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Publication numberUS20070175788 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/343,705
Publication dateAug 2, 2007
Filing dateJan 31, 2006
Priority dateJan 31, 2006
Publication number11343705, 343705, US 2007/0175788 A1, US 2007/175788 A1, US 20070175788 A1, US 20070175788A1, US 2007175788 A1, US 2007175788A1, US-A1-20070175788, US-A1-2007175788, US2007/0175788A1, US2007/175788A1, US20070175788 A1, US20070175788A1, US2007175788 A1, US2007175788A1
InventorsCarolyn Holba, Marsha Udell
Original AssigneeHolba Carolyn A, Udell Marsha R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carded mascara products and merchandising method and display
US 20070175788 A1
Abstract
A packaged mascara product comprising a mascara formula contained in a primary package comprised of a vial with a cap having a rod and brush, and a secondary package comprised of a card and a transparent blister that fits over the primary package and affixes it to the card, wherein the card is printed with a graphic depicting the lash look to be achieved with the mascara formula contained in the primary package; and a display for selling at least first and second packaged mascara products having different end benefits wherein the first packaged mascara product is blistered to card printed with a first lash look graphic visually depicting the first end benefit, and the second packaged mascara product is blistered to a card printed with a second lash look graphic visually depicting the second end benefit, and the third packaged mascara product is blistered to a card printed with a third lash look graphic visually depicting the third end benefit, and wherein the first, second, and third lash look graphics are visually distinctive.
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Claims(18)
1. A packaged mascara product comprising, in combination:
(i) a mascara formula contained in a primary package comprised of a vial with a cap having a rod and brush affixed thereto; and comprising the secondary package:
(ii) a card, and
(iii) a transparent blister that fits over the primary package and affixes it to the card; and wherein on the card is printed a graphic depicting the lash look to be achieved with the mascara formula contained in the primary package.
2. The product of claim 1 wherein the graphic is a drawing of eyelashes that are thick.
3. The product of claim 1 wherein the graphic is a drawing of eyelashes that are long.
4. The product of claim 1 wherein the graphic depicts eyelashes that are curved.
5. The product of claim 1 wherein the graphic depicts eyelashes that are thick, curved, and long.
6. The product of claim 1 wherein the mascara formula is long wearing or transfer resistant.
7. The mascara product of claim 1 wherein the mascara formula is a water and oil emulsion comprising water, at least one film forming polymer, and pigments.
8. The mascara product of claim 7 wherein the mascara formula contains a film forming polymer that oil soluble or dispersible.
9. The mascara product of claim 8 wherein the pigments comprise iron oxides.
10. The mascara product of claim 9 wherein the color is blue, brown, or black.
11. The product of claim 1 wherein the vial is a cylindrical vial.
12. The product of claim 1 wherein the cap contains a rod having a brush affixed thereto.
13. The product of claim 12 wherein the brush is a twisted metal wire brush.
14. The product of claim 13 wherein the twisted metal wire brush has 10 to 50 fibers per coil.
15. A method for selling mascara products having different end benefits comprising:
(a) providing a first packaged mascara product comprising (i) a mascara formula contained in a primary package comprised of a vial with a cap having a rod and brush affixed thereto; and comprising the secondary package containing:
(ii) a card, and
(iii) a transparent blister that fits over the primary package and affixes it to the card; and
wherein on the card is printed a graphic depicting the lash look to be achieved with the mascara formula contained in the primary package; and
(b) providing a second packaged mascara product comprising (i) a mascara formula contained in a primary package comprised of a vial with a cap having a rod and brush affixed thereto; and comprising the secondary package:
(ii) a card, and
(iii) a transparent blister that fits over the primary package and affixes it to the card; and wherein on the card is printed a graphic depicting the lash look to be achieved with the mascara formula contained in the primary package; and wherein the lash look to be achieved with the first packaged mascara product is different from the lash look to be achieved with the second packaged mascara product and those differences are visually captured in the differences between the lash look graphics on the products.
16. The method of claim 15 further comprising a third packaged mascara product comprising a mascara formula contained in a primary package comprised of a vial with a cap having a rod and brush affixed thereto; and comprising the secondary package:
(ii) a card, and
(iii) a transparent blister that fits over the primary package and affixes it to the card; and wherein on the card is printed a graphic depicting the lash look to be achieved with the mascara formula contained in the primary package; and wherein the lash look to be achieved with the third packaged mascara product is different from the lash look to be achieved with the first and second packaged mascara products and those differences are visually captured in the differences between the lash look graphics on the products.
17. The method of claim 16 wherein the lash look graphics of the first product depict long eyelashes and the lash look graphic of the second product depicts thick eyelashes, and the lash look graphic of the third product depicts eyelashes that have multiple benefits, and wherein the first, second, and third lash look graphics are visually evident to the shopper.
18. A display for selling at least first and second packaged mascara products having different end benefits wherein the first packaged mascara product is blistered to card printed with a first lash look graphic visually depicting the first end benefit, and the second packaged mascara product is blistered to a card printed with a second lash look graphic visually depicting the second end benefit, and the third packaged mascara product is blistered to a card printed with a third lash look graphic visually depicting the third end benefit, and wherein the first, second, and third lash look graphics are visually distinctive.
Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention is in the field of mascara products sold on blister cards and methods for merchandising such products.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Billions of dollars worth of cosmetics are sold in self-select distribution channels every year. The term “self-select” means that the consumer selects the cosmetics she wants based upon her preferences and, in most cases, without the advice and assistance of a beauty advisor. Typical examples of self-select distribution channels include large mass volume retainers like WalMart, chain drug stores, and so on. Typically in stores in the self-select channels, the cosmetics are displayed on what is referred to as a “wall”. They are carded, meaning that the cosmetic itself is usually blistered or otherwise attached to a card. The card is hung from a hook or similar device on the wall.

