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Publication numberUS20070117652 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/622,994
Publication dateMay 24, 2007
Filing dateJan 12, 2007
Priority dateMar 29, 2001
Also published asUS6991558, US7198575, US20020160854, US20060035722, WO2002078794A1
Publication number11622994, 622994, US 2007/0117652 A1, US 2007/117652 A1, US 20070117652 A1, US 20070117652A1, US 2007117652 A1, US 2007117652A1, US-A1-20070117652, US-A1-2007117652, US2007/0117652A1, US2007/117652A1, US20070117652 A1, US20070117652A1, US2007117652 A1, US2007117652A1
InventorsTodd Beach, David Anderson, Benoit Vincent
Original AssigneeTaylor Made Golf Company, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club head
US 20070117652 A1
Abstract
A club head for a golf club comprises a strike face and an outer shell. The strike face and the outer shell define a head volume of the club head. The club head has a first axis that extends generally horizontally and parallel to the strike face, a first moment of inertia about the first axis, a second axis that lies generally vertically and perpendicular to the first axis, a second moment of inertia about the second axis, and a center of gravity lying below a horizontal centerline of the club head. The first moment of inertia in units of kg-mm2 is greater than or equal to approximately 77 plus 0.46 times the head volume in units of cm3.
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Claims(47)
1-29. (canceled)
30: A golf club head comprising:
an outer shell;
a strike plate coupled to the outer shell, the strike plate having a strike face, the outer shell and the strike face defining a club head volume greater than 300 cm3;
a heel/toe axis extending through a center of gravity of the club head, generally parallel to the strike face, and generally horizontal relative to a ground plane when the club head is at an address position, wherein a rotational moment of inertia about the heel/toe axis is related to the club head volume by the equation Ixx≧0.46*HV+107, where Ixx is the rotational moment of inertia about the heel/toe axis in units of kg-mm2 and HV is the club head volume in units of cm3; and
a vertical axis extending through the center of gravity of the club head generally perpendicular to the heel/toe axis, wherein a rotational moment of inertia about the vertical axis is greater than or equal to 300 kg-mm2.
31: The golf club head of claim 30, further comprising a hosel axis extending axially through the hosel, wherein a horizontal distance measured between the center of gravity and the hosel axis is less than 30 mm.
32: The golf club head of claim 31, wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 250 grams.
33: The golf club head of claim 32, wherein the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
34: The golf club head of claim 32, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline.
35: The golf club head of claim 32, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.
36: The golf club head of claim 31, wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 210 grams.
37: The golf club head of claim 36, wherein the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
38: The golf club head of claim 36, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline.
39: The golf club head of claim 36, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.
40: The golf club head of claim 30, further comprising a hosel axis extending axially through the hosel, wherein a horizontal distance measured between the center of gravity and the hosel axis is between about 12 mm to about 25 mm.
41: The golf club head of claim 40, wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 250 grams.
42: The golf club head of claim 41, wherein the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
43: The golf club head of claim 41, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline.
44: The golf club head of claim 41, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.
45: The golf club head of claim 40, wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 210 grams.
46: The golf club head of claim 45, wherein the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
47: The golf club head of claim 45, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline.
48: The golf club head of claim 45, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.
49: The golf club head of claim 30, further comprising a hosel axis extending axially through the hosel, wherein a horizontal distance measured between the center of gravity and the hosel axis is between about 16 mm to about 20 mm.
50: The golf club head of claim 49, wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 250 grams.
51: The golf club head of claim 50, wherein the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
52: The golf club head of claim 50, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline.
53: The golf club head of claim 50, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.
54: The golf club head of claim 49, wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 210 grams.
55: The golf club head of claim 54, wherein the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
56: The golf club head of claim 54, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline.
57: The golf club head of claim 54, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.
58: The golf club head of claim 30, further comprising a hosel axis extending axially through the hosel, wherein a horizontal distance measured between the center of gravity and the hosel axis is between about 17 mm to about 18 mm.
59: The golf club head of claim 58, wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 250 grams.
60: The golf club head of claim 59, wherein the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
61: The golf club head of claim 59, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline.
62: The golf club head of claim 59, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.
63: The golf club head of claim 58, wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 210 grams.
64: The golf club head of claim 63, wherein the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
65: The golf club head of claim 63, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline.
66: The golf club head of claim 63, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.
67: A golf club head comprising:
an outer shell;
a strike plate coupled to the outer shell, the strike plate having a strike face, the outer shell and the strike face defining a club head volume greater than 300 cm3;
a plurality of weights attached to or integrally formed with the outer shell, the plurality of weights formed from a material having a density greater than that of the materials used to form the outer shell and the strike plate, wherein the plurality of weights comprise about 10 percent to about 40 percent of the total mass of the club head;
a heel/toe axis extending through a center of gravity of the club head, generally parallel to the strike face, and generally horizontal relative to a ground plane when the club head is at an address position, wherein a rotational moment of inertia about the heel/toe axis is related to the club head volume by the equation Ixx≧0.46*HV+107, where Ixx is the rotational moment of inertia about the heel/toe axis in units of kg-mm2 and HV is the club head volume in units of cm3; and
a vertical axis extending through the center of gravity of the club head generally perpendicular to the heel/toe axis, wherein a rotational moment of inertia about the vertical axis is greater than or equal to 300 kg-mm2; and
a hosel axis extending axially through the hosel, wherein a horizontal distance measured between the center of gravity and the hosel axis is less than 30 mm;
wherein the club head has a total mass within a range of about 180 grams to about 250 grams.
68: The golf club head of claim 67, wherein:
the outer shell is comprised of a composite material;
the center of gravity is disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head; and
at least one of the plurality of weights is disposed near a rear end of the club head.
68. The golf club head of claim 68, wherein the center of gravity is disposed at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline of the club head.
69: The golf club head of claim 69, wherein the center of gravity is disposed more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline of the club head.
70: The golf club head of claim 68, wherein the horizontal distance measured between the center of gravity and the hosel axis is between about 12 mm to about 25 mm.
71: The golf club head of claim 71, wherein the horizontal distance measured between the center of gravity and the hosel axis is between about 16 mm to about 20 mm.
72: The golf club head of claim 68 wherein the plurality of weights are disposed within corresponding recesses formed in the outer shell.
73: The golf club head of claim 68, wherein the plurality of weights are comprised of tungsten.
74: The golf club head of claim 68, wherein the plurality of weights are disposed below a horizontal centerline of the club head.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/214,559, filed Aug. 31, 2005, which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 09/821,370, filed Mar. 29, 2001, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,991,558, which are herein incorporated by reference for all purposes.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to golf clubs, and, in particular, to a golf club head with a designated relationship between the volume of the club head and the rotational inertia of the club head about a particular axis.

