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Publication numberUS20070192159 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/731,933
Publication dateAug 16, 2007
Filing dateApr 2, 2007
Priority dateJan 14, 2005
Also published asCA2594001A1, CN101120316A, CN102737335A, EP1856608A2, EP1856608A4, US20060161469, US20140137644, WO2006076460A2, WO2006076460A3
Publication number11731933, 731933, US 2007/0192159 A1, US 2007/192159 A1, US 20070192159 A1, US 20070192159A1, US 2007192159 A1, US 2007192159A1, US-A1-20070192159, US-A1-2007192159, US2007/0192159A1, US2007/192159A1, US20070192159 A1, US20070192159A1, US2007192159 A1, US2007192159A1
InventorsSteven Root, Michael Root
Original AssigneeRoot Steven A, Root Michael R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interactive advisory system
US 20070192159 A1
Abstract
A method of generating individualized real-time weather and environmental data including the steps of receiving user profiles that identify communicator devices and identifications of pre-determined weather and environmental sensors associated with designated locations; analyzing weather and environmental information as well as sensor data from the weather and environmental sensors to generate an individualized weather and environmental signal; and, transmitting the individualized weather and environmental information signal to the communicator devices.
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Claims(12)
1. A method of generating individualized real-time weather and environmental data, comprising the steps of:
receiving a plurality of user profiles with at least two of the user profiles identifying communicator devices, designated locations and identifications of pre-determined weather and environmental sensors associated with the designated locations;
analyzing a weather and environmental information database as well as sensor data from the pre-determined weather and environmental sensors to generate individualized weather and environmental output signals; and
transmitting the weather and environmental output signals to communicator devices identified in the user profiles.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of receiving the plurality of user profiles is defined further as receiving a spatial range identifier and associating the spatial range identifier with one of the pre-determined weather and environmental sensors.
3. The method of claim 1 , wherein the step of receiving the plurality of user profiles is defined further as receiving an environmental identifier indicative of the type of weather and environmental information to be monitored by the pre-determined weather and environmental sensors.
4. A method for collecting real-time road condition information, comprising the steps of:
mounting weather and environmental sensors in various locations along a roadway;
receiving, by a weather analysis unit, weather or environmental condition information from the sensors;
receiving a plurality of user profiles with at least two of the user profiles identifying communicator devices;
analyzing the weather or environmental condition information received from the sensors to generate individualized weather and environmental output signals; and,
transmitting the weather and environmental output signals to communicator devices identified in the user profiles.
5. The method of claim 4, wherein the step of mounting the weather and environmental sensors is defined further as mounting at least one of the weather and environmental sensors on a vehicle.
6. The method of claim 4, wherein the step of mounting the weather and environmental sensors is defined further as mounting at least one of the weather and environmental sensors on a billboard.
7. The method of claim 4, wherein the step of mounting the weather and environmental sensors is defined further as mounting at least one of the weather and environmental sensors on a gas pump.
8. The method of claim 4, wherein the step of mounting the weather and environmental sensors is defined further as mounting at least one of the weather and environmental sensors on a cell phone tower.
9. A method for collecting real-time weather and environmental data, comprising the steps of:
mounting weather and environmental sensors in predetermined locations;
inputting a spatial range associated with each sensor;
receiving weather or environmental condition information within the spatial range of the sensors;
inputting at least one monitoring characteristic into a user profile;
analyzing the weather or environmental condition information received from the sensors based on the monitoring characteristic within the user profile to generate individualized weather and environmental output signals; and,
transmitting the weather and environmental output signals to a communicator device.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein the monitoring characteristic is soil moisture.
11. The method of claim 9, further comprising the step of transmitting real-time locations of each sensor to the communicator device.
13. The method of claim 9, wherein the weather and environmental output signals are transmitted to communicator devices located in close proximity to the sensors.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application is a continuation of U.S. Ser. No. 11/035,654, filed on Jan. 14, 2005. The entire contents of 11/035,654 is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety for all purposes.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not applicable.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

During recent years, the demand for detailed information, such as for example weather information, has risen sharply. Personal computers and communication devices have increased the demand for more information because of their power to gather, manipulate, transmit and receive data. As a result, specialized information and value-added services are in great demand. End users no longer desire to gather, manipulate and evaluate raw data. For instance, nowhere is this condition more apparent than with weather services across North America.

Years ago, radio and television broadcasters recognized an increasing demand for weather information from their audience, and thus increased the number of on-air weather segments as a means for increasing market ranking. Today, the demand for specific content in weather information has exceeded the ability of broadcasters to meet this demand. Virtually every facet of business and personal activities are continually influenced by the weather, good or bad.

In the United States as in most countries, a governmental agency (the National Weather Service in the United States), has the primary responsibility of generating weather products for the general public. These products, such as advisories, statements, and forecasts are generated and made available to third parties, such as broadcasters, newspapers, internet web sites, paging companies and others who, in turn, distribute them to the public. However, this chain of data custody is one way.

