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Publication numberUS20070068101 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/582,071
Publication dateMar 29, 2007
Filing dateOct 17, 2006
Priority dateDec 9, 2004
Also published asCA2588826A1, CN101072919A, US20060123723, US20070068104, WO2006062793A2, WO2006062793A3
Publication number11582071, 582071, US 2007/0068101 A1, US 2007/068101 A1, US 20070068101 A1, US 20070068101A1, US 2007068101 A1, US 2007068101A1, US-A1-20070068101, US-A1-2007068101, US2007/0068101A1, US2007/068101A1, US20070068101 A1, US20070068101A1, US2007068101 A1, US2007068101A1
InventorsCharles Weir, Matthew Brokaw
Original AssigneeWeir Charles R, Brokaw Matthew C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Panel system for reaction-to-fire test applications
US 20070068101 A1
Abstract
An insulation finishing system includes a plurality of lineals fixed to a building structure. The lineal partitions define primary insulation cavities. A plurality of primary insulation panels are positioned within the primary insulation cavities. A plurality of lineal adapters are connected to the lineals. The lineal adapters define secondary insulation cavities. A plurality of finish insulation panels are positioned within the secondary insulation cavities. The primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels define a gap between each other. A vapor retarder is disposed in the gap. The vapor retarder is configured to substantially reflect thermal energy or heat away from the gap. A plurality of trim pieces are connected to the lineal adapters. The trim pieces fix the finish insulation panels in the secondary insulation cavities
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Claims(19)
1. An insulation finishing system comprising:
a plurality of lineals fixed to a building structure, wherein the lineals define primary insulation cavities;
a plurality of primary insulation panels positioned within the primary insulation cavities;
a plurality of lineal adapters connected to the lineals, wherein the lineal adapters define secondary insulation cavities covering the primary insulation panels;
a plurality of finish insulation panels positioned within the secondary insulation cavities, the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels defining a gap between each other;
a vapor retarder disposed in the gap, the vapor retarder configured to substantially reflect thermal energy or heat away from the gap; and
a plurality of trim pieces connected to the lineal adapters, the trim pieces fixing the finish insulation panels in the secondary insulation cavities.
2. The insulation finishing system of claim 1, wherein the vapor retarder is a metallic-based film.
3. The insulation finishing system of claim 2, wherein the metallic-based film has a plurality of perforations.
4. The insulation finishing system of claim 2, where the vapor retarder substantially retards the propagation of flames within the gap when the system is subjected to the National Fire Protection Association Standard 286 or the International Organization for Standardization Reaction-to-Fire Test 9705.
5. The insulation finishing system of claim 1, wherein the vapor retarder is fixed to the lineals by the lineal adapters.
6. The insulation finishing system of claim 1, wherein the vapor retarder is a thermal retarding panel.
7. An insulation finishing system comprising:
a plurality of lineals fixed to a building structure, wherein the lineal partitions define primary insulation cavities;
a plurality of primary insulation panels positioned within the primary insulation cavities;
a plurality of lineal adapters connected to the lineals, wherein the adapter partitions define secondary insulation cavities;
a plurality of finish insulation panels positioned within the secondary insulation cavities, the finish insulation panels having a rear surface, the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels defining a gap between each other;
a fire retarder disposed on the rear surface of the finish insulation panels, the fire retarder configured to substantially reflect thermal energy or heat away from the gap; and
a plurality of trim pieces connected to the lineal adapters, the trim pieces fixing the finish insulation panels in the secondary insulation cavities
8. The insulation finishing system of claim 7, wherein the coating is an intumescent coating.
9. The insulation finishing system of claim 8, wherein the coating is applied by spraying.
