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Publication numberUS20070153984 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/608,583
Publication dateJul 5, 2007
Filing dateDec 8, 2006
Priority dateJan 3, 2006
Also published asEP1977619A2, WO2007081563A2, WO2007081563A3
Publication number11608583, 608583, US 2007/0153984 A1, US 2007/153984 A1, US 20070153984 A1, US 20070153984A1, US 2007153984 A1, US 2007153984A1, US-A1-20070153984, US-A1-2007153984, US2007/0153984A1, US2007/153984A1, US20070153984 A1, US20070153984A1, US2007153984 A1, US2007153984A1
InventorsLeland Scott Bloebaum, Daniel P. Homiller, William O. Camp
Original AssigneeSony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and Apparatus for Routing Emergency Calls in a VoIP System
US 20070153984 A1
Abstract
Methods and apparatuses for routing emergency calls originated from mobile wireless devices in a Voice-over-IP (VoIP) system are described herein. In one or more embodiments, emergency calls are routed in a VoIP system by receiving incoming emergency calls originated from dual-mode mobile devices connected to the VoIP system through wireless access points (WAPs), determining locations associated with the incoming emergency calls, and redirecting callers to a cellular network. In other embodiments, emergency calls are routed in a VoIP system by mapping WAP identifiers to emergency answering points (EAPs), receiving an incoming emergency call from an originating WAP, identifying an EAP relating to the originating WAP, and directing the emergency call to the identified EAP.
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Claims(19)
1. A method of routing emergency calls in a Voice-over-IP (VoIP) system, comprising:
receiving an incoming emergency call originated from a mobile wireless device connected to the VoIP system through a wireless access point (WAP);
acquiring location information derived by a device in-range of the mobile wireless device; and
directing the emergency call to an emergency answering point (EAP) that services a geographic area corresponding to the location information acquired from the in-range device.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein acquiring the location information derived by the in-range device comprises acquiring the location information from the mobile wireless device.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein acquiring the location information derived by the in-range device comprises:
establishing a communication link with the in-range device through the mobile wireless device; and
acquiring the location information from the in-range device using the communication link.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein acquiring the location information derived by the in-range device comprises:
receiving a device identifier associated with the in-range device;
connecting to the in-range device using the device identifier; and acquiring the location information from the in-range device while connected to the in-range device.
5. The method of claim 4, further comprising maintaining a call connection with the mobile wireless device while connected to the in-range device.
6. The method of claim 1, further comprising initiating redirection of the emergency call to a cellular network if no location information is acquired.
7. A voice-over-IP (VoIP) system, comprising a call processing server configured to receive an incoming emergency call originated from a mobile wireless device connected to the VoIP system through a wireless access point (WAP), to acquire location information derived by a device in-range of the mobile wireless device, and to direct the emergency call to an emergency answering point (EAP) that services a geographic area corresponding to the location information acquired from the in-range device.
8. The VoIP system of claim 7, wherein the call processing server is configured to acquire the location information derived by the in-range device by acquiring the location information from the mobile wireless device.
9. The VoIP system of claim 7, wherein the call processing server is configured to acquire the location information derived by the in-range device by establishing a communication link with the in-range device through the mobile wireless device and acquiring the location information from the in-range device using the communication link.
10. The VoIP system of claim 7, wherein the call processing server is configured to acquire the location information derived by the in-range device by receiving a device identifier associated with the in-range device, connecting to the in-range device using the device identifier, and acquiring the location information from the in-range device while connected to the in-range device.
11. The VoIP system of claim 10, wherein the call processing server is further configured to maintain a call connection with the mobile wireless device while connected to the in-range device.
12. The VoIP system of claim 7, wherein the call processing server is further configured to initiate redirection of the emergency call to a cellular network if no location information is acquired.
13. A mobile wireless device, comprising:
a wireless broadband radio configured to connect the mobile wireless device to a wireless broadband network; and
a communication processor configured to establish a call connection with a voice-over-IP (VoIP) system via the wireless broadband network for placing an emergency call and to query one or more in-range devices for location information.
14. The mobile wireless device of claim 13, wherein the communication processor is configured to query the one or more in-range devices for location information responsive to the VoIP system requesting one or more location indicators from the mobile wireless device.
15. The mobile wireless device of claim 13, wherein the communication processor is further configured to provide location information acquired from one of the queried in-range devices to the VoIP system using the established call connection.
