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Publication numberUS20070107356 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/263,743
Publication dateMay 17, 2007
Filing dateNov 1, 2005
Priority dateNov 1, 2005
Publication number11263743, 263743, US 2007/0107356 A1, US 2007/107356 A1, US 20070107356 A1, US 20070107356A1, US 2007107356 A1, US 2007107356A1, US-A1-20070107356, US-A1-2007107356, US2007/0107356A1, US2007/107356A1, US20070107356 A1, US20070107356A1, US2007107356 A1, US2007107356A1
InventorsStephen Steffes, Robert Shaw, Andrew Brandt
Original AssigneeCertainteed Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Staggered look shake siding panel with improved locking mechanism
US 20070107356 A1
Abstract
A simulated shake siding panel having the random appearance of individual shakes is provided. The siding panel comprises a siding panel board, the siding panel board comprising front and rear faces, the front face including at least a bottommost course of a plurality of simulated side-by-side shakes forming an uneven butt line. A nailing strip is disposed proximate to a top edge of the siding panel board. A downwardly open hook is provided on the front face proximate to a top edge of the siding panel for interfitting with an upwardly open hook of a second like siding panel, the siding panel and second siding panel interfitted top to bottom. An upwardly open hook is disposed on the rear face of the siding panel, a top edge of the upwardly open hook being uniformly spaced from the top edge of the siding panel and non-uniformly spaced from the uneven butt line.
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Claims(21)
1. A simulated shake siding panel having the random appearance of individual shakes comprising:
a siding panel board, said siding panel board comprising front and rear faces, said front face including at least a bottommost course of a plurality of simulated side-by-side shakes forming an uneven butt line;
a downwardly open hook disposed on said front face adjacent to a top edge of said siding panel for interfitting with an upwardly open hook of a second like siding panel, said siding panel and second siding panel interfitted top to bottom; and
an upwardly open hook disposed on said rear face of said siding panel, a top edge of said upwardly open hook being uniformly spaced from the top edge of said siding panel and non-uniformly spaced from said uneven butt line.
2. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 1, wherein said siding panel comprises polypropylene or blend thereof.
3. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 1, wherein points along said uneven butt line corresponding to two different shakes from said bottommost course differ at least 0.25 inch in distance from said upwardly open hook top edge.
4. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 1, wherein points along said uneven butt line corresponding to two different shakes from said bottommost course differ between about 0.25 to 1.0 inch in distance from said upwardly open hook top edge.
5. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 1, wherein at least some of said plurality of shakes from said bottommost course have different widths.
6. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 1, wherein said shakes are simulated cedar shakes.
7. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 1, further comprising a nailing strip disposed proximate to a top edge of said siding panel board, said nailing strip comprising preformed nailing apertures.
8. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 1, wherein the upwardly open hook and the downwardly open hook engage with a frictional interference fit.
9. A simulated shake siding panel having the random appearance of individual shakes comprising:
a siding panel board, said siding panel board comprising front and rear faces, said front face including at least two course of simulated shakes disposed in top and bottom overlapping and underlapping relation, each course comprising a plurality of simulated side-by-side shakes, at least a bottommost course of said at least two courses forming an uneven butt line;
a nailing strip disposed proximate to a top edge of said siding panel board;
a downwardly open hook disposed on said front face adjacent to a top edge of said siding panel for interfitting with an upwardly open hook of a second like siding panel, said siding panel and second siding panel interfitted top to bottom; and
an upwardly open hook disposed on said rear face of said siding panel, a top edge of said upwardly open hook being uniformly spaced from the top edge of said siding panel and non-uniformly spaced from said uneven butt line.
10. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 9, wherein said siding panel comprises polypropylene or blend thereof.
11. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 9, wherein points along said uneven butt line corresponding to two different shakes from said bottommost course differ at least 0.25 inch in distance from said upwardly open hook top edge.
12. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 9, wherein points along said uneven butt line corresponding to two different shakes from said bottommost course differ between about 0.25 to 1.0 inch in distance from said upwardly open hook top edge.
13. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 9, wherein at least some of said shakes from each of said first and second courses have different widths.
14. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 9, wherein said shakes are simulated cedar shakes.
15. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 9, wherein said nailing strip comprises preformed nailing apertures.
16. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 9, wherein a topmost course of said first and second courses forms an uneven butt line.
