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Publication numberUS20070117494 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/601,916
Publication dateMay 24, 2007
Filing dateNov 20, 2006
Priority dateNov 23, 2005
Publication number11601916, 601916, US 2007/0117494 A1, US 2007/117494 A1, US 20070117494 A1, US 20070117494A1, US 2007117494 A1, US 2007117494A1, US-A1-20070117494, US-A1-2007117494, US2007/0117494A1, US2007/117494A1, US20070117494 A1, US20070117494A1, US2007117494 A1, US2007117494A1
InventorsKenneth Sheller
Original AssigneeKenneth Sheller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wobbly supports for removable toy figures for use individually, in toy vehicles, and in playsets, including earthquake playsets
US 20070117494 A1
Abstract
An action mechanism that enables individual toy figures to be placed upon, removed from and interchanged upon wobbly supports. The individual toy figures are used both freely and separately on their own and can also exhibit an animated and enlivened wobbly action when placed upon the action mechanism. The action mechanism employs the use of a resiliently flexible member as an animating means. Such means is preferably a coil spring. A means is also provided to cease the wobbling action. The action mechanism is principally employed for use with individual toy figures, in toy vehicles and in toy Playsets, including Earthquake Playsets and the figures are enabled to wobble individually in relation to their individual bases, their vehicles and their Playsets.
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Claims(17)
1. A wobbling action producing mechanism toy or amusement device having:
a) a base support
b) a mounting support set above said base support.
c) a resilient flexible connection fixedly connecting said base to said mounting support.
d) a means of placing and removing toy figures from said mounting support.
e) a means of ceasing the movement of said flexible resilient connection and the mounting support that is fixedly attached to said resilient connection.
2. A resilient flexible connection as in claim 1, in the form of a coil spring that allows the upper mounting support to wobble.
3. A mounting support as in claim 1, comprised of:
a) a cylinder surrounding said resilient connector, having a closed top, the inner surface of which is fixedly attached to the top end of said resilient connector.
b) a bottom end of the cylinder that surrounds said resilient connector which extends a portion of the way down the resilient connector.
c) a cylinder with an inner diameter that will allow said inner resilient connector to flex.
4. A cylinder as in claim 3 having a slightly tapered closed top, for ease of placement into the recess in the underside of a toy figure placed upon the top portion of the cylinder.
5. A base support as in claim 1, that is comprised of:
a) a lower bottom floor which fixedly attaches to and supports the bottom end of said resilient connector.
b) an upper floor with a hole in it, through which the flexible resilient connector surrounded by the cylinder can pass, such that the wobbling movement of the resilient connector and surrounding cylinder is not restricted.
c) vertical supports that integrally connect the lower supporting floor base to the upper floor which has the hole in it.
6. A cylinder as in claim 3 which is dimensioned and positioned such that:
a) the bottom end of the cylinder is positioned slightly below the level of the hole in the upper floor concealing most of the inner resilient connector, in which the outer dimension of the cylinder is smaller than the hole.
b) The bottom of the cylinder is placed in a position that is above the plane of the upper floor that has the hole in it, The outer diameter dimension of the cylinder is larger than the hole.
c) The cylinder will abut against the top plane of the upper floor when pressed downwardly, when an object is pressed onto said mounting support, offering greater resistance to the placement of a toy figure upon said mounting support if a firmer fit of the removable toy figure is desired.
d) A cylinder mounting that is dimensioned at its top end to easily fit into and be removable from a recess in the underside of a toy figure placed upon it
7. Mounting supports as in claim 1, comprising:
a) a flattened circular cuplike shape that accepts both feet of a toy figure.
b) a flattened mounting support on which vertical pins engage recesses in the underside of a toy figure placed upon the mounting support.
c) a mounting support in the shape of a seat that accepts a toy figure placed upon it.
d) a mounting support that at its top most portion is in the form of a ball, upon which a toy figure may be snap fit and removed.
e) a mounting support in the form of a circular flattened cup that employs a screw fit to hold a toy figure.
f) a mounting support that accepts a toy figure in a press fit.
g) a mounting support that accepts a toy figure in a snap fit.
h) a mounting support that accepts a toy figure magnetically.
i) a mounting support that accepts both feet of a toy figure.
j) a mounting support that accepts both feet of a toy figure and has a central post which engages a recess in the underside of a toy figure.
k) a mounting support that is in the form of a post which engages a recess in the underside of a toy figure.
8. A mounting support that is comprised of:
a) a horizontal segment of the upper portion of a hollow sphere open on its larger bottom diameter and open on its upper smaller diameter.
b) a smaller open upper diameter which is permanently affixed about a circular mounting support, onto which a removable toy figure is placed.
c) said circular mounting support is fixedly attached on its bottom side to the top end of a resiliently flexible connector, which at its bottom end is fixedly connected to a base support below.
9. A second higher floor above the base support as in claim 4 having a circular hole in it, through which a portion of the horizontal segment of the hollow sphere protrudes upwardly. The hole in the higher floor has a smaller diameter than the lower open diameter of the hollow sphere segment. This wobbly mounting support is then trapped below the upper floor, concealing the resilient member and denying any access to it. This wobbly support creates a close seal, concealing the space below the higher floor, while allowing the mounting support to wobble freely.
10. A mounting support, a resilient flexible connection, and a base support as in claim 1, that are used alone, placed in a toy vehicle, on a Playset, on a pretend floor, and on a pretend ground.
11. A resilient flexible connection as in claim 2 that is used in combination with a support base, a mounting support, used as an animated individual figure, in a vehicle, in a Playset including an Earthquake Playset, on a pretend floor, and on a pretend ground.
12. A three dimensional rectangular shape, that may be in the form of a girder, that is inserted between the top side of the base support and the underside of the movable mounting support as in claim 1, to cease the movement of the movable mounting support and resilient connector.
13. A three dimensional rectangular shape which:
a) may be in the form of a girder, as in claim 12, that has a slot running along its center, which is open at one end to allow the girder to pass around the resilient connector and mounting support, to cease the movement of the resilient connector and the mounting support.
b) is in the form of a rectangular flat plate with a slot running along its center, which is open at one end to allow it to pass around the resilient connector. It is inserted between the bottom of a surrounding cylinder in the mounting support and the top surface of a floor below the bottom end of the cylinder of the mounting support.
14. A rectangular flat plate as in claim 13 that has two stops at its open end to prevent its removal from the toy.
15. An Earthquake Playset comprised of:
a) a wobbling building structure is fixedly attached on its bottom side to the top ends of resiliently flexible connectors, which at their bottom ends are fixedly attached to the top surface of a base support which is in the form of a pretend ground. The building wobbles in relation to the pretend ground when the ground is moved or the building is touched.
b) a rectangular shaped girder that is inserted between the underside of the building and the pretend ground to stabilize the building and cause the wobbling of the building to cease.
c) a floor of the building which supports resilient flexible connectors at their bottom ends, and which at their upper ends are affixed to mounting supports that can support a removable toy figure.
d) a pretend ground to which a resilient flexible connector is fixedly attached at its bottom end and at its top end is fixedly attached to a mounting support that can support a removable toy figure.