16. The mobile wireless device of claim 13, wherein the communication processor is further configured to provide a device identifier acquired from one of the queried in-range devices to the VoIP system using the established call connection.
17. The mobile wireless device of claim 16, wherein the device identifier comprises one of an Internet Protocol address, a media access control address, a service set identifier, and a phone number.
18. The mobile wireless device of claim 13, wherein the communication processor is further configured to establish a communication link with one of the in-range devices and route information between the VoIP system and the linked in-range device using the established call connection and communication link.
19. The mobile wireless device of claim 13, wherein the communication processor is further configured to place a new emergency call to a cellular network responsive to a call redirection instruction.
Description
    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/755,926, filed Jan. 3, 2006, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates to converged cellular and wireless broadband networks, and particularly relates to routing emergency calls in converged networks.
  • [0003]
    The convergence of cellular and wireless broadband networks allows subscribers to move between the networks with seamless voice and data session continuity, just as subscribers move between cells within a cellular network. Wireless network convergence effectively creates a dual radio access network. When it is efficient to route information such as data or voice over a cellular network, a mobile device utilizes the cellular network for communication. Conversely, when it is more efficient to route information over a wireless broadband network, the mobile device utilizes the wireless broadband network for communication.
  • [0004]
    One issue relating to the convergence of cellular and wireless broadband networks is the routing of emergency calls to the appropriate local emergency personnel. Various governments require communication service providers to support emergency calls made from cellular handsets, e.g., the E-911 mandate issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States. Additionally, the FCC will require Voice-over-IP (VoIP) service providers to comply with the E-911 mandate in the near future. For example, VoIP providers will be required to deliver all 911 calls to the customer's local emergency operator and provide emergency operators with the call back number and location information of their customers.
  • [0005]
    Location-based services are widely used in cellular networks for identifying caller location when handling emergency calls placed by cellular handsets. For example, device-centric technologies such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) can pinpoint the location of a mobile device to an accuracy of ten meters or less. Network-assisted technologies such as assisted-GPS (AGPS) for Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) cellular networks and Enhanced Observed Time Difference (EOTD) for Global System for Mobile communications (GSM) networks can pinpoint the location of a mobile device to an accuracy of one hundred meters or less.
  • [0006]
    However, location identification technology for mobile devices that access wireless broadband networks is less mature. Further, the nature of broadband communication, e.g., the use of Internet Protocol (IP) bearers for communicating between remote devices, removes all information associated with the location of a caller. As such, the convergence of cellular and wireless broadband networks presents a new challenge for identifying the location of mobile wireless devices when the devices communicate over a wireless broadband network. For example, as a mobile wireless device seamlessly transitions from a cellular network to a wireless broadband network, the device may no longer be capable of determining and/or communicating its position when connected to the wireless broadband network. VoIP service providers face a particularly daunting task if mandated to support E-911 for mobile devices placing VoIP calls using wireless broadband access technology.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0007]
    The methods and apparatuses taught herein provide a method of routing emergency calls originated from mobile wireless devices in a Voice-over-IP (VoIP) system. In one example, the method comprises receiving incoming emergency calls originated from dual-mode mobile devices connected to the VoIP system through wireless access points (WAPs), determining locations associated with the incoming emergency calls, and redirecting callers to a cellular network. Corresponding to the above emergency call routing method, a complementary VoIP system comprises a call processing server configured to receive incoming emergency calls originated from dual-mode mobile devices connected to the VoIP system through WAPs. The call processing server is further configured to determine locations associated with the incoming emergency calls, and redirect callers to a cellular network.
  • [0008]
    Several embodiments described herein enable VoIP systems to acquire location information associated with mobile wireless devices accessing VoIP systems and to use the acquired location information to route emergency calls to appropriate emergency answering points (EAPs). In one example, WAP identifiers are mapped to EAPs. As such, when an incoming emergency call is received from an originating WAP, an EAP relating to the originating WAP is identified and the emergency call is directed to the identified EAP.
  • [0009]
    In another example, an incoming emergency call originated from a mobile wireless device connected to a VoIP system through a WAP is received by the VoIP system. Location information associated with the mobile wireless device is acquired from the mobile wireless device and the emergency call is directed to an EAP that services a geographic area corresponding to the location information acquired from the mobile wireless device.