Today's lifestyles are fast-paced and sophisticated. Requests for detailed weather information for specific applications outnumber the governments' ability to process them. However, adhering to their mandated responsibility, the National Weather Service generates the general products for public consumption twice daily. This condition forces the public to interpret general and outdated advisories to meet their needs. Often, this interpretation is made erroneously. Even worse, these products are usually regional or national in scope, and may not apply to a particular location where various local activities are underway.

By way of example, weather warnings are broadcast by radio stations across the United States. These warnings identify certain weather impacts within a specified area. In most cases, the warning area includes one or more counties, covering dozens to hundreds of square miles. Most often, these threats (such as severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, etc.), only impact a very small zone within the warning area. These threats also move rapidly. As impacts approach specific zones, they are in fact, moving away from other zones, inside the total warning area. Essentially, the existing reporting system is insufficient to specifically identify and adequately warn of personal risk. Furthermore, if the threat is imminent, the existing system cannot and does not provide preventive measures for each user near or at the threat. Thus, by default, distant or unaffected users are placed “on alert” unnecessarily when the threat may be moving away from their location.

Another common example further clarifies the problem. A family, excited to attend the championship softball game this upcoming weekend, closely monitors the local weather forecast. All week-long the forecast has advised fair to partly cloudy weather for game day. Early on game day, the forecast changes to partly cloudy, with a thirty percent chance for late afternoon showers. The family decides to attend the game, believing that the chances for rain are below their perceived risk level. Unknown to the family at midday, some clusters of showers are intensifying, and will place dangerous lightning over the game field. While the morning weather report was not completely inaccurate, the participants and spectators are exposed to risk. If later asked, it is likely the family members did not hear or remember the weather forecast. They also failed to link their limited knowledge of the weather to their own needs and risk exposure. They did not monitor changing weather events. Most likely, they had no ability to monitor developing risk at the game. Clearly, these people were forced to interpret outdated, limited information as applied to their specific application.

Therefore, a need exists for a system to automatically and continuously provide consumer customized reports, advisories, alerts, forecasts and warnings relevant to a consumer-defined level of need or dynamic spatial location. It is to such a system that the present invention is directed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides an interactive advisory system and method of delivering individualized information. One embodiment relates to a method of generating individualized real-time weather and environmental data A plurality of user profiles, with at least two user profiles identifying communicator device, designated locations and identifications of pre- determined weather and environmental sensors associated with the designated locations, are received. Weather and environmental information as well as sensor data from the pre-determined weather and environmental sensor data is analyzed to generate individualized weather and environmental output signals. The weather and environmental output signals are transmitted to communicator devices identified in the user profiles.

Another embodiment relates to a method for collecting real-time road condition information. Weather and environmental sensors are mounted in various locations along a roadway. A weather analysis unit receives weather or environmental condition information from the sensors. The weather and environmental condition information is used to generate individualized weather and environmental output signals. The signals are transmitted to communicator devices identified in user profiles.

Another embodiment relates to providing individualized and localized real-time weather and environmental data. Weather and environmental sensors are placed in predetermined locations within a spatial range associated with each sensor. Weather or environmental condition information within the spatial range of the sensors is received. The weather or environmental information is analyzed based on monitoring characteristics with a user profile. An individualized weather and environmental output signal is generated and transmitted to a communicator device.

Other advantages and features of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art when the following detailed description is read in view of the attached drawings and appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an interactive weather advisory system constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a coordinate system illustrating a spatial location identifier and a spatial range identifier utilized by versions of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of an interactive advisory system constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an interactive weather advisory system constructed in accordance with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIG. 1 shown therein in block diagram form, is one embodiment of the invention in the form of an interactive weather advisory system constructed in accordance with the present invention. The weather advisory system 8 is provided with a broadcast network 10 for selectively transmitting individualized weather output signals to remote communicator devices 11. The broadcast network 10 includes a weather analysis unit 12, a user input database 14, a communicator location database 16, and a communication network 20. The weather analysis unit 12 receives real-time weather data from a weather information database 21. The weather information database 21 can be located at the broadcast network 10, or remotely from the broadcast network 10. The weather analysis unit 12, the user input database 14, the communicator location database 16, the weather information database 21, and the communication network 20, interrelate and communicate via signal paths 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 and 32.

The user input database 14 permits a plurality of users to input data corresponding to the weather reports, advisories or forecasts such that individualized weather reports, advisories or prediction of events can be transmitted to each individual user. The user input database 14 contains data representative of at least one user-defined parameter correlated to each one of a plurality of users. In one version of the present invention, each of the user-defined parameters includes various information related to weather output signals, such as a spatial range identifier, a user profile, one or more weather content identifiers for identifying particular weather patterns, one or more time identifiers for identifying particular times or time intervals that a user may desire a weather product, a spatial location fixed or dynamic code, and a spatial location identifier for identifying particular spatial locations of interest to the user if the spatial location fixed or dynamic code indicates that the spatial location is to be fixed. The user profile in each of the user-defined parameters includes at least a user identifier code for identifying a particular communicator device 11 associated with a particular user.

