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Publication numberUS20070035092 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/161,900
Publication dateFeb 15, 2007
Filing dateAug 22, 2005
Priority dateAug 15, 2005
Also published asWO2007021290A2
Publication number11161900, 161900, US 2007/0035092 A1, US 2007/035092 A1, US 20070035092 A1, US 20070035092A1, US 2007035092 A1, US 2007035092A1, US-A1-20070035092, US-A1-2007035092, US2007/0035092A1, US2007/035092A1, US20070035092 A1, US20070035092A1, US2007035092 A1, US2007035092A1
InventorsGeorge Flores
Original AssigneeGeorge Flores
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf Card Game
US 20070035092 A1
Abstract
A golf card game comprised of a plurality of playing cards, divided into a plurality of categories, devised to simulate the game of golf and the scoring associated with the game of golf as played on an actual golf course. The present invention is played with each player being dealt a specific number of cards per hole. Each player plays in turn as in the rules of actual golf till each player completes the hole. The game can be played hole by hole either real or imagined; players may play set of holes, as in 9 holes or 18 holes as in a round of real golf, with the particulars of each hole being created as you go, or by utilizing a score card from a specific golf course with the particulars of each hole providing the setting for the virtual game of golf.
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Claims(18)
1. A golf card game comprising:
a plurality of playing cards;
said playing cards divided into a plurality of categories;
said categories including at least one of Tee-to-Green, Fairway, Recovery, Approach, Hazard, Around-the-Green, Hole/Eagle, Hole-in-One/Ace and Mulligan.
2. The golf card game as in claim 1 wherein said at least one Tee-to-Green, Fairway and Recovery category cards include a drive value distance from a virtual tee, a lay-up distance from a virtual green, and an approach value distance from a virtual pin.
3. The golf card game as in claim 2 wherein said at least one Tee-to-Green, Fairway and Recovery category card is black.
4. The golf card game as in claim 3 wherein said at least one black Tee-to-Green, Fairway and Recovery category card has a 2-Putt value.
5. The golf card game as in claim 3 wherein said at least one of black Tee-to-Green category card indicates a Fairway Hit.
6. The golf card game as in claim 3 wherein said at least one of black Tee to Green category card indicate a Green Hit.
7. The golf card game as in claim 3 wherein said at least one of black Tee-to-Green category card indicates (within) a Tap-In.
8. The golf card game as in claim 1 wherein said at least one Tee-to-Green, Fairway and Recovery category card is green.
9. The golf card game as in claim 8 wherein said at least one green Tee-to-Green, Fairway and Recovery category card has a 1-Putt value.
10. The golf card game as in claim 8 wherein said at least one green Tee-to-Green category card indicates a Fairway Hit.
11. The golf card game as in claim 8 wherein said at least one green Tee-to-Green category card indicates a Green Hit.
12. The golf card game as in claim 1 wherein at least one of said Tee-to-Green, Recovery, Eagle/Hole and Hole-in-One/Ace Card has a special symbol thereon.
13. The golf card game as in claim 12 wherein said at least one of said Tee-to-Green, Recovery, Eagle/Hole and Hole-in-One/Ace Card having said special symbol thereon is a Special Play Card.
14. The golf card game and system of playing according to claim 1 wherein the game is scored using a real score card from a real golf course.
15. The golf card game and system of playing according to claim 1 wherein at least one hazard is user selected prior to play.
16. The golf card game and system of playing according to claim 1 wherein a golf tee is used to determine which player is away.
17. The golf card game and system of playing according to claim 1 wherein each player receives 5 cards to start each hole of the game.
18. A golf card game and system of playing comprising:
dealing a plurality of playing cards to each player wherein said plurality of playing cards being divided into a plurality of categories;
said plurality of categories including at least one of Tee-to-Green, Fairway, Recovery, Approach, Hazard, Around-the-Green, Hole/Eagle, Hole-in-One/Ace and Mulligan;
determining which player is away by spinning a golf tee;
using pre-selected rules to guide play; and
scoring each player's turn on a golf score card.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The origins of the game of golf lead back to Roman times when the elite played a game using bent sticks and feather filled balls. The game evolved and was played in Scotland where it was known as Golfe, which is likely the direct ancestor of the modern game of golf. Practically every country plays golf and the popularity of the sport is growing each year. While golf used to be the exclusive province of the wealthy, the general public has become interested in the game no doubt due to some degree by the rise of popular superstar players.