  • [0010]
    In yet another example, an incoming emergency call originated from a mobile wireless device connected to a VoIP system through a WAP is received by the VoIP system. Location information derived by a device in-range of the mobile wireless device is acquired. The emergency call is directed to an EAP that services a geographic area corresponding to the location information acquired from the in-range device.
  • [0011]
    Of course, the present invention is not limited to the above features and advantages. Those skilled in the art will recognize additional features and advantages upon reading the following detailed description, and upon viewing the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a Voice-over-IP (VoIP) system.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 2 is a logic flow diagram of an embodiment of processing logic for identifying wireless access points to a VoIP system.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 3 is a logic flow diagram of an embodiment of processing logic for relating wireless access points to emergency answering points.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a database included in or associated with the VoIP system of FIG. 1.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 5 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a VoIP system that acquires location information from a device in-range of a mobile wireless device.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 6 is a logic flow diagram of an embodiment of processing logic for providing a wireless access point identifier to a VoIP system during an emergency call.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 7 is a logic flow diagram of one embodiment of processing logic for routing emergency calls in a VoIP system.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 8 is a logic flow diagram of an embodiment of processing logic for providing mobile wireless device location information to a VoIP system during an emergency call.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 9 is a logic flow diagram of an embodiment of processing logic for providing location information associated with a mobile wireless device to a VoIP system during an emergency call.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 10 is a logic flow diagram of another embodiment of processing logic for routing emergency calls in a VoIP system.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 11 is a logic flow diagram of yet another embodiment of processing logic for routing emergency calls in a VoIP system.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 12 is a logic flow diagram of an embodiment of processing logic for redirecting emergency calls received by a VoIP system over a cellular network.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 13 is a logic flow diagram of an embodiment of processing logic for redirecting an emergency call by a dual-mode mobile device over a cellular network.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0025]
    FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of a Voice-over-IP (VoIP) system 10 that provides packet-based voice and data services to mobile wireless devices such as a dual-mode mobile communication device 12. The dual-mode mobile device 12 gains access to the VoIP system 10 via a Wireless Access Point (WAP) 14, e.g., an IEEE 802.11 (WiFi), IEEE 802.16 (WiMax), or IEEE 802.20 (Mobile Broadband Wireless Access) compatible WAP. The dual-mode mobile device 12 is directly or indirectly coupled to the VoIP system 10, e.g., through a Packet-Switched Data Network (PSDN) 16 such as the Internet. The VoIP system 10 comprises a call processing server 18 for managing VoIP connections traversing the VoIP system 10, including emergency calls.
  • [0026]
    The dual-mode mobile device 12 and the VoIP system 10 communicate both control information and packet-based communication data. To establish and control packet-based calls, the dual-mode mobile device 12 and the VoIP system 10 use a signaling protocol, e.g., Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) or H.323. For example, the call processing server 18 of the VoIP system 10 and a communication processor 20 of the dual-mode mobile device 12 use SIP in conjunction with client code such as Java to control handling of emergency calls initiated by the device 12.
  • [0027]
    The communication processor 20 manages network communication for the dual-mode mobile device 12, including establishing and maintaining communication channels, initiating and managing calls, and acquiring the location of the dual-mode mobile device 12. The communication processor 20 may comprise one or more general or special purpose microprocessors, digital signal processors, application specific integrated circuits, field programmable gate arrays, and/or other types of digital processing circuits, configured according to computer program instructions implemented in software (or firmware).
  • [0028]
    Likewise, the call processing server 18 manages packet-based communication for the VoIP system 10. The call processing server 18 comprises hardware and/or software and can be deployed as a single server, cluster of servers, or a server farm having distributed functionality. The call processing server 18 manages device communication, maintains various mappings and translations, and opens and closes communication channels between devices. For example, the call processing server 18 includes a call agent 22 for providing VoIP call signaling and control functions. The call agent 22 manages signaling and control flows associated with devices that access the VoIP system 10, e.g., by originating, terminating or forwarding calls. In a non-limiting example, the call agent 22 may include a SIP server (not shown) for providing SIP call signaling and control functions, e.g., by routing and forwarding SIP requests.
  • [0029]
    Further, the call processing server 18 includes an application server 24 for executing one or more applications or services not managed by the call agent 22, e.g. voice mail, conference calling, and emergency call handling. The call processing server 18 interfaces with a media gateway controller/media gateway (MGC/MG) 26. The MGC/MG 26 contains call control logic and hardware for interfacing with the Public-Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) 28. As such, the call processing server 18 gains access to the PSTN 28 via the MGC/MG 26.