16. An earthquake Playset as in claim 15 that is comprised of all of the elements of claim 10 with the addition of:
a) a set of four resilient flexible connectors on each corner of the pretend ground, which at their top ends are affixed to a bottom surface of the pretend ground as that disclosed in claim 15. The bottom ends of these resilient flexible connectors are fixedly attached to the top surface of two plates, which rest upon a lower flat ground surface plate. These two said plates may be connected and configured as one continuous larger plate. When the pretend ground is pressed, the building structure resting upon it, along with any other wobbly structures, will wobble, as if in an Earthquake.
b) one or more pretend girders that are inserted between the underside of the pretend ground and the topside of the flat ground plate below. These girders may be removable and used for additional play.
c) a movable toy vehicle that rests upon the lower flat ground plate. The vehicle supports in its seat area, a resilient flexible connector, fixedly attached at its bottom end to a support base in the toy vehicle. The top end of the resilient flexible connector is fixedly attached to a wobbly mounting support for a removable toy figure.
d) a movable base support fixedly attached to the bottom end of a resilient flexible connector, which at its top end is fixedly connected to the bottom side of a mounting support for a removable toy figure.
e) a large flat plate described in 11. a) that when slid laterally causes all of the wobbly elements in the Earthquake Playset to wobble simultaneously. The plate may be removable.
17. An Earthquake Playset as in claim 15 with the additions of:
a) a building structure which is separated into several levels. The levels are integrally connected by resiliently flexible connectors. When the ground below the buildings is moved or the building is touched, the building levels wobble, as does the entire building.
b) flat panels that can be attached to the surface of the building between the levels of the building structures to stabilize them so that they cease to wobble and cannot wobble.
c) pretend girders that can be inserted between the all the levels of the structure to stabilize them, including the bottom most level.
d) mounting supports for removable toy figures that are placed upon a floor level of the building are fixedly attached on their undersides to the top ends of resiliently flexible connectors, the bottom ends of the connectors are fixedly connected to said floor of the building.
e) a railing that is placed surrounding the wobbly toy figure mounting supports that is in close proximity to said mounting supports.
f) slots in said railing allow pretend girders to be inserted between the undersides of the toy figure mounting supports, which support removable toy figures, and the base supports to which the wobbly mounting supports are fixedly connected by resiliently flexible connectors, causing the wobbly mounting supports to cease wobbling.
Description
    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims benefit of the filing date of Provisional Patent Application No 60/739,121, Filed on Nov. 23, 2005. in the name of Kenneth Sheller, the inventor. Titled: Springy Supports for Removable Toy Figures for Use Individually, in Vehicles, and in Playsets, Including Earthquake Playsets
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates to animated toys, particularly toy figures and structures that are animated to exhibit a free wobbling side to side and back and forth continual motion when they are moved or touched through the use of a supporting coil spring or springs. The invention enables simple toy figures to wobble with respect to the vehicles, play sets and bases on which they sit. Significantly, however, the figures are unique in that they are removable from their wobbly springy supports. The removable figures are also able to be played with freely and apart from their wobbly springy supports. The figures are generally configured with flat bottoms and or feet that enable them to stand alone. The figures, which may exist as various characters are interchangeable on their wobbly springy supports. Individual figures may be easily placed in various locations in a Playset wherein they may be animated and enlivened by numerous springy wobbly supports. There are also provided in the present invention, several unique configurations of the springy, wobbly mounting supports of the removable figures which conceal and deny access to the animating coil spring. There are also provided means of preventing the wobbling action, when desired. This may occur for example during an Earthquake Play set, if it is desired to cause the wobbling buildings, ground, and figures in various locations, be they on buildings or similar structures, on the ground or in vehicles, to stop shaking and wobbling. The cessation of the wobbling may also be employed during other normal play as well as in the Earthquake play situation.
  • [0004]
    2. Description of the Prior Art
  • [0005]
    Animating and enlivening toys of all kinds, and particularly toy figures is a continuing interest in toy play. Bottom weighted, bottom rounded, roly poly wobbling figures are very widely known and have been so for many years. The use of coil springs to enable various wobbly side to side and back and forth actions in figures is also very widely known. Many varieties of these toys are patented. For example: U.S. Pat. No. 6,840,838 by Reid in 1984 discloses a combination bobble head and bobble torso figure affixed to a base in which all of the enabling coil springs are permanently affixed to their respective parts. U.S. Pat. No. 2,901,862 by Thomas in 1959 discloses a vertically compressible drinking figure whose torso is permanently affixed to its feet by a coil spring which substitute for its legs. U.S. Pat. No. 2,760,303 by Del Mas in 1956 discloses a figure with detachable springy limbs, which, once detached, ceases to be a useable toy figure for play. The patent discloses that the limbs are detachable in order to store the figure more easily. U.S. Pat. No. 6,129,606 by Yuen in 2000 discloses a figure with a large motorized vibrating head permanently mounted on coil spring legs which are permanently affixed to its shoes. The figure vibrates, wobbles and bounces as a result of the vibrating motor. U.S. Pat. No. 2,858,644 by Durham in 1957 discloses an apple shaped jack in the box with a worm that is propelled out of the apple by a permanently attached coil spring enclosed inside the worm. The worm exhibits some wobbling action as well as pop up action. U.S. Pat. No. 2,775,064 by Otto in 1956 discloses a toy bird permanently affixed to a pretend ground by two coil springs for legs. The springs allow it to wobble to the point that it bends over and picks up a small object magnetically in its beak. U.S. Pat. No. 6,533,634 B1 by Sugar in 2003 discloses a wobbly figure mounted permanently to a coil spring at the bottom end of its torso, in which the supporting coil spring at its other bottom end is permanently affixed to a base that stands on top of a TV monitor which can be attached to the TV monitor by adhesive or suction cup. The figure wobbles on the spring due to the slight vibration of the monitor and is not removable from its base. The figure cannot be separated from the animating spring. U.S. Pat. No. 6,743,072 B2 by Nelson in 2004 discloses a wobbling toy eyeball permanently attached to the top end of a coil spring which at it's other bottom end, is integrally attached to a motor, causing the eyeball to move erratically. U.S. Pat. No. 6,511,359 B1 by Hoe King Luis in 2003 discloses a bobble head figure with a provision for the insertion of a photograph into a slot covering the face portion of the figure. The head is permanently affixed to the torso by a coil spring. U.S. Pat. No. 6,729,930B1 by Hoe King Luis in 2004 discloses a flat sheet magnet in the form of a figure with a flattened head portion permanently affixed to the magnet by a coil spring, enabling the head to bobble. U.S. Pat. No. DES161,962 by Planet in 1951 shows a wobbling figure with two coil springs for legs affixed to a base that is mounted on a suction cup. U.S. Pat. No. DES 413,152 by Chow in 1999 shows a football player figure affixed to a plate which is affixed to the top end of coil spring that is affixed to a bottom base plate. There is no indication that the figure is removable from the springy support.
