Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20070199844 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/799,011
Publication dateAug 30, 2007
Filing dateMay 1, 2007
Priority dateNov 30, 2004
Also published asUS20100193384
Publication number11799011, 799011, US 2007/0199844 A1, US 2007/199844 A1, US 20070199844 A1, US 20070199844A1, US 2007199844 A1, US 2007199844A1, US-A1-20070199844, US-A1-2007199844, US2007/0199844A1, US2007/199844A1, US20070199844 A1, US20070199844A1, US2007199844 A1, US2007199844A1
InventorsCharles Daley
Original AssigneeDaley Charles A Iii
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Computer bag
US 20070199844 A1
Abstract
The computer bag is made to hold a computer so the display can pivot at the bag front for quick access. Several embodiments include: A bag with a computer mount toward the top and a keyboard on a flap toward the bottom of the front wall: A bag with a pivoting equipment mount to hold a display or computer to the bag front: A bag with two side release buckle attachments and a cover flap: A bag with an inside computer mount and a slot in the front wall for the display to pass to the outside: A bag with a top wall opening for the computer body to enter the bag while the display remains outside: A bag with two hanger sockets on the right and left: A bag with a pivoting attachment for the computer on the lower part of the bag front and a flap to retain the computer near the top: A bag with computer mounts on the inside and outside of the bag with electrical connection between them.
Images(11)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(59)
1. An apparatus for carrying a computer for mobile use comprising:
a bag having a front wall, an opposing back wall, a left wall, a right wall, a bottom wall and a top wall including a top opening for providing access to the interior of the bag wherein each wall has an inside surface and an outside surface;
a computer holder attached to the of the top half of the front wall or to the top wall for mounting the computer so the computer's display panel can pivot into the line of sight of the operator; and
a manual character input device attached to the outside of the front wall between the computer holder and the bottom of the front wall.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the manual character input device is pivotally attached to the front wall.
3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the manual character input device is removably secured to the front wall.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the manual character input device is pivotally and removably secured to the front wall with a pivoting computer equipment mount.
5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more short flexible fabric hinge means aligned on a horizontal axis with attachments matching the input device to pivotally hold it to the bag's front wall.
6. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more half hinges aligned on a horizontal axis and matching complementary half hinges on the computer equipment.
7. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more axle/bearings on a horizontal axis with attachments to match the computer.
8. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the manual character input device is removably secured using attachments on the inside surface a pivoting cover capable of covering the computer in the computer holder when stored.
9. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising an electrical connection from the manual character input device through the bag's front wall to the bag's interior or computer holder.
10. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a lens located on the bag front to direct infra red light from the manual character input devices through the bag wall to a receiver on an inside mounted computer.
11. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising an inside mounting structure on the inside of the bags front wall to hold further computing equipment.
12. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising an electrical connection through the front wall between the computer holder and the bag's interior.
13. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the manual character input device is a keyboard having standard key size and arrangement, 10 keys wide (A to :) and thumb keys to actuate missing keys to the right and left.
14. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the manual character input device has shaping to cover, fit and protect the display panel of the computer in the computer holder.
15. An apparatus for carrying a computer for mobile use comprising:
a bag having a front wall, an opposing back wall, a left wall, a right wall, a bottom wall and a top wall including a top opening for providing access to the interior of the bag wherein each wall has an inside surface and an outside surface; and
a pivoting computer equipment mount attached to the outside of the bag's front wall.
16. The apparatus of claim 15 further comprising an electrical connection from the pivoting computer equipment mount through the front wall to the bag's interior.
17. The bag of claim 15 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more short flexible fabric hinge means aligned on a horizontal axis with attachments matching a computer to pivotally hold it to the bag's front wall
18. The bag of claim 15 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more half hinges aligned on a horizontal axis and matching complementary half hinges on the computer equipment.
19. The bag of claim 15 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more axle/bearings on a horizontal axis with attachments to match the computer.
20. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein the pivoting computer equipment mount is a pivoting cover with computer attachments on the inside surface to hold computer equipment by its edges or back.
21. The apparatus of claim 15 further comprising an inside mounting structure on the inside of the bag's front wall to hold further computing equipment.
22. The apparatus of claim 15 further comprising “up” position attachments on the outside of the front wall between the pivoting computer equipment mount and the top of the front wall to removably secure computer equipment up to the front wall.
23. The apparatus of claim 15 further comprising a computer with size, shape and attachments to match the pivoting computer equipment mount.
24. An apparatus for carrying a computer for mobile use comprising:
a bag having a front wall, an opposing back wall, a left wall, a right wall, a bottom wall and a top wall including a top opening for providing access to the interior of the bag wherein each wall has an inside surface and an outside surface;
a pivoting computer equipment mount attached to the outside of the bag's front wall; and
a pivoting cover attached to the outside of the bag which, along with the pivoting computer equipment mount, define the storage area of the computer.
25. The apparatus of claim 24 wherein the pivoting cover is attached near the center of the bag's front wall and pivots horizontally upward to cover the computer in the pivoting computer equipment mount.
26. The apparatus of claim 24 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more short flexible fabric hinge means aligned on a horizontal axis with attachments matching a computer to pivotally hold it to the bag's front wall
27. The apparatus of claim 24 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more half hinges aligned on a horizontal axis and matching complementary half hinges on the computer equipment.
28. The apparatus of claim 24 wherein the equipment mount comprises one or more axle/bearings on a horizontal axis with attachments to match the computer.
