriber previously stored and intends to view in step S111. The available general information and archived video data are cataloged in the system. The subscriber 12 can choose from a personal archive of lessons/notes or a general archive of lessons made available to all subscribers. The subscriber's previous lessons, instructions, analysis and game plans, as well as conversations and video data, are stored within the personal archive. The information and video data can be sorted by the subscriber 12 by skill level and/or particular area of the golf game, such as short game, iron play, or putting. Once the subscriber 12 selects a particular database, the subscriber can then either read the information and/or video data from the subscriber's 12 display screen 18 or the subscriber 12 can download the information and/or video data from the central server 21 onto the first computer 18 for future viewing in step S112.

FIG. 6 is an illustrative view of a handheld device used for communicating with the central server 21 and receiving information concerning golfing. The handheld device 36 consists of a screen 38 and a keypad 40 and is used for communicating with the central server 21 and receiving information concerning golf. The handheld device may be a conventional Personal Desk Assistant (PDA) or smart phone which is able to access the internet. In a preferred embodiment, the handheld device 36 connects to the central server 21 via wireless broadband. Alternatively, the connection may be established by dialup up on a cellular phone line, wireless connection to a network router and modem or any other known wireless connections. Alternatively, subscribers 12 may access the features of the system through a voice menu making selections to an audio menu using either audio commands or depressing keys on the alphanumeric keyboard. The subscriber 12 is able to access all features available through a similar connection described herein before with a computer such as club selection or the type of swing the subscriber should take depending on certain parameters including ball position and course conditions. Such information is available using the handheld device. However, the handheld device is normally used to obtain more immediate specific information and may be used in remote locations during play to receive advice on specific situations the subscriber is currently experiencing. The only limitation on accessing the service of the system is the ability to achieve a wireless connection. The information is provided from a subscriber-specific database. This information can further include notes and images from previous lessons administered by the golf instructor 14. Real-time information can also be provided over the internet to the handheld device by a golf instructor. Additionally, the subscriber 12 can utilize the handheld device 36 to communicate with the golf instructor either by voice or by text messaging. The compact size of the handheld device 36 makes it practical to be used while on the golf course, allowing the subscriber 12 to look up or receive instruction in real time without geographic limitations. If the handheld device includes speaker phone, video capabilities and a camera, the subscriber will have access to all the function provided by the system and obtainable at any computer workstation.

FIG. 7 is an illustrative view of a video conferencing setup for providing web based interactive group golf lessons. Alternatively, the video conferencing setup may e used to establish chat groups between subscribers wherein subscribers may relay and share experiences with other subscribers. When being used for a video conference, the video conferencing system 42 consists of the second computer 20 on the instructor's end and two or more first computers 18 on the subscriber's end connected to the central server 21 for providing web based interactive group golf lessons. Alternatively, subscribers may connect directly to the central server 21 and may either establish or select a preformed chat group to join. Subscribers 12 at different locations and the golf instructor 14 are able to communicate with one another in real time and/or delayed by logging onto the central server 21. Once logged on, the subscribers 12 are able to receive golf instructions from the golf instructor 14 while the golf instructor 14 is able to receive comments and/or questions from the subscribers. The subscribers 12 are able to upload video data to the central server 21 for viewing and analysis by the instructor 14. The golf instructor 14 is able to perform video demonstrations by uploading videos to the central server 21 for viewing by the subscribers 12. All subscribers 12 logged into a group lesson or chat room are able to view and/or listen to all communication by any subscriber 12 or instructor 14 within the group lesson. All video conferences and chat groups are saved and cataloged on the central server so that subscribers may search the database and view the conferences or dialog from a chat group at a later time.

The golf instructor 14 and subscribers 12 are able to communicate by telephone or through online voice communication via the central server 21. To communicate by voice, the golf instructor 14 utilizes the microphone 26 and speakers 24 attached to the instructor's computer 20. The golf instructor 14 can also use text messaging to converse with the subscribers 12 by typing on the keyboard 22. The golf instructor 14 can also choose to send golf instruction, and receive question and comments, through a time delayed medium. The subscribers 12 and golf instructor 14 can exchange emails or leave voicemails for one another. A benefit of utilizing web based communication is the ability to archive the conversations on a computer. By having previous conversations and videos archived, the subscribers 12 can review past golf lessons administered by the golf instructor 14. This allows the subscriber 12 to quickly remedy a swing fault which has already been addressed by the golf instructor 14 in a previous lesson. This would also make golf lessons more efficient as it eliminates the need for the golf instructor 14 to review previous lessons with the subscriber 12 during a current session.

The ability to have a group of subscribers 12 taking web based lessons simultaneously with one golf instructor also has several benefits. One obvious benefit is the cost savings. While group lessons are offered at golf facilities today, it is a common occurrence that not enough subscribers sign up for group lessons to constitute a group, let alone enough subscribers of the same skill level. Offering group lessons through web based video conferencing eliminates the geographic limitations of having subscribers being from the same locale. With additional subscribers, it's also easier to create groups of the same skill level, thereby providing the most effective instruction for all subscribers. Furthermore, being exposed to the perspective of other subscribers of like skills can offer further insight on the golf instructions.