  • [0006]
    Bobble head figures of various kinds are very well known. Springy dashboard figures and similar novelties, such as hula dancers and the like are well known. Toy vehicles with wobbly headed drivers, figures with springy heads, arms, torsos and legs, pop up jack in the box figures which use springs to a wobbly effect are known. Almost all of these figures share one thing in common. The movable springy portion of the figure is either permanently affixed to another part of the figure by a coil spring, and/or permanently affixed to a base by a coil spring. The springs are integrally and permanently attached to the figures. These figures cannot be removed from their springs for separate use as a plain toy, and in one instance in the Del Mas U.S. Pat. No. 2,760,303, in which the springy arms and legs are removable, the figure ceases to be useable as a toy figure once the limbs are removed.
  • [0007]
    In the instance of U.S. Pat. No. 2,760,303 by Del Mas in 1956, a figure is shown with coil springs for arms, legs and used as a chest to pelvis connection. The coil springs for arms attach with a pressure fit into arm sockets in the torso and are removable. There are hands attached to the outer ends of the arm springs. The coil springs used for legs can be unscrewed from, and screwed back upon, stumps protruding downwardly from the pelvis of the figure. There are feet integrally attached to the lower ends of the leg springs. The figure is not used separately once it's springy parts are separated and it is dismembered. In the present invention, once the figure is separated from the springy portion, it can be played with on its own, freely and separately. Furthermore, in the Del Mas patent, there is no provision for the figure to stand on its own and wobble as in the present invention. Since nothing supports the feet in the Del Mas figure, it would fall over immediately. The pelvis portion could be held in one's hand, while only the torso would wobble. However, this does not provide a full wobbling figure that wobbles in relation to its immediate environment, as is provided in the present invention. And, as stated, once any of the limbs are removed, the figure itself would cease to exist as a play figure. Furthermore, it would be difficult for a small child to easily unscrew and screw back the tightly screwed leg springs. It is also likely that a small child would be prohibited from handling such a toy due to a small parts safety issue with regard to the separated arms and legs. And finally, manufacturers would likely prohibit a small child from handling loose, elongated metal coil springs at all, even with feet and hands integrally attached at their ends.
  • [0008]
    In another instance, a toy Playground Play set manufactured by Fisher Price in 1986 discloses an airplane which wobbles freely upon a coil spring permanently affixed to the underside of the plane at its top end, and permanently affixed to the large base of the play set at its other lower end. This toy airplane has an open cockpit which receives a rigidly held removable toy figure. The airplane and the figure sitting within it wobble on the spring together as a unit. The figure, however, does not wobble in relation to the airplane in which it has been placed. The figure itself does not come to life as is provided in the present invention.
  • [0009]
    In another instance, U.S. Pat. No. 3,501,861 and its continuation U.S. Pat. No. 3,526,991 in 1968 and 1971 respectively by A. E Goldfarb describe a vertically compressible coil spring-loaded game piece, which is designed to pop up off of a game board. Disclosed is a suction cup means for delaying the pop up action. The game piece, in its un-compressed position can be stood up on its spring, which surrounds a center post. The coil spring, at its bottom end is affixed to a small circular base which aids in the compression of the spring. The game piece's upper portion, consists of a removable, hemispherical hollow cap painted with eyes. This cap is press fit on top of the suction cup and spring portion below. A scale model built of this toy demonstrates that the bases provided in the two Goldfarb patents of this toy, do not allow the toy to wobble when standing without almost immediately falling over when touched or moved from below. It would be difficult for the uncoordinated play of a young child to make it wobble without knocking it over almost immediately. There is no provision for the toy to be placed or fixed to any additional structure such as a vehicle or ground or larger base to stabilize it. It cannot wobble as the present invention provides. In addition, since it was designed to pop up into the air, attachment to a large base or to a vehicle for example, would not allow it to pop up. It was designed only to pop up into the air as described in the game play as disclosed in the two Goldfarb patents. There is nothing to suggest in the Goldfarb patent that it would ever be attached to any larger base. The cap is described as removable for replacement repair or for removal during shipping. It is disclosed in these two patents that the suction cup and upper cap units are designed to remain connected together during game play in which it pops up and falls down. This removable cap, which mounts with a press fit upon the top end of the suction cup and coil spring unit, would not be easily placed upon the spring and suction cup lower unit by a small child in the form that is provided. The placement of the cap from above upon the lower portion as it would be used in play is a blind one since the much larger cap obscures the smaller lower portion. Furthermore, the fit between the two parts is tight so that the cap will not fall off during game play. No guides or tapered or enlarged portions of the connections to aid in easy placement of the cap upon its lower support, are provided in the Goldfarb invention as are provided in the present invention. There is no provision in the Goldfarb invention for the ease of use for the placement of the cap by a small child. It was not designed for young children for use in this manner. It is essentially only a pop-up toy.
  • [0010]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,601,433 by Potter in 1997 discloses a simulated Earthquake educational device comprising a large pretend ground plate mounted on four coil springs which allow the plate to wobble. A small removable building affixed by tape, sits atop of this ground plate. The ground plate and building move as a unit when the ground wobbles. A vibrating variable speed motor is attached to the plate to cause it to totter. There is no provision for any kind of stabilizing means to stop the wobbling, short of shutting off the motor.
  • [0011]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,343,475 by Stander in 1982 discloses a an Earthquake game device in which a heavy metal ball rolls down a tunnel on a game board which causes a vibration and rumble sound simulating an earthquake. Various small blocks simulating buildings which sit atop the ground can be pinned together to make them earthquake proof. The buildings do not wobble as the present invention provides. They either fall apart or hold together. No means are provided in the Stander invention to stop the vibration of the ground as the present invention provides.
  • [0012]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,394,017 by Malloy in 1983 discloses an Earthquake Game in which buildings sit upon tiltable ground areas that are motorized to tilt as if in an earthquake. Buildings with holes in them can be pegged to the ground and together to make them earthquake proof. The buildings do not wobble freely with respect to the ground, nor are any girders inserted under the buildings or under the vibrating ground to stop the earthquake as is provided in the manner of the present invention.
  • [0013]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,147,358 by Erickson in 1979 discloses an Earthquake game in which a vibrating means causes a pretend ground, which consists of many puzzle like parts to separate and cause the animals on these vibrating sections to fall into the spaces between them, as if in a terrible earthquake. Nothing wobbles in the manner provided in the present invention, nor are there any means to stop the earthquake as is provided in the present invention.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0014]
    In view of the foregoing, the main object of the present invention is to bring life into and animate toy figures. More specifically, to enliven and animate the figure in a way that allows it to be played with as both a normal free standing figure on its own, and as an enlivened animated figure as well. It is also the object of the present invention to animate groups of interchangeable toy figures. It is also the object of the present invention to animate a group of removable, interchangeable toy figures simultaneously, such as in a vehicle or in a Playset. And, it is also the object of the present invention to be able to cause the animation of the aforementioned toy figures to stop when that is desired.