For instance, the user identifier code could be a mobile telephone number identifying one of the communicator devices 11, which in this instance could be a mobile telephone or a pager, for example. The weather content identifier could be a computer code to identify one or a variety of weather conditions or events such as tornadoes, thunderstorms, hail storms, lightning storms, showers, snow storms, blizzards, high winds, winds aloft, rapidly rising or rapidly falling barometric pressure or other such weather patterns or conditions. The time identifier desirably could be a computer code for identifying the particular time, times, or time intervals the user desires the interactive weather advisory system 8 to communicate weather data to the user or to monitor the real-time weather data for a particular time and/or date. The spatial location identifier 26 could be a computer code identifying a particular predetermined spatial location such as, by way of example but not limitation, a longitude and latitude anywhere in the world, a town, a county, a township, address, zip code, altitude and combinations thereof.

As discussed above, the spatial location identifier identifies a particular spatial location anywhere in the world and/or altitude above sea level. The spatial range identifier identifies a particular spatial range surrounding the spatial location identifier. Each of the users can select the spatial location identifier and the spatial range identifier so as to receive weather forecasts and/or weather advisories or any other weather information for the spatial location identified by the spatial location identifier, and within the spatial range identified by the spatial range identifier.

For example, referring to FIG. 2, shown therein is a coordinate system illustrating four spatial location identifiers and four spatial range identifiers selected by different users of the present invention. That is, one of the users selects the spatial location identifier (X1, Y1, Z1), and the spatial range identifier (R1). Another one of the users selects the spatial location identifier (X2, Y2, Z2), and the spatial range identifier (R2).

The user who selected the spatial location identifier (X1, Y1, Z1) and the spatial range identifier R1 will receive weather products and advisories concerning the spatial range identified by the spatial location identifier (X1, Y1, Z1) and the spatial range identifier R1, as predefined in his user input database. The user who selected the spatial location identifier (X2, Y2, Z2) and the spatial range identifier R2 will receive weather products and advisories concerning the spatial range identified by the spatial location identifier (X2, Y2, Z2) and the spatial range identifier R2, and as predefined in the user input database 14. Likewise, the users who selected the spatial location identifiers (X3, Y3, Z3) and (X4, Y4, Z4) and the spatial range identifiers R3 and R4 will receive weather products and advisories concerning the spatial range identified by the spatial location identifiers (X3, Y3, Z3), (X4, Y4, Z4) and the spatial range identifier R3, R4, and as predefined in the user input database 14.

The magnitudes of the spatial range identifiers R1, R2, R3 and R4 can be different or the same. In addition, the magnitudes of the spatial range identifiers R1, R2, R3 and R4 can vary widely and are desirably selected by the users.

Particular users can input the user-defined parameters into the user input database 14 via any suitable method. For example, the user input database 14 is desirably configured to acquire its data from a variety of optional sources preferably chosen by the user, such as verbally through a telephone customer service network, a mobile phone network equipped with wireless application protocol technology, email, a personal digital assistant, a laptop computer, or an interactive web site. Furthermore, users could mail the user-defined parameters to the broadcast network 10, and an individual at the broadcast network 10 could input the user-defined parameters directly into the user input database 14 via a keyboard or other similar input device. In one embodiment, the user inputs the selected information into the user input database 14 via the user's communicator device 11.

The weather information database 21 contains real-time weather data for at least the spatial locations contained in the communicator location database 16 and the spatial locations identified by the spatial location identifier in the user input database 14. The weather analysis unit 12 generates predictions of all weather events based on the real-time weather data. The weather information database 21 desirably receives its real-time weather data from at least one of a plurality of possible resources such as, by way of example but not limitation, government weather information resources, privately operated weather information resources, and other various meteorological resources. The real-time weather data could also be either input directly at the physical location of the weather information database 21 or input via a mobile phone network, a mobile phone network with wireless application protocol, the Internet, aircraft communication systems, email, a personal digital assistant, a laptop computer, regular computer, or other wireless devices.

The communicator location database 16 is an optional feature of the present invention, and is enabled via the signal path 22 when the user requests real-time weather advisories or prediction of events at the dynamic spatial location of the user's communicator device 11. The communicator location database 16 is continuously updated such that the communicator location database 16 contains real-time data indicative of the spatial locations of the communicator devices 11. In one embodiment, the user identifier code in the user's profile is transmitted to the communicator location database 16 via the signal path 22. The communicator location database 16 desirably receives data from the communicator devices 11 identified by the user identifier codes via at least one of a variety of possible resources such as a mobile phone network, a mobile phone network equipped with the wireless application protocol technology, global positioning satellite technology, the Internet, loran technology, radar technology, transponder technology or any other type of technology capable of tracking the spatial location of a communicator device 11 and communicating the location of such communicator device 11 to the communicator location database 16 of the broadcast network 10. Preferably, the communicator location database 16 is continuously and automatically updated as to the location of each of the communicator devices 11, such as by the wireless application protocol technology.