2. Description of the Related Art

A wood-type golf club typically includes a hollow shaft with a golf club head attached to the lower end of the shaft. The club head typically includes a load-bearing outer shell with an integral or attached strike plate. The strike plate defines a front surface or strike face adapted for striking a golf ball.

The mass of a club head is limited by various practical considerations, such as the desire to keep the swing weight of the golf club close to a conventional value. Accordingly, most club heads have a mass between 180-250 grams. A certain portion of the club head's mass is reserved for components that provide structural support, such as the load bearing outer shell. The remaining mass, which is referred to as performance mass, can be distributed within the club head to optimize performance.

For some time, golf club manufacturers have searched for ways to best distribute the performance mass so as to improve club head performance. Recently, golf club manufacturers have attempted to position most of the performance mass along the perimeter of the club head so as to increase the rotational moment of inertia (“MOI”) of the club head about the club head center of gravity (“CG”). In particular, many club heads include two or more weights spaced along the heel/toe axis (i.e., an axis that extends through the club head CG generally parallel to the strike face in a generally horizontal direction relative to the ground when the club head is at address position). Such perimeter weighting increases the MOI of the club head about the vertical axis (i.e., an axis that extends through the club head CG in a generally vertical direction relative to the ground when the club head is at address position). This tends to make the club head more resistant to twisting during off-center hits. However, as will be explained below, such perimeter weighting represents an inefficient use of the performance mass.