17. An injection molded simulated shake siding panel having the random appearance of individual shakes comprising:
a siding panel board, said siding panel board comprising front and rear faces, said front face including at least two courses of simulated cedar shakes disposed in top and bottom overlapping and underlapping relation, each course comprising a plurality of simulated side-by-side shakes, each course having an uneven butt line and non-uniformly shaped shakes;
a nailing strip disposed proximate to a top edge of said siding panel board and comprising preformed nailing apertures;
a downwardly open hook disposed on said front face adjacent to a top edge of said siding panel for interfitting with an upwardly open hook of a second like siding panel, said siding panel and second siding panel interfitted top to bottom; and
an upwardly open hook disposed on said rear face of said siding panel, a top edge of said upwardly open hook being uniformly spaced from the top edge of said siding panel and non-uniformly spaced from the uneven butt line of a bottommost course of said first and second courses,
wherein the upwardly open hook and the downwardly open hook engage with a frictional interference fit.
18. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 17, wherein said siding panel comprises polypropylene or blend thereof.
19. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 17, wherein points along said bottommost course butt line corresponding to two different shakes from said bottommost course differ at least 0.25 inch in distance from said upwardly open hook top edge.
20. The simulated shake siding panel of claim 17, wherein at least one of said upwardly and downwardly open hooks comprises a flange spaced from a plane of the panel body, and wherein the flange is at least partially flared in a direction away from the plane of the panel body, thereby providing a lead-in for engagement of said hooks.
21. A method of installing a siding panel assembly, comprising the steps of:
providing first and second simulated shake siding panels having the random appearance of individual shakes, each panel comprising:
a siding panel board, said siding panel board comprising front and rear faces, said front face including at least a bottommost course of a plurality of simulated side-by-side shakes forming an uneven butt line;
a downwardly open hook disposed on said front face adjacent to a top edge of said siding panel for interfitting with an upwardly open hook of a second like siding panel, said siding panel and second siding panel interfitted top to bottom; and
an upwardly open hook disposed on said rear face of said siding panel, a top edge of said upwardly open hook being uniformly spaced from the top edge of said siding panel and non-uniformly spaced from said uneven butt line;
attaching said first siding panel to a vertical wall of a structure; and
engaging the upwardly open hook member of the second siding panel with the downwardly open hook member of the first siding panel such that said first and second siding panels are interfitted top to bottom; and
attaching said second siding panel to said vertical wall of said structure.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    This application relates to commonly assigned U.S. Design Pat. Application No. 90/______ entitled “Double Rough Split Shake Siding Panel,” filed on the same date hereas, the entirety of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to siding panels, and more particularly to simulated wood shake siding panels and still more particularly to simulated cedar shake siding panels.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    Siding products for facing exterior building walls can resemble traditional wooden clapboards, cedar shakes and the like and are available in durable low-maintenance materials such as aluminum and various polymers. Simulative modern siding panels often are made to resemble traditional wood siding materials. A traditional wooden siding material might be installed in overlapped tiers or courses, for example single horizontally elongated clapboards or single rows of discrete single shingles, placed adjacent to one another and individually nailed. Modern siding materials also are installed in overlapping courses, but each course of the siding panel material can simulate two or more overlapped courses of traditional materials such as clapboards or shingles.
  • [0004]
    In the case of simulated shingles or cedar shakes, each integral siding panel simulates at least one row of laterally adjacent shingles, and usually simulates two or more courses that appear to overlap vertically. The siding panel is supplied in convenient lengths for handling and installation, for example four or eight or twelve feet.
  • [0005]
    With specific reference to FIGS. 7A to 7E thereof, U.S. Pat. No. 6,737,008 to Gilbert et al. discloses a siding panel having a single course containing a plurality of simulated cedar shake impressions formed therein. In order to give the appearance that individual shakes have different lengths, the bottom edge of some of the shake impressions are beveled, though the individual cedar shake impressions each have the same length.
  • [0006]
    The siding panel of Gilbert et al. has a continuous bottom edge which forms into a J-channel having a continuous lip for mating with a downwardly facing U-channel of a second siding panel attached below it on a wall. The lip is uniformly spaced along its length from the bottom edge, as the J-channel is formed by bending a portion of the precursor polymeric sheet, which has a continuous lateral edge. This continuous lip ensures that all siding panels in an upper row of panels are equally spaced from a lower row of siding panels to which they are coupled, as the mating J-channel and U-channel are sized to provide the desired spacing, i.e., the upper siding panels are correctly located when the continuous J-channel lip, once inserted into the U-channel of a siding panel from the lower row, meets the top wall of the U-channel.