  • [0015]
    To this end, the present invention provides a support mechanism upon which toy figures, having been mounted on their mounting supports for animating them and for interchanging them, can be removed from said mounting supports. The removable toy figures are mounted on supports using press, plug, screw, snap and pin fits or other common means such as magnetic means. The mounting supports are generally circular in plan, but may be rectilinear or square or other shape in plan when they are a portion of a pretend floor. Permanently affixed to the underside of these various mountings is the top end of a coil spring. The spring at its bottom end is permanently affixed to a base which may be formed as a simple base for an individual figure, as a vehicle, as a pretend floor, or as a pretend ground. When the figure is placed, for example, on a springy support mounting in a vehicle, the figure wobbles in relation to the vehicle when the vehicle moves or when the figure is touched directly. The coil spring supporting the figure imparts a wobbling, side to side, back and forth extended wobbling motion to the figure. In a further example, the figure may be configured as an animal which is placed on a springy support that is affixed to an individual base, a pretend ground, floor of a building, or vehicle. The child may pet or pretend to feed the animal causing it to respond with an enlivening wobbly movement in which it wobbles in relation to the base, ground, floor, or vehicle.
  • [0016]
    The coil spring may be left uncovered or surrounded by a hollow cylinder which may continue along most of its length, and is permanently affixed to the underside of the figure mounting. In the case where the figure mounting is a post, which is received by a recess in the underside of a toy figure to be placed upon it, the post is simply extended downward toward the lower end of the spring as a hollow cylinder surrounding the spring. The top end of the coil spring, in this instance, is fixedly attached to the underside of the top horizontal circular plane of the post. In addition, the post is deliberately tapered at its top end to allow for an easy placement and removal of a figure upon it for use by young children. This cylinder both conceals the spring and denies access to it. In addition, a second upper floor may be added above the floor to which the lower end of the spring is fixedly attached. The spring and surrounding cylinder unit protrude through a hole in this upper floor. The upper floor serves to conceal the permanent attachment of the spring to the lower floor and the bottom end of the cylinder, which protrudes downwardly, slightly past the hole in the floor. The spring inside the cylinder continues all the way to the bottom supporting floor where it is permanently affixed. The cylinder passes downwardly through the hole only slightly, so that the cylinder and internal spring unit within it, will not be inhibited from wobbling.
  • [0017]
    In addition, a circular horizontal segment of the upper portion of a hollow sphere can be fitted about the lower end of the cylinder that surrounds the spring. This circular horizontal segment of a hollow sphere can also be fitted about another larger circular figure mounting such as a circular cup mounting that receives both feet of the figure. The lower diameter of this hollow sphere segment is larger than the hole through which it protrudes upwardly in the upper floor. This configuration has the function of trapping the entire springy unit below the upper floor, further concealing the spring below and denying any access to it. This unit that protrudes through the hole in the floor consists of: the figure mounting portion; the cylinder that is fixedly attached to the underside of the mounting portion; and the coil spring inside the cylinder that is fixedly attached to the underside of the mounting portion at one end and attached to the lower floor base at its other end. The spherical horizontal hollow sphere segment also has the function of creating a loose seal that cleanly closes off access to the space below the upper floor, while allowing the unit to wobble freely as well.
  • [0018]
    In another variation, the diameter of the cylinder surrounding the spring may be configured slightly larger than the hole in the upper floor through which the spring protrudes upwardly from its permanent connection from the lower floor base. This will cause the bottom of the cylinder to abut against the top surface of this upper floor when a toy figure is placed onto the said mounting support from above and offer resistance to this figure placement, making it easier for a child to make a tighter press fit of the figure onto its wobbly mounting support if that is desired.
  • [0019]
    Additional consideration is taken to select the proper spring, so that the spring is not so weak that the figure flops over, or wobbles too rapidly, or is too stiff that the figure barely wobbles, or wobbles too slowly. It is desired to select a spring that will facilitate the wobbling action for as an extended period of time as possible, thus extending the effect of the animated wobbly action. The selection of the spring is dependent upon the weight and center of gravity of the figure and the thickness and hardness of the material used in the spring, which varies the rigidity of the spring. The greater the number of turns in the spring generally gives it more flexibility. The spring should optimally be strong enough to resist deformation when the figure is removed or pulled from above when there is a tight fit of the figure on its mounting. However, the fitting of the figures to their mounting supports is deliberately designed to allow for a minimum of resistance to both their placement and their removal from their mounting supports for ease of use by small children.
  • [0020]
    When it is desired to cause the figure to cease wobbling, means are provided wherein a rectilinear shape, such as a pretend girder, is introduced between the bottom side of the figure mounting support and the top of the base which, as stated above, may be either an individual base, a floor, part of a vehicle, or other pretend floor or pretend ground. The rectilinear shape introduced for this purpose must have a center slot down its length so that it will bypass both the spring and the cylinder that surrounds the spring, if the spring is covered by a cylinder. This stabilizer may also take the form of an elongated flat plate which slides in and out between the bottom end of the cylinder and the top of the supporting base or floor below. This stabilizer may also have protruding stops at it's inner end, so that it remains within the toy for continual use, such as in a vehicle, in which it is desired to have the figures wobble or not wobble. This flattened stabilizing plate structure also has a center slot down its length to allow it to pass around the spring and surrounding cylinder. This flat stabilizer can also be introduced in a lateral pivoting motion.
  • [0021]
    In the instance of an Earthquake Playset, in which the building structures wobble on springs, toy girders are introduced between the building structure which is spring mounted to a pretend ground structure, in order to prevent it from wobbling. The ground on which this building sits is also mounted on springs, and toy girders are introduced between the ground on which the building sits and the plane to which the bottom ends of the supporting springs of the ground are attached, in order to stop the ground from wobbling as well. In another version, the building or tower structure is divided into separate wobbling levels, each separated by a coil spring or springs. In a similar manner to the aforementioned one piece buildings, stabilizing pretend girders can be introduced under the building structure and between the levels of the building structure to stabilize them. Furthermore, rectangular flat panels can be attached to the outer surface of this structure with snap fit or other common means between each level, connecting the wobbling levels to stabilize them. In addition, wobbling toy figures involved in the Earthquake Playset are stabilized with toy girders similarly, as described above whether standing on a wobbling building, standing on the moving ground, standing on a small base or in a vehicle the movement of which urges them to wobble. Finally, the entire Playset can be placed on an accompanying flat plate that is manually slid laterally to cause all of the structures and figures to wobble simultaneously, as if in a Giant Earthquake.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0022]