An exception to the general trend of heel/toe weighting is U.S. Pat. No. 5,176,383, which discloses a club head with a weight positioned at the rear of a support. The support and the weight are in-line with the center of percussion of the club head. This patent claims that this arrangement concentrates the inertial energy of the club head along the center of percussion, which, in turn, maximizes the amount of energy that is imparted to the golf ball. However, a golf club according to this patent disadvantageously has a CG that is above the horizontal centerline of the golf club.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one embodiment of the invention, a golf club head comprises a strike face and an outer shell. The strike face and the outer shell define a head volume of the club head. The club head has a first axis that extends generally horizontally and parallel to the strike face, a first moment of inertia about the first axis, a second axis that lies generally vertically and perpendicular to the first axis, a second moment of inertia about the second axis, and a center of gravity lying below a horizontal centerline of the club head. The first moment of inertia in units of kg-mm2 is greater than or equal to approximately 77 plus 0.46 times the head volume in units of cm3.

In another embodiment of the invention, the first moment of inertia in units of kg-mm2 is greater than or equal to approximately 107 plus 0.46 times the head volume in units of cm3.

In another embodiment of the invention, the center of gravity lies more than 1 mm below the horizontal centerline. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the center of gravity lies more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline.

In another embodiment of the invention, the club head has a mass of less than 250 grams. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the club head has a mass of less than 230 grams. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the club head has a mass of less than 210 grams.

In another embodiment of the invention, the club head has a volume greater than 300 cm3. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the club head has a volume less than 200 cm3.

In another embodiment of the invention, the second moment of inertia is greater than 250 kg-mm2. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the second moment of inertia is greater than 300 kg-mm2.

In another embodiment of the invention, the club head includes a plurality of weights.

For purposes of summarizing the invention and the advantages achieved over the prior art, certain objects and advantages of the invention have been described herein above. Of course, it is to be understood that not necessarily all such objects or advantages may be achieved in accordance with any particular embodiment of the invention. Thus, for example, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention may be embodied or carried out in a manner that achieves or optimizes one advantage or group of advantages as taught herein without necessarily achieving other objects or advantages as may be taught or suggested herein.

All of these embodiments are intended to be within the scope of the invention herein disclosed. These and other embodiments of the present invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments having reference to the attached figures, the invention not being limited to any particular preferred embodiment(s) disclosed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other features of the invention will now be described with reference to the drawings of a preferred embodiment, which are intended to illustrate and not to limit the invention, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a front view of a golf club head centered about a coordinate system;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a golf club striking a golf ball;

FIG. 3 is a side view of a golf club striking a golf ball;

FIG. 4 is another side view of a golf club illustrating the location of the center of gravity;

FIG. 5 is a front perspective view of the golf club head having certain features and advantages according to the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a front view of the golf club head of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the golf club head of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a bottom perspective view of the golf club head of FIG. 4;

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a club head 10 located about a coordinate system 12. The coordinate system 12 is centered about the center of gravity (“CG”) of the club head. As is typical in the art, the club head 10 comprises a strike plate 14, which defines a front surface or strike face 16 for impacting a golf ball. A hosel 18 extends upwardly from the strike plate 14. The hosel 18 is used to attach the club head 10 to a golf club shaft (not shown) as is well known in the art. The club head 10 also includes a load bearing outer shell 20 that is either integrally made with or attached to the strike plate 14. A heel region 22 of the club head 10 is located close to the hosel 18 while the toe region 24 of the club head is located opposite the heel region 22.

