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Publication numberUS20070197126 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/673,593
Publication dateAug 23, 2007
Filing dateFeb 11, 2007
Priority dateFeb 10, 2006
Publication number11673593, 673593, US 2007/0197126 A1, US 2007/197126 A1, US 20070197126 A1, US 20070197126A1, US 2007197126 A1, US 2007197126A1, US-A1-20070197126, US-A1-2007197126, US2007/0197126A1, US2007/197126A1, US20070197126 A1, US20070197126A1, US2007197126 A1, US2007197126A1
InventorsSteven Derrah
Original AssigneeDerrah Steven J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetic SkatePark
US 20070197126 A1
Abstract
A toy skateboarder and toy skate-park are provided that involve the interaction of toy skateboard riders with magnets fastened to the underside of their skateboards. They ride on a miniature skate-park designed to allow a magnet tipped stick to steer the rider around from underneath the skate-park. The magnet tipped stick controls all the action. The riders can be towed around and then flicked off to aim at many different skate-park targets to imitate different skateboard rides.
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Claims(20)
1. A skate-park play set, the skate-park play set comprising:
at least one magnetic control stick:
a skate-park, wherein the skate-park comprises:
a plurality of clear guide walls having rounded edge tops; and at least one magnetic skate boarder adapted to controlled skate boarding on the skate-park, wherein skate board control is provided via the at least one magnetic control stick.
2. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the at least one magnetic skate boarder comprises:
a skateboard, wherein the skateboard comprises:
a plurality of trucks;
a plurality of wheels, wherein each of the plurality of trucks is associated with each of the plurality of trucks;
at least one magnet;
at least one gravity weight; and
a rider suitably balanced on the skateboard, wherein the rider comprises:
a plurality of balancing arms; wherein each of the plurality of balancing arms comprise a rail-guide line ups.
3. The skate-park play set as in claim 2 wherein each of the skate board trucks comprises non-magnetic trucks.
4. The skate-park play set as in claim 3 wherein each of the non-magnetic trucks comprises aluminum trucks.
5. The skate-park play set as in claim 2 wherein each of the plurality of wheels comprise urethane wheels.
6. The skate-park play set as in claim 2 wherein the at least one gravity weight comprises a non-magnetic gravity weight.
7. The skate-park play set as in claim 6 wherein the non-magnetic gravity weight comprises an aluminum gravity weight.
8. The skate-park play set as in claim 2 wherein the rider comprises a plurality of arms wherein each of the plurality of arms comprises at least one pin roller adaptable to mating with at least one of the plurality of clear guide walls.
9. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the skate-park comprises at least one magnetic array.
10. The skate-park play set as in claim 9, wherein the skate-park further comprises at least one adjustable ball connector array stand adaptable to holding the magnet array.
11. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the skate-park comprises at least one ball connector array card stand.
12. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the skate-park comprises at least one flick off wedge for assisting in the separation of the magnetic skate boarder and the at least one magnetic control stick.
13. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the skate-park comprises at least one jump end having magnet arrays adapted to repel the magnetic skate boarder and the at least one magnetic control stick at substantially the same time.
14. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the skate-park comprises at least one blank end jump adapted to aid the separation of the magnet based skateboard and the magnet tipped stick.
15. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the skate-park comprises at least one remote adjustable trajectory jump.
16. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the skate-park comprises;
at least street jump;
at least one rail slide; and
at least one rad stop.
17. The skate-park play set as in claim 16 wherein each of the at least one rad stop comprises a rad stop constructed of a material selected from the group of rare earth magnet, permanent magnet, and steel.
18. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the skate-park comprises:
at least one wipeout recovery tunnel; and
at least one carving pool.
19. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the at least one magnetic control stick comprises an angled shaft, wherein the angled shaft is adaptable to holding a magnet.
20. The skate-park play set as in claim 1, wherein the at least one magnetic control stick comprises a ball connector magnet array stick.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/772,260 filed Feb. 10, 2006. The disclosure of this Provisional Patent Application is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a small scale model skateboard system; more specifically to a model skateboard system suitable for a table top. The skateboard system includes novel magnetic skateboards interoperable with magnetic control sticks and magnetic arrays.