10. The insulation finishing system of claim 7, where the fire retarder substantially retards the propagation of flames when the system is subjected to the National Fire Protection Association Standard 286 or the International Organization for Standardization Reaction-to-Fire Test 9705.
11. A method of finishing a building structure which includes the steps of:
attaching a lineal to the building structure to create an initial primary insulation cavity;
positioning a primary insulation panel against the lineal partition;
positioning a subsequent lineal against the positioned primary insulation panel;
attaching the subsequent lineal to the building structure;
attaching a vapor retarder to the primary insulation panel, the vapor retarder configured to substantially reflect thermal energy or heat;
attaching a lineal adapter to a lineal to create an initial secondary insulation cavity;
positioning a finish insulation panel against the adapter partition, the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels defining a gap between each other;
positioning a subsequent lineal adapter against the positioned finish insulation panel;
attaching the subsequent lineal adapter to the lineal; and
connecting trim pieces to the lineal adapters, thereby fixing the finish insulation panels within the secondary insulation cavities;
wherein the vapor retarder is configured to substantially retard the propagation of thermal energy or heat away from the gap.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein the vapor retarder is a metallic-based film.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the metallic-based film has a plurality of perforations.
14. The method of claim 11, wherein the vapor retarder substantially retards the propagation of flames within the gap when subjected to the National Fire Protection Association Standard 286 or the International Organization for Standardization Reaction-to-Fire Test 9705.
15. The method of claim 11, wherein the method includes the step of fixing the vapor retarder to the lineals with the lineal adapters.
16. A method of finishing a building structure which includes the steps of:
attaching a lineal to the building structure to create an initial primary insulation cavity;
positioning a primary insulation panel against the lineal partition;
positioning a subsequent lineal against the positioned primary insulation panel;
attaching the subsequent lineal to the building structure;
attaching a lineal adapter to a lineal to create an initial secondary insulation cavity;
providing a finish insulation panel, the finish insulation panel having a rear surface;
coating the rear surface of the finish insulation panel with a fire retarder;
positioning the finish insulation panel against the lineal adapter, the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels defining a gap between each other;
positioning a subsequent lineal adapter against the positioned finish insulation panel;
attaching the subsequent lineal adapter to the lineal; and
connecting trim pieces to the lineal adapters, thereby fixing the finish insulation panels within the secondary insulation cavities;
wherein the fire retarder is configured to substantially retard the propagation of thermal energy or heat away from the gap between the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels.
17. The method of claim 16, wherein the coating is an intumescent coating.
18. The method of claim 16, wherein a vapor retarder is disposed in a gap between the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein the vapor retarder has a thickness of 6 mils.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of co-pending application, U.S. Ser. No. 11/008,060 filed Dec. 09, 2004 which is incorporated by reference in its entirety. This application is also related to commonly assigned U.S. patent application entitled “Panel Mounting System For High Temperature Applications”, filed on the same date filed on the same date, which is incorporated herein by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates generally to an insulated panel mounting system for building structures and, more particularly, to an insulated panel mounting system which substantially retards flame propagation between layers of insulated panels.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Homeowners often desire to finish rooms, such as basements or above-ground rooms, in a manner which provides a comfortable and aesthetically pleasing atmosphere.

