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Publication numberUS20070062961 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/228,983
Publication dateMar 22, 2007
Filing dateSep 16, 2005
Priority dateSep 16, 2005
Publication number11228983, 228983, US 2007/0062961 A1, US 2007/062961 A1, US 20070062961 A1, US 20070062961A1, US 2007062961 A1, US 2007062961A1, US-A1-20070062961, US-A1-2007062961, US2007/0062961A1, US2007/062961A1, US20070062961 A1, US20070062961A1, US2007062961 A1, US2007062961A1
InventorsPeter Rigas
Original AssigneePleo Originals, Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ergonomic wine glass
US 20070062961 A1
Abstract
A beverage drinking glass includes a base support segment and a beverage holding vessel segment. The beverage holding vessel segment has at least one sidewall, a bottom, and a top rim to create the vessel segment. The bottom is connected to the base support segment. The top rim has a cut-out section to create a facial profile/nose-receiving depression, and the cut-out section is less than 50% of the peripheral length of the rim. The beverage drinking glass is preferably selected from the group consisting of tumbler, cup, wine glass, mug and goblet.
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Claims(20)
1. A beverage drinking glass, which comprises:
a.) a base support segment;
b.) a beverage holding vessel segment having at least one sidewall, a bottom, and a top rim, to create said vessel segment, said bottom being connected to said base support segment, said top rim having a cut-out section to create a facial profile depression, said cut-out section being less than 50% of the peripheral length of said rim.
2. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said cut-out section extends downwardly for at least one half inch from said top rim.
3. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said cut-out section is a continuous curvilinear cut-out section.
4. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said cut-out section is arcuate and symmetrical.
5. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said beverage drinking glass is selected from the group consisting of tumbler, cup, wine glass, mug and goblet.
6. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said vessel segment bottom and said base support segment are the same component.
7. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said vessel segment bottom and said base support segment are different components.
8. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said base support component includes a flat base and a stem wherein said stem is connected to said vessel segment bottom.
9. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said cut-out has a portion that is selected from the group consisting of a circle arc, an ellipse segment, an oval segment, a parabola segment and a sine curve segment.
10. The beverage drinking glass of claim 1 wherein said beverage drinking glass is a wine glass.
11. A set of beverage drinking glasses, which comprises:
a set of at least four beverage drinking glasses, each of said at least four beverage drinking glasses including:
a.) a unique identifier located thereon to distinguish it from all other beverage drinking glasses in said set;
b.) a said base support segment;
c.) a beverage holding vessel segment having at least one side wall, a bottom, and a top rim, to create said bottom being connected to said base support segment, said top rim section to create a nose-receiving depression, said cut-out section being less than 50% peripheral length of said rim.
12. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said cut-out section extends downwardly for at least one half inch from said top rim.
13. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said cut-out section is a continuous curvilinear cut-out section.
14. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said cut-out section is arcuate and symmetrical.
15. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said beverage drinking glass is selected from the group consisting of tumbler, cup, wine glass, mug and goblet.
16. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said vessel segment bottom and said base support segment are the same component.
17. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said vessel segment bottom and said base support segment are different components.
18. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said base support component includes a flat base and a stem wherein said stem is connected to said vessel segment bottom.
19. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said cut-out has a portion that is selected from the group consisting of a circle erc, an ellipse segment, an oval segment, a parabola segment and a sine curve segment.
20. The set of beverage drinking glasses of claim 11 wherein said beverage drinking glass is a wine glass.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1 . Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates to ergonomic wine glasses particularly, and relates more generally to ergonomic beverage drinking glasses. The present invention drinking glasses have a unique structure that includes a rim depression that provides for more convenient beverage filling, sniffing, breathing, decanting and drinking. This is particularly important to wine consumption and the present invention offers tremendous improvements over existing glasses for wine connoisseurs.
  • [0003]
    2 . Information Disclosure Statement
  • [0004]
    The following prior art id representative of the state of the art in the field of:
  • [0005]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,502,712B1 describes a drinking vessel provided having the duel purpose of providing in addition to drinking therefrom to also smell the aroma emitted from the drink by providing the drinking vessel with at least one inner element inside the drinking vessel dividing the drinking vessel into drinking compartment from which a drink can be sipped and providing an aroma compartment from which the aroma of the drink can be smelled while drinking from the drinking compartment and that the drinking compartment and the aroma compartment have different configurations.