    FIG. 1, Is a front elevational view of a removable wobbly toy figure with phantom lines showing the cylindrical and slightly tapered recess at the center of its underside. The toy figure is spaced above a vertical cross-sectional view down the center line of a wobbly cylindrical post. The post surrounds, and is permanently affixed from the inside of its top surface to the top end of a coil spring which is affixed at its bottom end to the supporting base. The toy figure is removably mounted from this wobbly unit comprised of a cylinder, inner coil spring and base unit. The toy figure has a flat bottom and can stand alone.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 2, Is a similar view of a front elevation of a toy animal figure mounted on a wobbly post unit which is shown in a vertical cross-sectional view down the center line of a cylindrical wobbly post and supporting base. The post shows a tapered top end for ease of placement and removal of the toy animal figure. The bottom of the toy animal figure is partly broken away to show the fit of the post in the underside of the toy animal figure. The base consists of a second higher floor through which the post bottom end protrudes downwardly slightly to conceal the attachment of the spring to the bottom floor base.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 3, Is similar to FIG. 2 in its views showing a removable toy animal figure. In addition, the lower portion of the wobbly post consists of a horizontal section of the upper portion of a hollow sphere which protrudes upwardly through a hole in a floor that is above the base floor.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 4, is similar to FIG. 2 but the toy figure is in the shape of human bust.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 5, is similar to FIGS. 1-4 in its views, showing a removable wobbly toy figure mounted on a circular base that both surrounds its feet and furnishes a center post that is received in a recess in the center of the underside of the toy figure.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 6, is similar to FIGS. 1-5 in its views, showing a removable toy figure mounted upon a support similar to the one in FIG. 5 with the addition of a horizontal segment of the upper portion of a hollow sphere affixed to and surrounding the circular mounting portion that supports the toy figure about the circumference if its two feet. This segment of the sphere, which is mounted on a spring, protrudes upwardly through a hole in a second higher floor above the base floor. The hole in the higher floor is smaller than lower diameter of the sphere segment. This wobbly segment is trapped below the hole in the higher floor.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 7, is similar in its views and structure to FIG. 6 but instead shows the horizontal hollow sphere segment surrounding the bottom end of the cylinder which surrounds the coil spring, instead of surrounding the larger circular toy figure's feet mounting as in FIG. 6. This enables the support base to be smaller in width than the base in FIG. 6. The wobbly unit portion is trapped below the hole in the higher floor concealing the spring and denying access to it.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 8 is similar in its views to FIGS. 1-7 and shows a removable figure press fit in a circular cup mounting support which receives its both feet. A cylinder which surrounds the coil spring is permanently affixed to the bottom side of the mounting support to conceal the spring within. The spring is similarly affixed to a bottom floor support base.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 9, is similar in its views and structure of FIG. 8 but without the cylinder surrounding the spring as it appears in FIG. 8.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 10, is the same as FIG. 9 but showing the figure in its position separated from its support mounting.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 11, is similar in is views and structure to FIG. 2, but shows the removable wobbly toy figure engaged in a snap fit attachment of a ball shape at the top portion of the support base in a press fit, instead of on a tapered post as disclosed in FIG. 2.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 12, is similar in its views to FIGS. 1-11 but shows a removable toy figure attached to a flat mounting support with a pin fit, wherein holes in the bottoms of the feet receive the pins which protrude upwardly from the support. The mounting may be circular or rectilinear or square or other shape.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 13, is similar in it's views and structure to FIG. 9 but shows a screw fit instead of a press fit into the mounting support for the removable toy figure.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 14, shows side elevational view of a removable seated toy figure. The toy figure sits on a mounting support which has an upwardly directed pin which is received in a recess in the center of the bottom end of the trunk of the toy figure. The toy figure mounting support is affixed to the top end of a spring, which is affixed at its bottom end to a base support. The mounting support, spring, and base support are shown in cross-section through the center line of the pin upon which the removable toy figure attaches.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 15, is similar in its view and structure to FIG. 12 but has an additional floor area surrounding the wobbly mounting support. This wobbly portion appears as a section of the floor, in for example, the floor of a building structure or deck of a ship, and may be circular, square in shape, or other shape.
  • [0037]
    FIG. 16, is a cross-sectional view seen through the center line of a cylindrical wobbly post affixed to a spring which is affixed to a support base. The cylinder has a diameter that is smaller than the hole in the upper floor. The base has a second higher floor upon which the wiggly post abuts from above, in order to offer some resistance to the placement of the figure upon it, if a firmer fit of the removable toy figure is desired.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 23, is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 in which the wobbly springy post and support are shown in a cross-sectional view through the center of the post. The toy figure is shown both separated from, in one view, and in the other view, mounted upon the springy post, which is permanently affixed to the floor of a vehicle.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 24, shows a partial side elevational view and a partial perspective view of a removable toy figure placed in the seat of an airplane. The toy figure sits press fit in a springy wobbly seat mounting support in the plane. A coil spring connects the bottom side of the seat to the floor of the plane, which is shown in a cross-section going through the center of the spring. Phantom lines show a portion of the seated toy figure through the side of the seat. Phantom lines also show the toy figure in a position removed from the seat.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 29, shows a side elevational view of a removable wobbly toy figure mounted on a springy support, the underside of which is permanently affixed to the floor of a vehicle by a coil spring. The vehicle and springy mechanism mounting support are shown in a cross-sectional view through the center of the mounting support. The springy mechanism is similar to FIG. 6, in its structure and view. This wobbly mounting support consists of a horizontal section of the upper portion of a hollow sphere and is circular in plan view. This wobbly unit protrudes upwardly through a circular hole in a floor set above the bottom floor of the vehicle to which the bottom end of the coil spring is permanently affixed.
  • [0041]
    FIG. 30, is nearly identical to FIG. 29 except that the toy figure is shown removed from the vehicle. Phantom lines in the toy figure show the recess in the bottom side of the toy figure that receives the wobbly post in the vehicle.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 27, shows a Playground Playset in perspective view. In this view, four removable wobbly toy figures are shown. Two of these toy figures are removed from their wobbly posts and two are seated on their wobbly posts in a press fit. The toy figures on their posts show phantom lines, which are recesses showing the posts and where the posts are positioned. Shown is a Merry Go Round and a Seesaw upon which the toy figures are placed, the movement of which induces the toy figures to wobble in relation to the Seesaw and Merry Go Round. 27C′ is a side elevational cross-sectional view of the springy post 27C showing the coil spring attachment at its upper end to the surrounding cylinder, the upper floor and hole through which the post protrudes, and the lower floor to which the bottom end of the spring is permanently affixed.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 50, is a perspective view of an action mechanism designed to enable a removeable toy figure and its mounting support to wobble and also to stop a removable toy figure, and its mounting support upon which it sits, from wobbling. The unit shown consists of a circular mounting area for a toy figure, the underside of which is fixedly attached to the top end of a coil spring and also fixedly attached to the top end of a cylinder which surrounds most of the coil spring. The spring at its bottom end is fixedly attached to a base support. A pretend steel girder or other similar shape is inserted between the bottom side of the toy figure mounting support and the top side of the base support. An animating coil spring, and cylinder surrounding the spring, as well as a portion of the base are shown in phantom lines. Also shown in phantom lines is a central slot in the horizontal portion of the girder, running along the length of the girder, which allows the girder to pass around the spring and cylinder. The girder acts to stabilize the normally springy mounting support and does not allow it to move. Parts of the girder, spring, surrounding cylinder, slot and bottom support base are shown in phantom lines.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 17, is a cross-sectional elevational view of a removable figure mounted on a wobbly support as disclosed in FIG. 50. A stabilizing girder is shown inserted between the toy figure mounting support and the base support below. The girder is shown in elevation. The cross-section is taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 50. This line runs along the center of the mounting support, spring, surrounding cylinder, and base. The mounting support and attached cylinder, spring, and lower base are shown in this vertical cross-section. The slot in the girder which passes around the cylinder is shown in horizontal phantom lines.
  • [0045]
    FIG. 18, is identical to FIG. 17 except that the shape of the stabilizing girder that is inserted is different, wherein the horizontal slot is more squared and the sides and ends of the girder consist of I-Beams instead of one large girder as in FIG. 17.