Most basements are constructed of common methods including cinder block walls or poured concrete walls. Left unfinished, cinder block or poured concrete basement walls can allow humidity into the basement, and also allow the loss of heat through the basement walls. Traditionally, basement walls have been finished by known methods including attachment of wood studs to the basement walls and subsequent attachment of a wall surface, such as drywall or paneling, to the wood studs. Insulation such as glass fiber insulation batts have been placed between the wall and the wall surface before attachment of the wall surface to the wood studs, or a granular or loose-fill fibrous insulation is poured or blown into the spaces between the wall and the wall surface after the wall surface is attached to the wood studs.

A known method of finishing a room involves the use of layered insulative panels releaseably connected to installed frame members as developed by the assignee herein, Owens Corning, and as described in the Weir et al. U.S. Pub. No. 2004/0219853 A1 for a “Room Finishing System”, and the Hettler et al. US Pub. No. 2005/0150183 A1 for an “Insulation System with Variable Position Vapor Barrier” which are expressly incorporated herein by reference.

It would be advantageous if the layered insulative panels substantially retarded the propagation of flames between the layers of the insulated panels when the insulation finishing system is exposed to a high temperature reaction-to-fire test.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The above objects as well as others not specifically enumerated are achieved by an insulation finishing system. The system includes a plurality of lineals fixed to a building structure. The lineal partitions define primary insulation cavities. A plurality of primary insulation panels are positioned within the primary insulation cavities. A plurality of lineal adapters are connected to the lineals. The lineal adapters define secondary insulation cavities. A plurality of finish insulation panels are positioned within the secondary insulation cavities. The primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels define a gap between each other. A vapor retarder is disposed in the gap. The vapor retarder is configured to substantially reflect thermal energy or heat away from the gap. A plurality of trim pieces are connected to the lineal adapters. The trim pieces fix the finish insulation panels in the secondary insulation cavities.

According to this invention there is also provided an insulation finishing system. The system includes a plurality of lineals fixed to a building structure. The lineal partitions define primary insulation cavities. A plurality of primary insulation panels are positioned within the primary insulation cavities. A plurality of lineal adapters are connected to the lineals. The lineal adapters define secondary insulation cavities. A plurality of finish insulation panels are positioned within the secondary insulation cavities. The primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels define a gap between each other. A fire retarder is disposed on the rear surface of the finish insulation panel. The fire retarder is configured to substantially reflect thermal energy or heat away from the gap. A plurality of trim pieces are connected to the lineal adapters. The trim pieces fix the finish insulation panels in the secondary insulation cavities.

According to this method there is also provided a method of finishing a building structure. The method includes attaching a lineal to the building structure to create an initial primary insulation cavity, positioning a primary insulation panel against the lineal, positioning a subsequent lineal against the positioned primary insulation panel, attaching the subsequent lineal to the building structure, attaching a vapor retarder to the primary insulation panel, the vapor retarder configured to substantially reflect thermal energy or heat from the gap, attaching a lineal adapter to a lineal to create an initial secondary insulation cavity, positioning a finish insulation panel against the lineal adapter, the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels defining a gap between each other, positioning a subsequent lineal adapter against the positioned finish insulation panel, attaching the subsequent lineal adapter to the lineal, and connecting trim pieces to the lineal adapters, thereby fixing the finish insulation panels within the secondary insulation cavities.

According to this method there is also provided a method of finishing a building structure. The method includes attaching a lineal to the building structure to create an initial primary insulation cavity, positioning a primary insulation panel against the lineal, positioning a subsequent lineal against the positioned primary insulation panel, attaching the subsequent lineal to the building structure, attaching a lineal adapter to a lineal to create an initial secondary insulation cavity, providing a finish insulation panel, the finish insulation panel having a rear surface, coating the rear surface of the finish insulation panel with a fire retarder, positioning the finish insulation panel against the lineal adapter, the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels defining a gap between each other, positioning a subsequent lineal adapter against the positioned finish insulation panel, attaching the subsequent lineal adapter to the lineal, and connecting trim pieces to the lineal adapters, thereby fixing the finish insulation panels within the secondary insulation cavities, wherein the fire retarder is configured to substantially retard the propagation of thermal energy or heat away from the gap between the primary insulation panels and the finish insulation panels.

Various objects and advantages will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of the various embodiments, when read in light of the accompanying drawings. It is to be expressly understood, however, that the drawings are for illustrative purposes and are not to be construed as defining the limits of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view, partially broken away, of a layered insulation finishing system.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of a lineal, adapter and trim piece for the layered insulation finishing system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the layered insulation finishing system of FIG. 1 taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a second embodiment of the layered insulation finishing system taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION AND PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The description and drawings disclose a layered insulation finishing system 10 for finishing a room. With reference to FIG. 1, the layered insulation finishing system 10 is shown installed on a building structure 12. For ease of explanation herein the building structure 12 will be generally referred to as a wall 12; however, it is to be understood that it is within the contemplated scope of the present invention that the building structure can include ceilings and other building structures. The wall 12 may be any type that one might desire to finish, either in a residential or a commercial building. The room may include more than one wall and may also include a floor (not shown) and a ceiling (not shown). The wall 12 may have windows and doors therein, (not shown).