29. The apparatus of claim 24 wherein the pivoting computer equipment mount and pivoting cover are combined with the computer attachments on the inside surface of the pivoting cover to hold computer by its edges or back.
30. The apparatus of claim 24 further comprising “up” position attachments on the outside of the front wall between the pivoting computer equipment mount and the top of the front wall to removably secure computer equipment up to the front wall.
31. The apparatus of claim 24 further comprising a computer with size, shape and attachments to match the pivoting computer equipment mount.
32. An apparatus for carrying a computer for mobile use comprising:
a bag having a front wall, an opposing back wall, a left wall, a right wall, a bottom wall and a top wall including a top opening for providing access to the interior of the bag wherein each wall has an inside surface and an outside surface;
a storage compartment defined by an interior space configured by connecting the front wall to the back wall;
an opening in the front wall through which an inside mounted computer's display panel can be passed for viewing on the outside of the bag; and
a computer inside mounting structure along the inside surface of the bag for securing the computer to the front wall.
33. The apparatus of claim 32 wherein the front wall opening is slot-like to pass an inside mounted computer's display panel to the outside of the front wall.
34. The apparatus of claim 32 wherein the mounting structure includes a computer/bag coupling to match a mounted computer.
35. The apparatus of claim 32 further comprising a manual character input device pivotally secured to the outside of the bag's front wall.
36. The apparatus of claim 35 wherein the manual character input device is removably secured with a pivoting computer equipment mount.
37. The apparatus of claim 35 further comprising an electrical connection for the manual character input device leading from the manual character input device or equipment mount through the front wall and to the bag's interior.
38. The apparatus of claim 35 further comprising a lens located on the bag front or computer/bag coupling to direct infra red light from the manual character input devices through the bag wall to a receiver on an inside mounted computer.
39. The apparatus of claim 32 further comprising a computer to match the bag's inside mounting structure and opening.
40. An apparatus for carrying a computer for mobile use comprising:
a bag having a front wall, an opposing back wall, a left wall, a right wall, a bottom wall and a top wall including a top opening for providing access to the interior of the bag wherein each wall has an inside surface and an outside surface;
a storage compartment defined by an interior space configured by connecting the front wall to the back wall;
an separate computer installation opening in the top wall for installing the computer body into the bag while its display panel remains outside the bag; and
a computer inside mounting structure along the inside surface of the bag for securing the computer to the inside of front wall.
41. The apparatus of claim 40 wherein the top wall computer installation opening includes a computer/bag coupling to match a mounted computer.
42. The apparatus of claim 40 further comprising a manual character input device pivotally secured to the outside of the bag's front wall.
43. The apparatus of claim 42 wherein the manual character input device is removably secured with an equipment mount.
44. The apparatus of claim 42 further comprising an electrical connection for the manual character input device leading from the manual character input device or equipment mount through the front wall and to the bag's interior.
45. The apparatus of claim 42 further comprising a lens located on the bag front or computer/bag coupling to direct infra red light from the manual character input devices through the bag wall to a receiver on an inside mounted computer.
46. The apparatus of claim 40 further comprising a computer with size, shape and attachments to match the computer installation opening.
47. An apparatus for carrying a computer for mobile use comprising:
a bag having a front wall, an opposing back wall, a left wall, a right wall, a bottom wall and a top wall including a top opening for providing access to the interior of the bag wherein each wall has an inside surface and an outside surface; and
an outside mounting structure attached to the outside surface of the front wall and consisting of two vertical hangers on the right and left side of the bag's front wall.
48. The apparatus of claim 47 further comprising an electrical connection from the outside of the front wall through the front wall to the interior of the bag.
49. An apparatus for carrying a computer for mobile use comprising:
a bag having a front wall, an opposing back wall, a left wall, a right wall, a bottom wall and a top wall including a top opening for providing access to the interior of the bag wherein each wall has an inside surface and an outside surface;
a computer mounting plate secured to the lower outside of the front wall with attachments to match the lower end of a computer and allow it to pivot horizontally; and
a computer mounting flap secured to the upper outside of the front wall with attachments near its distal end and matching the upper end of a computer.
50. The apparatus of claim 49 wherein the flap has elastic.
51. The apparatus of claim 49 wherein the flap has at least one rigid panel to pry the flap and attachments into place.
52. The apparatus of claim 49 wherein the computer mounting plate has an electrical plug and connection leading through the bag's front wall to the bag's interior wherein the plug engages the computer when it is pivoted up against the front wall.
53. The apparatus of claim 49 further comprising an interior lining designed to hold peripherals and cover wires.
54. An apparatus for carrying a computer for mobile use comprising:
a bag having a front wall, an opposing back wall, a left wall, a right wall, a bottom wall and a top wall including a top opening for providing access to the interior of the bag wherein each wall has an inside surface and an outside surface;
a outside computer equipment mounting structure attached to the outside surface of the bag's front wall;
an inside computer equipment mounting structure attached to the inside surface of the bag's front wall; and
an electrical connection between the inside mounting structure and the outside mounting structure to electrically connect the equipment mounted in them.
55. The apparatus of claim 54 wherein the inside computer equipment mounting structure is a pocket with a seal flap wherein the seal flap has an electrical plug and wiring leading through the flap and front wall to the outside mounting structure.
56. The apparatus of claim 55, further comprising computer equipment with shaping, size, attachments and electrical connection to match the inside mounting structure.
57. The apparatus of claim 54 wherein the inside computer equipment mounting structure is a coupling with fixtures to physically hold and electrically connect the equipment it holds with the outside computer equipment mount.
58. The apparatus of claim 57, further comprising computer equipment with shaping, size, attachments, coupling and electrical connection to match the inside mounting structure.
59. The apparatus of claim 54 wherein the inside computer equipment mounting structure is a footing and headpiece which removably secure the computer to the bag and together stretch the bag's front wall tight over the equipment.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a Continuation-In-Part and claims the filing benefit under 35 U.S.C. §120 of pending U.S. application Ser. No. 11/163,763, filed Oct. 28, 2005 which is a Continuation-In-Part of pending U.S. application Ser. No. 11/001,428, filed Nov. 30, 2004, and incorporated herein by reference.