  • [0030]
    As part of managing packet-based connections in the VoIP system 10, the call processing server 18 processes emergency calls received from various devices connected to the system 10, including mobile wireless devices such as the dual-mode mobile device 12. Emergency calls received by the VoIP system 10 may include proprietary emergency voice calls, 911 emergency voice calls, emergency text messages, emergency instant messages or the like. The call processing server 18 routes received emergency calls to Emergency Answering Point (EAPs) 30, i.e., designated statewide default answering points such as Public Service Answering Points (PSAPs), appropriate local emergency authorities or other emergency answering points or proprietary emergency answering points such as Onstar. To route an emergency call to an appropriate EAP, the call processing server 18 acquires information associated the location of the packet-based call, e.g., geospacial or civic location information such as latitude, longitude, altitude, street address, phone number, building name, etc. The call processing server 18 uses such location information to identify an appropriate EAP for receiving a particular emergency call.
  • [0031]
    The VoIP system 10 routes emergency calls to the EAPs 30 via either the PSTN 28 or an emergency services network 32 such as the wireline E911 network or a proprietary emergency call handling network capable of routing emergency calls and related information to the EAPs 30. To route an emergency call via the PSTN 28, the call processing server 18 uses location information associated with the call to identify an address of an appropriate EAP and then forwards the call to the EAP address over the PSTN 28 via the MGC/MG 26. When routing calls via the emergency services network 32, the call processing server 18 forwards the emergency call along with acquired location information to the emergency services network 32 directly via a gateway (not shown) or indirectly via the PSDN 16 or the PSTN 28. The emergency services network 32 uses the location information to identify an address of an appropriate EAP for responding to the emergency call.
  • [0032]
    Several embodiments are described herein that enable the VoIP system 10 to acquire location information associated with mobile wireless devices accessing the system 10 and to use the acquired location information to route emergency calls to an appropriate EAP. In one embodiment, the call processing server 18 populates and manages a database 34 that relates WAPs to the EAPs 30 using location information associated with mobile wireless devices. Particularly, the call processing server 18 uses location information associated with mobile wireless devices as an approximation of WAP location and relates one or more of the EAPs 30 to particular WAPs using the location information. Thus, when the VoIP system 10 receives an emergency call from a known WAP, i.e., a WAP having an entry in the database, the call processing server 18 identifies an EAP associated with the WAP and routes the emergency call to the identified EAP.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 2 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for identifying WAPs and providing location information associated with identified WAPs to the VoIP system 10. Prior to connecting to the VoIP system 10, a mobile wireless device gains wireless broadband access, e.g. to a wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) (Step 100). For example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 gains wireless broadband access via the WAP 14 using a WLAN radio 36 included in the device 12. The WAP 14 implements a network access authentication procedure for determining whether the dual-mode mobile device 12 is an authorized device.
  • [0034]
    After gaining access to a wireless broadband network, the mobile wireless device logs into or is otherwise authenticated by the VoIP system 10 (Step 102). After authentication is completed, or alternatively, as part of the authentication process, the mobile wireless device sends to the VoIP system 10 an identifier associated with the originating WAP, i.e., the WAP through which the device gains access to the VoIP system 10 (Step 104). For example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 provides an identifier associated with the originating WAP 14. Each identifier uniquely identifies a particular WAP to the VoIP system 10, e.g., a media access control (MAC) address, a service set identifier (SSID), or an internet protocol (IP) address. Upon request from the VoIP system 10 or automatically, the mobile wireless device sends location information associated with the mobile device to the VoIP system 10 (Step 106).
  • [0035]
    FIG. 3 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for populating the database 34 with WAP information provided by mobile wireless devices. When a mobile wireless device accesses the VoIP system 10 via a wireless broadband connection, e.g., during non-emergency calls, the device logs into or otherwise authenticates itself to the VoIP system 10 (Step 108). As part of the login process, the mobile wireless device sends to the VoIP system 10 an identifier associated with a WAP through which the device communicates with the VoIP system 10. For example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 provides an identifier associated with the originating WAP 14 to the VoIP system 10.