The layered insulation finishing system 10 includes a plurality of lineals 20 which create primary insulation cavities 16, as shown in FIG. 3, when installed on the wall 12. As shown in FIG. 1, the lineals 20 are a plastic material, but the lineals 20 can be made of metal or any other material suitable to be installed on a wall 12 and create primary insulation cavities 16. In an alternative embodiment, the lineals 20 are not present, and the panels 70 are installed directly to the wall using adhesives or mechanical fasteners, or in a further alternative embodiment, the panels 70 are secured using lineals 20 to attach the panels 70 at the top and bottom only, with out the vertical lineals shown in FIG. 1. While not illustrated, one skilled in the art appreciates that in such instances, the panel 70 may be manufactured without a seam, or the seams may be finished and butted together, or an additional trim piece may be added to finish the seams.

The lineals 20 attach to the wall 12 in a suitable manner. In certain embodiments, the lineal 20 is attached to the wall 12 with suitable fasteners 14; however, in other embodiments, the lineal 20 can be affixed to the wall 12 with a suitable adhesive material or any other mechanism which provides attachment to the wall 12.

The layered insulation finishing system 10 further includes primary insulation panels 50. The primary insulation panel 50 may be made of any type of insulation known to those of skill in the art, such as, but not limited to, fiberglass insulation, fiberglass board, rock wool board, mineral board, or foam board. Typical densities of the fibrous insulation panels 50 will be in the range from about 2 to 15 pounds per cubic foot (pcf), although other densities can be used.

In certain embodiments, if a fibrous insulation board is used, a board that can be used is a 700 Series glass fiber insulation board available from Owens Corning. In particular, a 703 Series board having a density of at least about 3 lb/ft3 can be used. Such glass fiber insulation boards are composed of glass fibers having a binder thereon which has been cured to bind the fibers into a matrix. For densities above about 2.25 lb/ft3, boards of such bindered glass fibers are relatively rigid, meaning that they generally support their own weight when stood on their end and do not sag by any significant amount when left in such a position for a long period of time.

As best shown in FIG. 2, the lineal 20 has a lineal base plate 22 which has opposing lineal retaining flanges 22 a and 22 b. The lineal 20 also has opposing lineal partitions 24 and 25 which extend from the lineal base plate 22. In certain embodiments, the use of lineal partitions 24, 25 additionally helps to reduce the overall cross sectional area of the direct paths of thermal conduction between the wall 12 and the interior of the room, and thus to improve the overall R value of the finished system.

In certain embodiments, one or more of the lineal partitions 24, 25 can include one or more inwardly extending detents 28 a, 28 b. The lineal base plate 22 can include at least one break-away notch 29 that extends along the intersection of the lineal base retaining flange 22 a and the lineal partition 24. The break-away notch 29 allows the installer to easily remove the lineal base retaining flange 22 a so that the lineal 20 can be installed in a corner or other area such as against a window or door (not shown).

As shown in FIGS. 1-3, the layered insulation finishing system 10 includes lineal adaptors 30 that create secondary insulation cavities 18, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, when connected to the lineals 20. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the lineal adaptors 30 are a plastic material, but the lineal adaptors 30 can be made of metal or any other material suitable to be connected to the lineals 20 and create secondary insulation cavities 18.

As shown in FIG. 2, the lineal adaptor 30 has opposing adaptor partitions 34 and 35 which extend from a top side of the adaptor base plate 32. The opposing adaptor partitions 34 and 35 define an adapter receiving channel 36 for engaging a trim piece 40, as will be explained below. In certain embodiments, the adaptor partitions 34, 35 allow a releasable engaging connection to be formed between the lineal adaptor 30 and the trim piece 40.

