Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20070145686 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/640,611
Publication dateJun 28, 2007
Filing dateDec 18, 2006
Priority dateDec 23, 2005
Publication number11640611, 640611, US 2007/0145686 A1, US 2007/145686 A1, US 20070145686 A1, US 20070145686A1, US 2007145686 A1, US 2007145686A1, US-A1-20070145686, US-A1-2007145686, US2007/0145686A1, US2007/145686A1, US20070145686 A1, US20070145686A1, US2007145686 A1, US2007145686A1
InventorsAdam Wisniewski
Original AssigneeAdam Wisniewski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple choice card game
US 20070145686 A1
Abstract
The present invention generally relates to a card game for entertainment and amusement. Playing cards depicting known public figures, celebrities, fictional characters, or non-fictional characters are dealt to players. Players then play cards from their hands in rounds based upon categories. For each round, players vote on which player played the most suitable card, and that player wins the round and can be awarded one or more points. The winner of the game is the player who has won the most rounds, or accumulated the most points, once all of the cards have been played.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
1. A method of playing a card game comprising the steps of:
a) providing a deck comprising a plurality of cards depicting people;
b) providing at least two categories of play;
d) dealing cards to at least two players;
e) determining a category of play;
f) playing a round by having each player play a card;
g) having each player vote on which played card best suits the category;
h) awarding at least one point to the player receiving the most votes; and
i) repeating steps e-h until all of the cards have been played.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the cards depict people selected from the group consisting of celebrities, public figures, non-fictional characters, fictional characters, and combinations thereof.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein each card depicts a male person or a female person.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least two categories are selected from the group comprising husband, wife, lover, girlfriend, boyfriend, boy next door, girl next door, hottest, hottie, sexiest, finest, sweetest, one-night stand, date, friend, best friend, style, sugar daddy, bad boy, bad girl, and ultimate prize.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein at least four categories are provided.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein at least twenty cards are provided.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein the number of cards is between twenty and one hundred.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the number of cards is at least forty five.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein the category of play is determined by selecting a category in order from a numbered list.
10. The method of claim 1, wherein the category of play is determined by rolling at least one dice.
11. The method of claim 1, wherein each player plays a card by first laying the card face down and then having all the players turn their card face up in turn or simultaneously.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein each player plays a card by laying the card face up for the other players to see.
13. A method of playing a card game comprising the steps of:
a) providing a deck comprising between twenty and one hundred cards depicting people;
b) providing at least two categories of play;
d) dealing cards to at least two players;
e) determining a category of play having a number of points associated therewith;
f) playing a round by having each player play a card;
g) having each player vote on which played card best suits the category;
h) awarding the number of points associated with the category of play to the player receiving the most votes; and
i) repeating steps e-h until all of the cards have been played.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein each card depicts a male person or a female person.
15. The method of claim 13, wherein the at least two categories are selected from the group comprising husband, wife, lover, girlfriend, boyfriend, boy next door, girl next door, hottest, hottie, sexiest, finest, sweetest, one-night stand, date, friend, best friend, style, sugar daddy, bad boy, bad girl, and ultimate prize.
16. The method of claim 13, wherein at least four categories are provided.
17. The method of claim 13, wherein the number of cards is at least forty five.
18. The method of claim 13, wherein the category of play is determined by selecting a category from a list of categories.
19. A method of playing a card game comprising the steps of:
a) providing a deck of cards comprising between twenty and one hundred cards depicting celebrities or public figures;
b) providing at least three categories of play;
d) dealing cards to at least two players;
e) determining a category of play;
f) playing a round by having each player play a card;
g) having each player vote on which played card best suits the category;
h) awarding the round to the player receiving the most votes; and
i) repeating steps e-h until all of the cards have been played.
20. The method of claim 13, wherein each card in the deck of cards depicts a celebrity or public figure of the same gender as that depicted on each other card in the deck.
Description
RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/753,881, filed on Dec. 23, 2005.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention generally relates to a card game for entertainment and amusement.

2. Background of the Technology

Various card games for entertainment and amusement of the players are known.

Many card games are based upon a standard deck of playing cards having ace through king of suits including clubs, diamonds, hearts and spades. Some such games utilize up to two jokers as well. Some games based upon the standard deck of cards are meant to be played by multiple players, while some can be played by a single player. Some examples of such games include, but are not limited to, bridge, poker, gin, blackjack, solitaire, go fish, and war.