The communication network 20 can be, by way of example but not limitation, a mobile phone network, a mobile phone network with wireless application protocol technology, the Internet, a facsimile network, a satellite network (one or two-way), a RF radio network, or any other means of transmitting information from a source to an end user.

The communicator devices 11 can be bidirectional or unidirectional communicator devices. The communicator devices 11 can be, by way of example but not limitation, a portable device, such as a mobile telephone, a smart phone, a pager, a laptop computer or a personal digital assistant, or any other electronic device capable of receiving weather information data. Furthermore, the communicator device 11 can be incorporated into an object that is utilized or accessible by the user, such as a helmet, an automobile, or an airplane, for example. While only three communicator devices 11 are represented in FIG. 1 for purposes of illustration, the interactive weather advisory system 8 contemplates the utilization of a large number of communicator devices 11.

The weather analysis unit 12 receives the data in the user input database 14, the communicator location database 16, and the weather information database 21 from the signal paths 24, 26, and 28. The weather analysis unit 12 can be, by way of example but not limitation, a computer desirably programmed to automatically and continuously compare the data in the user input database 14, communicator location database 16, and weather information database 21 so as to generate an individualized weather output signal including weather information within the spatial range identified by the spatial range identifier for each user-defined parameter in the user input database 14. The weather output signals are transmitted to the communication network 20 via the signal path 32.

The weather analysis unit 12 gathers the real-time weather data from the weather information database 21. The term “real-time weather data”, as used herein, refers to weather data which is continually updated so as to indicate current or near current information. In some instances, the “real-time weather data” may be delayed by relatively small increments of five minutes, 15 minutes, or 30 minutes, for example. In other instances, the “real-time weather data” can be provided with substantially no delay. It is expected that the increments will become smaller as communication networks and weather related technology become faster.

The weather analysis unit 12 generates predictions of all weather related events and compares past and current events contained in the weather information database 21 (such as future position, strength, trajectory, etc.), to construct a four-dimensional database. Three dimensions of the database define a physical location on or above the earth's surface (the spatial location identifier (X1, Y1, Z1). The fourth dimension is time—past, present or future (identified as T1, T2, T3, T4). By employing high speed computer processors in real-time, the weather analysis unit 12 compares all events (past, current and predicted), at specific positions (X1, Y1, Z1, T1) with identical user supplied data (the user input database—X1, Y1, Z1, R1, T1), and identifies any matches (weather output signals) to the user through the communication network 20 and communication devices 11.

The communication network 20 receives the weather output signals and the user identification codes via the signal paths 32 and 30. In response thereto, the communication network 20 transmits the individualized weather output signals to the communicator devices 11 associated with the user identification codes via the signal paths 34 a, 34 b and 34 c, such that each user receives the individualized weather information that was requested.

The signal paths 34 a, 34 b and 34 c refer to any suitable communication link which permits electronic communications. For example, the signal paths 34 a, 34 b and 34 c can be point-to-point shared and dedicated communications, infra red links, microwave links, telephone links, CATV links, satellite and radio links and fiber optic links.

Various combinations of weather information can be incorporated into the user input database 14 so as to provide the user with selected and specific weather information. For example, a user traveling in his automobile may wish to be informed by the interactive weather advisory system 8 concerning all hailstorms for an area within a 2.5 mile radius of his vehicle as he is traveling from his point of origin to his destination. The user, for example, through his smart phone (communicator device 11) in his vehicle working in conjunction with a mobile phone network (communication network 20) with wireless application protocol, inputs selected information into the user input database 14; namely, the user's smart phone number (user identifier code), hail (weather content identifier), 2.5 mile radius (spatial range identifier 24) and spatial location dynamic (spatial location of the user's smart phone is then automatically and continuously monitored), and the like.

The interactive weather advisory system 8 then monitors weather information and predictions of events in the weather analysis unit 12, and transmits the individualized weather output signal to the user's smart phone if a hailstorm is detected or is highly likely to form within a 2.5 mile radius of the vehicle along the vehicle's path of travel, for the duration of travel.

The individualized weather output signal can be an audio and/or video data signal. For example, the individualized weather output signal can be a .WAV file or other suitable file containing an animated representation of a real or hypothetical individual speaking an individualized message to the user. In the example given above, the individualized message may be that the hailstorm is 2.5 miles ahead of the vehicle and thus, the user should consider stopping for a short period of time so as to avoid the hailstorm. Alternatively, the individualized message may be that the hailstorm is 2.5 miles ahead of the vehicle and thus, the user should consider stopping until further notified by another individualized weather output signal so as to avoid the hailstorm. In other words, the weather analysis unit 12 may transmit another individualized weather output signal to the user via the communication network 20 and the communicator devices 11 notifying the user that the weather condition identified by the weather content identifier has passed or is beyond the spatial location identified by the spatial range identifier.