FIG. 2 also shows the lineal adaptor 30 including the adaptor base plate 32 with opposing adaptor retaining flanges 32 a and 32 b. The lineal adaptor 30 also has a connector member 33 which extends from a bottom side of the adaptor base plate 32. The connector member 33 can have any desired shape so that the connector member 33 can fit within a lineal receiving channel 26. In the embodiment shown, the connector member 33 has generally convex walls 33 a and 33 b.

Referring again to FIG. 3, each lineal adaptor flange 32 a and 32 b extends outwardly such that, when the insulation finishing system 10 is assembled, the primary insulation panel 50 is located within the primary insulation cavity 16. Thus, the base plate 32, and its flanges 32 a, 32 b, on the lineal adaptor 30, holds (or retains) the primary insulation panel 50 within the primary insulation cavity 16.

In certain embodiments, one or more of the adaptor partitions 34, 35 can include one or more inwardly extending detents 38 a, 38 b for securing the trim piece 40 to the lineal adaptor 30. The adaptor base plate 32 can include at least one break-away notch 39 that extends along the intersection of the adaptor base retaining flange 32 a and the adapter partition 34. The break-away notch 39 allows the installer to easily remove the adaptor retaining flange 32 a so that the lineal adaptor 30 can be installed in a corner or other area such as against a window or door (not shown).

When the lineal adaptor 30 is connected to the lineal 20, the adaptor connector 33 is positioned within the lineal receiving channel 26 of the lineal 20. In certain embodiments, the adaptor connector 33 snaps into the lineal partitions 24, 25 such that the adaptor connector 33 releasably retains the lineal adaptor 30 in engagement with the lineal 20. For example, the lineal adaptor 30 can be snapped into the lineal 20 such that, if necessary, the lineal adaptor 30 can be removed without damage to the lineal 20 or the lineal adaptor 30 itself. It is to be understood, that in another embodiment, the releasable connection between the lineal 20 and the lineal adaptor 30 can be achieved by a fast-release or other type of connector. Additionally, the lineal partitions 34 and 35 allow a releasable connection to be formed between the lineal adaptor 30 and the trim piece 40.

The layered insulation finishing system 10 further includes a plurality of finish insulation panels 70 having a decorative facing 74 attached to an outer surface of the finish insulation panels 70. When installed, the finish insulation panel 70 is located in the secondary insulation cavity 18.

The finish insulation panels 70 may be made of any type insulation known to those of skill in the art, such as, but not limited to, fiberglass insulation, fiberglass board, rock wool board, mineral board or foam board. Typical densities of the finish insulation panels 70 will be in the range of from about 2 to about 15 pounds per cubic foot (pcf), although other densities can be used.

The decorative facing 74 can be any type of decorative covering, such as fabric or vinyl, suitable to provide an aesthetically pleasing and durable cover for the finish insulation panels 70.

The layered insulation finishing system 10 includes a vapor retarder 60 as shown in FIG. 3. In this embodiment, as will be discussed in more detail below, the vapor retarder 60 is configured to control vapor permeance and substantially retard the potential propagation of flames in a gap 84 between the primary insulation panels 50 and the finish insulation panels 70.

The layered insulation finishing system 10 also includes a plurality of trim pieces 40 which connect to the lineal adapters 30 and retain the finish insulation panels 70 within the secondary insulation cavity 18. As shown in FIGS. 1-3, the trim pieces 40 are a plastic material, but the trim pieces 40 can be made of metal or any other material suitable to connect to the lineal adapters 30 and retain the finish insulation panels 70 within the secondary insulation cavities 18.

As shown in FIG. 2, the trim piece 40 has a trim base plate 42 with opposing trim retaining flanges 42 a and 42 b. The trim piece 40 can have an outer surface 44 preferably treated in a manner well-known in the art such that the outer surface 44 presents a decorative finish, such as simulated wood grain finish.

The trim piece 40 also has a trim connector 43 which extends from a bottom of the trim base plate 42. The trim connector 43 can have any desired shape so that the trim connector member 43 can fit within the adapter receiving channel 36 of the lineal adapter 30. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the trim connector 43 has generally convex walls 43 a and 43 b.