The coordinate system 12 comprises three axes: (i) a vertical axis 26 that extends through the CG generally parallel to the strike face 16 in a generally vertical direction relative to the ground when the club head 10 is at address position, (ii) a heel/toe axis 28 that extends through the CG generally parallel to the strike face 16 and generally perpendicular to the vertical axis 26, and (iii) a front/back axis 30 that extends through the CG generally perpendicular to the vertical axis 26 and the heel/toe axis 28. Heel/toe axis 28 and front/back axis 30 both extend in a generally horizontal direction relative to the ground when the club head 10 is at address position.

The club head 10 has a rotational moment of inertia (i.e., a resistance to twisting) about each of the three axes. Specifically, the club head 10 has a moment of inertia (“Izz”) about the vertical axis 26, a moment of inertia (“Ixx”) about the heel/toe axis 28, and a moment of inertia (“Iyy”) about the front/back axis 30. The methods for determining these moments of inertia for any particular club head are well known to those skilled in the art.

An aspect of Applicant's invention is the realization that preferably most or more preferably all of the performance mass of the club head 10 should be arranged so as to increase the moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28 and the moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26. FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a golf ball 32 hitting the strike face 16 of a club head 10. As is not unusual in golf, the club head 10 is shown striking the golf ball 32 “off-center”. In this case, the golfball 32 has hit the club head 10 near the toe 24 of the club head (i.e., a “side off-center hit”). The side off-center hit causes the club head 10 to twist about the vertical axis 26 as shown by arrow 27A. This tends to produce an inaccurate shot.

To mitigate the twisting about the vertical axis 26 during such side off-center hits, golf club manufacturers have typically sought to increase the golf club's moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26 by concentrating at least some of the performance weight along the heel/toe axis 28. For example, heel/toe weights, which are indicated by the reference number 25, can be added to the club head 10 to increase the club head's moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26. This produces more accurate shots.

However, such heel/toe weights 25 do not necessarily improve performance during all off-center hits. For example, FIG. 3 is a side view of the club head 10 striking a golf ball 32. As with FIG. 2, the club head 10 has struck the golf ball 32 off-center. However, in this case, the golf ball 32 has hit the club head 10 below the center of the club head (i.e., a “vertical off-center hit”). This type of off-center hit causes the club head 10 to twist about the heel/toe axis 28 as indicated by arrow 27B. However, heel/toe weights 25 do not increase the club head's moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28. Thus, they do not reduce the tendency of the club head 10 to twist about the heel/toe axis 28. Accordingly, heel/toe weights 25 do not improve the golf club's performance during vertical off-center hits. Heel/toe weights 25 do increase the club head's moment of inertia Iyy about the front/back axis 30. However, it has been determined that during off-center hits the club head 10 tends not to rotate about this axis. Accordingly, the moment of inertia Iyy about the front/back axis 30 is not as effective in improving club head performance.

In contrast, front/back weights 29, which are spaced substantially about the front/back axis 30, increase the club head's moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28. Thus, front/back weights 29 improve the golf club's performance during vertical off-center hits. Moreover, as shown in FIG. 2, such front/back weights 29 also increase the club head's moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26. Therefore, front/back weights 29 improve the club head's performance during side off-center hits and vertical off-center hits.

Another aspect of the invention is the recognition that the performance mass of the club head 10 should also be arranged such that the club head has a low CG. More specifically, as shown in FIG. 4, the CG of the club head 10 is preferably located below a horizontal centerline 31 of the club head (i.e., the line 31 that extends through the geometric center of the strike face 16 and bisects a vertical line 33, which extends perpendicularly from the ground 35 to the top of the strike face 16 when the club head 10 is in the normal address position). Consequently, in some embodiments the performance mass is concentrated below the physical center of the club head. In contrast, most golf clubs have a CG above the horizontal centerline 31.