As another example, a user may desire to be informed of all real-time weather data and predictions of events within a particular spatial range of a particular dynamic spatial location. For instance, the user may be interested in whether his aircraft is at risk of icing as he flies from Oklahoma City to Tulsa, Okla. To provide a suitable level of comfort and safety, the user may wish to be informed of icing conditions within 10 miles of the dynamic spatial location of his aircraft. The user, for example, through his smart phone or other suitable avionic device (communicator device 11) in his aircraft working in conjunction with a mobile phone network (communication network 20) with wireless application protocol, inputs selected information into the user input database 14; namely, the user's smart phone number (user identifier code), icing (weather content identifier), 10 mile radius (spatial range identifier 24), and the spatial location dynamic. The spatial location of the user's smart phone or other suitable avionic device is then automatically and continuously monitored as the aircraft traverses through time and space from (X1, Y1, Z1, T1) to (X4, Y4, Z4, T4). The interactive weather analysis unit 12 then monitors the real-time weather data in the weather information database 21 and the predicted events in the weather analysis unit 12 so as to transmit the individualized weather output signal to the user's smart phone or other avionic device identifying, if icing is detected or is highly likely to form relevant to a 10 mile radius of the aircraft.

As yet another example, perhaps the user is only interested in a particular weather pattern at a particular fixed spatial location and within a particular spatial range irrespective of the immediate location of the communicator device 11. To accomplish this user's request, the broadcast network 10 does not utilize the communicator location database 16. The user inputs selected information into the user input database 14, namely the user's phone number (user identifier code), the code for the particular weather pattern in which the user is interested (weather content identifier), the spatial range around the spatial location in which the user is interested (spatial range identifier), and the spatial location in which the user is interested (spatial location identifier). The weather analysis unit 12 then monitors the real-time weather data in the weather information database 21 and the predicted events in the weather analysis unit 12 so as to transmit the individualized weather information concerning the weather pattern in the spatial location and range requested by the user.

As a further example, perhaps the user is only interested in a particular weather condition at the spatial location and within a particular spatial range at a particular time. The user inputs selected information into the user input database 14, namely, the user's phone number (user identifier code), the code for the particular weather pattern in which the user is interested (weather content identifier), the spatial range around the spatial location in which the user is interested (spatial range identifier and the spatial location in which the user is interested spatial location identifier) and the time and date (time identifier) that the user to wishes to be informed of the weather conditions at the spatial location of interest. In response thereto, the weather analysis unit 12 monitors the real time weather data from the weather information database 21 for the spatial location and range identified by the spatial range identifier and spatial location identifier to determine the probability of the particular weather pattern occurring at the time identified by the time identifier. The weather analysis unit 12 sends, via the signal path 32, the individualized weather output signal to the communication network 20. The communication network 20 receives the user identifier code, via signal path 30, from the user input database 14 and transmits the weather output signal received from the weather analysis unit 12 to the particular communicator device 11 identified by the user identifier code. Thus, the user receives the individualized weather information concerning the spatial location, spatial range and time requested by the user.

The signal paths 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 and 32 can be logical and/or physical links between various software and/or hardware utilized to implement the present invention. It should be understood that each of the signal paths 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 and 32 are shown and described separately herein for the sole purpose of clearly illustrating the information and logic being communicated between the individual components of the present invention. In operation, the signal paths may not be separate signal paths but may be a single signal path. In addition, the various information does not necessarily have to flow between the components of the present invention in the manner shown in FIG. 1. For example, although FIG. 1 illustrates the user identifier code being transmitted directly from the user input database 14 to the communication network 20 via the signal path 30, the user identifier code can be communicated to the weather analysis unit 12 via the signal path 24 and then communicated to the communication network 20 via the signal path 32.

It should be understood that although the user has been described as manually inputting the user identifier code into the user input database 14, the user identifier code could be automatically input into the user input database 14 by the communicator device 11.

Once the user-defined parameters have been input into the user input database 14, the user-defined parameters can be analyzed by the weather analysis unit 12 along with weather content identifiers for purposes of targeted marketing. A plurality of vendors 36 can be provided access to the weather analysis unit 12 of the broadcast network 10 via a plurality of signal paths 38 a, 38 b, and 38 c. The vendors 36 can independently input search information into the weather analysis unit 12 for compiling a data set of information which is useful to the vendors 36.

For example, a particular vendor 36 a, who is in the business of selling snow blowers, may input a weather content identifier and time identifier into the weather analysis unit 12 so as to request a list of all spatial locations in the United States which are expected to receive at least 10 inches of snow in the next week. The weather analysis unit 12 would then compile the data set of all spatial locations in the United States which is expected to receive at least 10 inches of snow in the next week based on at least one weather content identifier, the time identifier, and the real-time weather data stored in the weather information database 21. The data set is then output to the vendor 36 a. Based on the data set, the vendor 36 a may send advertisements or additional snow blowers to the areas identified in the data set.