Other card games are based upon custom decks of cards, and can depict pictures, numbers, colors, or other images. In such games, the cards depict images relating to the particular game.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a card game, and more particularly to a method of playing a card game. The presently described game utilizes custom cards, and is not based upon a standard deck of cards. In the present game, playing cards, preferably depicting known public figures, celebrities, fictional characters, or non-fictional characters, are dealt to players. Players then play cards from their hands in rounds based upon categories. For each round, players vote on which player played the most suitable card, and that player wins the round and can be awarded one or more points. The winner of the game is the player who has won the most rounds, or accumulated the most points, once all of the cards have been played.

In at least one embodiment, a method of playing a card game is provided that comprises the steps of: a) providing a deck comprising a plurality of cards depicting people; b) providing at least two categories of play; d) dealing cards to at least two players; e) determining a category of play; f) playing a round by having each player play a card; g) having each player vote on which played card best suits the category; h) awarding at least one point to the player receiving the most votes; and i) repeating steps e-h until all of the cards have been played.

In at least a second embodiment, a method of playing a card game is provided that comprises the steps of: a) providing a deck comprising between twenty and one hundred cards depicting people; b) providing at least two categories of play; d) dealing cards to at least two players; e) determining a category of play having a number of points associated therewith; f) playing a round by having each player play a card; g) having each player vote on which played card best suits the category; h) awarding the number of points associated with the category of play to the player receiving the most votes; and i) repeating steps e-h until all of the cards have been played.

In at least a third embodiment, a method of playing a card game is provided that comprises the steps of: a method of playing a card game comprising the steps of: a) providing a deck of cards comprising between twenty and one hundred cards depicting celebrities or public figures; b) providing at least three categories of play; d) dealing cards to at least two players; e) determining a category of play; f) playing a round by having each player play a card; g) having each player vote on which played card best suits the category; h) awarding the round to the player receiving the most votes; and i) repeating steps e-h until all of the cards have been played.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING(S)

FIG. 1 is a flow chart illustrating one preferred method of playing the game of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a card game, and more particularly to a method of playing a card game. The presently described game utilizes custom cards, and is not based upon a standard deck of cards.

One preferred method of playing the presently described game comprises: a) providing a deck comprising a plurality of cards depicting people, who are preferably known public figures and/or celebrities; b) providing at least two categories of play; d) dealing cards among multiple players, preferably at least two players; e) selecting a category of play for a round or trick; f) playing a round or trick by having each player play a card such that all players can see all of the cards played; g) having each player vote on which played card best suits the category; h) awarding a point, or multiple points, to the player receiving the most votes; and i) repeating e-h until all of the cards have been played.

In a preferred embodiment the cards depict people such as celebrities, public figures, non-fictional characters, or fictional characters. In preferred embodiments, each card in the deck depicts a male person or a female person. In particularly preferred embodiments, the cards depict celebrities or public figures of a single gender. In such embodiments, each card in the deck of cards depicts a celebrity or public figure of the same gender as the gender of the celebrity or public figure depicted on each other card in the deck. For example, in one embodiment of the game, all the cards depict female celebrities, with each card depicting a different female celebrity. In another embodiment, all the cards depict male celebrities, with each card depicting a different male celebrity. While not being bound by any particular theory, it is believed that having the people depicted on the cards be personalities known to the general public increases the enjoyment of the game and allows players to use their perceptions of the people on the cards in making decisions regarding which cards to play and which cards to vote for in any given trick.

In preferred embodiments, at least two players or teams play the game using the playing cards. Preferably, more than two players or teams play the game, and most preferably the game is played by from about three to about seven players or teams. More than 7 players can play the game. However, when more than 7 players play the game, it is recommended that the players divide into two or more teams due to the limited number of playing cards. A team is a group of players that receives one hand and can confer on which card from that hand should be played in each round of the game.