Over the years, there have been attempts by game designers to capture the pleasure of golf without the expense of green fees, or dependence upon daylight and weather conditions. In particular, it is known in the art to attempt to simulate the game of golf utilizing cards. One problem with this approach is that the card games rely on complicated mathematical calculations including the manipulation of positive and negative numbers, conversion charts to translate point values into score values, or “magic cubes” to simulate the game. This reliance on methods far removed from the actual experience of playing golf detracts from the enjoyment and avid golfers are not likely to view these games as any kind of substitute for a real game of golf.

There is a need for a card game that recreates the stroke-by-stroke, hole-by-hole situational game that captures the strategy and feel of a “real” game of golf that can be played indoors.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a card game that virtually utilizes a stroke-by-stroke game play that does not require the use of conversion charts or complicated mathematical manipulations. The players utilize skill, strategy as well as chance to “hit” fairways, greens and make putts by selecting cards from their hands according to the rules of the game. Scoring is associated with the game of golf as played on an actual golf course.

Other features and advantages of the instant invention will become apparent from the following description of the invention which refers to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a Hole/Eagle Card.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of a black Tee-To-Green Card.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a Hole-in-One/Ace Card.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a Recovery Card.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a Hazard Card.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a Fairway Card.

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a Mulligan Card.

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a green Tee-To-Green Card.

FIG. 9 is a plan view of Around-the-Green Cards.

FIG. 10 is a plan view of Approach Cards.

FIG. 11 is a plan view of a special play according to the present invention.

FIG. 12 is a plan view of another special play according to the present invention.

FIG. 13 is a plan view of yet another special play according to the present invention.

FIG. 14 is a plan view of a further special play according to the present invention.

FIG. 15 is a plan view of another special play according to the present invention.

FIG. 16 is a plan view of yet another special play according to the present invention.

FIG. 17 is a plan view of a further special play according to the present invention.

FIG. 18 is a plan view of yet another special play according to the present invention.

FIG. 19 is a plan view of a deck of Golf Card Game golf cards according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring to the figures, FIG. 19 shows a deck of Golf Card Game golf cards 1000. A full deck 1000 contains fifty-four cards. The typical deck 1000 includes twenty-one Tee-to-Green Cards (FIGS. 2 and 8), eight Fairway Cards (FIG. 6), four Recovery Cards (FIG. 4), eight Hazard Cards (FIG. 5), four Around-the-Green Cards (FIG. 9), two Hole/Eagle Cards (FIG. 1), one Hole-In-One/Ace Card (FIG. 3), two Mulligan Cards (FIG. 7), and four Approach Cards (FIG. 10). FIGS. 1 through 10 illustrate the individual card types. FIGS. 11 through 18 illustrate typical playing hands according to the present invention.

Now referring to FIG. 1, the Hole/Eagle Card 10 is shown labeled Hole 3 on a center portion and Eagle 1 on opposing corners of the card 10. Hole/Eagle Card 10 is used in conjunction with specially marked black Tee-to-Green Cards 20 (FIG. 2). The special symbol 2 (FIG. 1) is used in conjunction with special symbol 26 on black Tee-to-Green Cards (FIG. 2). There are two Hole/Eagle Cards 10 in the deck 1000 (FIG. 19).