  • [0006]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,293,034B1 describes a wine bottle ring of a continuous unbroken form for accepting a neck of a wine bottle so the ring may be supported on the wine bottle. A plurality of wine glass rings, are formed of spring steel in a loop having a pair of opposing and abutting ends. The loops are of a size for accepting a stem of wine glass, and further, for being supported on a base of wine glass. The wine glass rings each provide a distinctive ornamentation so as to distinguish the wine glasses from each other. The method includes serving the wine bottle with the wine glass rings attached to the bottle ring so that the decorative elements are immediately visible. When the wine, glasses are distributed to guests, each has one of the wine glass rings engaged on its stem so that one glass may be distinguished from the next.
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat No. 5,899,354 describes a drinking mug including a body with a lipid-receiving interior volume with a handle connected to the body and extending outwardly therefrom. The body has a first eye relief channel extending longitudinally along the body and a second eye relief channel extending generally parallel to the first eye relief channel and extending longitudinally along the body. The first and second eye relief channels are indentations in the exterior surface of the annular configuration of the body. Each of the first and second eye relief channels extends from a top of the body to a bottom of the body. A nose bridge receptacle is formed in the body between the first and second eye relief channels.
  • [0008]
    U.S. Pat No. 5,014,865 describes drinking implements or utensils are devised by assembling various components having distinctive decorative features. A cup assembly is provided with a threaded ferrule at the base thereof receiving a threaded pin at the end of a stem assembly. A decorative collar is interposed between the two and adapted for covering and concealing the ferrule in a fashionable manner. A candle holder based upon the same modular assembly technique is also presented.
  • [0009]
    U.S. Pat No. 4,681,236 describes a drinking glass have a press-molded stem and a base (or pedestal), comprising at least one hallow passage extending approximately horizontally and transversely through the stem. An insert, formed of, for example, a colored plastic, may be fitted into the hallow passage.
  • [0010]
    U.S. Pat No. 4,555,040 describes a receptacle for holding liquid includes temperature measuring device to measure the temperature of the liquid contained therein. The receptacle may be a stemmed wine glass which includes a thermometer in the stem. The thermometer has a bulb with a tip adjacent to or extending into the bowl of the wine glass. Thus, the temperature of the contents of the wine glass may be easily measured to establish whether the wine has been stored and poured at the correct temperature.
  • [0011]
    U.S. Pat No. 3,400,855 describes a spill proof container comprising ajar having an interior surface, at least one set of diametrically opposed and foldable channel members secured to the interior surface, said members normally folded against the interior surface and adapted to be rotated to a position perpendicular to the interior surface, and a baffle member positioned in the channel members after rotation thereof to the perpendicular position.
  • [0012]
    U.S. Pat No. 2,196,450 describes a vessel comprising a body having a hollow top forming a container, and a depending flange forming a support, the underside of the top and flange together forming a pocket, said pocket having a screw threaded recess, detachable member shaped to fit the internal surface of said pocket, said detachable member having an opening registering with said recess, a screw projecting through said opening and screwing into said recess, said screw having a flanged head, a sheet bearing display matter clamped between said detachable member and said body, and compressible packing rings between said flanged head and the detachable member and the depending flange of the body.
  • [0013]
    U.S. Pat No. 2,170,311 illustrates it should be understood that this form of bowl is more or less conventional and other forms may be substituted as long as they lend themselves to the application of the special features about to be described.
  • [0014]
    U.S. Design Pat. No. Des 355,812 illustrates a beverage glass with a stem and base.
  • [0015]
    U.S. Design Pat. No. Des 143,778 describes a stem article of glass where in which the joint between the bowl and the foot is formed in the stem.
  • [0016]
    U.S. Design Pat. No. Des 77,942 illustrates a goblet or similar device with a rectangular center stem.
  • [0017]
    U.S. Design Pat. No. 77,227 illustrates a goblet with a stylized diamond center stem.
  • [0018]
    Notwithstanding the prior art, the present invention is neither taught nor rendered obvious thereby.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0019]
    The present invention is a drinking glass and a set of drinking glasses that have an ergonomic structure utilizing a facial profile depression, and preferably a nose-receiving depression at the rim. The terms “drinking glass” and “drinking glasses” are used herein to describe one or more of any drinking vessel that holds a predetermined volume of consumable beverage, is hand held, has an open top that typically involves nose insertion partially into the open top when used to drink a beverage therefrom. This includes cups, mugs, steins, goblets, tumblers and wine glasses. It includes those drinking glass made from glass and those made from other materials, such as ceramic, metal, plastic, natural materials, etc. The term “tumbler” means any non-stemmed drinking glass that has no handle.
  • [0020]
    The present invention relates to a beverage drinking glass includes a base support segment and a beverage holding vessel segment.