There should be a plurality of cards so that each player or team is dealt multiple cards and thus has a selection in determining which card to play for any given category of play. Any number of cards can be used with the presently described game, although it is believed that the game is more entertaining and enjoyable when each player begins the game with at least three cards in their hand. Accordingly, it is preferred that a deck of cards used for playing the presently described game has at least twenty cards, or between twenty and one hundred cards. In some preferred embodiments, a deck of cards has between twenty five cards and sixty cards. In some particularly preferred embodiments, a deck of cards has at least thirty cards, at least thirty five cards, at least forty cards, at least forty-five cards, at least fifty cards, or at least fifty five cards. In at least one embodiment, a deck of cards for use in playing the presently described game has fifty two, or fifty four, cards, similar to a standard deck of playing cards.

In a preferred embodiment, one player shuffles and deals the cards among all of the players. The cards dealt to any given player make up that player's “hand.” Once each player has had an opportunity to observe the cards in his or her hand, the first category is selected and the first “trick” or “round” is played. “Trick” is a term used in card games such as bridge and is used herein with the same meaning as it has in other card games. Each time all of the players each lay down one of the cards in their hands, that is a trick or a round. The trick or round is not completed until a winner of that trick or round is determined.

In playing the first round or trick, players each pick a card from their hand that they believe is most suited for the current category of play, and play the card by laying it down. Once each player has played a card, the players look at all the cards that have been played and vote on which card is the most suited to the category of play. The player that played the card receiving the most votes wins the round, and then takes the trick, or gets awarded one point or multiple points. The next category of play is then selected, and the process continues with each player playing a card, looking at the cards played and voting for one of the cards played, and the round being won by the player who played the card that receives the most votes. The game ends when all of the cards have been played. The winner is the player that took the most tricks or received the most points.

The number of players will determine the number of rounds or tricks for each game. For example, the number of cards in the deck divided by the number of players in the game equals the number of rounds or tricks to be played in the game. A preferred method of playing the game comprises dealing all of the cards so that each player has the same number of cards. If the number of cards cannot be evenly divided by the number of players, the extra cards may be set aside and not used in a particular game so that each player does have the same number of cards. Alternatively, the extra cards may be placed in a holding area to be used as wild cards. One way to use wild cards is to allow players to trade one of their cards for a wild card if they believe that the wild card has more potential of winning a trick than their own card. Another way in which wild cards may be used are as open cards that participate in each round or trick, such that if the players vote that one of the wild cards would win the trick, the trick may be set aside and not awarded to any one player.

The particular category of play to be used in any given round can be determined or selected in any appropriate manner. For example, in at least one embodiment, categories are provided in a list. The list can be a numbered list, and the categories can be played in order from the numbered list. For example, in one embodiment, category number one is used for the first round or trick, category number two is used for the second, and so on. If the number of rounds or tricks for a game exceeds the number of categories provided, the players may simply start again at the top of the category list once they have reached the bottom. Rotating through the category list in such a manner can thus be continued until all of the cards have been played. Alternatively, the number of the category to be played can be selected by rolling at least one dice, or by any other suitable method. As another example, a dice, spinner, or other selection device can be provided that has the categories represented thereon. In a preferred embodiment that uses a dice to select the category of play, the category to be played is determined by the category represented on the face of the dice that lands face up when the dice is rolled. The dice is then rolled prior to each round or trick to determine the category to be played. Preferably, each player takes at least one turn rolling the dice to determine a category during the game. In yet another embodiment, category cards can be provided, and a category card can be drawn by one of the players prior to each trick.

Categories appropriate for use with the various embodiments of the present game include, but are not limited to, any characterization of a person. In at least one preferred embodiment, categories relate to characterizations of interpersonal relationships and/or physical attributes. Such preferred categories can include, for example, husband, wife, lover, girlfriend, boyfriend, boy next door, girl next door, hottest, hottie, sexiest, finest, sweetest, one-night stand, date, friend, best friend, style, sugar daddy, bad boy, bad girl, or ultimate prize. In particularly preferred embodiments of the present game, a listing of categories is provided to players that includes a description or definition of the various categories to assist in player understanding of the categories.

It is desirable, although not necessary, to have several categories. In preferred embodiments, at least two categories are provided. More preferably, at least four categories, at least five categories, or at least six categories are provided.

Cards can be played during a round or trick in several ways. For example, in one embodiment, each player chooses a card in turn and places it face-up on the table so the other players can see it. In another embodiment, each player chooses a card and simultaneously places it face-up on the table so the other players can see it. In yet another embodiment, each player chooses a card and places it face-down until all of the players have selected a card, and then the players flip their cards over, simultaneously or in turn, so that all of the players can see them.