On the other hand, cosmetics sold in the prestige channel, such as department stores, are usually stored the behind the counter. The shopper approaches a beauty advisor at the counter who advises and assists the shopper in selecting products that are suitable for her. While the prestige shopping experience often ensures that the shopper buys products she is happy with and makes fewer purchasing mistakes, the prestige packaging and personal assistance has its price. The cosmetics purchased in the prestige channel are often considerably more expensive than those sold in self-select channels. While the consumer can purchase a high quality product at a lesser price when shopping in self-select channels, she is still left to her own devices in terms of selecting products that are suitable for her. This can sometimes be a very hit or miss proposition particularly with consumers who are not as sophisticated with respect to cosmetics. In some cases the self-select shopper will purchase a number of products she is not happy with before finding the right one. The amount of money spent ends up being close to or more than what she would have spent if she had purchased a more expensive product in a department store after consultation with a beauty advisor.

This means that cosmetics manufacturers who sell in self-select channels must present their products in a way that catches the interest of the prospective purchaser and accurately and simply communicates the main benefits of the product being offered. In other words, the product itself must serve as a stationary beauty advisor. In most cases, cosmetic products sold in the self-select channels are sold on what is referred to as blister cards. In this presentation, a thin transparent sheet of plastic is heat formed over the product to affix it to a card. The card is used to display graphics and indicia, typically providing information about the product name, benefits, ingredient listing, color, source, UPC codes, and so on. Cosmetics manufacturers often print cards with eye catching color patterns and graphics to draw the shopper to their section of the wall. In some other cases, cosmetics manufacturers try to squeeze so much information on the blister cards that the fine print becomes almost indistinguishable to the consumer, who ends up reading little or nothing. There is an obvious advantage to designing blister cards to simply and effective communicate the benefit of the product being sold and to draw the purchaser's eye to a certain section of a busy wall filled with many other products sold by competitors.

One category where simple and effective communication is particularly desired is in the mascara category. Mascaras have many end benefits besides color. For example, there are mascaras that lengthen for those that have short stubby lashes. For those who have sparse but longer lashes, thickening mascaras are more popular. Certain other consumers want mascaras that are multi-benefit, e.g. that provide conditioning, thickening, lenghthening, accentuating, and so on. One problem with the typical blister card presentation of mascaras in self-select channels, is that the end benefit is communicated in small type on the card. Often the shopper becomes confused. She locates the mascara section on the wall, then has to slowly and painstakingly read the copy to determine which product has the end benefit she is seeking. Because of the laboriousness of reading copy on all products offered, the consumer is likely to purchase the first product she sees that provides the end benefit she is seeking. Often that product is the one that has the most eye-catching coloring and graphics. This causes the other cosmetics manufacturer, who may have the best product of all, to lose a sale and a potential repeat customer.

Accordingly, there is a need for presentation for mascaras sold on blister cards that catches the shopper's eye from far away and simply communicates the benefits of the product being offered, particularly in terms of the type of lash look to be achieved.

It is an object of the invention to provide a packaged mascara product on a blister card where the card contains a graphic depicting the type of lash look to be achieved with the mascara product.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a method for promoting sales of mascara products sold on blister cards by depicting on the blister card a graphic showing the lash look to be achieved with the mascara product being offered.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a packaged mascara product sold on a display wherein the type of lash look to be achieved with the product is depicted on the display by a graphic showing the lash look to be achieved.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention is directed to a packaged mascara product comprising, in combination:

a mascara formula contained in a primary package comprised of a vial with a cap having a rod and brush affixed thereto,

a card,

a transparent blister that fits over the primary package and affixes it to the card; and wherein on the card is printed a graphic depicting the lash look to be achieved with the mascara formula contained in the primary package.