  • [0007]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,015,391 to Epstein et al. discloses a two course siding panel where the shakes of the lower course do not each have the same length. Perhaps for this reason, Epstein et al. employ a locking mechanism comprising a downwardly depending flange 24 and an upwardly open channel 22 for receiving the flange. (See, e.g., Epstein et al., FIG. 4). This mechanism is not preferred though, as it is believed to significantly limit the amount by which the shingle impressions of the lower course can differ in length while still providing an aesthetically pleasing panel where the flange 24 is not readily visible.
  • [0008]
    Therefore, there remains a need for an improved siding panel having a simulated shake appearance where individual shakes have different lengths. Still further, there remains a need for a mating mechanism for mating overlapping panels having shakes of different lengths.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0009]
    A simulated shake siding panel having the random appearance of individual shakes is provided. The siding panel comprises a siding panel board, the siding panel board comprising front and rear faces, the front face including at least a bottommost course of a plurality of simulated side-by-side shakes forming an uneven butt line. A nailing strip is disposed proximate to a top edge of the siding panel board. A downwardly open hook is provided on the front face adjacent to a top edge of the siding panel for interfitting with an upwardly open hook of a second like siding panel, the siding panel and second siding panel interfitted top to bottom. An upwardly open hook is disposed on the rear face of the siding panel, a top edge of the upwardly open hook being uniformly spaced from the top edge of the siding panel and non-uniformly spaced from the uneven butt line.
  • [0010]
    From the foregoing, a siding panel is provided having a realistic, simulated shake appearance. Random butt lines in the shake courses provide the appearance of shakes having different lengths, while still allowing for mating hook members to be used as connection members for overlapping panels. Further, by varying the length, width and/or intermediate shake gap depth and/or width, the appearance of randomly selected shakes is provided. By providing sufficient numbers of such shakes in a panel, it becomes difficult to visually discern a shake pattern when multiple panels are installed to cover a vertical wall of a structure.
  • [0011]
    The above and other features of the present invention will be better understood from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the invention that is provided in connection with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    The accompanying drawings illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention, as well as other information pertinent to the disclosure, in which:
  • [0013]
    FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of the a double rough split siding panel showing our new design;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the siding panel of FIG. 1;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 3 is a rear elevational view of the siding panel of FIG. 1;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 4 is a right side elevational view of the siding panel of FIG. 1;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 5 is a left side elevational view of the siding panel of FIG. 1; and
  • [0018]
    FIG. 6 is a section view showing an inventive joint for overlap engagement, shown in several stages of engagement.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a simulated shake siding panel 10. FIGS. 2 and 3 are front and rear elevational views of the siding panel 10 of FIG. 1, respectively. FIGS. 4 and 5 are right and left side elevational views of the siding panel of FIG. 1, respectively.
  • [0020]
    In embodiments, the siding panel may be formed by beltmolding/extrusion, blow molding, compression molding, vacuum forming and other processes. In an exemplary embodiment, the siding panel is integrally formed in an injection molding process from a polymeric material, such as vinyl, polyethylene, nylon, polyurethane, wood composite resin, etc. . . . and more preferably, polypropylene or a polypropylene blend or mixture, such as polypropylene mixed with 15-25%, and preferably about 20%, CaCO3 and with a UV stabilizer. The mix preferably has a melt flow rate of 30-40 g/10 min.
  • [0021]
    The panel has a front face 12, a rear face 14 and a top edge 16. The front face 12 of the illustrated panel 10 includes two courses 18, 20 of simulated side-by-side shakes 22, with course 18 being the bottommost course. Although illustrated as having two courses, the panel 10 may include only a single course or more than two courses. The courses 18, 20 are oriented, at least in appearance, in overlapping and underlapping relation, with the bottoms of shakes of the upper course 20 appearing to overlap the tops of the shakes of bottommost course 18.