Rounds or tricks can be won in the present game based upon a vote or other decision by the players. Once each player has chosen a card and all of the players can see the chosen cards, the players can vote or otherwise decide which card that has been played best suites the category of play for that trick. In at least one preferred embodiment, each player votes in turn and the player having the card that receives the most votes wins the round or trick. In one such embodiment, a number of points is associated with the category of play, and that number of points is awarded to the player that wins the round by having their card receive the most votes.

If there are an even number of players the vote may result in a tie. In one embodiment, when the voting ends up in a tie, then each winning player gets a point. In another embodiment, players may discuss or debate the voting results in order to sway someone to change their vote.

Another possibility is that each player may vote for a different card, such as the card he or she played, resulting in no one having more votes than anyone else. In such an instance, it is preferred that no points be allocated for that trick and the game proceeds to the next trick.

When all the cards have been played, the player having won the most rounds, taken the most tricks, or alternatively having been awarded the most points, is considered to be the winner of the game. If two players have the same number of points or tricks, then there is not a clear single winner. In one embodiment, players having the same number of points or tricks at the end of the game are declared to be joint winners. In a preferred embodiment, the players having a tied high score become potential winners and a tie-break is used to determine the actual winner. One method of performing a tie-break comprises dealing three cards to each potential winner and having the potential winners choose a card to play for a specific category. Once the potential winners play their chosen cards, the other players vote for one of the cards played by a potential winner, and the round is won based upon which card gets the most votes.

To aid in keeping score, a preferred embodiment of the game provides a scorecard. The names of each player, or another identifier such as, for example, initials, are written on the scorecard and a score keeper, who can be the dealer or another player, keeps a tally of the points awarded during the game. In another embodiment, any player that wins a trick, and thus wins a point, may simply take the cards from that trick and set them aside. The number of tricks taken by each player is then counted at the end of the game and the player with the most tricks is the winner.

The examples below relate to methods and rules for playing various embodiments of the presently described game. The examples below are provided for illustrative purposes and should not be used to limit the scope of the claims below.

EXAMPLE 1 Method of Play

As described in FIG. 1, at least one method of playing the presently described game comprises the steps of: providing a deck of cards depicting people; providing at least two categories of play; dealing the cards to the players; selecting a category of play; having each player play a card; having each player vote on which played card best suits the category of play; awarding the trick to the player receiving the most votes; determining whether the players still have cards in their hands; repeating the steps of selecting a category of play, having each player play a card, voting on the cards played, and awarding the trick to the player receiving the most votes until the players do not have any more cards in their hands; and declaring a winner.

EXAMPLE 2 Method of Play

In another embodiment of the presently described game, the method of play comprises the following steps:

  • 1. A dealer and scorekeeper are selected (they can be the same person).
  • 2. The deck of cards is divided among all players evenly until the deck has run out, starting with the player to the right of the dealer.
  • 3. Once the last card has been dealt, the dealer reads the first category of play from the listed categories. It is preferred that a definition of the category of play also be provided.
  • 4. To Begin, the player to the right of the dealer then starts by selecting a card from their hand that best suits the category of play. The player then places the card face down on the playing surface.
  • 5. Step 4 is then repeated by each player in turn, until all players have chosen a card for the current category of play. It is preferred that once a player selects a card and turns it face down, that the player then does not change their selected card with a different card.
  • 6. Each player then shows their card to the other player. This can be done in turn, but is more preferably done simultaneously.
  • 7. Once all players have flipped their cards over, the players then choose which player has won that trick based on that particular category.
  • 8. The players can cast their vote for the winning card of that particular hand in the order in which they were dealt the cards (see Rule 2).
  • 9. Since it is the dealers job to coordinate the selections, he or she is responsible to give the players ample time to vote.
  • 10. If a player, whose turn it is to vote, has not made a decision yet. They can be skipped temporarily and returned to after the furthest person to the left of the dealer has made their selection.
  • 11. Each player is allowed one selection or vote. They can select any of the other players cards or their own.
  • 12. The deciding factor of a winning trick will be based on a majority vote. If there are an even number of players and the voting is a tie, then each player who has a card that is the subject of the tied vote gets a point.
  • 13. If each card played receives one vote, then there are no points allocated.
  • 14. Once a trick has been completed, the dealer marks one point next to the winning players name on the score card.
  • 15. The process of selecting a category, playing cards, and voting on a winner is repeated with the next category of play on the list.
  • 16. Once all of the categories of play have been used once, the categories are used again in order until all of the cards have been played.
  • 17. Once all of the cards have been played and points have been awarded. The player with the highest point score wins.
  • 18. If there are two or more players with the same score at the end of the game, a tie breaker is declared and the two or more players will be dealt 3 cards by the dealer and will then select the one card out of the 3 in a category chosen by the dealer.
  • 19. The winner of the tie breaker will be determined by a vote of the remaining players.
EXAMPLE 3 Rules of Play