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 8, a black Tee-to-Green Card is shown generally as 20 in FIG. 2 and a green Tee-to-Green Card is represented as 80 in FIG. 8. There are eleven black Tee-to-Green Cards 20 and ten green Tee-to-Green Cards 80 in the deck 1000 (FIG. 19). Black Tee-to-Green Cards 20 are marked Tee-to-Green 23 along opposing sides of the card 20 and are also known as Par Cards. Green Tee-to-Green Cards 80 are also marked Tee-to-Green 83 along opposing sides of the card 80 and are also known as Birdie Cards. A drive value 22 and 82 represents the distance of the drive in yards a virtual golf ball goes

when this card is played. A Lay-up value 21 and 81 in yards indicates the distance from the green. The special mark 26 (appearing only on some black cards 20) is used in conjunction with either Hole/Eagle card 10 (FIG. 1) or the Hole-In-One/Ace card 30 (FIG. 3). A Feet-from-Pin value 24 and 84 indicates both the results of an approach and the distance from the hole when putting. All black Tee-to-Green cards 20 have a 2-Putt value 25 and all green Tee-to-Green Cards 80 have a 1-Putt value 85. Some Tee-to-Green Cards 20 and 80 may indicate Fairway Hit, Green Hit or within a Tap-In instead of a putt value (not shown).

Referring now to FIG. 3, a Hole-In-One card 30 also known as an Ace 31 can only be played with the black Tee-to-Green Card 20 (FIG. 2) that has the special symbol 26 (FIG. 2). There is only one Hole-In-One Card 30 in the deck 1000 (FIG. 19).

FIG. 4 shows Recovery Card 40 having a 2-Putt value 45. There are two black Recovery Cards 40 and two green. The black Recovery Cards 40 always have a 2-Putt value 45 and the green Recovery Cards (not shown) always have a 1-Putt value (not shown). Recovery Cards 40 are identified by the word Recovery 43 marked on opposite edges of the Card 40. When a player is in a fairway bunker, Rough or Trees, the Recovery Card 40 allows the player a shot to the green. Without a Recovery Card 40, a player must lay-up using the Lay-Up Values (21, 61 or 81 in FIGS. 2, 6 and 8 respectively) on any Tee-to-Green 20 and 80 (FIGS. 2 and 8) or Fairway 60 (FIG. 6) Cards. A Recovery Card 40 played around the green (unlike when played from a fairway which only allows the player a shot to the green), will get the player safely on the green. Only one Recovery Card 40 has the special symbol 46 (FIG. 4) and is used for special plays. The Recovery Card 40 may also be used in regular play using Drive value 42, Lay-Up value 4, Approach value 44 or Putt value 45 (FIG. 4).

FIG. 5 shows Hazard Card 50 with the kind of hazard identified, Bunker 51 for example, on opposite edges of card 50. A circled number 52 indicates the distance in feet from the green. The word Hazard 53 appears in the center of the card 50 to identify the kind of card. In a typical deck 1000 (FIG. 19), there are four Bunker Cards 51, two Out-of-Bounds Cards (not shown) and two Water Hazard Cards (not shown).

Now referring to FIG. 6, Fairway Card 60 is shown displaying the word Fairway 63 on opposite edges of the card 60. There are two types of Fairway Cards 60. There are four black and four green Fairway Cards 60. All black Fairway Cards 60 have a 2-Putt value 68 and the green cards 60 have a 1-Putt value (not shown). Fairway Cards 60 are used to challenge an opponent's drive or can be used in regular play. The Fairway Card 60 indicates Trees 67 or Rough (not shown) offset to one side of the card 60 as well as abbreviated TS 66 or RH (abbreviation for rough—not shown) along opposing edges. The distance from the pin in feet or Approach value 64 is also displayed along opposing edges of the card 60 in the same manner as the Tee-to-Green Cards 20 and 80 (FIGS. 2 and 8). Likewise, a drive value 62 and a lay-up value 61 appear along opposing edges of the card 60 as well.

With reference to FIG. 7, two Mulligan Cards 70 are included in the deck 1000 (FIG. 19) but are removed from the deck for Tournament Play. The Mulligan Card 70 is played when a player is Out-of-Bounds or in a Water Hazard to avoid a one-stroke penalty. The Mulligan Card 70 is identified by the word Mulligan 71 appearing on opposing edges of the card 70.