As another example, the particular vendor 36 a, who is in the business of selling snow blowers, may input a weather content identifier and time identifier into the weather analysis unit 12 so as to request a list of all user profiles identifying users who resided in spatial locations in the United States which are expected to receive at least 10 inches of snow in the next week. The weather analysis unit 12 would then compile the data set of all spatial locations in United States which is expected to receive at least 10 inches of snow in the next week based on at least one weather content identifier, the time identifier, the user profiles, and the real-time weather data stored in the weather information database 21. The data set is then output to the vendor 36 a. Based on the data set, the vendor 36 a may send advertisements to the users who are identified in the data set.

It is envisioned that users will subscribe to the services provided by the broadcast network 10. In this regard, the broadcast network 10 may or may not charge a service fee to the users. In addition, some services may be provided by the broadcast network 10 for one charge and additional services may be provided at an enhanced charge.

To save processing power, the weather analysis unit 12 may periodically determine which communicator devices 11 are turned off or out of range. Once this has been determined, the weather analysis unit 12 would then not generate any individualized weather output signals for the communicator devices 11 which are turned off or out of range. Once a particular one of the communicator devices 11 is turned on or comes within range, the weather analysis unit 12 would then attempt to generate individualized weather output signals for such communicator devices 11. In other words, to save processing power the weather analysis unit 12 may only generate individualized weather output signals for the communicator devices 11 which are active and within range.

The weather analysis unit 12 can be located at the broadcast network 10. Alternatively, the weather analysis unit 12 can be separate from the remainder of the broadcast network 10 and provided as a service to the broadcast network 10.

In one preferred embodiment, rather than or in addition to the user providing user-defined parameters to the user input database 14, the user input database 14 is programmed to provide a plurality of pre-defined user profiles with each of the pre-defined user profiles directed to an activity designated by the user optionally including data and time of the activity. The activity can be a business, personal or recreational need. For example, the business need can be any work dependent upon or impacted by weather conditions to carry out a desired activity, such as, but not limited to a rancher, contractor, farmer, or painter. The personal need can be any activity positively or negatively impacted by weather conditions, such as but not limited to, duties performed by a homeowner, such as mowing the lawn, painting the house, trimming trees, or the like. The recreational need can be any recreational or other outdoor activity dependent upon weather conditions, such as but not limited to golfing, cycling, boating, hiking, fishing, or snow skiing.

In this case, the user selects or provides an activity or category to the user input database 14. The user input database 14 retrieves pre-defined information concerning such activity or category and stores or links such pre-defined information with the user's user profile. The broadcast network 10 and/or weather analysis unit 12 then functions as set forth above to provide weather alerts or other information concerning the information contained in the user's user profile.

For example, a user may plan on golfing on a particular weekend during the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. In this case, the user would select the pre-defined user profile for “golfing”, and the time frame of such planned activity. The location of planned activity can also be entered into the user input database 14, or the location of the communicator device 11 can be monitored by the communicator location database 16. The information contained in the pre-defined user profile is input into the user input database 14 and output weather alerts and forecasts are then generated as discussed above.

The pre-defined user profiles are determined by member(s) of the broadcast network 10 and/or weather analysis unit 12, who identify weather conditions which are typically suitable and/or adverse to each designated activity. Thus, for example, a pre-defined user profile for “golfing” will contain data such as wind conditions, lightning, rain, temperature and other conditions which will positively or negatively impact a golfing activity. The data in the pre-defined user profile can be determined either before or after selection of the activity by the user.

If desired by the user, the broadcast network 10 and/or weather analysis unit 12 can assume the responsibility for generating the appropriate size of the spatial range identifier (as in the case with the user profile, or pre-defined user profile). Alternatively, the spatial range identifier can be determined by the nature of the weather event. In the latter case, member(s) of the broadcast network 10 and/or weather analysis unit 12 would determine an “area of concern” around each weather event that would or could occur and the communication network 20 would then send notifications to any user or communicator device 11 that may come into contact with the area of concern.

For example, a tornado may be ½ mile wide and the broadcast network 10 and/or weather analysis unit 12 would, based upon its experience, knowledge and/or abilities, determine that the area of concern would be 1½ miles wide and 8 miles long—moving northeasterly. Any user contained within the user input database 14 would be notified, as discussed above, if the user's location comes into contact with the “area of concern”.

Other Uses of this System

Shown in FIGS. 3-4, are advisory systems 8 a and 8 b which can be used for delivering other types of information or for more accurately predicting weather related events. The advisory systems 8 a and 8 b are similar in construction and function to the weather advisory system 8, except as described below. For purposes of clarity, similar components have been provided with the same numeric prefix, and different alphabetic suffix.

The advisory system 8 a is provided with a broadcast network 10 a. In one embodiment, the broadcast network 10 a is used for transmitting individualized real-time work assignments from, for example, an employer to an employee. The broadcast network 10 a is provided with an analysis unit 12 a, a communicator location database 16 a, and communicator devices 11 a and 11 b. The communicator device 11 a is referred to herein as an “employer communicator device”, and the communicator device 11 b is referred to herein as an “employee communicator device.” The communicator location database 16 a is continuously updated to contain real-time data indicative of the spatial locations of the communicator devices 11 a and 11 b. In a similar manner as described above, the analysis unit 12 a makes comparisons between user profiles (as represented by a box 80 a), dynamic locations stored in the communicator location database 16 a, fixed locations as represented by a box 82 a and job assignments entered into the analysis unit 12 a from one of the employer communicator devices 11 a. The system 8 a may be further described as an employer system 40 a and an employee system 42 a to delineate the types of information being conveyed within the system 8 a.