In general, the trim retaining flanges 42 a and 42 b maintain the finish insulation panel 70 in the secondary insulation cavity 18 and provide a decorative interface between adjacent finish insulation panels 70. In certain embodiments, as shown in FIG. 1, a trim piece 40 can be oriented in a vertical direction and used as a vertical divider member 40′, which is inserted between adjacent finish insulation panels 70.

During the installation process, the layered insulation finishing system 10 may be installed in a step-wise fashion until the wall 12 is covered. An initial lineal 20 is fixed to a wall 12, thereby forming an initial primary insulation cavity 16. An initial primary insulation panel 50 is positioned in the initial primary insulation cavity 16, such that an end portion of the initial primary insulation panel 50 is pressed against the lineal partition 24 using hand applied pressure. Following installation of the primary insulation panel 50, a subsequent lineal 20 is pressed against the installed primary insulation panel 50, again using only hand pressure, and the subsequent lineal 20 is fastened to the wall 12 using appropriate fasteners 14. This procedure is followed until the wall 12 is covered by the primary insulation panels 50. In certain installations, a temporary clip, such as a scrap part of a lineal 20 and/or trim piece 40, can be used to hold the primary insulation panel 50 within the primary insulation cavity 16 during the sequential installation of subsequent insulation panels 50.

As previously discussed, the layered insulation finishing system 10 preferably includes a vapor retarder 60 as shown in FIG. 3. In this embodiment, the vapor retarder 60 is configured to control vapor permeance and substantially retard the potential propagation of flames in the gap 84 between the primary insulation panels 50 and the finish insulation panels 70. The vapor retarder 60 is a key element in allowing the insulation finishing system 10 to substantially retard the propagation of flames between the installed primary insulation panels 50 and the finish insulation panels 70, such as in reaction-to-fire testing. Reaction-to-fire testing, such as the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 286 or the International Organization of Standards Reaction-to-Fire Test 9705, evaluates the contribution of interior finish materials to room fire growth during specified fire exposure conditions. NFPA-286 determines the extent to which the interior finish materials may contribute to fire growth in a room and the potential for fire spread beyond the room under the particular conditions simulated. The test indicates the maximum extent of fire growth in a room, the rate of heat release, and if they occur, the time to flashover and the time to flame extension beyond the doorway following flashover. The potential for spread of fire to other objects in the room, remote from the ignition source, is evaluated by measurements of 1) the total heat flux incident on the center of the floor, 2) a characteristic upper-level gas temperature in the room, and 3) instantaneous net peak rate of heat release. The test is conducted using an ignition source positioned 12 inches above the floor (to simulate a burning waste basket. The ignition source is a gas burner. During the test, the ignition source produces a 40±1 kW heat output for five minutes followed by a 160±5 kW heat output for ten minutes. During the test, temperatures, heat release and heat flux are measured and recorded every six seconds. The acceptable limits for the NFPA-286 test include: a) eight foot flame spread to the ceiling during the 40 kW period, b) eight foot flame spread to the back wall and twelve foot flame spread to the left and right hand walls during the 160 kW period, c) flashover ratings including a heat flux of less than 20 kW/sq m, upper layer temperature of less than 1100 deg F. for an ignition paper target, and an HRR of less than 1 MW for exit doorway flames, and d) total smoke release of less than 1000 sq m.

Most removable panel systems include the use of layered insulative panels, which can have a propensity for flame propagation in the gap 84 between the layers of the insulative panels when the panels are exposed to high intensity flame sources, such as the flame sources used in the NFPA-286 reaction-to-fire testing. The thermal energy from the flame sources in the close vicinity of layered insulation panels is trapped and confined in the gap between the layered insulative panels. The temperature within the gap continues to rise due to the insulative nature of the insulative panels. The temperature within the gap can reach high enough levels to cause components of the insulative panels, such as polymers and fibrous glass binders, to ignite and propagate the spread of flames within the gap area.