FIG. 9 shows the four Around-the-Green Cards generally as 90. These cards 90 are identified by the words Around-the-Green 98 being centrally printed on the cards 90. Each

kind of play around the green is indicated on opposing sides of the cards 90. Card 99 is a Hole from Rough 97, Card 96 is a Hole form Bunker 95, Card 93 is an Up and Down 94 and Card 91 is a Chip-In 92. These Cards 90 are used when the player is playing around the green.

FIG. 10 illustrates the four Approach Cards shown generally as 100. Approach Cards 100 are used to challenge an opponent's approach to the green. A Fringe Card 101 is shown with a Pin Distance 114 labeled on opposing edges of card 101. The Fringe Card 101 is identified by the Label 115 also appearing on opposite edges of the card 101. The opponent may chip or putt from this distance 114. A Second Cut Card 103 is shown with the Second Cut designation 104 appearing along opposing edges of the card 104 along with a distance from the green in feet 113. The player must chip. A Rough Card 106 is likewise identified with the Rough designation 105 appearing along opposing edges of card 106. The circled number 112 indicates distance from the green in feet. Additionally, when a Rough Card 106 is used, the player must add 10 feet to pin value on card (not shown) used to chip. A Deep Rough Card 109 is identified in a similar manner as the other Approach Cards 100 by a centrally disposed label 108 along with special instructions 110 (in the case of Deep Rough Card 109—add 20 feet to Pin 110) and the specific kind of Approach Card 100 being displayed along opposing edges 107. As with the other Approach Cards 100, the number in the circle 111 indicates the distance from the green in feet when this card is used.

FIGS. 11 through 18 are examples of Special Plays according to the present invention. Referring to FIG. 11, an example of the Special Play known as the Hole-In-One 200 is shown. This play requires two cards, a black Tee-To-Green Card 20 (FIG. 2) with the special symbol 26 (FIG. 2) printed on it and the Hole-in-One/Ace Card 30 (FIG. 3). This play is equivalent to the Hole-In-One in the actual game of golf and is scored in the same manner.

Referring now to FIG. 12, the Special Play known as an Eagle on a Par-4 is illustrated. In order to play this hand, all the Tee-to-Green Cards 20 (FIG. 2) must be black and the cards used on the approach must have the special symbol 310 on it. The Hole/Eagle Card 10 (FIG. 1) used in conjunction for an “eagle” as in the game of golf. In the example shown, the player drives three-hundred and fifty-five yards 308 with the first card 302 and then the second card 304 with the special symbol 310 is played along with the Hole/Eagle Card 306 to complete the “Eagle on a Par-4” play.

With reference to FIG. 13, an Eagle on a Par-4 from Trouble 400 play is illustrated. In the example shown, play starts with a drive of three-hundred and fifty yards 410 using the first card 402, a black Tee-to-Green Card. Next, an opponent plays the Fairway Card 404 showing the Trees 412. The third card played is the Recovery Card 406 with the special symbol 414 on it along with the Hole/Eagle Card 408 to complete the “Eagle on a Par-4 from Trouble” 400. The drive (first card 402) must be a black Tee-to-Green Card.

FIG. 14 illustrates a “Reaching the Green in Two on a Par-5” 500 play according to the present invention. Both the drive card 502 and the approach to the green card 504 must be black Tee-to-Green Cards.

Referring now to FIG. 15, the special play “Reaching the Green in Two on a Par-5 from Trouble” 600 using three cards. Again, the drive card 602 must be a black Tee-to-Green Card. In the example shown, the drive is three-hundred and twenty-five yards 608. Next, an opponent plays second card 604, a Fairway Card 60 (FIG. 6) and in the example shown illustrates Rough 610 (but could be trees as noted in FIG. 6). The third card played must be a black Recovery Card 606 with special symbol 612.