For example, an employer uses the employer communicator device 11 a to input employee information and/or criteria into an employee's user profile such as, for example, job location, job schedule, skill set requirements, personality traits, and other criteria as represented by a box 84 a. Further, the employer inputs work or job assignment criteria into the analysis unit 12 a such as, for example, job location, job schedule, skill set requirements, personality traits, and other criteria. The employer inputs the above criteria into one of the employer communicator devices 11 a which may be, for example, a computer, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a cellular phone, a combination cellular phone/PDA, or any other device which may then transmit the employee information and/or job assignment criteria to the analysis unit 12 a. The analysis unit 12 a may be, for example, a computer or a web server. The analysis unit 12 a matches the employee user profile criteria with the work assignment criteria to generate a data set of at least one individualized work assignment.

The individualized real-time work assignment is transmitted to one of the employee communicator devices 11 b based upon the matching of the work assignment criteria with the employee user-profile. The data set can be transmitted to the employer communicator device 11 a such that the employer can review the data set to assign the work assignment to a particular one of the employees, or alternatively, the analysis unit 12 a can automatically assign the work assignment to a particular one of the employees and thereby transmit the work assignment to the employee's communicator device 11 b without any intervention by the employer. The employee's communicator device 11 b may be, for example, a PDA, a cellular phone, a combination cellular phone/PDA, a pager, or any other device in which the analysis unit 12 a or the employer may communicate information to the employee.

The user profile for each of the employees includes information relating to the employee's traits such as, for example, personality, sales style, dress, skill set, location, schedule, or any other quality or trait relating to the particular employee. Further, the user profile is preferably accessible by both the employer communicator device 11 a and the employee communicator device 11 b. However, it is preferred that the employer communicator device la have access to the entire user profile, while the employee communicator device 11 b only have access to a subset of the user profile. Thus, the user profile accessible by the employer system 40 a may differ from the user profile accessible by the employee system 42 a.

For example, the user profile accessible by the employer system 40 a may include traits related to a particular employee that remain hidden or unknown to the employee. For instance, the employee may have access to information stored in his user profile such as location, schedule, skill set, and other criteria as represented by a box 86 a and may be provided access to his user-profile to update information as needed. In addition to the above-mentioned employee-accessible information, the employer may have access to the employee user profile to input and access employee traits such as personality, sales style, dress, and skill set and may be provided access to update this information as needed.

In another embodiment, the system 8 a is used to deliver goods based upon real-time location of a carrier of the goods. More specifically, the system 8 a can be used to accommodate purchasers of products ordered online in order to quickly and efficiently deliver goods to the purchaser's specified location.

The analysis unit 12 a is loaded with employee user profiles and locations. The analysis unit 12 a identifies delivery persons (employees) located near a purchaser's location. Part of the employee's user profile can include an inventory of the goods on the employee's delivery truck. The employee need not know what inventory is located on his delivery truck, but only his delivery destination.

For example, a purchaser may order fresh produce online. The employer may input the purchaser's order (work assignment) into the employer communicator device 11 a (which inputs the work assignment into the analysis unit 12 a) so that the analysis unit 12 a may determine which delivery person may efficiently deliver the specified goods to the purchaser. Also, by ordering online, the purchaser may send his order directly to the analysis unit 12 a such that the analysis unit 12 a automatically determines the appropriate delivery person to deliver goods to the purchaser and sends the assignment to the delivery person via the employee's communicator device 11 b. Further, the employer updates the user profile to track and monitor the precise inventory located on the employee's delivery truck, the inventory being delivered, and any inventory that may be stolen from the delivery truck.

In yet another embodiment, the system 8 a can be used for sending salesmen to the field for soliciting new clients. For example, a company may receive an inquiry from a sales lead. Information about the lead is entered into the analysis unit 12 a as a job assignment from the employer communicator device 11 a. The analysis unit 12 a then determines the appropriate salesman to send to the lead based on information stored in the salesman's user-profile. The salesman's user-profile may include information such as salesman location, personality traits, dress style or other attributes used to determine which salesman may be appropriate to send to the lead.

Shown in FIG. 4 is another advisory system 8 b constructed in accordance with the present invention. The advisory system 8 b includes a broadcast network 10 b. The broadcast network 10 b is similar in construction and function as the broadcast network 10 discussed above, except that the broadcast network 10 b includes individualized sensor networks 48 a having weather and environmental sensors 48 b which are specifically associated with geographic areas associated with predetermined users.

For example, the weather and environmental data collection sites are tremendously sparse in growing areas of the world. In the state of Iowa, only a minimal number of National Weather Service data collection points exist. The scarcity of weather data hinders farmers because a dense grid of weather data points is non-existent in order for farmers to make critical decisions about their crops. For example, how do you know what 160-acre tract of land to fertilize when soil temperature data, crop moisture data, and chance of precipitation data is unavailable?