The invention is further directed to a display for selling mascara products having more than one end benefit, comprising:

a first set of mascara products having at least one first lash look end benefit blistered onto cards wherein the first lash look end benefit is depicted with a graphic of eyelashes having the first lash look end benefit, and

a second set of mascara products having at least one second lash look end benefit that is different from the first lash look end benefit, said product blistered onto cards wherein the second lash look end benefit is depicted with a graphic of eyelashes having the second lash look end benefit, and the first and second graphics are visually distinctive and communicate the differences in lash look end benefit between the first and second product sets.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1: depicts the front face of a card onto which a mascara product may be blistered, containing a graphic that depicts eyelashes that are thick.

FIG. 2: depicts the front face of a card onto which a mascara product may be blistered, containing a graphic that depicts eyelashes that are long.

FIG. 3: depicts the front face of a card onto which a mascara product may be blistered, containing a graphic that depicts eyelashes that are thick, long, and curved.

FIG. 4: depicts the rear face of the card of FIG. 1, containing graphics and text further describing the mascara product blistered onto the card.

FIG. 5: depicts the rear face of the card of FIG. 2, containing graphics and text further describing the mascara product blistered to the card.

FIG. 6: depicts the rear face of the card of FIG. 3, containing graphics and text further describing the mascara product blistered to the card.

FIG. 7: illustrates the blister that fits over the mascara product and affixes it to the card.

FIG. 8: depicts a fully assembled stock keeping unit (SKU) where the mascara product is blistered to the card.

FIG. 9: depicts another embodiment of the invention showing the front face of a card onto which a mascara product may be blistered, containing another type of graphic showing a side face section view containing eyelashes that are thick, curved, and long.

FIG. 10: depicts another embodiment of the invention showing the front face of a card onto which a mascara product may be blistered, containing another type of graphic showing a side face section view containing eyelashes that are long and thick.

FIG. 11: depicts another embodiment of the invention showing the front face of a card onto which a mascara product may be blistered, containing another type of graphic showing a side face section view containing eyelashes that are thick.

FIG. 12: depicts a fully assembled stock keeping unit showing a mascara product blistered to a card that contains a graphic showing a side face section view containing eyelashes that are long and curved.

FIG. 13: depicts a mascara component comprised of a cap/rod/brush assembly and a reservoir for holding the mascara.

FIG. 14: depicts the different types of racks that may by used to display the packaged mascara products of the invention.

FIG. 14A: illustrates a standard rack containing shelves.

FIG. 14B: illustrates a product support member that is typically referred to as a “hook”.

FIG. 14C: illustrates a shelf-like product support member.

FIG. 14D: illustrates a basket type of product support member.

FIG. 14E: Is a holder for signage that may be used to identify the different sections of the display and the cosmetics they contain.

FIG. 15: depicts the types of planar wall materials from which product may be suspended using different types of product support members.

FIG. 15A: depicts what is often referred to in the industry as a slat wall.

FIG. 15B: depicts what is often referred to in the industry as a grid wall.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

I. The Mascara Product

The invention is directed to a mascara product having at least one lash look end benefit, blistered onto a card that contains a simple, easy to read graphic that depicts that end benefit to the shopper in a simple eye catching manner. Preferably, such mascara products are sold in what is referred to as a cap/rod/brush/vial package, as best depicted in FIG. 13.

A. Vial

Such a mascara product 1 contains the mascara formula (not shown) stored in a storage container such as a vial 2. While in most cases the vial 2 is cylindrical, this does not have to be the case. The vial may be other shapes and sizes, such as square, triangular, or any type of shape that is suitable for storing a mascara formula and which can be closed using the standard closure. In most cases mascara formulas have a semi-solid consistency, however mascara formulas in solid and liquid forms are known.

Typically the vial 2 has a neck 3 that contains engaging means 4, most often in the form of threads. The neck 3 of the vial 2 most often has a diameter that is less than the general diameter of the vial 2. The ensures that when the cap is affixed to the vial the entire container has a smooth external surface where the cap and vial are flush with each other Vial 2 may be a variety of colors depending on the preference of the cosmetics manufacturer. If desired, vial may be decorated with the cosmetics manufacturer's logo, or other indicia.

The vial 2 is closed with a cap 5 to which is affixed a rod 6 and brush 7. The inner surface of the cap 5 contains engaging means (not shown) that mate with the engaging means 4 that is found on the neck 3 of vial 2. This permits closure of the vial 2, preferably in hermetic fashion, which in turn prevents drying out of the mascara formula found within.

B. Rod

Attached to the cap 5 inner surface is rod 6. The rod has a proximal end 8 that is attached to the cap 5 inner surface and a distal end 9 to which the brush 7 attaches. The rod is typically made of the thermoplastic material such as polyethylene, polypropylene, or similar. The thermoplastic material must be selected so that it is not chemically degraded by the mascara formula found within the vial 2.