2. Description of Background

The sport of skateboarding has become increasingly popular as a recreational activity for persons of ordinary skill levels, and as a competitive sport for persons with extraordinary skill levels together with its attendant entertainment value for spectators. As a consequence, various types of toy skateboards have been proposed. Such skateboards range from simple wind-up toy skateboards with mounted figurines, such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,836,819 issued to Oishi et al., to more advanced radio-controlled toy skateboards with figurines that can be controlled in some degree to portray body movement during skateboarding maneuvers and stunts.

However, remote controlled systems require complicated electronics and external power such as batteries. Thus, although skateboard systems of this nature can provide a challenging environment to those of more advanced operating skills, there remains a need to accommodate persons of various skill levels so that immediate enjoyment of the remote controlled skateboard device can be realized.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention a skate-park play set is provided. The skate-park play set includes a magnetic control stick and a skate-park, having a plurality of clear guide walls having rounded edge tops. The skate-park play set also includes a magnetic skate boarder adapted to controlled skate boarding on the skate-park via the magnetic control stick.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The subject matter which is regarded as the invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the claims at the conclusion of the specification. The foregoing and other objects, features, and advantages of the invention are apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 FIG. 1 is a front view of the skate style skatepark with a rider and control stick;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the magnet skate rider with skateboard, magnet and weight cube;

FIG. 3 is a side view of the magnet tipped stick;

FIG. 4 is a top view of two multi magnet arrays;

FIG. 5 is a side view of a jump section of skatepark showing the flick off action;

FIG. 6 is a side view of a section of skatepark showing the double repellent jump;

FIG. 6A is a side view of a section of skatepark showing the blank end jump;

FIG. 7 is a side view of the street style skatepark with riders and control sticks;

FIG. 8 is an overhead side view of the remote adjustable trajectory jump with rider and control stick;

FIG. 9 is a back view of the remote adjustable trajectory jump showing its heavy base;

FIG. 10 is a side view of the remote adjustable trajectory jump showing the dial marks, the magnet array stand and the flick off wedge;

FIG. 11 is a side view of the magnet array stand;

FIG. 12 is an over head view of the remote adjustable trajectory jump with a rider rollerneath ing thru;

FIG. 13 is an over head view of the pool and ramp skatepark with a rider jumping into it from the remote adjustable trajectory jump;

FIG. 14 is an overhead side view of a magnet skate course; and

FIG. 15 is an index listing of the parts used in the invention described herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Although the present invention will be described with reference to the embodiments shown in the drawings, it should be understood that the present invention could be embodied in many alternate forms of embodiments. All like components are labeled with the same identifying numbers. Small scale is defined as less than normal human size.

Novel features of the invention provide a fast moving, high jumping imitation of the sport of skateboarding. It involves the interaction of toy skateboard riders 9 with magnets 12 fastened to the underside of their skateboards 18. Skateboard rider 9 ride on miniature skate-parks 27 and 29 adapted to allow a magnet tipped stick 11 to steer the rider 9. The magnet tipped stick 11 controls all the action. The skaters 9 can be towed around via magnet tipped stick 11 and then flicked off to aim at many different skate-park targets to imitate different skateboard rides.

The skateboards 18 work similar to full size skateboards. For example, trucks 19 are built and work similar to full size skateboards . . . i.e., the trucks 19 turn the board by weight shifts. The wheels are urethane, also similar to full size skateboards.

A feature of the present invention allows the skateboarder 10 to stand slightly different then a real rider would in order to stay balanced and upright. In addition the arms of the skateboarder 10 are proportionately longer and extend outward, crossing at the middle of the board, hovering over port and starboard.