FIG. 16 is an example of the Special Play “Eagle on a Par-5” 700 according to the present invention. The play begins with a drive of three-hundred and fifty yards 710 as indicated on the black Tee-to-Green Card 702. Next, a Lay-Up of sixty yards 712 from the green is played by using a black Tee-to-Green Card 704. The third shot uses two cards, a black Tee-to-Green Card 706 with a special symbol 714 and a Hole/Eagle Card 708. This combination of cards is scored as an “Eagle on a Par-5” hole.

The play illustrated in FIG. 17 is the “Double Eagle” 800 according to the present invention. Play begins in this example with black Tee-to-Green Card 802 showing a drive of three-hundred and fifty-six yards 810. The second “shot” utilizes three cards, 804, 806 and 808 respectively. A black Tee-to-Green Card 804 has special symbol 814 and is played with two Hole/Eagle Cards 806 and 808. This hand is scored as a “Double Eagle” 800.

Referring to FIG. 18, an example of the “Double Eagle from Trouble” play 900 according to the present invention is shown leading off with a drive of three-hundred and twenty-five 912 using a black Tee-to-Green Card 902. Next, an opponent plays Fairway Card 904 that places the player in the Rough 914. Player responds with three cards, 906, 908 and 910 respectively. Recovery Card 906 has special symbol 916 and then two Hole/Eagle Cards 908 and 910 are played to complete the “Double Eagle from Trouble” 900.

The previous examples are only a few of the many possible plays according to the present invention that change each time the game is played.

Rules for GOLF CARD GAME—Tournament Edition

Instructions for two and four players: Tournament play, (Mulligan cards are removed)

Drives

A score card from your favorite golf course may be used or players may create a course hole by hole as they play, in either case, players determine par of the holes and the particulars before dealing, such as out of bounds, water hazards and fairway bunkers on drives, water hazards on approach, etc. (Fairway rough and trees on drives and bunkers on approach are a given).

2. Shuffle the deck 1000 (FIG. 19) (before each hole) and deal five cards to each player. (The deck 1000 (FIG. 19) is placed face down in reach of all players to draw from).

3. Each player may discard and draw up to three cards to build a hand. (The discarded cards placed face down are now out of play for the remainder of the hole). During play players draw cards to maintain a five card hand. Players may use a mix of black and green cards and use shot values found on any Tee-to-Green 20 or 80 (FIGS. 2 and 8), Fairway 60 (FIG. 6) or Recovery Cards 40 (FIG. 4), but can only use certain cards for special plays (See “Special Plays”).

4. A player may call a misdeal if he/she has only one or no cards with shot values.

5. On the first hole determine who is away (a golf tee can be used). As in real golf, the players to the left go in turn to start the first hole. On the first drive, with four players, the first player away will have the advantage over the third, and the second player away will have the advantage over the fourth. (The first and third players and second and fourth players are seated across from each other as opponents). After the first drive players go in turn according to position and scoring as in real golf. An important and unique feature of the present invention is that it allows all players to know their exact positions on the course—yards off the tee, yards from the green, feet from the green, feet from the pin, etc. without calculations, and in this Golf Card Game position and scoring are what determine a player's advantage to challenge an opponent's shot.

6. When a card is played, (like a drive), it is placed face up in front of the player. If that card is challenged, the challenging card is given to the player and placed face up on top of the challenged card so that both show.

7. Players away first (on drives) have the advantage and can challenge by using a Hazard Card 50 (FIG. 5), if it applies to the hole and only if they out-drive their opponents (when the Hazard Bunker Card 51 (FIG. 5) is played on a fairway bunker disregard the circled feet-from-green number 52 (FIG. 5) which is used only around the greens and use the yardage of the drive card played).