C. Brush

A brush 7 is attached to the distal end 9 of the rod 6. In one preferred embodiment, the brush 7 is preferably a twisted metal wire brush, formed by capturing fibers between two wires, then twisting the wires to form a spiral array. This type of brush is well known in the art. Examples of such a brush and how it is made are set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 6,427,700 (see FIGS. 2 and 3 in particular), and U.S. Pat. No. 4,887,622, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

In one embodiment of the invention the brush is a twisted metal wire brush having 10 to 40 fibers (bristles) per coil as set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 4,887,622. Such preferred brushes may be made of hollow or solid circular fibers, which may be nylon, polypropylene, and so on. The fiber diameters may range from about 3 mil (thousandths of an inch) to 6 mil, more preferably from about 4 to about 5 mil.

In another embodiment of the invention the brush is made from fibers having different cross-sectional diameters as set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 6,427,700.

A wide variety of other brushes are suitable, including twisted metal wire brushes or applicators that are formed in other ways, for example by molding. The twisted metal wire brushes may be made from any types of suitable fibers, having many different cross sections, with wires having a variety of different diameters. In addition, such brushes may be trimmed or shaved to provide unique appearances. There are no limitations on the type of brush that may be attached to the rod and used in the mascara package, so long as the brush provides the desired end benefit advertised by the cosmetics manufacturer—something that is usually determined by considering the mascara formula and brush as a two component system that must work together to provide the desired result.

D. Mascara Formula

The mascara formula may be in the anhydrous or water and oil emulsion form. Typically, anhydrous mascara compositions contain from about 0.1-95% of an oil, 0.1-65% pigments, and from about 0.1-50% film forming polymer. Emulsion mascaras contain essentially the same types of ingredients and in the same ranges, but in addition contain water, preferably ranging from about 1-85%, with all percentages mentioned herein being percentages by weight unless otherwise indicated.

The oils may be volatile or non-volatile. Examples of volatile oils include those that have vapor pressures of less than about 2 mm. of mercury at 20° C., including cyclic silicones such as octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane, dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane; or linear silicones such as hexamethyldisiloxane, octamethyltrisiloxane, decamethyltetrasiloxane, dodecamethylpentasiloxane, a linear volatile silicone containing six Si—O units, or mixtures thereof. Also suitable as volatile oils are paraffinic hydrocarbons having from about 8 to 18 carbon atoms, including but not limited to C9-11 isoparaffins, isododecane, isohexadecane, or mixtures thereof.

A wide variety of non-volatile oils may also be used, including silicone oils or organic oils. Examples of suitable silicone oils include linear non-volatile silicones such as dimethicone, phenyl trimethicone, phenyl dimethicone, diphenyl dimethicone, cetyl dimethicone, or other non-volatile silicones that are oily ingredients and also have an emulsifier function such as dimethicone copolyol, cetyl dimethicone copolyol, and so on.

The mascara formula may also contain one or more structuring agents, particularly if found in the solid or semi-solid form. If present, such structuring agents may range from about 0.1-90% of silicone waxes (such as stearyl dimethicone, behenyl dimethicone), natural waxes (such as candelilla or ozokerite), synthetic waxes (polyethylene homopolymers or copolymers of polyethylene and polypropylene), mineral waxes (such as paraffin).

Mascaras, except for niche mascara products that are clear, contain pigments. If present, pigments are generally iron oxides, such as black, yellow, red, and the like.

Mascara formulas may be waterproof or regular. Generally regular mascaras can be removed with soap and water, while removal of waterproof mascaras requires special removers.

One type of mascara formula may be a fully pigmented mascara for application to lashes, dispensed from one container. Another type of mascara may be a clear, or substantially clear eyelash product which optionally may have special pigments that provide a reflective or jewel look. Another type of mascara may be a two-pack product where one half of the container has chamber with an applicator, which contains a clear or white basecoat for first application to the lashes for lengthening or nourishing the lashes, and the other half of the container has a chamber with an applicator, which contains the colored product. Examples of this type of product are sold by Revlon® under the Lash Fantasy® trademark.

II. The Card

The mascara product is affixed to a card 10. Examples of cards are depicted in FIGS. 1-6. Card 10 has a front surface 11 and a rear surface 12. The types of information that may be found on the card include, but are not limited to:

A. Color Descriptor

Card 10, either front surface 11 or rear surface 12, will most often contain a color descriptor 13 that identifies the color of the mascara formula found within the package. A wide variety of color descriptors are appropriate. While the card 10 front surface 11 depicted in FIGS. 1-3, 8, 9-12 contain color descriptors indicating that the mascara products ultimately blistered to card 10 will be black, blackest black, or blackened brown, respectively, suitable color descriptors may include color names such as blue, navy blue, black, brown, dark green, and so on. The scope of the invention is not limited to cards 10 containing only the color descriptors 13 set forth in the FIGS. 1-3, 8, and 9-11. The only important feature of the color descriptor 13 is that it must accurately and simply communicate the color of the mascara product to the shopper.