The vertical distance between the CG and the horizontal centerline 31 will be referred to as CGz. As mentioned above, a club head 10 desirably has CG that lies below the horizontal centerline 31, which extends through the geometric center of the strike face 16. Preferably, the CG lies at least 1 millimeter below the horizontal centerline 31 (i.e., CGz is at least 1 mm). More preferably, CGz is at least 2 millimeters. It is difficult to design wood-type clubs with a CG below the horizontal centerline 31. Accordingly, the front/back weights 29 of the club head 10 preferably are located entirely below the horizontal center line 31 of the club head. Moreover, moving the CG even a small distance below the horizontal centerline 31 has a large effect on the golf shot. For example, failure to get the golf ball air borne results in drastically reduced shot distance. A low CG helps the golfer get a golf ball air borne. Specifically, a lower CG increases the launch angle of a golf shot because when the CG is below the point of impact the strike face 16 rotates in such away that it increases the loft of the golf club.

The club head 10 preferably should also be arranged such that the CG is located not too far back from a shaft or hosel axis 37 of the club head (i.e., a line that extends axially through the center of the shaft and the hosel). The horizontal distance measured in a direction back from the strike face 16 between the CG and the hosel axis 37 will be referred to as Delta 1. Preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 12-25 millimeters. More preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 16-20 millimeters. Most preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 17-18 millimeters. Delta 1 can be manipulated by varying the mass in front of the CG (i.e., closer to the face) with respect to the mass behind the CG. That is, by increasing the mass behind the CG with respect to the mass in front of the CG, Delta 1 can be increased. In a similar manner, by increasing the mass in front of the CG with respect to the mass behind the CG Delta 1 can be decreased. The above ranges for Delta 1 are preferred for several reasons. If Delta 1 is too far forward, the trajectory of the golf ball tends to be too low and to the right, especially in large club heads (e.g., club heads having a head volume greater than 300 cm3). Conversely, if Delta 1 is too far back the trajectory of the golf ball tends to be too high and the golf ball tends to have too much spin.

With reference now to FIGS. 5-8 a preferred construction of a golf club head 50 with certain features and advantages according to the present invention will now be described. As shown in FIG. 5, the club head 50 is comprised of a strike plate 58. The strike plate 58 defines a front surface or strike face 60 for impacting a golf ball. A hosel 62 extends upwardly from the strike plate 58. The hosel 62 is configured to be coupled to a golf club shaft (not shown) in a well known manner. The strike plate 58 and hosel 62 are preferably made of a strong yet light weight metal, such as titanium or a composite material. Of course, other suitable materials can be used.

The club head 50 further comprises a load bearing outer shell 64 that is preferably attached to the strike plate 58. As with the strike plate 58, the outer shell is preferably made of a strong yet light weight metal, such as, for example) titanium or a composite material. Of course, other suitable materials can be used. The outer shell 64 preferably defines an interior cavity 65 (see FIG. 7) within the club head 50. Together the strike plate 58 and the outer shell 64 define a head volume (i.e., “HV”) of the club head 50. The head volume HV represents the volume occupied by the club head 50 and is traditionally measured in cm3. Head volume is an important design parameter. Other things being equal, it is easier to achieve a higher rotational moment of inertia about the CG in a club head that defines a larger head volume as compared to a club head that defines a smaller head volume. This is because the performance weight can be distributed farther from the CG in a club head with a large head volume. Conversely, other things being equal, it is easier to achieve a lower CG in a club head with a small head volume as compared to a club head with a large head volume. Accordingly, a design compromise must be made between desired inertial characteristics of the club head and the location of the CG. Moreover, golfers generally do not like the look and feel of unusually large or small club heads. Thus, the head volume of the club head 50 preferably is between 200-450 cm3.

With reference to FIG. 6, the club head 50 includes a toe region 66 and a heel region 68, as will be known to those of skill in the art. The bottom of the club head 50 is delimited in part by a sole 70 and the top of the club head is delimited by a crown 72. The features of the club head 50 described up to this point can be considered conventional.