  • [0046]
    FIG. 19, is similar in its views and structure to FIGS. 17 and 18, except that a flat plate stabilizer is inserted between the bottom of the cylinder and the top surface of the base support instead of a girder stabilizer.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 20, is a plan view of a girder and mounting support as disclosed in FIG. 17.
  • [0048]
    FIG. 21, is a plan view of a girder and mounting support as disclosed in FIG. 18.
  • [0049]
    FIG. 22 is a plan view of the flat plate stabilizer used in FIG. 19 showing the plate with and without protruding end stops. The end stops would limit the plate from being removed from the toy.
  • [0050]
    FIG. 40, is a perspective view of the stabilizing girder disclosed in FIG. 17 and FIG. 20.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 41, is a perspective view of the stabilizing girder disclosed in FIG. 18 and FIG. 21.
  • [0052]
    FIG. 42 is a perspective view of the stabilizing plate disclosed in FIG. 19 and FIG. 22.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 25, is perspective view of an Earthquake Playset in which a building structure is mounted on springs that enable it to wobble as if in an Earthquake. There is a stabilizing girder structure shown in the inserted position between the bottom side of the building and the ground below it. The girder structure stops the building from wobbling. The inserted portion of the girder is shown in phantom lines. Removable figures are mounted upon wobbly springy supports both on the pretend ground of the Playset and the roof of the building structure,
  • [0054]
    FIG. 26, Is a perspective view of an Earthquake Playset similar to FIG. 25 with the addition of four supporting coil springs mounted on movable plates under the pretend ground to allow the ground to wobble, as well as the building, and removable toy figures to wobble. Additional removable girders are disclosed that can be inserted between the bottom of the pretend ground above and a lower ground portion below, on which the movable pretend ground spring supports rest. The hidden portion of the inserted removable stabilizing girders are shown in phantom lines. Two additional removable toy figures are disclosed: one, on a wobbly base similar to FIG. 50 and one, in a vehicle with a springy wobbly support (not seen), similar to FIG. 23. In addition, the entire Playset rests on a slidable ground plate that enables all the movable elements of the entire Playset to wobble simultaneously when moved to create a Giant Earthquake Experience.
  • [0055]
    FIG. 28, is a perspective view of an Earthquake Playset similar to FIG. 25. A building structure is disclosed, with each level being separated by a coil spring or springs. In similar manner to FIG. 25 and FIG. 26, pretend girders can be inserted under the building structure, and between the levels of the building structure to stabilize them. In addition, rectangular flat panels can be attached to the outer surface of the building structure with snap fit or other common means, connecting the wobbling levels to stabilize them. Removable toy figures can be placed upon springy wobbling mounting supports, which are affixed to a floor of the building structure. Accompanying stabilizing removable girders similar to that shown in FIG. 50 can be introduced through slots in a railing surrounding the area where the wobbling toy figures are positioned, if such a railing is provided. In addition, the wobbling toy figures may be placed on other varied mounting supports, such as those disclosed in FIG. 15, FIG. 23, FIG. 6, FIG. 19, or any other mounting support types that have been disclosed in the present invention or are known in the art.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0056]
    With reference now to the drawings, and in particular to FIG. 2 and FIG. 2, a new device embodying the concepts of the present invention will be described.
  • [0057]
    FIG. 1 discloses a toy FIG. 1A in the shape of a human character. The toy figure has flat bottomed feet which enable it to stand securely on its own. A recess 1C in the underside of the figure accepts the upper portion of a mounting support post 1D upon which this figure may be freely placed and removed. The post 1D is generally of a hollow cylindrical shape with a slight taper at its upper end to allow it to fit easily into the recess 1C in the underside of the removable toy FIG. 1A. The post 1D has a flattened top surface 1K. A coil spring 1B at its top end is permanently affixed to the underside of the flattened top surface of the post and the inner top portion 1G of the cylinder mounting 1D. The bottom end 1F of this coil spring is permanently affixed to a base support 1E. When the figure is placed upon the mounting support post and either touched or the entire unit is moved, the figure will wobble in all directions for an extended amount of time, enlivening the figure. The FIG. 1A being also removable is ready for free play on its own. In addition, various other figures may be interchanged on the wobbly spring post as described for many more play possibilities.
  • [0058]
    FIG. 2, discloses a toy figure in the shape of a Pussy Cat animal 2C. The removable figure is shown mounted on a generally cylindrical post 2A which has a slightly tapered top end. The post is permanently mounted and affixed to the top end of a coil spring 2F which the post surrounds. The bottom end of the coil spring is permanently affixed to a bottom floor 2B. An upper floor 2D is provided which has a hole 2E through which the wobbly post 2A protrudes. The bottom end of the wobbly post passes slightly below the hole in the upper floor. This serves the purpose of concealing the spring and denying access to it, while still allowing free movement of the wobbly post.
  • [0059]
    FIG. 6, discloses a removable toy FIG. 6B mounted upon a support 6A This mounting support 6A is comprised of a horizontal segment of the upper portion of a hollow sphere, open on its bottom larger diameter 6K. Its upper smaller open diameter is permanently affixed to a circular mounting area 6G onto which the toy FIG. 6D is placed. This circular mounting area is permanently affixed to the top end of a coil spring 6F. The bottom end of the spring is affixed to the floor below. A second higher floor 6B is provided which has a circular hole 6H through which a portion of the horizontal hollow sphere segment protrudes upwardly. The hole 6H in the higher floor has a smaller diameter than the lower open diameter 6K of the hollow sphere segment. This wobbly mounting support hollow sphere segment is then trapped below the upper floor, concealing the spring and denying any access to it. This wobbly figure support 6A in relationship to the hole in the floor, creates a close seal concealing the space below the wobbly figure support 6A, and denying access to the space, concealing and denying access to the spring and at the same time allowing the wobbly figure mounting support to wobble freely.
  • [0060]
    FIG. 7 is similar to FIG. 6 in its function but instead shows the horizontal hollow sphere segment 7A surrounding the bottom end of the cylinder which surrounds the coil spring 7C instead of surrounding the larger circular figure mounting support 7D. This enables the base support 7E to be smaller in width. The wobbly unit is trapped below a hole in the floor as described in FIG. 6.
  • [0061]
    FIG. 11, Discloses a removable wobbly toy FIG. 11B mounted atop a ball 11A in a snap fit.
  • [0062]
    FIG. 14 shows a removable seated wobbly toy FIG. 14A. The toy figure sits upon a mounting support 14E with an upwardly directed pin 14B which is received in a recess in the center of the bottom end of the trunk of the toy figure. The underside of the figure mounting supporting is affixed to the top end of a coil spring 14C which is affixed at its bottom end to a base support 14D.
  • [0063]
    FIG. 15 shows a removable wobbly toy FIG. 15D pin mounted upon a mounting support 15A. The mounting support on its underside is attached to the top end of a coil spring 15E, which at its bottom end is attached to a base support 15F. A second higher floor 15B surrounds the wobbly mounting support, both of which are on the same plane. The mounting support 15A may be circular or square in plan, or other shape. The space in the surrounding upper floor may be either circular, square, or other shape to match the mounting support 15A. This gives more of an appearance of a continuous flat floor, a portion of which holds a wobbly toy figure. Pins 15C protrude upwardly from the mounting support 15A and are received in recesses in the underside of the feet of the toy FIG. 15D to secure it to the wobbly mounting support 15A.