  • [0022]
    In an exemplary embodiment, the shakes of each course are molded to have a simulated shake appearance, with realistic vertical grooves simulating hand-split rough cedar shakes. In furtherance of this simulated appearance, individual shakes in the panel have seemingly random widths as well as lengths. In exemplary embodiments the widths vary between about 4.25 to 7.0 inches, and preferably between about 4.35 to 6.95 inches. Each shingle is separated from an adjacent shingle by an inter-shingle gap 24 that preferably is a variation in surface height as opposed to through-gaps between portions of the integral panel material (although actual through-gaps would also be possible). In embodiments, the gaps 24 between adjacent shakes can vary in width, such as between about 0.2 to 0.5 inches, and preferably between about 0.24 to 0.44 inches.
  • [0023]
    In exemplary embodiments, each course includes shingle shakes nominally having a length of about 9 inches. As shown, each course 18, 20 preferably has an uneven butt line 26, 28. Individual shakes have exposed faces ranging from about 8.25 to 10.0 inches, and preferably between about 8.5 to 9.8 inches. Of course, individual shakes in the bottommost course 18 can have different exposed lengths across their width depending upon the respective lengths of the shakes from the upper course 20 that overlap the individual shakes of the bottommost course 18.
  • [0024]
    In one embodiment, the panel 10 has a length between about 4 to 12 feet, and ideally about 5 feet. Each course 18, 20 may have between about 7 to 24 shingles, and preferably about 9 in a 5 foot embodiment. In an exemplary embodiment, no two shakes in a panel are identical.
  • [0025]
    Adjacent to the top edge 16, the siding panel 10 includes a planar nailing strip 34 having preformed elongated nailing apertures 36 therein located to receive nails or other fasteners for attaching the panel 10 to the vertical wall of a structure. The nailing strip and fasteners are covered by and overlapping siding panel in an installed siding panel assembly.
  • [0026]
    The front face 12 also includes a downwardly open hook member 30 disposed adjacent to the top edge 16 of the siding panel 10, such as between the nailing apertures 36 of the nailing strip 34 and the upper shingle course 20. This hook member 30 frictionally engages the return leg of complimentary upwardly open hook member 32 disposed on the rear face 14 of a like siding panel 10 and shown in the rear elevational view of FIG. 3.
  • [0027]
    Importantly, upwardly open hook member 32 has a top edge 33 that is equally spaced from a fixed, continuous reference point, such as the top edge 16 of the siding panel 10, is but unevenly spaced from the butt line 26 of the bottommost course 18 of shakes. The continuous (or semi-continuous) and straight edge 33 can be formed by use of appropriately shaped mold inserts, such as in the case of injection molding, for example, or by post formation trim operations. The straight edge 33 ensures consistent, accurate placement of overlapping and underlapping panels 10 with respect to one another as well as with respect to adjacent panels, as the edge 33 makes continuous engagement with the downwardly open hook member 30 as described in more detail below notwithstanding the uneven butt line 26 of the bottommost course 18.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 6 is a section view showing the overlap coupling of two siding panels together in various stages using hook members 30, 32. As can be seen from the view of FIG. 6, the butt line 26 of the bottommost course 18 of shakes is uneven. FIG. 6 shows the cross section being taken through first shake 22 a, with second shake 22 b shown extending beyond the bottom edge of the shake 22 a.
  • [0029]
    The return leg of upwardly open hook member 32 is preferably tapered. This taper or ramp feature allows the joint to mate easily by guiding the tab into the slot, and reduces the incidence of partial engagement.
  • [0030]
    In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, the downward hook 30 has a curved shape wherein the ramp at the leading edge leads to a pinch point of minimum slot width, at which an interference fit is obtained with the return leg of the upward hook 32, which is also tapered on the leading edge. This structure has particular advantages because the interference fit at the point of minimum slot width provides a tactile indication to the installer, when the hooks 30, 32 are engaged up to a particular point. The tactile indication of resistance is not unlike the resistance of a detent, but unlike a detent does not produce a snap or positive obstruction at a particular insertion distance. The tapered parts and the interference fit at the cusp along hook 30 as shown in FIG. 6 have the advantages of a detent without the disadvantage of fixing a specific position or insertion distance that can instead depend on the ambient temperature versus nominal temperature expectations if desired.