Golfers prefer a driver type golf club to have a total mass of less than 250 grams. Therefore, the club head 50 preferably has a total mass of less than 250 grams. More preferably, the club head 50 has a total mass of less than 230 grams. Most preferably, the club head 50 has a total mass of less than 210 grams. A lighter club head 50 is preferred because it reduces the swing weight of the golf club. However, a lighter club head 50 also has less performance mass available to increase the rotational inertia of the club head 50 about the club head CG. Thus, a design compromise must be made between the total mass of the club head 50 and the desired rotational inertia characteristics of the club head.

The structural members (i.e., the outer shell 64 and the strike plate 58) comprise approximately 60%-90% of the total mass of the club head 50. The remaining 40%-10% of the club head mass constitutes the performance mass, which is preferably distributed in weight plugs or weights 74 described below.

FIGS. 7 and 8 show cross-sectional side and bottom views, respectively, of the club head 50. In the preferred embodiment, the golf club head 50 includes two or more weights or plugs 74 a, 74 b that are situated within corresponding recesses 76 a, 76 b formed in the outer shell 64. In the illustrated embodiment, the weights 74 a, 74 b are removably coupled to the sole 70 of the club head 50 by screws 78. However, it should be appreciated that the weights 74 a, 74 b can be coupled to the club head 50 by using an adhesive, brazing, etc., or the weights may be integrally formed with the sole 70. The weights 74 a, 74 b preferably are made of a material, such as, for example, tungsten, that is denser than the material(s) that form the outer shell 64 and the strike plate 58.

As best seen in FIG. 8, the weights 74 a, 74 b are preferably located along a front/back axis 80 that extends generally perpendicularly away from the strike face 60 of the club head 50. More preferably, one of the weights 74 a is located along the front back axis 80 near the strike plate 58 and the other weight 74 b is also located along the front back axis 80 near a rear end 81 of the club head 50.

In addition, as best seen in FIG. 7, both of the weights 74 a, 74 b are preferably located below the horizontal centerline 82 of the club head 50. This arrangement is preferred because it moves the CG of the club head 50 to a position below the horizontal centerline 82.

The club head 50 described above preferably has a moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28 that is significantly greater than conventional club heads (i.e., interior volumes between 200-350 cm3 and a mass between 180-250 grams). As mentioned above, the inertial properties of a club head are dependent upon the head volume. Accordingly, the club head 50 preferably has a moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28 as set forth below in equation 1.
Ixx≧0.46*HV+77  (1)

    • where: HV is club head volume in units of cm3
      • Ixx is in units of kg-mm2
        More preferably, the club head 50 has a moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28 as set forth below in equation 2.
        Ixx≧0.46*HV+107  (2)
    • where: HV is club head volume in units of cm3
      • Ixx is in units of kg-mm2
        The higher moments of inertia Ixx of equation 2 can be achieved by reducing or holding constant the mass of the shell 64 and/or the strike plate 58 while increasing or holding constant the mass of the weights 74 a, 74 b while also giving due consideration to the structural integrity of the club head 50.

In addition, the CG of the club head 50 preferably lies below the horizontal centerline 82 of the club head 50. More preferably, the CG is more than 1 mm below the horizontal centerline 82 of the club head 50. The lower CG can be achieved by increasing the mass of the weights 74 a, 74 b while reducing or holding constant the mass of the shell 64 and strike plate 58. The CG can also be reduced by decreasing the thickness of the weights 74 a, 74 b and/or decreasing the density of the weights 74 a, 74 b.

Preferably, the club head 50 also has a moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26 that is at least 250 kg-mm2. More preferably, the club head has a moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26 of at least 300 kg-mm2. As with the moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28, the moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26 can be increased by reducing or holding constant the mass of the shell 64 and/or the strike plate 58 while increasing or holding constant the mass of the weights 74 while also giving due consideration to the structural integrity of the club head 50.

As mentioned above, the Delta 1 of the club head 50 preferably is less than 30 mm. Preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 12-25 mm. More preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 16-20 mm. Most preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 17-18 mm.