8. Any player can challenge an opponent's drive with a Fairway Card 60 (FIG. 6) placing the opposing player in the Trees 67 (FIG. 6) or Rough (not shown). The challenging card must be the same color card played by his/her opponent. A Fairway Hit (indicated on one black and one green Tee-to-Green Cards 20 and 80 FIGS. 2 and 8) when played, cannot be challenged by Fairway Cards 60 (FIG. 6) or Hazard Cards 50 (FIG. 5). If a player challenges an opponent's drive with two Fairway Cards 60 (FIG. 6) both being the same color of the opponent's drive card and both cards indicating Trees 67 (FIG. 6), the ball's lie is rendered unplayable. The player takes an imaginary two-club length drop and a real one-stroke penalty and continues play. If this play is made with two Fairway Cards 60 (FIG. 6) indicating Rough (not shown), there can be no recovery, and the player must lay-up (See rule 14).

9. If the Fairway Card 60 (FIG. 6) is your first card played challenging your opponent's drive, you may draw and replace it before your drive.

10. Players who drove first (having the advantage) may not draw before challenging with a Fairway 60 (FIG. 6) or a Hazard Card 50 (FIG. 5), but may challenge from the Trees 67 (FIG. 6) or rough (not shown).

11. If a player is out of bounds or finds a water hazard on his/her drive, a one-stroke penalty is imposed. Player draws cards and must Tee-Off again. Player must still out-drive his/her opponent, to avoid another Hazard Card 50 (FIG. 5) from challenging player, with respect to rule 10.

On lateral hazards play continues from where the ball went out of play (this is determined by the drive value of the card played.)

Play the Rip-It indicated black Tee-to-Green Card 20 (FIG. 2) (not shown) to reach short Par-4's in one (on holes 360 yards or shorter). Otherwise use drive yardage indicated. This play may challenged by Fairway Cards 60 (FIG. 6) using drive yardage indicated on card to determine where ball will be in play. Players may also challenge this play with Approach 100 (FIG. 10) or Hazard Cards 50 (FIG. 5), if the Hazard Card 50 (FIG. 5) applies to the approach to the green.

Lay-Ups & Fairway Bunkers

Play from fairway bunkers, rough or trees requires a Recovery Card 40 (FIG. 4) to have a shot to the green and to be able to challenge on approach, or player must lay-up using lay-up values 21, 61, 81 and 41 (FIGS. 2, 6, 8 and 4 respectively) found on any Tee-to-Green 20 or 80 (FIGS. 2 and 8), Fairway 60 (FIG. 6) or Recovery Cards 40 (FIG. 4) if player chooses. Player may also play a Green Hit, indicated on one black and one green Tee-to-Green Cards 20 and 80 (FIGS. 2 and 8). These cards are not challengeable, and may also be played from the fairway.

15. You may not lay-up on Par-4's unless from trouble.

16. Lay-ups on Par-4's and Par-5's are not challengeable. (Except for rule 17)

17. When laying up, there are nine cards with lay-up values that fall within play of the four Around-the-Green Cards 90 (FIG. 9). The four cards are: Chip-In 92, Up-and-Down 94, Hole-from-Bunker 95 and Hole-from-Rough 97. The nine lay-up values (01), (02), (03), (04), (05), (06), (07), (08), and (09) are challengeable by Hazard 50 (FIG. 5) and Approach Cards 100 (FIG. 10) in that they are lay-ups in close proximity to the green.

EXAMPLE

Your drive was challenged and you are in the trees; you do not have a Recovery Card 40 (FIG. 4) and must lay-up. You have two choices: You can lay-up 50 yards from the green, try to reach the green in 3, and hopefully 1-putt to save par, but you choose, having a Chip-In 92, Around-the-Green Card 90 (FIG. 9) to lay-up 7 yards from the green, and chip-in for birdie! Even if your lay-up is challenged and you find the Fringe 115, Second Cut 104, Rough 105 or Deep Rough 107 (FIG. 10), the Chip-In 92 (FIG. 9) will still play. To no avail, you found the bunker, and a Chip-In 92 Card (FIG. 9) will not play from a bunker.

Approaching the Greens & Par-3's

18. Players in turn (shortest drives first, then longest lay-up values etc.) approach the green using the feet-from-pin values 24, 84, 44 and 64 (FIGS. 2, 8, 4 and 6 respectively) found on any Tee-to-Green 20 and 80 (FIGS. 2 and 8), Recovery 40 (FIG. 4) or Fairway 60 (FIG. 6) Cards. The player whose shot is closest to the pin will have the advantage and may challenge by playing an Approach 100 (FIG. 10) or Hazard Card 50 (FIG. 5) if it applies to the hole.