  • [0036]
    The call processing server 18 verifies whether the originating WAP 14 is known to the VoIP system 10 (Step 110). If the originating WAP 14 is known, the call processing server 18 processes the incoming call (Step 112). Conversely, if the originating WAP 14 is unknown, the VoIP system 10 acquires location information from the dual-mode mobile device 12 (Step 114). The acquired location information serves as an approximation of the location of the originating WAP 14. The database 34 is then updated with the acquired location information (Step 116). Particularly, the database 34 maps the new WAP identifier with one or more of the EAPs 30 that service a geographic area corresponding to location information associated with the newly identified WAP, as illustrated by FIG. 4. Further, the VoIP system 10 may acquire location information from multiple mobile wireless devices that access the system 10 through the same WAP. The call processing server 18 may use the plurality of acquired location information to refine or pinpoint the location of a particular WAP.
  • [0037]
    The dual-mode mobile device 12 can acquire its location in various ways. For example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 may include a GPS device (not shown) for determining its location. Alternatively, the dual-mode mobile device 12 may communicate with a cellular network 38 to acquire its location. For example, a cellular radio 40 included in the dual-mode mobile device 12 can establish a radio connection to the cellular network 38. Once connected, the dual-mode mobile device 12 acquires its location by cellular network-derived techniques such as Enhanced Observed Time Difference (EOTD), assisted GPS, or Time Difference of Observed Arrival (TDOA). In yet another example, a user of the dual-mode mobile device 12 inputs location information into the device, e.g., by inputting alphanumeric characters into a keypad of the device 12 or by voice command.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 5 illustrates an embodiment where a mobile wireless device such as the dual-mode mobile device 12 or the VoIP system 10 acquires location information from an in-range device 42, i.e., a device in sufficient proximity with the mobile wireless device such that a wireless connection can be established between the devices. The location information acquired from the in-range device 42 can be used to approximate the location of the dual-mode mobile device 12 when the device 12 is unable to ascertain its own location. The dual-mode mobile device 12 either obtains location information from the in-range device 42 and provides the location information to the VoIP system 10 or initiates a connection between the VoIP system 10 and the in-range device 42.
  • [0039]
    In one example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 acquires location information from the in-range device 42 and provides it to the VoIP system 10. As such, the in-range device 42 is unknown to the VoIP system 10. During an emergency call, a SIP signaling connection is established between the communication processor 20 of the dual-mode mobile device 12 and the call processing server 18 of the VoIP system 10. In addition, a media connection is also established between the VoIP system 10 and the dual-mode mobile device 12 for exchanging information between the communication processor 20 and the call processing server 18. Upon determining that the location of the dual-mode mobile device 12 is not known or cannot be approximated, the dual-mode mobile device 12 establishes a SIP connection with a communication processor 44 of the in-range device 42. As part of the SIP connection with the in-range device 42, a media connection is also established. The dual-mode mobile device 12 then requests location information from the in-range device 42. The dual-mode mobile device 12 acquires the location information from the in-range device 42 via the media connection between the two devices. The dual-mode mobile device 12 then provides the location information to the VoIP system 10 via the media connection between the dual-mode device 12 and the VoIP system 10.
  • [0040]
    In another non-limiting example, the call processing server 18 establishes new SIP and media connections with the communication processor 44 of the in-range device 42. Using the preexisting media connection with the in-range device 42, the dual-mode mobile device 12 may acquire a device identifier from the in-range device 42, e.g., a MAC address, SSID, IP address, or phone number. The dual-mode mobile device 12 then forwards the device identifier acquired from the in-range device 42 to the VoIP system 10 via the preexisting media connection between the system 10 and the dual-mode device 12. The call processing server 18 uses the device identifier to establish new SIP and media connections between the VoIP system 10 and the in-range device 42. As such, the call processing server 18 can then acquire location information from the in-range device 42 over the newly established media channel. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the call processing server 18 can contact one or more in-range devices while maintaining an emergency call connection with the dual-mode mobile device 12.