The sensor network 48 a includes temporary or permanent data collection sensors 48 b which may be installed, for example, on a 10 acre to 40 acre grid on the land of a subscriber or user of the system 8 b. Each sensor 48 b may have a unique spatial range associated with it such as, for example, a five mile or twenty mile radius. The spatial range associated with each sensor 48 b can be selected by the user and specified as a result of the sensor 48 b type and purpose as well as the density of the sensor network 48 a. For example, if the user is interested in soil moisture in order to schedule a fertilizer treatment, the spatial range associated with the chosen sensor 48 b may be set, for example, at 375 feet. In another example, the user may be interested in soil temperature for placing seeds in the ground and the desired spatial range associated with the chosen sensor 48 b may be, for example, 2,000 feet. The user of the system 8 b includes a user profile as discussed above, which is supplemented with information regarding the sensors 48 b associated with the user, e.g., installed on or near the user's land. The sensors 48 b transmit site-specific, individualized information to the weather analysis unit 12 b so that more detailed information can be used by the weather analysis unit 12 b in generating the site-specific weather information for the user.

The sensors 48 b can be any type of sensor which generates information usable for forecasting weather, transmitting current weather conditions, transmitting current environmental conditions, and/or forecasting environmental conditions. For example, the sensors 48 b can be used to sample or record such parameters as, but not limited to, air temperature, humidity, precipitation, solar radiation, wind speed and direction, soil temperature, soil moisture, and/or chemical constituents in the soil.

For example, a user may enter into his user profile types of information the user would like the sensor network 48 a to monitor such as, for example, temperature, moisture and/or soil conditions. The weather analysis unit 12 b receives the sensor data from the sensor network 48 a and transmits information to the user via the user's communicator device 50 b based on information entered into his user profile. The user may also choose a specific sensor for monitoring a specific area at any given time by modifying his user profile.

Further, the system 8 b may be used to transmit real-time road condition information to the weather analysis unit 12 b to enhance the weather information transmitted to the users of the system 8 b. Although the sensors 48 b can include their own power source such as a battery or solar power source, the sensors 48 b are preferably positioned on a device which has its own electrical power source. For example, a temporary or permanent sensor or sensors 48 b may be placed in various locations along a roadway such as on a vehicle, on or beside the roadway, on a billboard, gas pump, cell phone tower or sign alongside the roadway or railway, on a delivery vehicle(s) such as, for example, UPS and/or FedEx, or on the streetlights. If the sensor 48 b is placed on the roadway, it may be placed in the concrete or asphalt. If placed beside the roadway, the sensor 48 b may be placed in, for example, a ditch. The sensor(s) 48 b may detect, for example, moisture, temperature or any other weather or environmental condition associated with the roadway, sign alongside the roadway, on streetlights, or on delivery vehicles such as, for example, UPS and/or FedEx, or on railway cars. Alternatively, the sensor(s) 48 b may be used to detect traffic conditions or any other condition associated with a particular roadway or railway.

For example, each sensor 48 b may be placed 100 feet away from the nearest sensor in order to create the sensor network 48 a for determining conditions for a specified area along a roadway or railway. Further, the sensor(s) 48 b may be placed on various cellular phone towers so that users of a particular cellular phone system associated with the tower may access various conditions using the system 8 b.

Each of the weather sensors 48 a can also include a system such as a GPS system for determining the current location of such weather sensor so that the current location of the weather sensor is transmitted to the weather analysis unit 12 b.

One skilled in the art will recognize many uses of the system 8 b. For example, when sensor data is collected by sensors 48 a positioned on moving vehicles along roadways or railways, the weather analysis unit 12 b can transmit such weather information to communicator devices 11 b located in close proximity to where the sensor data is being collected. Thus, assuming that a Federal Express truck is located 5 miles from a subscriber, the information collected from the sensor on the Federal Express truck can be transmitted to the subscriber.

From the above description, it is clear that the present invention is well adapted to carry out the objects and to attain the advantages mentioned herein as well as those inherent in the invention. While presently preferred embodiments of the invention have been described for purposes of this disclosure, it will be readily understood that numerous changes may be made which will readily suggest themselves to those skilled in the art and which are accomplished within the spirit of the invention disclosed.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8255868 *Sep 11, 2007Aug 28, 2012Intuit Inc.Method and system for providing setup assistance for computing system implemented applications
Classifications
U.S. Classification705/7.34
International ClassificationG06F9/46
Cooperative ClassificationG06Q30/02, G06Q30/0205, G06Q10/063112, G01W1/00, G06Q10/06
European ClassificationG06Q10/06, G06Q30/02, G06Q30/0205, G06Q10/06311B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 29, 2010ASAssignment
Owner name: LOCATOR IP, LP,PENNSYLVANIA
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Owner name: WEATHERBANK, INC., OKLAHOMA
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