  • [0064]
    FIG. 16, discloses a configuration nearly identical to FIG. 2. However, in FIG. 2 the wobbly mounting support 2A protrudes downward slightly past the hole 2E in the upper floor 2D. In FIG. 16 the cylinder 16A, that surrounds the coil spring 16C, is smaller in diameter than the hole through which the spring protrudes downwardly to the bottom floor base, to which it is fixedly attached. The cylinder 16A that surrounds the coil spring 16C, abuts against the upper floor 16B when a toy figure is pressed upon it, in order to offer some resistance if a firmer fit of the toy figure upon the post is desired.
  • [0065]
    FIG. 23 is similar to FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 with the difference being that the wobbly toy figure support structures are positioned within a vehicle 23A. Disclosed is a toy FIG. 23B with a recess 23D on its underside. The bottoms of its feet are flat so that the figure is free standing for separate play when it is not mounted on the wobbly mounting support post 23C in the vehicle 23A. A coil spring 23F is fixedly attached at its top end, to the inside of the top end of the wobbly support post. The coil spring at its bottom end, fixedly connects the wobbly post support 23C to the floor base support of the vehicle below. The post 23C protrudes downwardly slightly past a hole in the upper floor 23E. The FIG. 23B is shown both separated from and mounted upon the wobbly springy post support 23C in the vehicle 23A.
  • [0066]
    FIG. 24, shows a removable toy FIG. 24B placed in the seat 24C of an airplane 24A. The toy figure sits in a press fit in the seat. A coil spring 24D fixedly connects the bottom side of the seat to the floor 24E of the plane 24A. As the plane is moved and played with the toy figure wobbles freely in relation to the plane. The figure has flat bottom feet 24G, that enable it to stand alone and be played with freely apart from its position seated in the plane. The figure is shown in phantom lines in its removed position in 24F.
  • [0067]
    FIG. 29 shows a view of a removable wobbly toy FIG. 29C mounted on a springy base support 29B the underside of which is permanently affixed to the floor 29E of a vehicle 29A. This wobbly mounting support consists of a horizontal section of a hollow sphere, circular in plan view, surrounding and fixedly attached at is smaller upper diameter to a circular mounting support portion, in which the removable toy figure is placed. The unit protrudes upwardly through a circular hole 29F in a floor 29G set above the bottom floor of the vehicle 29A to which the bottom end of the coil spring is permanently attached. The removable toy figure wobbles in relation to the vehicle when the vehicle is moved or the toy figure is touched.
  • [0068]
    FIG. 30 is nearly identical to FIG. 29, except that the toy FIG. 30C is shown in the removed position from the vehicle 30A. Phantom lines in the lower portion of the toy figure show the recess 30E in the bottom of the toy figure, that receives the post 30F portion of the wobbly figure mounting support 30B which is permanently affixed by a coil spring 30D to the floor 30G of the vehicle 30A. The removable figure has flat bottom feet 30H which enables the toy figure to stand freely for free play apart from the vehicle. The removable toy figure wobbles in relation to the vehicle when the vehicle is moved or the toy figure is touched.
  • [0069]
    FIG. 27, shows a Playground Playset. The entire Playset is comprised of a large base 27H, a Merry Go Round 27E, a SeeSaw 27D and four removable toy figures. Two of these toy FIGS. 27B and 27G are shown removed from their wobbly mounting support posts 27K and 27L. Two toy FIGS. 27A and 27F are shown seated on their wobbly mounting support posts 27M and 27N which are shown in phantom lines. Toy FIGS. 27A and 27B play on a Merry Go Round 27E and toy FIGS. 27F and 27G play on the Seesaw 27D. The movement of the Merry Go Round and the SeeSaw induce the toy figures to wobble in relation to the Merry Go Round and SeeSaw when the Seesaw and Merry Go Round are moved while the toy figures are placed upon their wobbly mounting support posts. A wobbly mounting support post 27C is shown that has no toy figures in its proximity. 27C′ is a view of 27C shown in elevation in a cross-sectional view running vertically through the center of wobbly mounting support post 27C. Shown in 27C′ is the outer portion of the wobbly post 27R, a coil spring 27P which is permanently affixed to the inner portion of the post at the top end of the coil spring. The coil spring is permanently affixed at its bottom end to a base support 27Q of the Merry Go Round. The wobbly post 27C protrudes through a hole in the top surface 27S of the Merry Go Round. In addition, all of the toy figures have flat bottoms that allow them to stand and can be played with separately, apart from the Playset, for free play. All of the toy figures wobble in relation to the Merry Go Round and SeeSaw and are interchangeable upon all of the posts in the Playset.
  • [0070]
    FIG. 50, is an action mechanism designed to enable a removable toy figure and its mounting support to wobble and also to stop a removable toy figure, and its mounting support upon which it sits, from wobbling. The action mechanism consists of a circular mounting area 50A upon which a toy figure is placed. The underside of this mounting area is permanently affixed to the top end of a coil spring 50F. The coil spring at its bottom end is fixedly attached to a base support 50C. Also fixedly attached to the underside of the mounting support 50A is a cylinder 50D which surrounds most of the coil spring. The cylinder 50D surrounds the spring loosely enough to allow movement of the spring within it. The cylinder 50D extends downwardly toward the supporting base but does not extend all the way down to the base support, to which the bottom end of the coil spring 50F is permanently affixed. This allows for enough room for the cylinder and spring to wobble without restriction from the cylinder. A pretend steel girder 50B, or other similar shape is inserted between the bottom side of the toy figure mounting support 50A and the top side of the base support 50C to cease the wobbling action of the upper structure and stabilize it. This said upper structure consists of the mounted toy figure (not shown), the mounting support 50A, the cylinder 50D and the coil spring 50F to stop the wobbling action. The girder is removable. The animating coil spring 50F, the cylinder 50D surrounding the spring and a portion of the base 50B are shown in phantom lines. Importantly, shown in phantom lines is a central slot 50E, shown with an arrow, in the horizontal portion of the girder 50B, running along the length of the girder. The slot 50E is wide enough to allow the stabilizing girder 50B to easily pass around the cylinder 50D.
  • [0071]
    FIG. 17, shows a cross-sectional elevational view of a removable toy FIG. 17F, mounted on a wobbly support 17E as disclosed in FIG. 50. A stabilizing girder 17C is shown inserted between the toy figure mounting support 17E and the top surface of the base support 17D below. The girder is shown in elevation. The cross-section is taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 50. This line runs vertically along the center of the mounting support, spring, surrounding cylinder, and base. The mounting support 17E and attached cylinder 17A, animating coil spring 17B and lower support base 17D are shown in this vertical cross-section. The slot 17G in the girder which passes around the cylinder is shown in horizontal phantom lines.