Example 1

The player away draws cards and places his/her card face up showing the shot is 5-feet from the pin. The player's opponent, without drawing cards, now knows that he/she has the better hand, having a shot 3-feet from the pin; and challenges (without drawing cards) by playing an Approach Card 100 (FIG. 10) 109 indicating Deep Rough 107, showing the true results of the shot. Then second player (again, without drawing cards) plays his/hers closer shot (at his/hers turn). (With four players there may be other players away before your shot)

Example 2

Player away (draws cards) shoots and is 5-feet from the pin; the opponent now knows that he/she does not have a better shot, so there will be no challenge here. Player draws cards (at his/hers turn) and hopes to a least get closer to the pin so not to be challenged, but the shot will be 8-feet from the pin, nothing to do but let it fly and hope for the best while the first player waits on like the grim reaper.

19. Some Approach 100 (FIG. 10) and all Hazard Cards 50 (FIG. 5) have a circled number 111, 112 and 113 (FIG. 10) and 52 (FIG. 5) respectively indicating feet-from-green except the Approach Fringe Card 101 (FIG. 10) which indicates feet-from-pin. As long as the feet-from-green is closer to the green (advancing the ball); a player can play a Hazard 50 (FIG. 5) or Approach Card 100 (FIG. 10) over another on an opponent.

20. A Recovery Card 40 (FIG. 4) played around the green (unlike played from a fairway bunker, rough or tree, which only allows a player a shot to the green) will get a player safely on the green as will a Green Hit indicated card.

21. Disregard the penalty on Approach Cards 100 Rough 105 (FIG. 10) and Deep Rough 107 (FIG. 10) when using Recovery Cards 40 (FIG. 4), Green Hit or (within) Tap-In indicated cards when chipping onto a green.

22. A player approaching the green from a lay-up position after opponent has already reached the green before the players lay-up, must come closer to the pin then his/her opponent, so not to be challenged again.

23. When both opponents have missed the green, the player chipping closest to the pin has the advantage and may challenge the other.

24. When playing a Hole/Eagle Card 10 (FIG. 1), or a Hole in One/Ace Card 30 (FIG. 3), successfully (see “Special Plays”), and when playing a Chip-In 91 (FIG. 9), Up-and-Down 94 (FIG. 9), Hole-from-Bunker 93 (FIG. 9) or a Hole-from-Rough Card 97 (FIG. 9), player may continue challenging his/her opponent but may not draw cards.

25. If a player has no cards with shot values to continue play, it's considered a lost ball, a one-stroke penalty is imposed and player must draw five new cards and go back and replay the shot (on drives) or take a drop around the green (on approaches).

Putting

26. Putting begins when all players are on the green.

27. Putting is based on a 24-foot break point.

28. In putting a player may draw cards after challenging to finish his/her turn.

29. Player closest to pin has the advantage to challenge first.

Example 1

Player away draws cards and at any distance from the pin may play a 2-Putt value card 25, 45, 68, (FIGS. 2, 4 and 6 respectively) to finish the hole unchallenged. The opponent (at his/her turn) draws cards (because there will be no challenge) and may also play a 2-Putt value card 25, 45, 68, (FIGS. 2, 4, 6 respectively) to finish the hole also unchallenged.

Example 2

When player away after drawing cards plays a 1-Putt value Card 85 (FIG. 8) 23-feet from the pin or less, opponent (without drawing cards) can play an additional 1-Putt value card 85 (FIG. 8) on first player to total a 2-Putt finish. Then second player may draw cards at his/her turn and first player (without drawing cards) may also challenge second players putt in the same manner if second player is also putting from 23-feet or less.