It will be appreciated that this arrangement not only helps the board and rider 9 to stay upright but allows the arms to line up with the skatepark's clear guide walls 26 used to send skateboarder 10 straight off jumps with some accuracy. The rider's arms have pin rollers built into them to better interact with the guide walls 26. Another feature is used to help the toy skater's balance; a weight cube 20 is added to the underside of the skateboard 18 to add some weight close to the running surface, creating a low center of gravity.

Another novel feature included in this invention is the use of repellent magnet arrays 14 and 15. These arrays act on the magnet 12 carried under the rider's skateboard 18. The multi magnet arrays 14 and 15 have the magnet's magnetic polarity, respective to the skateboard magnet 12, to repel the skateboard 18 magnet 12 making the board 18 and rider 10 repel off the array surfaces 14, 15.

These arrays are placed at the ends of jumps shown in FIG'S. 1, 6, 7, and 8 and are embedded under flat sections. The arrays 14 and 15 placed under the flats repel the rider 9. The arrays placed at the ends of the jumps give the rider extra pop up height and variation in the air.

The magnet arrays 14 and 15 can be detachable and interchangeable and can also be attached to a stand 32 that can be tilted side to side or end to end. It will be appreciated that these different variations of the array placements result in all different jumping routines. Moving the array 15 to a suitable desired position and the board and rider 9 goes straight out from the jump with front wheels high; move the array another way and the board and rider goes to the left with rear wheels high; yet another and the board and rider 9 will do a back flip and so on.

It will also be appreciated that arrays 15 and 14 can have the board and rider 9 flicked at them FIG. 5 or towed straight by them repelling the board and rider and the magnet tipped stick 11 at the same time. It will be further appreciated that a user (not shown) develops a skill of magnet sticking and flicking the skateboarder 10 off skate park 27. The ability to successfully flick off the board and rider 9 entails specific variables contained in this application in FIG'S. 2,4, and 5.

It will be understood that magnets 12 need to be of sufficient magnetic field strength to attract each other strongly enough to tow the board 18 and rider 9 around without loosing them, but not too strong as to stifle the flicking off action described earlier. Because the flick off requires operator skill (even with the magnetic pull properly adjusted) “sticking” aids have been developed to make it easier for the operator to send the board and rider where he or she wants to. For instance the double jump FIG. 6 allows the rider 9 and stick 11 to separate automatically. The blank end jump 38 FIG. 6A, that dilutes the magnetic pull by gradually increasing the distance between the magnets 12 at the end of a jump and then there's the flick off wedge 39 that does the same thing as the blank jump 38 but is not placed at the end of the jump. These sticking action helpers improve the skilled player's performance and allow the less skilled users to get into the game.

DETAILED DRAWING DESCRIPTIONS

FIG. 1 shows the street style skate park 27 with a repellent jump 21. It shows magnet skater 9 and the hand held end of the magnet tipped stick 11. The peg legs 35 are shown holding the park's 27 underside high enough off the table to allow for stick 11 movement. The 4 pegs 35 are designed to take up as little space as possible to allow 95% sticking area underneath. The park 27 should be constructed of any suitable material such as hard plastic that is about 1/16th″ thick or less. Thin construction allows the magnet's desirable attract-and-repel effects to be unaffected. FIG. 1 also shows the magnet arrays 15 that are placed around the park 27. Some arrays 15 are made to flick the rider 9 at the street ramp 23 and some are made to tow the rider straight by, like the repellent jump 21 and some arrays are made to bounce the rider 9 back and forth 25 between each other. It will be appreciated that the magnet arrays 15 may be located in any suitable position.