In this embodiment, the vapor retarder 60 is a metallic-based reflective insulation and vapor barrier film. Metallic-based reflective insulation and vapor barrier films typically include a metallic core, such as aluminum core having a thickness of about 0.001″, sandwiched between layers of a polyester coating. Typically each layer of the polyester coating is about 0.0005″ thick. One example of a metallic-based reflective insulation and vapor barrier film is the Alumiseal Zero Penn Vapor Barrier from the Alumiseal Corporation in Hanover, Mass. However, other metallic-based reflective insulation and vapor barrier films can be used. In one embodiment, the vapor retarder 60 can be a film configured to allow no permeance. In another embodiment, the vapor barrier 60 can include a plurality of perforations. The perforations are configured to allow a desired level of permeance through the vapor barrier 60. In yet another embodiment, the gap 84 between the primary insulation panels 50 and the finish insulation panels 70 can be filled with another thermal retarding or vapor barrier material, such as another thermal retarding and vapor barrier panel or thermal retarding loosefil material, or any other material sufficient to control vapor permeance and substantially retard the potential propagation of flames in the gap 84 between the primary insulation panels 50 and the finish insulation panels 70.

The vapor retarder 60 is effective in substantially retarding the propagation of flames in the gap 84 between the installed primary insulation panels 50 and the finish insulation panels 70, such as in reaction-to-fire testing, because the vapor retarder 60 substantially reflects the thermal energy and/or heat away from the gap 84 between the insulative layers. The reflected thermal energy and/or heat are substantially dissipated back toward the energy source such that a large portion of the energy is not retained in the gap between the insulative panels.

During the installation process, the vapor retarder 60 is draped over the primary insulation panels 50 and the lineals 20. The vapor retarder 60 is temporarily fastened to any building surface or the primary insulation panels 50 using any suitable manner, such as for example stapling. Alternatively, the vapor retarder 60 can be held in place by temporary clips or scraps while the rest of the vapor retarder 60 is installed.

The lineal adaptors 30 are then connected to the lineals 20 such that the adaptor connector 33 inserts a first portion 62 of the vapor retarder 60 into the receiving channel 26 of the lineal 20, as best seen in FIG. 3. A second portion 64 of the vapor retarder 60 is positioned close to, or in certain embodiments, against, the primary insulation panel 50.

In a similar manner as discussed earlier with respect to the primary insulation panels 50, the finish insulation panels 70 are installed in a step-wise fashion until the primary insulation panels 50 are covered. An initial lineal adaptor 30 is connected to a lineal 20, thereby forming an initial secondary insulation cavity 18. An initial finish insulation panel 70 is positioned in the initial secondary insulation cavity 18, such that an end portion of the initial finish insulation panel 70 is pressed against the adaptor partition 34 using hand applied pressure. Following installation of the initial finish insulation panel 70, a subsequent lineal adaptor 30 is pressed against the installed finish insulation panel 70, again using only hand pressure, and the adaptor connector 33 is connected to an installed lineal 20. This procedure is followed until the primary insulation panels 50 are covered by the finish insulation panels 70. In certain installations, a temporary clip, such as a scrap of a lineal 20 and/or trim piece 40, can be used to hold the finish insulation panels 70 within the secondary insulation cavities 18 during the sequential installation of the subsequent finish insulation panels 70.

As shown in FIG. 3, the trim retaining flanges 42 a and 42 b extend outwardly such that, when the layered insulation finishing system 10 is assembled, the finish insulation panels 70 are located within the secondary insulation cavity 18. Thus, the base plate 42, with its flanges 42 a, 42 b, on the trim piece 40, holds (or retains) the finish insulation panel 70 within the secondary insulation cavity 18.

In this embodiment as shown in FIG. 3, the vapor retarder 60 is shown on a multi-layered insulative panel system. In is to be understood, that the vapor retarder 60 can be used on a single insulative panel system, such as for example, an insulative panel system used on typical stud wall construction.