Example 3

When player away after drawing cards plays a 1-Putt value card 85 (FIG. 8) 24-feet from the pin or greater, opponent (without drawing cards) may play a 2-Putt value card 25, 45, 68, (FIGS. 2, 4 and 6 respectively) on first player to total a 3-Putt finish on the hole. Again second player draws cards at his/her turn and first player (without drawing cards) may also challenge second players putt in the same manner or as in example 2, whichever applies to the putt.

30. The challenging player may ONLY play a 2-Putt value card 25, 45, 68, (FIGS. 2, 4 and 6 respectively) on his/her opponent when his/her opponent is 1-putting from 24 feet or greater, and ONLY a 1-Putt value card when his/her opponent is 1-putting from 23 feet or less.

31. The Tee-to-Green Card 20 (FIG. 2) that indicates (within) a Tap-In (not shown) does not require any other putt value card be played.

32. If a player reaches the green and has no cards with a putt value after drawing, the player must take a 3-Putt on the hole.

Special Plays

Special Plays include: Hole-in-One's, Eagles holed from the fairway on Par-4's, Eagles holed from trouble (fairway bunkers, rough or trees) on Par-4's, Double Eagles, Double Eagles from trouble, third shot Eagles, reaching the green in two and reaching the green in two from trouble on Par-5's.

33. All Special Plays are always challengeable, and players may draw cards immediately after challenging any Special Play.

34. There are four black Tee-to-Green 20 (FIG. 2) Cards and one black Recovery Card 40 (FIG. 4) that include a special symbol 26 and 46 (FIGS. 2 and 4 respectively) next to the feet-from-pin 24 and 44 (FIGS. 2 and 4 respectively) location, also there is one Hole-in-One/Ace Card 30 (FIG. 3), and two Hole/Eagle Cards 10 (FIG. 1) that also have this special symbol 2 and 32 (FIGS. 1 and 3 respectively).

35. Match a black Tee-to-Green card 20 (FIG. 2) with a special symbol 26 (FIG. 2) with the Hole-in-One Card 30 (FIG. 3) for a shot at a Hole-in-One on par-3's.

36. Match a black Tee-to-Green card 20 (FIG. 2) with a special symbol 26 (FIG. 2) with the Eagle/Hole Card 10 (FIG. 1) on your approach, to hole for an eagle on par-4's, or on your third shot on Par-5's.

37. Match a black Tee-to-Green Card 20 (FIG. 2) with a special symbol 26 (FIG. 2) together with the two Eagle/Hole Cards 10 (FIG. 1) on approach for a double-eagle on Par-5's.

38. Play any two black Tee-to-Green Cards 20 (FIG. 2) to reach a Par-5 in two (playing one card for your drive and one for your approach.)

39. The drive card (and lay-up on Par-5's) played before any Special Play approach must also be a black Tee-to-Green Card 20 (FIG. 2), but does not need to have the special symbol 26 (FIG. 2).

40. The black Recovery Card 40 (FIG. 4) with the special symbol 46 (FIG. 4) can be used for Special Plays from trouble (fairway bunkers, rough or trees), and to reach par-5's in two from trouble, but not from fairways.

41. Special play cards are played together as one. (See rules 35, 36 and 37)

Milligan's Golf

42. The Mulligan Cards 70 (FIG. 7) are utilized in the deck 1000 (FIG. 19).

43. A Mulligan Card 70 (FIG. 7) can be used anytime except when putting.

44. Where a lost ball would apply there is no stroke penalty. Player just draws five new cards and continues.

45. Where a player would have a 3-Putt penalty for not having a putt value card on the green, he/she draws till the first putt value card is found.

Although the instant invention has been described in relation to particular embodiments thereof, many other variations and modifications and other uses will become apparent to those skilled in the art.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7985127 *May 31, 2007Jul 26, 2011Big Fish Games, Inc.Golf solitaire video game
WO2008150997A1 *May 30, 2008Dec 11, 2008Big Fish Games IncGolf solitaire video game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/298
International ClassificationA63F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0005, A63F1/04
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4J, A63F1/04