B. Product Number

It may be desirable to print the product number 14 clearly on the front surface 11 or the rear surface 12 of card 10. A very clearly printed product number 14 on the front surface 11 of the card 10 facilitates restocking of the mascara product. Generally, the product number is assigned by the cosmetics manufacturer who manufactures the mascara product. In some cases the product number is the SKU number, a six digit number in the form xxxx-xx assigned by the cosmetics manufacturer that specifically identifies a particular product. Each product manufactured by a particular cosmetics manufacturer typically contains at least one specific identifying number that enables the manufacturer to track information about the product such as sales, stocking, and so on.

C. Brand Identifier

Preferably, the card 10, either the front surface 11 or rear surface 12, will contain a brand identifier 15. The term “brand identifier” is text, or a logo, or both, that identify the brand of the cosmetic product. In most cases the brand identifier will be trademarked. While the brand identifiers 15 depicted in FIGS. 1-3, 8, and 9-12 are Almay® and Revlon® respectively, the scope of the invention is not limited to cards 10 that are printed with only those brand identifiers. Rather, any other brand identifier that identifies a cosmetics manufacturer may be printed on card 10 front surface 11 or rear surface 12.

D. Sub Brand Identifier

Card 10, either on the front surface 11 or rear surface 12, may contain a sub brand identifier 16. Most cosmetics companies have various sub brands under which they sell their branded cosmetics. For example, X Cosmetics (brand) may sell a line of mascara products under the sub brand “Longest Lashes” (sub brand). While FIGS. 1-3 and 8-12 refer to sub brands One Coat®, Luxurious Lengths™, Lash Fantasy®, and Fabulash®, which are sub brands owned by Revlon Consumer Products Corporation, the invention is not limited to those sub brands. Rather, any sub brands owned by any cosmetics manufacturers are included within the description of sub brand identifier herein.

E. Product Type Descriptor

Somewhere on card 10, either the front surface 11 or rear surface 12, the product type is noted by a product descriptor 17 which tells the consumer what type of cosmetic product is found within the package. In this case the product is mascara. Preferably, the product descriptor 17 is on the front surface 11, and in lettering large enough to be easily seen by the shopper. The product type descriptor 17 communicates to the shopper the type of cosmetic product that is being offered in the package. It is possible that the product descriptor 17 be one word, “mascara” that describes the product. Alternatively, the product descriptor 17 can be part of a larger, specific trade mark or trade name, as depicted in the card 10 of FIG. 1 where the product is identified by brand 15 (Almay), sub brand 16 (One Coat), with a further trade mark name “One Coat Nourishing Mascara”, with the product descriptor 17 “mascara” being part of a trademark that identifies what may be referred to as a sub sub brand, e.g. a subset of a brand which is in turn a subset of another larger brand.

Alternatively, product descriptor 17 may simply be the word “mascara” (or similar words such as lash coating, lash color, etc.) as set forth in FIGS. 9 or 10, preferably placed such that it is easily read by the shopper.

F. End Benefit Descriptor

The card 10 will contain one or more descriptors that identify the end benefit that is achieved with the mascara product of the invention, referred to as end benefit descriptors 18. The term “end benefit” means the cosmetic result that is delivered by the product when used in accordance with the cosmetics manufacturer's instructions. For example, with mascara products, the desired end benefits include thickening lashes, lengthening lashes, curving or curling lashes, nourishing or conditioning lashes, or multi-benefits which may include combinations of two or more of the benefits mentioned, and so on. The term “end benefit descriptor” means the one or more descriptors used by the cosmetics manufacturer to indicate to the consumer the end benefits of the product being offered when the product is used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

The term “lengthening” means that the mascara formula and brush combination adds length to the lashes when applied in the proper manner, that is, according to the cosmetics manufacturer's instructions. The term “thickening” means that the mascara formula and brush combination thickens lashes when applied in the proper manner. The term “curving” or “curvier” means that the mascara and brush combination will tend to curl the lashes when applied in the proper manner. The term “nourishing” means that the mascara is formulated to contain ingredients that soften or condition the lashes when applied in the proper manner. The term “multi-benefit” means that the mascara has more that one end benefit such as a combination of and two or more of lengthening, thickening, nourishing, or curling lashes, or others not mentioned herein.

For example, FIG. 1 depicts a card 10 that will ultimately have blistered to it a mascara product 1 that has the end benefit of thickening the lashes as denoted by the end benefit descriptor “thickening” 18A. The term “volumizing” may be used instead of thickening to describe the end benefit of making lashes look thicker or like they have more volume. FIG. 11 depicts a card that will ultimately have a mascara product blistered to it where the end benefit of the mascara product 1 is volumizing lashes, as denoted by the end benefit descriptor “volumizes” lashes 18D.