In another embodiment of the layered insulation finishing system 110 as shown in FIG. 4, a coating 180 is applied to a rear surface 182 of the finish insulation panel 170. The coating 180 is configured to substantially retard potential flame propagation in a gap 184 between the primary insulation panel 150 and the finish insulation panel 170. In this embodiment, the coating 180 is an intumescent coating applied directly to the rear surface 182 of the finish insulation panel 170. When exposed to a high thermal energy source, such as for example, heat from a reaction-to-fire test, the intumescent coating 180 swells and forms a thick layer of foam. The thick layer of foam substantially retards the propagation of flames within the gap between the primary insulative panels 150 and the finish insulation panels 170 by shielding the gap 184 from the heat of the energy source. One example of an intumescent coating 180 is the No-Burn® Wood Gard Mih from No-Burn®, Inc. in Wadsworth, Ohio. However, other intumescent coatings can be used.

In this embodiment, the coating 180 is applied to the rear surface 182 of the finish insulation panel 170 by spraying. It is to be understood that the coating 180 can be applied by any manner, such as brushing, sufficient to cover the rear surface 182 of the finish insulation panel 170.

In another embodiment, a non-intumescent flame propagation retarding coating can be used.

In an alternative embodiment, the coating 180 and/or retarder 60 is replaced with a flame resistant fabric or film, such as the metallic film described above, or a glass mat or veil, or other flame resistant material, such as those disclosed in the commonly assigned copending U.S. application Ser. No. 11/187,741, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Such a mat or veil may be manufactured to provide a desired vapor resistance, or may be coated to provide such vapor and/or flame resistant properties.

It is to be understood, in another embodiment, that a vapor retarder (not shown), can be disposed in the gap 184 and can be used simultaneously with the coating 180. The vapor retarder is configured to control vapor permeance. In this embodiment, the vapor retarder can be any suitable film or sheet, such as a poly film of 6 mils or more, sufficient to control vapor permeance.

In this embodiment as shown in FIG. 4, the coating 180 is used on a multi-layered insulative panel system. In is to be understood, that the coating 180 can be used on a single insulative panel system, such as for example, an insulative panel system used on typical stud wall construction.

The principle and mode of operation of this invention have been described in its preferred embodiments. However, it should be noted that this invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically illustrated and described without departing from its scope.

Referenced by
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US7598460 *Oct 28, 2005Oct 6, 2009Roberts Iv Leonard PascalRadiation shielding wood or laminate faced door having a high fire rating and method for making same
US7681365 *Apr 4, 2008Mar 23, 2010James Alan KleinHead-of-wall fireblock systems and related wall assemblies
US7752817Feb 29, 2008Jul 13, 2010California Expanded Metal Products CompanyTwo-piece track system
US7950198Nov 17, 2009May 31, 2011California Expanded Metal Products CompanyFire-rated wall construction product
US8087205Aug 21, 2008Jan 3, 2012California Expanded Metal Products CompanyFire-rated wall construction product
US8136314Oct 18, 2010Mar 20, 2012James A KleinHead-of-wall fireblocks
US8151526 *Mar 18, 2010Apr 10, 2012Klein James AHead-of-wall fireblock systems and related wall assemblies
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/302.1
International ClassificationE04B1/70
Cooperative ClassificationB32B7/02, B32B2307/304, B32B2307/724, B32B2262/0253, B32B2250/20, E04B1/765, B32B5/26, B32B5/245, E04B1/942, B32B2307/3065, B32B2260/021, E04B1/70, B32B2264/102, B32B2307/102, B32B2262/10, E04B1/762, B32B2262/101, B32B2307/7246, B32B2607/00, B32B19/06, B32B2264/104, E04B1/7023, E04B1/80, B32B2264/108, E04H4/0075
European ClassificationB32B5/26, E04B1/76D9, B32B5/24A, B32B19/06, E04B1/80, E04H4/00D, B32B7/02, E04B1/76D, E04B1/70D, E04B1/94B1, E04B1/70
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 30, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS TECHNOLOGY, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:WEIR, CHARLES R.;BROKAW, MATTHEW C.;REEL/FRAME:019097/0855
Effective date: 20061211