  • [0031]
    The interference fit in FIG. 6 enables a course that is being installed to be held temporarily by an already-installed course due to the frictional engagement of hooks 30, 32. The temporary engagement, without fixing relative positions as would be the case with a detent or a hook with a positive barb, allows the installer to make fine adjustments in the position of the panel while it is held frictionally close to a final position. At the same time, the frictional support permits the installer to release his or her grip on the panel, for example to reach for a nail. The frictional support also can wholly or partly support the panel while the installer's attention is directed to making the attachments to adjacent panels as described below. When installed, the friction fit preferably does not prevent lateral expansion and contraction of the panel due to temperature changes.
  • [0032]
    The frictional engagement can be a bend or rounded bump in the female-side hook 30 versus a taper in the male-side hook 32, or another form of frictional engagement that operates without positively fixing a supporting position.
  • [0033]
    The lap joint as described, namely with an interference fit made along the vertically overlapped upper and lower edges of panel courses, is especially apt when provided together with the butt joint structure described below. The butt joint structure makes it possible to assemble the butt joint, between panels along the same course (typically in the same line of horizontal elongation), by moving the panel being installed in a substantially vertical direction relative to the last previously installed panel in the same course. Alternatively, the motion is inwardly and normal to the plane of the wall, followed by an upward movement.
  • [0034]
    To facilitate installation notwithstanding the frictionally tight arrangement of hooks 30, 32, at least one of the upwardly and downwardly opening hooks, namely the downwardly opening hook 30 in the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, comprises a flange 31 spaced from a plane of the panel body, wherein the flange 31 is at least partly flared in a direction away from the plane of the panel body, thereby providing a lead-in for engagement of the hooks 30, 32. This embodiment also shows that hook 30 can be buttressed by one or more ridges 38 disposed outside and against the hook opening, thus contributing to the strength of hook 30 and to the extent to which hook 30 can exert a pinching pressure on the flange of hook 32 to hold the lower panel in place, temporarily during installation, by the frictional interference fit of hooks 30, 32.
  • [0035]
    In an assembly, the siding panels are hung in overlapping courses. Proceeding from a point of low elevation, for example, a first panel is positioned and nailed to the building by passing fasteners (e.g., nails or screws) through the top edge of the panel, i.e., through holes 36 of the nailing strip 34. The next upper course overlaps and conceals the nailing strip along the top edge of the next lower course. As the panels are installed, each section of paneling is joined to the next adjacent panel(s) on the same level or course. The hook members 30, 32 are sized to affix the bottom edge of the upper course correctly relative to the overlapped lower course, and side butt joint structures can affix panels 10 end-to-end in the direction of their elongation. In an exemplary embodiment, the butt joints comprise interlocking underlap edges 40 and tabs 42 as described fully in copending, commonly assigned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/697,479 entitled “Siding Panel Tab and Slot Joint” to Stucky et al., the entirety of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein. Other complementary joint structures for joining adjacent panels in end-to-end abutment described in Stucky et al. may also be employed.
  • [0036]
    There should be clearance for the panels to expand without interference, and sufficient overlap or depth of joint engagement so that when the panels contract, they remain adequately attached. To that end, a temperature scale/indicator can be employed, and appropriate installation methodology, as described in, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,939,036 entitled “Temperature-Expansion Indicator for Siding Panels” to Beck et al., the entirety of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • [0037]
    From the foregoing, a siding panel is provided having a realistic, simulated shake appearance. Random butt lines in the shake courses provide the appearance of shakes having different lengths, while still allowing for mating hook members to be used as connection members for overlapping panels. Further, by varying the length, width and/or intermediate shake gap depth and/or width, the appearance of randomly selected shakes is provided. By providing sufficient numbers of such shakes in a panel, it becomes difficult to visually discern a shake pattern when multiple panels are installed to cover a vertical wall of a structure.
  • [0038]
    Although the invention has been described in terms of exemplary embodiments, it is not limited thereto. Rather, the appended claims should be construed broadly to include other variants and embodiments of the invention that may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and range of equivalents of the invention
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/518
International ClassificationE04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0864
European ClassificationE04F13/08D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 1, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: CERTAINTEED CORPORATION,PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:STEFFES, STEPHEN WILLIAM;SHAW, ROBERT DAVID;BRANDT, ANDREW CLYDE;SIGNING DATES FROM 20051028 TO 20051031;REEL/FRAME:017179/0914