A street 23 is placed at mid-park 27 with an array 15 embedded at the jump's 23 edge. This array is positioned to repel the rider 9 as rider 9 passes by, adding vertical height to the jump. In front of the jump 23 it a rail slide 24 which can also be sticked from the underside. An added feature to this rail slide 24 is that is has a rad stop magnet 37 embedded in the back side of the hollow rail slide 24. This rad stop magnet 37 is a single rare earth magnet 12 placed to attract the rare earth magnet 12 attached to the underside of the skateboard and rider 9. This adds to the playability of the toy by grabbing the board and rider 9 out of mid air even if the board and rider 9 is a little off target. Rad studs 37 are also fun to aim at on the edges and corners of jumps. Especially when they are raised enough to clear the skateboard wheels causing the board and rider to spin just after the rad stop magnet 37 catches it going by.

FIG. 2 shows a side view of the magnet skateboard and rider 9. The rider 9 is made of any suitable material such as plastic able to withstand landings from large jumps and fast crashes. The rider's arms are spread perpendicular to the skateboard's 18 length with the rider's 9 left arm extending over the port side of the board 18 and right arm extending over the starboard side of the board. This cross-board, wide armed stance is designed to help the rider's 9 balance and props up the righting moment helping the board and rider 9 to remain upright. The wide arms are also designed to line up with the clear guide walls 26 (shown in FIG'S. 8 and 12). The arms also carry integrated rollers 16 designed to roll freely along the guide walls 26 allowing for accurate send offs out of jump chutes (shown in FIG'S. 8 and 12).

The skateboard 18 is realistic looking with double kicks and ends and is made of any suitable material such as hard plastic. It has two miniature skateboard trucks 19 attached and can be made out of suitable non-magnetic material such as plastic or aluminum. The truck 19 axels (not shown) are constructed of any suitable size and material. The wheels 17 are also constructed of any suitable material for all terrain grip and realistic handling.

A cylinder shaped magnet 12 is placed just behind the front truck 19. Magnet 12 is any suitable permanent magnet according to the thickness of the skatepark 27, the weight of the board and rider 9, and the strength of the magnets on the stick 11 and on the skateboard 18.

It will be appreciated that the magnets 12 need to attract each other strongly enough to tow the board and rider 9 around with out loosing them, but not too strong as to stiffen the flicking-off action described earlier. The board and rider should be able to be towed up to speed then with the flick of the wrist be released cleanly and pointed at a specific target. If the magnet pull is too strong this won't happen. A known set up that works is having a 10 mm cylinder magnet 12 on the skateboard 18 and a 7 mm cylinder magnet 12 on the stick 11.

The weight cube 20 is located under the skateboard 18 between the trucks 19. Weight cube 20 places weight down low to quicken the righting moment which reduces the chance of wipe outs and lets the rider 9 land most jumps. Any suitable material such as aluminum or plastic encased lead may be used.

FIG. 3 shows an angled view of the magnet tipped stick 11 with the full length broken off to fit the drawing. The stick should be long enough to reach under the width of the park. It has a right angle magnet holder 13 long enough to stick up into the hollow street jump 23 and the rail slide 24. The holder 13 has to be strongly held to the stick 11 as well as the magnet 12.

A cylinder shaped magnet 12 is fastened firmly to the end of the holder 13. This magnet may be the same type as on the skateboard 18, a strong permanent magnet called a rare earth magnet 12. Also shown is the ball connector magnet array 15 on a stick 40. This setup can pass under a rider 9 and make him hop up while in motion or from a stop. It has a ball connector and a set screw that allows the player to tilt and set the magnet array card 15 front to back, end to end or side to side for variable jump effects.

FIG. 4 shows a top view of two magnet arrays 14 and 15. These arrays may also use the same magnets 12 as on the skateboard 18 and the stick 11, rare earth magnets 12.

These magnetic arrays 14,15 may be constructed with magnets 12 held together by a thick plastic card or any other suitable mechanism. Magnets 12 are fastened into drill holes in the card by a pressure fit as well as permanent glue to ensure they stay put, sticking out of the face and back of each card. The 5 magnet array 15 is flat with all the magnets facing the same way. Both sides can be used for different effects. One side attracts while the other side repels. On the present invention the primary use for the magnet arrays would be to repel the skateboard and rider 9 to give extra pop up height and variation to the jumps. The variation that the arrays 14 and 15 can create for jumps is infinite. It will be understood that the magnetic arrays 14,15 may contain any suitable number of magnets 12.