  • [0041]
    In yet another non-limiting example, the call processing server 18 communicates with the in-range device 42 through the dual-mode device 12. Particularly, the dual-mode device 12 routes or passes information between the VoIP system 10 and the in-range device 42 using the SIP and media connections established between the dual-mode device 12 and the VoIP system 10 and between the dual-mode device 12 and the in-range device 42. That is, the dual-mode mobile device 12 can function as a relay to establish communication between the in-range device 42 and the VoIP system 10. As such, the dual-mode mobile device 12 functions as a router or pass-through device, enabling the call processing server 18 to use the preexisting connections with the dual-mode mobile device 12 to acquire location information from the in-range device 42.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 6 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for placing an emergency call to the VoIP system 10 by a mobile wireless device via a WAP. The mobile wireless initiates an emergency call with the VoIP system 10 via a wireless broadband connection (Step 200). For example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 initiates an emergency call via a wireless broadband connection established by the WAP 14. The mobile wireless device sends to the VoIP system 10 an identifier associated with a WAP through which the device communicates with the VoIP system 10 (Step 202). For example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 provides an identifier associated with the originating WAP 14.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 7 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for routing an emergency call received by the VoIP system 10 to an appropriate EAP using the WAP/EAP relationships provided by the database 34. For example, after the dual-mode mobile device 12 is authenticated by the originating WAP 14, the device 12 initiates an emergency call via the wireless broadband connection established by the WAP 14 (Step 204). The VoIP system 10 receives from the dual-mode mobile device 12 an identifier associated with the originating WAP 14 (Step 206). The call processing server 18 then queries or mines the database 34 using the WAP identifier received from the dual-mode mobile device 12 to identify an EAP associated with the originating WAP 14 (Step 208). The call processing server 18 directs the emergency call to the identified EAP (Step 210), e.g., via the PSTN 28 or the emergency services network 32.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 8 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for placing an emergency call to the VoIP system 10 by a mobile wireless device that provides its location to the system 10 as part of the emergency call. The mobile wireless initiates an emergency call with the VoIP system 10 via a wireless broadband connection (Step 300). For example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 initiates an emergency call via a wireless broadband connection established by the WAP 14. The mobile wireless device provides to the VoIP system 10 location information associated with the mobile wireless device (Step 302). For example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 provides to the VoIP system 10 GPS-derived, cellular network-derived, or user-derived location information each as previously described.
  • [0045]
    Alternatively, FIG. 9 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for placing an emergency call to the VoIP system 10 by a mobile wireless device that provides the location of an in-range device to the system 10 as an approximation of the mobile wireless device's location. The mobile wireless initiates an emergency call with the VoIP system 10 via a wireless broadband connection (Step 304). If the mobile wireless device cannot identify its own location, the mobile wireless device establishes a connection with an in-range device (Step 306). For example, the communication processor 20 of the dual-mode mobile device 12 establishes SIP and media connections with the communication processor 44 of the in-range device 42. The mobile wireless device then acquires location information from the in-range device via the connection between the two devices (Step 308). The mobile wireless device provides the acquired in-range device location information to the VoIP system 10 via the connection established between the system 10 and the mobile wireless device resulting from the emergency call (Step 310).
  • [0046]
    FIG. 10 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for routing an emergency call received by the VoIP system 10 to an appropriate EAP using location information received from a mobile wireless device placing the emergency call. For example, after the dual-mode mobile device 12 is authenticated by the originating WAP 14, the device 12 places an emergency call via the wireless broadband connection established by the WAP 14 (Step 312).
  • [0047]
    In addition to receiving the emergency call, the VoIP system 10 also receives from the dual-mode mobile device 12 solicited or unsolicited location information acquired by the device 12 (Step 314). In one example, the device 12 acquires the location information after a user initiates an emergency call via the device 12, but before the device 12 places the call to the VoIP system 10. In another example, the device 12 provides location information previously acquired and stored by the device 12. Regardless of when the device 12 acquires its location, the location information may be automatically provided to the VoIP system 10 as part of the emergency call or may be provided by the device 12 upon request by the VoIP system 10. The call processing server 18 then directs the emergency call to an EAP that services the geographic area corresponding to the unsolicited location information (Step 316), e.g., via the PSTN 28 or the emergency services network 32.
  • [0048]
    FIG. 11 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for routing an emergency call received by the VoIP system 10 to an appropriate EAP using location information received from a device in-range of a mobile wireless device placing the emergency call. According to this particular embodiment, a mobile wireless device is unable to acquire its location, but is in-range of a device that has or can obtain location information. During an emergency call, the call processing server 18 uses location information acquired from an in-range device as an approximation of the location of the mobile wireless device that placed the emergency call. For example, the processing logic “begins” with the dual-mode mobile device 12 placing an emergency call to the VoIP system 10 via a wireless broadband connection established by the originating WAP 14 (Step 400). In addition to receiving the emergency call, the VoIP system 10 also receives from the dual-mode mobile device 12 address information associated with the in-range device 42 and uses the address information to establish a connection with the in-range device 42 (Step 402). The VoIP system 10 then acquires location information from the in-range device 42 via the newly established connection between the system 10 and the in-range device 42 (Step 404). The call processing server 18 directs the emergency call to an EAP that services the geographic area corresponding to the in-range device location information (Step 406), e.g., via the PSTN 28 or the emergency services network 32.