FIG. 8 is a flow chart of of an exemplary method for creating a game plan. In step S201 the subscriber 12 creates a “game plan” to summarize the lessons in a format that can be used on any course for the purpose of helping the subscriber 12 recall lessons while playing. In step S202 the subscriber 12 chooses the skill level that best matches the subscriber's ability. Upon selecting “Beginner”, “Intermediate” or “Professional”, in steps S203, S205 and S207, respectively, the subscriber 12 is provided with the option to further establish a game plan for each type of shot and club tailored to the skill level and abilities of the subscriber for best results in steps S204, S206 and S208, respectively. The game plan takes into consideration, but are not limited to, the following aspects of the subscriber's golf game: subscribers overall length with specific golf clubs (woods, irons, wedges), natural shot shape (draw, neutral, or fade), and playing to the subscriber's strengths (driving, iron play, short game, putting). The game plan instructs the subscriber 12 on how to execute a particular golf shot in specific conditions/situations. The golf game plan further allows the subscriber 12 to use previously learned lessons on any golf course. The game plan may be provided interactively with the system based upon the subscriber's answers to questions provided by the system concerning the subscriber's golf game or with an instructor in a personalized lesson. The system may also provide guidelines so the subscriber is able to develop a personalized game pan on their run.

The system of the present invention also includes website development and membership plans. The website is hosted on the central server 21. Information that will be available on the website includes but is not limited to subscriber's 12 name, address, account balance, and hyperlinks to golf instructions. Other information stored on the central server 21 includes membership info, usage data, and referral data.

FIG. 9 is a depiction of an exemplary membership structure. The plan may include an initial a basic membership and an advanced membership. With an exemplary basic membership, a subscriber 12 may receive a 10 minute analysis and storage capacity for video data representing 2 swings. A subscriber 12 is further provided with storage capacity for two swing videos. With an advanced membership with different levels allowing access to different features, a subscriber 12 may receive a 20 minute initial swing consultation with the advisory staff. A subscriber is also has access to developing a customized game plan for course/training to suit the subscriber's needs. Additionally, with each additional 10 minute consultation booked by the subscriber 12, the subscriber 12 receives additional disk space to store two additional video data. The subscriber 12 also gains access to a golf tablet that stores each of the subscriber's lessons as well as allows the subscriber to view pro's swings for self analysis. Furthermore, the advanced membership provides access to group lessons as well as an online chat room. By offering a variety of memberships, a subscriber 12 can choose a membership that fits the subscriber's budget and needs. Additional memberships such as unlimited membership which may grant a subscriber with unlimited access and use of all system features are also provided.

FIG. 10 is a diagram of the Internet compatible system for providing data representing golf instructions of the present invention. The communication interface 44 receives a message which includes data representing a request for golf instruction from the distribution processor 46. The communication interface 44 transmits the data representing a request for golf instruction through the network, which connects the system to the subscriber end users. The data representing a request for golf instruction is sent by a subscriber 12. Such data may include but is not limited to text or video data. The message processor 48 examines the request provided by an input device/processor 52 and sends the request on to the distribution processor 46. The input devices/processors 52 include but are not limited to cameras 16, mouse 23, keyboards 22 and microphones 26. The subscriber 12, using the input devices/processors 52, sends a request to be linked to the desired instructional link. The subscriber 12 can choose to take individual lessons, group lessons, or review the archive. Once the subscriber 12 is linked to the system, the subscriber 12 can further use the input devices/processors 52 to send a video, text or audio request to the instructor 14. Upon receiving the data request, the instructor 14 can provide analysis in video, text, and or audio form to the subscriber 12 in the same fashion the subscriber 12 sends the request.

The message processor 48 also provides the signal to generate a display image on display devices 50 such as monitors, televisions or projectors. The display image provides a visual aid to the subscriber 12 thus allowing the subscriber to make requests through the input devices/processors 52. The signal to generate a display image may also comprise a video used for analysis.

FIG. 11 is a diagram of the interactive system for receiving data representing golf instructions of the present invention. A display processor 60 generates a user interface display image on a display device 62 such as a monitor, television or projector, enabling a user to enter a request to receive golf instructions. The display image provides a visual aid to the subscriber 12 thus allowing the subscriber to make requests through the input devices/processors 58. The signal to generate a display image may also comprise a video used for analysis. A message processor 56 receives data representing a request for golf instruction entered by a user via the input devices 58. The input devices/processors 52 include but are not limited to cameras 16, mouse 23, keyboards 22 and microphones 26. The subscriber 12, using the input devices/processors 52, sends a request to be linked to the desired instructional link. The subscriber 12 can choose to take individual lessons, group lessons, or review the archive. The communication interface 54 processes the request received from the message processor 56 to provide a formatted request message for communication and initiates communication of a formatted request message to a destination system. The communication interface 54 also receives a message responsive to the communicated formatted request message, and initiates the communication of the responsive message to said user. The communication interface 54 further transmits the data representing a request for golf instruction through the network, which connects the system to the subscriber end users. Data requests are sent from the communication interface 54 through the network. Additionally, analyses are also received by the communication interface 54 from the network.

The present invention is disclosed for use in providing individualized or group personal golf lessons and instructions. However, this system may be used for providing individualized or group personal lessons and instruction for any number of different activities including but not limited to tennis, baseball, cooking, knitting, arts and crafts, home improvement, and automobile repair.

While certain novel features of this invention have been shown and described and are pointed out in the annexed claims, it is not intended to be limited to the details above, since it will be understood that various omissions, modifications, substitutions and changes in the forms and details of the device illustrated and in its operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing in any way from the spirit of the present invention.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/266, 434/252
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationG09B19/0038, A63B2220/806, A63B2225/20, G09B5/06, A63B2225/50, A63B24/0003, A63B2024/0012, A63B69/36
European ClassificationG09B19/00E2, A63B69/36, G09B5/06, A63B24/00A