The magnet array 14 is curved and concaved but still basicly flat. It's slightly curved shape (not shown) allows the same facing magnets 12 to concentrate on the repellent waves toward a center point for more “pop”.

Different variations of the array 15 placements result in all different routines. Move the array one way and the board and rider goes straight out with front wheels high. Another position and the board and rider 9 will do a back flip, and so on.

FIG. 5 shows a side view of the magnet skater 9 being towed at speed then flicked off to free ride off a jump. The motion arrows surrounding the stick 11 on the right show the stick being twisted down and away from the underside of the skatepark 27 and 29. This flicking off action is one of the main skills used when referring to magnet sticking.

FIG. 6 shows the magnet tipped stick 11 towing the board and rider 9 from the underside of the skatepark 27 and 29. Also shown is the board and rider 9 being drawn across the end of a jump that has a magnet array enveloped between two thin walled surfaces; thus accomplishing the flicking motion. The second surface allows the stick's tip 12 to run smoothly by the back side of the magnet array where the magnets are faced to repel the stick's magnet. This allows a smooth send off by making a positive pass by the magnet array 15 therefore controlling the rider's path till the very edge of the jump. This is the double repellent jump 21.

FIG. 6A shows an alternate embodiment to control the rider's 9 path to the very end of the jump; a blank envelope 38 shown in 6A. This allows the stick's magnetic tip to gradually go out of the magnet's range, making it easy to disengage the stick 11 from the underside of the skateboard 18 and the skatepark 27 without flicking off.

In this embodiment, magnet array 15 is removed. Hence the name blank envelope or blank end jump 38. It will be understood that this embodiment does not need to be hollow to work. It could be a solid material and work just as well. An alternate embodiment of this feature is outlined in FIG. 10 showing the flick-off wedge 39.

FIG. 7 shown an overhead, side view of the street style skatepark 27. A view of the opposite side from FIG. 1 is revealed. A rider 9 is seen being towed up the jump face while the thick passes through its pathway 22 then by the repellent jump end 21 and into the air.

The street jump 23 and the rail slide 24 are seen next to the back -n- forth 25 magnet array 15. Clear guide walls 26 are seen running up both sides of the take off by the take off platform 36.

FIG. 8 shows an overhead side view of the remote, adjustable trajectory jump 28. The rider 9 is shown poised to descend down the jump and into the air. The heavy jump base 30 is seen as well as the array stand 32 with a magnet array attached.

This jump 28 is designed to be placed outside the skatepark 27 and 29 and can send an airborne rider 9 from outside the park to land on a downside slope inside the park. This jump is also designed for the rider to be flicked off towards the end of the jump 28 where the arrays 14 and 15 are placed.

FIG. 9 shows the backside of the remote adjustable trajectory jump 28 or R.A.T. jump 28. The jump base 30 is seen showing its wide heavy body tapering up to its triangle shaped axis point. The clear guide walls 26 are also seen.

FIG. 10 shows a side view of the R.A.T. jump 28. This view is from the operator's side of the jump. The jump 28 can be tilted back and forth to provide different take off angles. This is possible by loosening then re-tightening the jump axle bolt 33. Dial markings 34 are provided to set a desired trajectory. The magnet array stand 32 with a 5 magnet array 15 attached. Also shown is a flick off wedge 39 placed where the towing speed of the board and rider 9 reaches its maximum desired level and where the board and rider 9 has to be flicked off to take on the rest of it's targeted ride. These wedges 39 are designed to make flicking off much easier by spreading the distance between the skateboard's magnet 12 and the stick's magnet 12 gradually until the magnet's pull is not felt. These wedges 39 are like the blank end jump 38 shown in FIG. 6A except they are not placed at the end of a jump. These flick off wedges can be attached anywhere to the underside of the skatepark's 27 and 29 as they can be made detachable and interchangeable by tiny clips and stick backs (not shown), or can be built into the skatepark's underside at popular flick off sites.