The club head 50 described above has generally traditional dimensions as a driver-type wood (i.e., the head volume is between 200 and 300 cm3). However, some golfers prefer a “large” club head. That is, some golfers prefer a club head that defines an interior volume greater than 300 cm3 and a mass between about 180-210 grams. If such a club head is desired, it can be constructed as described above by enlarging the size of the strike plate 58 and the outer shell 64.

As with the club head 50 described above, the club head preferably has a moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28 as set forth above in equation 1. More preferably, the club head 50 has a moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28 as set forth in equation 2. The CG of the club head 50 also preferably lies below the horizontal centerline 82 of the club head. More preferably, the CG is more than 1 mm below the horizontal centerline 82 of the club head 50. Preferably, the club head 50 also has a moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26 that is at least 250 kg-mm2. More preferably, the club head has a moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26 of at least 300 kg-mm2. Preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 12-25 mm. More preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 16-20 mm. Most preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 17-18 mm.

In a modified arrangement, the club head 50 may comprise a smaller driver or a fairway wood club head. This smaller club head defines a head volume of less than 200 cm3 and a mass between about 200-250 grams. If such a club head 50 is desired, it also can be constructed as described above by adjusting the shape and size of the strike plate 58 and the outer shell 64. As with the club bead 50 described above, a smaller driver or fairway wood type club head preferably has a moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28 as set forth above in equation 1. More preferably, the club head 50 has a moment of inertia Ixx about the heel/toe axis 28 as set forth in equation 2. The CG of the club head 50 also preferably lies at least 1 mm below the horizontal centerline 82 of the club head 50. More preferably, the CG is more than 2 mm below the horizontal centerline 82 of the club head 50. Preferably, the club head 50 also has a moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26 that is at least 200 kg-mm2. More preferably, the club head 50 has a moment of inertia Izz about the vertical axis 26 of at least 250 kg-mm2. Delta 1 preferably is in the range of 12-25 mm. More preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 16-20 mm. Most preferably, Delta 1 is in the range of 17-18 mm.

For purposes of describing the invention and the advantages achieved over the prior art, certain objects and advantages of the invention have been described above. Of course, it is to be understood that not necessarily all such objects or advantages may be achieved in accordance with any particular embodiment of the invention. Thus, for example, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention may be embodied or carried out in a manner that achieves or optimizes one advantage or group of advantages as taught herein without necessarily achieving other objects or advantages as may be taught or suggested herein.

Moreover, although this invention has been disclosed in the context of certain preferred embodiments and examples, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the present invention extends beyond the specifically disclosed embodiments to other alternative embodiments and/or uses of the invention and obvious modifications and equivalents thereof. In addition, while a number of variations of the invention have been shown and described in detail, other modifications, which are within the scope of this invention, will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art based upon this disclosure. It is also contemplated that various combination or subcombinations of the specific features and aspects of the embodiments may be made and still fall within the scope of the invention. Accordingly, it should be understood that various features and aspects of the disclosed embodiments can be combine with or substituted for one another in order to form varying modes of the disclosed invention. Thus, it is intended that the scope of the present invention herein disclosed should not be limited by the particular disclosed embodiments described above, but should be determined only by a fair reading of the claims that follow.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8636609 *Oct 11, 2007Jan 28, 2014Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head having dent resistant thin crown
US20080132356 *Oct 11, 2007Jun 5, 2008Bing-Ling ChaoGolf club head having dent resistant thin crown
US20130190104 *Mar 13, 2013Jul 25, 2013Nike, IncGolf Club with Adjustable Weight
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/349, 473/324, 473/313, 473/345, 473/335
International ClassificationA63B53/04, A63B53/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2053/0416, A63B2053/0491, A63B2053/0412, A63B53/04, A63B2053/0408, A63B53/0466, A63B2053/0433
European ClassificationA63B53/04, A63B53/04L