  • [0049]
    FIG. 12 illustrates an embodiment of processing logic for re-directing an incoming emergency call received by the VoIP system 10 when the system 10 is unable to acquire location information associated with the emergency call. The processing logic “begins” with the VoIP system 10 receiving an emergency call placed by a mobile device capable of both cellular and wireless communication such as the dual-mode mobile device 12 (Step 500). Upon receiving the emergency call, the call processing server 18 determines whether a location associated with the emergency call is identifiable (Step 502), e.g., by one or more of the embodiments described herein. If a location is identifiable, the call processing server 18 routes the emergency call to an appropriate EAP (Step 504).
  • [0050]
    If the location is unidentifiable, i.e., the call processing server 18 is not able to determine the location or an approximate location of the dual-mode mobile device 12, the emergency call is re-directed to an alternate carrier such as a cellular carrier associated with the cellular network 38 (Step 506). In one example, the call processing server 18 provides a call redirection instruction to the dual-mode mobile device 12 after the server 18 determines that the location of the device 12 is unidentifiable, thus instructing the dual-mode device 12 to re-direct the emergency call. In another example, the dual-mode mobile device 12 recognizes that it cannot acquire its location, and in doing so, re-directs the call to the cellular network 38 without instruction from the call processing server 18.
  • [0051]
    The communication processor 20 manages emergency call redirection in the dual-mode mobile device 12. When the location of the dual-mode mobile device 12 is unidentifiable, the communication processor 20 establishes a cellular communication channel with the cellular network 38, as illustrated by Step 508 of FIG. 13. In one example, the call processing server 18 of the VoIP system 10 provides a call redirection instruction to the dual-mode mobile device 12, causing the communication processor 20 to “re-direct” the emergency call by placing a subsequent emergency call over the cellular network 38. In another example, the communication processor 20 recognizes that it cannot acquire the location of the dual-mode mobile device 12, and in doing so, generates an internal call redirection instruction causing the dual-mode device 12 to “re-direct” the call without instruction from the call processing server 18. Regardless of how a call redirection instruction is generated, the communication processor 20 “re-directs” the emergency call by placing a subsequent emergency call over the cellular network 38 in response to a call redirection instruction, as illustrated by Step 510 of FIG. 13. As such, the emergency call is serviced by a cellular-based system (not shown) when the location of the dual-mode mobile device 12 is unidentifiable. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the communication processor 20 can establish a cellular communication channel while maintaining a call connection with the VoIP system 10 if the WLAN and cellular radios 36, 40 do not substantially interfere with each other.
  • [0052]
    With the above embodiments in mind, it should be understood that emergency call routing in VoIP systems as taught herein provides for a VoIP system, e.g., the system 10 that is configured to route an emergency call placed by a mobile wireless device to an EAP that services a geographic area corresponding to an approximate location of the mobile wireless device. The VoIP system is also configured to re-direct emergency calls received from dual-mode mobile devices over a cellular network when the calls lack location information sufficient for the VoIP system to route the calls to appropriate EAPs.
  • [0053]
    Thus, while the invention has been described in terms of specific embodiments, it should be understood that the present invention is not limited by the foregoing description, nor is it limited by the accompanying drawings. Instead, the present invention is limited only by the following claims and their legal equivalents.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification379/33, 379/45, 370/395.52
International ClassificationH04M3/08, H04W4/22, H04W88/06
Cooperative ClassificationH04M7/006, H04W88/06, H04W76/007, H04M2242/04, H04M2242/30, H04W4/22, H04M2207/18
European ClassificationH04W76/00E, H04M7/00M, H04W88/06, H04W4/22
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 8, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: SONY ERICSSON MOBILE COMMUNIATIONS AB, SWEDEN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BLOEBAUM, LELAND SCOTT;HOMILLER, DANIEL P.;CAMP, WILLIAMO., JR.;REEL/FRAME:018604/0737
Effective date: 20061208