In another embodiment of the presently described game, the following rules are provided to players, along with a deck of cards, a dice, a category card, and a score card:

  • 1. Select a Dealer/Score Keeper—The dealer is responsible for distributing the cards and tallying votes. The score keeper if responsible for keeping track of the score.
  • 2. Explain Categories—Before the dealer distributes the cards, each category must be explained so that every player has a clear understanding (see category card and dice).
  • 3. Deal the Cards—The dealer must now deal the cards, face down and evenly among all the players.
  • 4. Begin the Game—Now that every player has their cards, the first person dealt to must roll the dice.
  • 5. Play—Each player must choose a card, within their hand, that best fits the category that is face up on the dice. Once a player has chosen a card, they must place it face down in front of them.
  • 6. Flip—Once all payers have chosen a card and placed it face down in front of them, everyone flips their card over simultaneously.
  • 7. Voting—Each player must now vote for one of the cards now showing. Voting is based on which card they feel best suits the category rolled, including their own card. The order in which the players vote is determined by the order in which the cards were dealt. If a player needs more time to come to a decision, they are allowed to be skipped temporarily, but must vote after the last player has made their selection.
  • 8. Scoring—The player with the card that receives the most votes wins the round and earns the amount of points that corresponds with the category rolled (see dice and category card). The score keeper is now responsible for putting the points from the category won next to the winning player's name on the score card.
  • 9. Round Two—After the point(s) are given to the winner of the previous round, the next player in line rolls the dice for round two. For each new round, a player rolls the dice. Once each player has rolled once, then the process is repeated until each player is left with no cards.
  • 10. Tie Breaker—In the case of two or more players ending with the same amount of points, the winner will be determined by playing one final round. The players involved in the tie will be dealt three new cards by a dealer uninvolved in play. The dealer will then roll the dice to determine the category. The players must now choose a card that best suits that category and the winner is determined by a vote of the player(s) uninvolved in play.
EXAMPLE 4 Category Card

One example of the contents of a category card that could be provided with the instructions of Example 3 above is as follows:

Categories

  • Style (1 point)—a distinctive mode of fashion and character. Fashionable.
  • Sugar Daddy (2 points)—a wealthy man who gives expensive gifts.
  • One Night (3 points)—a single unrepeated encounter.
  • Sexiest (4 points)—highly appealing or interesting. To arouse sexual desire.
  • Husband (5 points)—a man with whom you would like to share a long committed relationship. An ideal mate.
  • Hottie (6 points)—ranks highest in physical attraction and overall appeal.

In this example, the listed categories have different numbers of points associated therewith. If a game consisted of six players, and had six rounds in which each category was played once and each player won one round, the player that won the round having the category of hottie would win the game. If a game consisted of six players, and had six rounds in which each category was played once and one player won the rounds having the categories of husband and hottie, that player would win the game because no other player would have more points.

In another embodiment of the categories of play, each category is worth the same number of points, such as one point or two points. In such an embodiment, the player that wins the most rounds during a game becomes the winner of the game.

While particular elements and embodiments of the presently described game have been shown and described above, it should be understood that modifications may be made, particularly in light of the foregoing teaching, that are still within the scope of the present invention. Therefore, it is intended that the invention not be limited to the particular embodiments disclosed, but that the invention will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7980930 *Dec 28, 2007Jul 19, 2011InnovatronOn-line game based on words, making use of a search engine
US8733760Nov 21, 2012May 27, 2014André FontanaGame and method of playing a game
US20110319154 *Apr 19, 2011Dec 29, 2011David BezarBlackjack pass game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/292
International ClassificationA63F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/00
European ClassificationA63F1/00