  • [0072]
    FIG. 18, is identical to FIG. 17 except that the shape of the stabilizing girder 18C that is inserted between the figure mounting 18B and the base support 18D is different in shape. In 18C the slot that surrounds the cylinder 18A is more squared as shown in 21B of FIG. 21 than that shown in 20C of FIG. 20 which is a plan view of the girder 17C of FIG. 17. In addition, the sides and ends of the girder 18C consist of I-Beams as seen in FIG. 41, instead of being one large girder with a slot down its center as shown in 20C of FIG. 20, and FIG. 40.
  • [0073]
    FIG. 19, discloses a means for stopping the wobbling action that is similar to FIG. 17 and FIG. 18. It varies in that the shape of the stabilizing girder 19C is a flat rectangular plate, which is inserted between the bottom of the cylinder 19A and the top surface of the base support 19B.
  • [0074]
    FIG. 20, is a plan view of the stabilizing girder as disclosed in FIG. 17 The views of this girder are marked 20B and 20C. The figure mounting support is marked 20D and the cylinder that surrounds the coil spring is marked 20A and is shown in phantom lines. The inner portion of the slot 20E that surrounds the cylinder and part of the girder that stabilizes the wobbling are also shown in phantom lines.
  • [0075]
    FIG. 21, is a plan view of a stabilizing girder 21B and toy figure mounting support 21D as disclosed in FIG. 18. The cylinder containing the animating spring and the inner part of the girder are shown in phantom lines.
  • [0076]
    FIG. 22, shows a plan view of a slidable stabilizing flat plate as disclosed in FIG. 19. It is shown in two variations marked 22C and 22A. Example 22A shows the slidable stabilizing plate with two stops at its open end that would limit the plate from being removed from the toy. Example 22 is simply a flattened plate with a slot running along its length with no stops to limit its removal from the toy.
  • [0077]
    FIG. 25, discloses a perspective view of an Earthquake Playset in which a building structure 25F is fixedly attached on its bottom side to the top ends of coil springs 25B, which at their bottom ends are fixedly attached to the top surface of a horizontal plate 25P, which rests slightly above the level upon which the entire Playset rests. The top surface of this plate 25P is also on a level that is just below the bottom side of the girder structure 25C. The number of springs may vary from between one and four depending on building size and strength of springs. Two are shown for illustration purposes. In practice, three springs arranged in a triangle offer a wide range of motion and good support of the building structure. The building 25F is then enabled to wobble as if in an Earthquake when the pretend ground 25G is moved. There is disclosed a movable stabilizing girder structure 25C in the form of three attached I-Beams in a U shape shown in the inserted position between the bottom side of the building structure 25F and an inner horizontal plate 25P within the pretend ground 25G below the girder. The girder in it's inserted position under the building structure stops the building from wobbling on the coil springs 25B. The inserted portion of the girder is shown in phantom lines. The girder is fashioned in this U shape to make it easier for a child to insert two girders at once to stabilize the building structure, although separate girders or other similar shaped structures may be inserted as well.
  • [0078]
    Removable toy FIGS. 25A, 25J, and 25K are mounted upon wobbly springy supports both on the pretend ground 25G of the Playset and the roof of the building structure 25F. Wobbly springy toy figure mountings 25N, 25H, 25L, 25M and 25K are shown, upon which the various removable toy figures can be placed in a pressure fit or other fit where it is appropriate. The bottom ends of the coil springs (not shown) of wobbly posts 25L, 25H and 25N are permanently affixed to a lower ground plate (not shown) of the pretend ground 25C. The bottom ends of the coil springs (not shown)of wobbly posts 25M and 25K are permanently affixed to a plate (not shown) below the roof top floor, or directly to the rooftop floor, whichever is desired. Toy FIG. 25J matches wobbly post 25L specifically. The other two FIGS. 25A and 25K can be placed upon on any of the other four wobbly mounting supports 25H, 25N, 25K, and 25M making them interchangeable upon the four mentioned posts for additional play. When the pretend ground 25G is moved laterally the toy figures and the building will wobble as if in a Giant Earthquake.
  • [0079]
    FIG. 26, discloses a perspective view of an Earthquake Playset similar to the Earthquake Playset disclosed in FIG. 25. In FIG. 26, however, the entire pretend ground 26C is placed upon four coil springs 26G which permanently attach at their top ends to a plate (not shown) covering the bottom of the pretend ground 26C. The coil springs at their bottom ends fixedly attach to two flat plates 26E upon which the structure above rests. This additional springy structure allows the pretend ground 26C, the building 26F and the wobbly toy figure mounting support 26L to wobble when the ground 26C is pressed or when the Playset is moved. Additional removable girders 26N and 26H are disclosed that can be inserted between the underside of the pretend ground 26C above and the lower ground plate 26A below, on which the pretend ground spring supports 26E rest. The hidden inserted portions of the removable stabilizing girders 26N, 26H and 26D are shown in phantom lines. Two additional removable wobbly toy FIGS. 26J and 26P are disclosed. Toy FIG. 26P is on a wobbly mounting support similar to that disclosed in FIG. 50 and the other wobbly toy FIG. 26J is shown in a vehicle 26L. The wobbly mounting support post in the vehicle is not shown, but is similar to that shown in FIG. 23. Finally, the entire Playset rests on a slidable ground plate 26A that may be a separate part or be affixed to the upper portion of the Playset. This ground plate 26A, when moved laterally, enables all of the movable elements of the entire Playset above to wobble simultaneously, to create a Giant Earthquake Experience.
  • [0080]
    FIG. 28, discloses an Earthquake Playset similar to that disclosed in FIG. 25 and FIG. 26. A building tower structure 28Z is shown with an arrow, is comprised of separate levels 28G, 28P and 28Q. Each level is separated by a connecting coil spring or springs 28D, 28E and 28F. In similar manner to FIG. 25 and FIG. 26, pretend girders such as 28 H can be inserted between the levels of the building structures to stabilize them. In addition, rectangular flat panels such as 28C, can be attached to the outer surface of the building structure with snap fit or other common means, connecting the wobbling building segments to stabilize them. Removable toy figures such as 28A, can be placed upon this building structure upon springy wobbly mounting supports such as 28B. Stabilizing girders such as 28L, similar to 50B shown in FIG. 50 can be introduced through slots 28M or 28J in a railing surrounding the area where the wobbling figures are positioned, if such a railing is provided. The girders, such as 50B can be positioned directly if no railing is provided.
  • [0081]
    The removable toy figures can be placed on wobbly mounting supports such as those disclosed in FIGS. 15, 23, 6, 19 or any of the others disclosed in the present invention, or other similar wobbly mounting supports. The use of various stabilizing elements appropriate to the different kinds of wobbly mounting supports to limit their wobbly movement falls within the scope of the present invention.
  • [0082]
    With respect to the above description of the present invention, having been put forth in detail as to the aim, function, manner of operation, basic construction and variations in construction, and applications, it is expected that these descriptions are readily understood by someone skilled in the art of the present invention. It is understood that this description is illustrative only of the principles of the invention. It is not desired to limit the invention to the exact shape, function, operation, construction, and application described. Therefore, it is understood that all modifications, adoptions, applications and variations of the present invention that fall within known or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains, shall fall within the scope of the invention.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification446/309
International ClassificationA63H11/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/18, A63H13/005
European ClassificationA63H13/18, A63H13/00B