Similarly, FIG. 2 depicts a card 10 that will ultimately have blistered to it a mascara product 1 that has the end benefit of lengthening the lashes as denoted by the end benefit descriptor “lengthening” 18B. The term “extends” or “extending” may also be used to describe the lengthening end benefit. For example, FIG. 9 depicts a card 10 that will ultimately have a mascara product blistered thereto, where the end benefit is “extends” lashes 18E.

FIG. 3 depicts a card 10 that will ultimately have blistered to it a mascara product that has multi-benefits, e.g. thickening, lengthening, and curving 18C. The term “magnifies” lashes 18F may also be used to indicate the multi-benefit end benefit descriptor as seen in FIG. 10.

Many end benefit descriptors are suitable so long as they accurate and simply convey to the shopper reading the card 10 what the end benefits of the product will be if she purchases it and uses it on her lashes.

G. Lash Look Graphic

All of the cards 10 will contain at least one lash look graphic 19, either on front surface 11 or rear surface 12, preferably front surface 12. The term “lash look graphic” means a drawing or photograph of eyelashes or a section of the face containing eyelashes where the eyelashes illustrate the end benefit provided by the mascara product 1 that is blistered to the card 10.

Most often, cosmetics manufacturers do not sell just one mascara product 1 with only one end benefit. Rather, they tend to sell a variety of mascara products, each having a different end benefit or combination of end benefits. For example, the Figures depict cards 10 for mascara products 1 that have the end benefit of thickening, lengthening, and multi-benefit. In the invention, the cosmetics manufacturer's entire mascara product 1 collection under one brand and sub brand will be divided into separate subsets depending on the end benefit provided. Each subset of products having a specified end benefit will contain mascara products 1 blistered to cards 10 where the end benefit is denoted by the appropriate lash look graphic 19. Further, the lash look graphic 19 for each subset will be visually distinct from the lash look graphic 19 that is on the card 10 to which is blistered a mascara product having a different end benefit.

For example, in the scenario where the mascara products of FIGS. 1-3 are sold together on a display or wall in the self-select distribution channel, each of the cards 10 in FIGS. 1-3 will contain a lash look graphic 19 that is different from the lash look graphic 19 on the cards 10 for the other products. Moreover, each of the lash look graphics 19 on each of the cards are visually distinct from each other such that a typical shopper having a normal level of experience and average attention span can easily distinguish one mascara product 1 subset from the other by simply looking at the lash look graphic 19.

In FIG. 1, the mascara product 1 to be blistered to the card 10 is identified with the end benefit descriptor 18A of thickening. The lash look graphic 19 is a drawing of eyelashes that are thick 19A. The lash look graphic depicting thickened lashes 19A is large enough so that the shopper can see the graphic from a distance away, and the placement of the end benefit descriptor 18A in a prominent place on the card 10 front surface 11 reinforces the consumer's conclusion that the product is for thickening lashes.

Then in FIG. 2, the mascara product 1 to be blistered to the card 10 front surface 11 is identified with the end benefit descriptor 19A of lengthening. The lash look graphic depicting lengthened lashes 19B is a drawing of eyelashes that are long when compared to the thickening lash look graphic 19A on front surface 11 of card 10 in FIG. 1.

In FIG. 3, the mascara product 1 to be blistered onto the card 10 front surface 11 is identified with the end benefit descriptors 18C of fuller (thickening), longer (lengthening), and curvier (curling), a multi-benefit product. The lash look graphic 19 is a drawing of eyelashes that are thick, long, and curved 19C, and more obviously so when compared to the lash look graphics 19A and 19B. Thus, when the shopper is shopping at the section of the display or wall where a particular brand of products is being sold, the subsets of different types of mascara products 1 in the product category of mascara will be identified by lash look graphics that depict the particular end benefit and are simply and visually different from each other. While, in some cases, the shopper may not be able to tell that the lash look graphic 19A depicts thicker lashes in general, when compared to the other mascara product 1 offerings by the same manufacturer it will be obvious that the thickening lash look graphic 19A depicts thicker lashes than the lengthening lash look graphic 19B, and the multi-benefit graphic 19C depicts thicker, longer, and curvier lashes than the mascara products 1 on the cards 10 that have other end benefits. When viewed all together by the shopper, she will be easily able to tell the difference between the lash look graphics 19 on a relative basis, even from a distance.