  • [0021]
    The beverage holding vessel segment has at least one sidewall, a bottom, and a top rim to create the vessel segment. The bottom is connected to the base support segment. The top rim has a cut-out section to create a facial profile depression, and the cut-out section is less than 50% of the peripheral length of the rim.
  • [0022]
    In some preferred embodiments, the present invention beverage drinking glass cut-out section extends downwardly for at least one half inch from the top rim. Preferably, the beverage drinking glass cut-out section is a continuous curvilinear cut-out section. It is also preferably arcuate and symmetrical.
  • [0023]
    The present invention beverage drinking glass is preferably selected from the group consisting of tumbler, cup, wine glass, mug and goblet. Snifters are particularly popular goblets among wine connoisseurs.
  • [0024]
    In some embodiments, the present invention beverage drinking glass vessel segment bottom and the base support segment are the same component. In other embodiments, the beverage drinking vessel segment bottom and the base support segment are different components. For example, the beverage drinking glass base support component may include a flat base and a stem wherein the stem is connected to the vessel segment bottom.
  • [0025]
    The present invention drinking glass cut-out may have any shape that*reasonably accommodate a facial profile, e.g. angular linear sections and/or curved sections. In some present invention preferred embodiments, the beverage drinking glass cut-out has a portion that is selected from the group consisting of a circle arc, an ellipse segment, an oval segment, a parabola segment and a sine curve segment.
  • [0026]
    In many preferred embodiments, the present invention beverage is a wine glass.
  • [0027]
    The present invention also includes a set of beverage drinking glasses, which comprises:
  • [0028]
    a set of at least four beverage drinking glasses, each of the at least four beverage drinking glasses including:
  • [0029]
    a.) a unique identifier located thereon to distinguish it from all other beverage drinking glasses in the set;
  • [0030]
    b.) the base support segment;
  • [0031]
    c.) a beverage holding vessel segment having at least one side wall, a bottom, and a top rim, to create the bottom being connected to the base support segment, the top rim section to create a nose-receiving depression, the cut-out section being less than 50% peripheral length of the rim.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0032]
    The present invention should be more fully understood when the specification herein is taken in conjunction with the drawings appended hereto wherein:
  • [0033]
    FIG. 1 shows a front view of present invention ergonomic beverage drinking glass;
  • [0034]
    FIGS. 2 and 3 show side and top views respectively of the present invention glass shown in FIG. 1;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 4 shows a front view of a present invention goblet;
  • [0036]
    FIG. 5 shows a front view of a present invention tumbler glass;
  • [0037]
    FIG. 6 shows a front view of a present invention cup;
  • [0038]
    FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate front and right side views of a present invention mug;
  • [0039]
    FIG. 9 illustrates a front view of a present invention set of wine glasses;
  • [0040]
    FIG. 10 illustrates the present invention glass shown in FIGS. 1 through 3 wherein wine from a bottle is conveniently being poured into it;
  • [0041]
    FIG. 11 shows a present invention beverage glass in use for experiencing the bouquet of a wine; and,
  • [0042]
    FIG. 12 shows a present invention beverage glass in use for consumption of wine.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENT INVENTION
  • [0043]
    FIG. 1 shows a front view of present invention ergonomic beverage drinking glass 100, and FIGS. 2 and 3 show side and top views respectively of the present invention glass 100 shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0044]
    Ergonomic beverage drinking glass 100 includes a base support segment made up of a base 3 and a stem 5. There is a color indicia 7 that may be part of a set of glasses each having unique identifiers to distinguish it from others in the set.
  • [0045]
    There is also a beverage holding vessel segment 10 that includes a bottom 9, a wall. 11 and a top rim 13. There is also a cut-out section 15, as shown. The cut-out section 15 acts as a bottle neck rest for pouring water, wine, soda, beer or other consumable beverage. Additionally, cut-out section 15 permits closer nose contact with otherwise higher walls for testing bouquet or other sniffing. Finally, when a user is drinking from a present invention glass such as wine glass 100, the head need not be tilted to tip the glass without spilling because cut-out section 15 acts as a nose-receiving depression.
  • [0046]
    FIG. 2 shows a side view and FIG. 3 shows a top view of wine glass 100 that is shown in FIG. 1. As can be seen by looking at all of FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the cut-out 15 is preferably less then 50% of the rim length and is usually about 25 to 35% thereof from a top view. The top view arc representing cut-out section 15 is segment A of FIG. 3.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 4 shows a front view of a present invention goblet 200. This goblet 200 has a base support segment made up of base 43 and stem 45. Vessel segment 40 has side wall 51 and bottom 49. The upper portion 47 of stem 45 is connected to vessel segment 40. Vessel segment 40 of goblet 200 is typical in its ability to hold liquid, but rim 53 has a present invention cut-out 55 to act as a nose-receiving depression so that a user does not need to tip his head to cleanly consume the last drops of liquid. The cut-out 55 also acts as a rest for pouring and offers a closer nose position for sniffing.