FIG. 11 shows a side view close up of the magnet array stand 32 with an array attached 15. The ball connector on the stand 32 enables the array to be mounted width to length. Then once mounted it can be swiveled east, west as well as north, south. These adjustments combined with the tilt adjustments outlined in FIG. 10 allows for an infinite combination of different jumps for the board and rider 9 to perform.

FIG. 12 shows an overhead side view of the R.A.T. jump 28 and the rider 9 after being flicked off and heading towards the magnet arrays 15 and the edge of the jump's end 28. Notice how the rider's arms are hooked over the top edge of the clear guide walls. This is where the arm rollers 16 hook up and keep the rider centered and stable when traveling at high speed towards the edge of a big jump. These rollers 16 allow for a clean send off capable of jumping the rider across a room.

FIG. 13 shows a top view of the pool and ramp park 29 in use with the R.A.T. jump 28 placed near by. The remote adjustable trajectory jump 28 is shown pointed towards the skatepark's pool section. A rider is seen jumping a gap, landing on the downside face of the skatepool. The R.A.T. jump 28 is capable of sending the rider and board 9 much further than the gap shown. The pool section offers lots of playability. For instance riders can be flicked at it, go into a carve, shoot out, go up the ramp, then roll back into the pool, etc, etc. It will be understood that any suitable combination may be achieved.

Another novel area of this park 29 is this automatic return chute. It employs downhill banking and curves to funnel off riders 9 having jumped onto the deck or over jumped and crashed into the clear hi wall 31. The rider's come rolling out of a tunnel shooting into the pool to carve it up.

This park design 29 and many others are possible with the use of the interaction of the magnet skaters 9, magnet tipped sticks 11, and magnet array 15 and 14. Especially with the variables added with the four different sticking techniques suggested by this invention in FIG'S. 5, 6, 6A, and 10, and the four different jumps: the double repellent jump 21, the street jump to rail 23 and 24, the blank end jump 38, and the R.A.T. jump 28. These jumps are outlined in FIG. 1-23 and 24, FIG. 4-28 and 23, FIG. 6-38 and FIG. 8-28

FIG. 14 shows another type of magnet skate course. All types of courses are possible as long as 1 side of the course is open to allow magnet sticking underneath.

It will be appreciated that the interaction of the features described herein, such as the magnet bottomed skateboard and rider 9, the magnet tipped stick 11, and the specifically placed magnet arrays 14 and 15; combined with the four different jumps and the different sticking techniques outlined in this application offer an original toy with playability factor suitable for all skill levels. It should be understood that the foregoing description is only illustrative of the invention. Accordingly, the present invention is intended to embrace all such alternatives, modifications and variances which fall within the scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7578719Jun 15, 2006Aug 25, 2009Perry C. FaanesSculpture method utilizing new means of simulating, viewing, and displaying sporting, undersea and other environments
US7946903 *May 4, 2007May 24, 2011Mattel, Inc.Wheeled toy vehicles and playsets for use therewith
US7988520Jul 18, 2009Aug 2, 2011Perry FaanesSculpture device
US8894463Dec 9, 2011Nov 25, 2014Mattel, Inc.Toy figure assembly with toy figure and surfboard
US20120115393 *Oct 10, 2011May 10, 2012Richelle MohToy playset
WO2013013482A1 *Dec 15, 2011Jan 31, 2013Chen YonghuangFinger toy base
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/288
International ClassificationA63H17/25
Cooperative ClassificationA63H7/00, A63H18/10, A63H17/25, A63H18/028, A63H17/14
European ClassificationA63H17/14, A63H17/25, A63H7/00, A63H18/10, A63H18/02F