Suitable lash look graphics 19 can take forms other than a simple drawing of eyelashes as depicted in FIGS. 1-3. FIGS. 9-12 depict cards 10 containing another type of lash look graphic 19 which contains a drawing of a side profile section of a woman's face having accentuated eyelashes where the eyelashes depict the end benefit to be achieved by using the mascara product. For example, in FIG. 9, the lash look graphic 19 contains a profile of one side of a woman's face showing an eyebrow, a closed eye, and accentuated lashes that are exceptionally long 19D when compared to the lash look graphic 19 depicted on the card 10 in FIG. 10 which shows a lash look graphic where the lashes are long and curved but not nearly as thick 19E as those depicted in lash look graphic 19D of FIG. 9. Similarly, in FIG. 11, the lash look graphic 19 shows the side profile of a woman's face with accentuated lashes, a lash look graphic depicting thicker lashes 19F when compared to 19D and 19E. While the mascara products in FIGS. 9-12 are of the same brand (Revlon®), they are of different sub brands (Luxurious Lengths™, Lash Fantasy, and Fabulash®). The lash look graphics 19 may identify product subsets within a brand and sub brand (as is the case with the product cards 10 as set forth in FIGS. 1-3), or they may identify products having different lash looks across different sub brands within the same brand as is the case with the products depicted in FIGS. 9-12.

Many other types of drawings or photographs may be suitable for the lash look graphic 19. The graphic may contain a drawing of the entire face with the particular lash look, or a profile drawing of lashes only, or any other type of drawing or photograph so long as it conveys to the shopper the type of end benefit to be achieved with the mascara product being sold.

H. Product Claims

Card 10 may also contain, on the front surface 11 or rear surface 12, any product claims that the manufacturer makes with respect to the particular mascara product. The term “product claims” means the quantitative claims that the manufacturer makes with respect to the product, for example, that it provides “100% thicker lashes” as depicted in FIG. 1, or provides “up to 70% visibly longer lashes” as depicted on the card 10 in FIG. 2, or “5× the Impact” as noted on the card 10 in FIG. 10. Generally such types of quantitative claims cannot be made unless the manufacturer making the claim does adequate tests to substantiate the claims being made.

I. Ingredient Listing

The card will generally contain a list of the ingredients present in the mascara formula, listed in order of decreasing amount. The ingredient listing 20 is most often found on card 10 rear surface 12.

I. Miscellaneous Information

cards 10 may contain other types of information, such as the weight of the mascara product in ounces or milliliters, the indication that it is “new”, the UPC code (usually found on card 10 rear surface 12), advertising for companion products, the name and address of the cosmetics manufacturer, and various numbers associated with the product itself or the components that form part of the product or package. Particularly with respect to mascara products, it is often deemed desirable to show a drawing of the brush 21 that is found in the product. Cosmetics manufacturers believe that this appeals to purchasers.

III. The Blister

As noted herein, the mascara product is blistered to the card 10, particularly the front surface 11. The blister 22 is made of a generally transparent thermoformable plastic and, when the package is assembled, forms a clear covering over the mascara product. Typically the blister 22 has side edges 23 that facilitate its attachment to card 10 by, for example, gluing. The blister serves the dual function of affixing mascara product to the card 10, also protecting the product from consumer damage and tampering, yet permitting easy removal and access once the product has been purchased by the consumer.

IV. The Package

An example of the entire assembled package of the invention is depicted in FIG. 8. The mascara product is affixed to front surface 11 of card 10 with the blister 22. The edges 23 of blister are glued to card 10 and hold the mascara product 1 on the card 10. The card 10 contains the various descriptors, text, and information as set forth herein.

V. The Display

As previously noted herein, cosmetics manufacturers will generally sell the mascara package in a certain section of the wall or display in a self-select marketing channel. Typically the cosmetic manufacturer's mascara products being sold under one brand are all grouped together on the display wall. The entire product grouping may be comprised of subsets of products, each having a different end benefit, which is called out on the card 10 using the lash look graphic 19 described herein, possibly with other identifying indicia. The lash look graphics 19 vary between subsets of mascara products such that the shopper can visually distinguish the lash look graphic 19 depicted on a lengthening mascara and the lash look graphic depicted on a thickening mascara product, for example, and discern the difference in lash look. When mascara products are sold in this manner, the different relative appearance of the lash look graphics between subsets of product are apparent to the consumer.

FIG. 14 illustrates the various types of racks that may be used to display the mascara packages of the invention. FIG. 14A is a standard shelf 24 where the packaged mascara products 1 could be displayed thereon in a variety of ways such as by using stands, cardboard boxes with slat holders, and the like. The packaged mascara products 1 could be arranged on the shelves 24 so that the packaged mascara products 1 having one end benefit are in one section and the other packaged mascara products 1 having the other end benefit are in a second but adjacent section. Thus, the shopper can easily see the different types of packaged mascara products with the different lash look graphics and immediately locate the mascara product that best suits her needs.