  • [0048]
    FIG. 5 shows a front view of a present invention tumbler glass 300. This tumbler glass 300 may be a vitreous product, or a metal, plastic or ceramic product, and may have any top view shape that can be used to drink from. Most common, of course, is a circular glass, but it could be a square, hexagonal or other shape without exceeding the scope of the present invention. The glass 300 has a common bottom and base support segment. Specifically, bottom 63 also acts as base 61. Vessel segment 65 is square from a top view and has four equal side walls such as side wall 67, except that rim 69 has a deep notch 71 that finctions in the same manner and serves the same purposes as cut-out section 15 described above. Tumbler glass 300 when the present invention tumbler is used for iced drinks, one can learn to consume the beverage without being inundated with a cascade of ice cubes in the face to finish (bottom liquid).
  • [0049]
    FIG. 6 shows a front view of a present invention cup 400. It includes a base support 81 and a vessel segment 85 with bottom 87 and finger loop 89. Side wall 83 has a cut-out section 93, as shown, and functions in a manner similar to the cut-out sections described above.
  • [0050]
    FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate a front and right side views of a present invention mug 500. It has a base 161 and bottom 163 that are integral. In other words, the bottom 163 of vessel segment 165 also serves as a base support segment (base 161). Wall 167 is a cylindrical member and has cut-out 171 at rim 169 to attain the present invention benefits and functionality as described above in conjunction with other present invention glasses.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 9 illustrates a front view of a present invention set of wine glasses 1000. These four wine glasses are individually wine glasses 600, 700, 800 and 900. Glass 900 is identical to glass 100 of FIGS. 1 through 3 above, and identical parts are identically numbered. The other glasses are also identical except for markings on the stem 5. On glass 600, there is a single color indicia 7; on glass 700, two such indicia 7 and 12; on glass 800, three indicia 7, 12 and 14; and on glass 900, indicia 7, 12, 14 and 16. These are unique identifiers and help drinking individuals distinguish their glasses from others. Thus, when you put a glass down at a party and return, you can be assured that you will not pick up someone else's glass and germs!
  • [0052]
    FIG. 10 illustrates the present invention glass 100 in FIGS. 1 through 3 wherein wine from a bottle is conveniently being poured into it. Thus, all of the components of glass 100 are numbered as above, and bottle 120 with neck 122 contains wine 124. As can be seen, neck 122 conveniently positions or rests in cut-out 15, making pouring wine 124 from bottle 120 much easier than it would otherwise be. The cut-out 15 provides numerous advantages: first, it aligns neck 122 for easy pouring; second, the resting prevents roll-off of the bottle 120 during pouring; third, the lower portion of neck 122 decreases spillage from splashing.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 11 shows the present invention beverage glass 100 in use for experiencing the bouquet of a wine. The wine drinker 250 uses the olfactory sense to identify wine qualities. The nose 252 of a seasoned wine drinker 250 will discern cork smell, mold, sweetness, fruitiness, etc. and the expert will discern and even identify specific flavors, e.g. hint of pear, etc. The present invention cut-out 15 brings nose 252 close to the wine surface while maintaining high walls to keep in the vapors, without the need to tilt the glass.
  • [0054]
    FIG. 12 shows a present invention beverage glass 100 in use for consumption of wine. Here, drinker 250 has reversed the position of glass 100 from the FIG. 11 position so that cut-out 15 is away from drinker 250. The cut-out 15 enables high bottoms up tilting without the need for putting the head back, due to the facial profile nose-receiving depression of cut-out 15.
  • [0055]
    Obviously, numerous modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described herein.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7610872 *Apr 7, 2005Nov 3, 2009Roman CoppolaTasting glasses having revealable indicators there on and method of conducting blind taste test
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US8469225 *Sep 29, 2011Jun 25, 2013Silipint, Inc.Semi-rigid beverage receptacle
US9204744 *May 23, 2013Dec 8, 2015Margarita D. VacantiDrinkware
US9801484 *Jul 28, 2015Oct 31, 2017Keeley DoddStemware stabilizer
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Classifications
U.S. Classification220/703
International ClassificationA47G19/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47G19/2205, A47G19/2227, A47G2400/045
European ClassificationA47G19/22B, A47G19/22B6
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 16, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: PLEO ORIGINALS, LLC., PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:RIGAS, PETER E.;REEL/FRAME:017007/0343
Effective date: 20050915