FIG. 14B illustrates a hook 25, typically part of what is referred to as the “hook and hang” method for displaying cosmetic products. Typically the hook 25 contains a straight protrusion, which is convenient for hanging the cards to which the mascara products are blistered. In this case the cards will have a hole 26 near the top edge so that they can easily be threaded onto and hung from the hook 25. The hook generally also has a fastener 27 that facilitates its attachment to the planar walls depicted in FIG. 14, either the slat wall of FIG. 15A or the grid wall of FIG. 15B.

FIG. 14C illustrates yet another type of product support member in the from of an adjustable shelf 28 that may be affixed to any of the planar walls depicted in FIG. 15. Adjustable shelf 28 has attachments 29 that enable it to be attached to the planar walls depicted in FIG. 15.

FIG. 14D depicts a basket type 30 of product support. In this scenario the basket can be affixed to the planar walls in FIG. 15 using attachments 31.

FIG. 14E depicts one type of signage holder 32 that may be used in the display. Signage holder 32 holder contains a slat 33 into which a card or similar type of sign may be inserted.

When constructing display, generally the packaged mascara products 1 are displayed in subsections within one section devoted to mascara products 1. One subsection will contain a packaged mascara product 1 that has one end benefit. Another subsection will contain a packaged mascara product that has an end benefit that is different than the end benefit provided by the first packaged mascara product. Additional subsections may be present that display packaged mascara products 1 that have other end benefits that are different from the end benefits of the mascara products 1 in the first and second subsections. Each of the packaged mascara products 1 having different end benefits will contain a lash look graphic that is distinguishable by the shopper such that she can easily locate on the display the packaged mascara product 1 that contains the product providing the end benefit she is seeking. Further, the shopper is able to easily distinguish her desired packaged mascara product 1 from the other packaged mascara products 1 that provide end benefits that are not what she is looking for.

Thus, the shopper will be easily able to view the lash look graphics on the cards to which the mascara products are blistered, see the differences in the lash look graphics and understand in a visual way, the different end benefits of each of the mascara products being offered.

VI. Method of Selling

The invention is also directed to a method for selling mascara products that have different end benefits where the differences between the end benefits are visually communicated to the shopper using lash look graphics which are printed onto cards to which the mascara products are blistered.

The method comprises first providing a providing a first packaged mascara product that contains a mascara formula contained in a primary package comprised of a vial with a cap having a rod and brush affixed thereto. The package includes a secondary package comprised of a card and a transparent blister that fits over the primary package and affixes it to the card. On the card is a printed graphic depicting the lash look to be achieved with the mascara formula contained in the primary package.

In the method, at least one additional mascara product having a different end benefit than the first packaged mascara product is also provided.

The second product comprises a mascara formula contained in a primary package comprised of a vial with a cap having a rod and brush affixed thereto; and comprising the secondary package, a card, and a transparent blister that fits over the primary package and affixes it to the card. On that card is printed a graphic depicting the lash look to be achieved with the second product, which is a different lash look from the look to be achieved with the first product. The differences in end benefits between the two products are visually captured in the lash look graphics, which are printed on the cards for the first and second products.

Any number of mascara products may be sold using the method, so long as there are at least two, and each mascara product that is sold has a different end benefit that is capable of being printed on the blister cards for the product. The lash look graphics will communicate to the shopper in a visual way the differences in end benefits between the two types of products.

The method of the invention is more consumer friendly. The shopper can immediately see the differences between the products being offered by referring to the lash look graphic which denotes in a very simple easily understood manner the differences between the mascara products.

While the invention has been described in connection with the preferred embodiment, it is not intended to limit the scope of the invention to the particular form set forth but, on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7856118Jul 20, 2007Dec 21, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethods for recommending a personal care product and tools therefor
US8091779 *Jun 13, 2008Jan 10, 2012Target Brands, Inc.Transaction product with removable cosmetic article
US8094879Nov 18, 2010Jan 10, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethods for recommending personal care product and tools therefor
US20110068030 *Jul 16, 2010Mar 24, 2011Paul Alan SheppardCosmetic display system
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/471
International ClassificationB65D73/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D40/265, A45D40/00, B65D75/36, A47F5/0838
European ClassificationA45D40/26C2, A45D40/00, A47F5/08B3, B65D75/36
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 3, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: CITICORP USA, INC., NEW YORK
Free format text: AMENDED AND RESTATED PATENT SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:REVLON CONSUMER PRODUCTS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:018700/0001
Effective date: 20061220
Jul 31, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: CITICORP USA, INC., NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:REVLON CONSUMER PRODUCTS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:018026/0023
Effective date: 20060713
Mar 14, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: REVLON CONSUMER PRODUCTS CORPORATION, NEW YORK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HOLBA, CAROLYN ANNE;UDELL, MARSHA ROCHELLE;REEL/FRAME:017335/0689
Effective date: 20060309