This application claims the filing benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/833,920, filed on Aug. 29, 2006, the entire teachings of which are incorporated herein by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a carrying case for a computer and peripherals.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Computers are becoming an essential part of people's lives. Most people are introduced to computer via the “desk top” computer and spend most of their computing time on one of these machines. The desktop computer is too large to be easily moved so the computer industry responded with the lap top (notebook) computer, portable tablets, “palm tops”, and various hand held devices. The lap top, despite its name, is normally used on a desk and is simply a portable desk top machine. Hand held devices and palm tops, because of their size, cannot be viewed as easily as a desktop, do not have keyboards with standard keys for two hand typing, cannot operate with conventional software, cannot incorporate normal peripherals and, because of their size, must have inferior memory, speed, batteries and telecommunications components.

The objective of the current invention, then, is to introduce a bag that can hold a computer so that it can be used at any time and position while still performing as closely as possible to a standard desk top computer. Combined with a computer, it allows the user to: view the fold out display without lifting the bag; type with two hands because the strap holds the machine; store general cargo or additional computer equipment inside the bag; carry the computer more comfortably because it is softer and forms to the body better than a hard computer body; protect their computer from falling while in use; renew the visible and less expensive bag portion; carry a computer in a from resembling normal attire: chose a bag style of his liking. The advantage of the bag computer combination can be optimized by making a specialized bag.

A bag that holds computer equipment on its outside front for immediate use is unusual but there are some related bags and carrying cases.

Patent application 20060113203 deals with a variety of docking ports mounted on a flap which pivots on the front wall of a bag.

There are flaps with attachments on bag fronts. For example, there are pocket closure flaps with buttons, snaps or Velcro to hold them down. These, however, must have something to seal or cover and matching attachment on the bag front thus defining its use. A short flap used to mount computer equipment must have an attachment to match the equipment, must be strong enough to securely hold weight of one or two pounds and cannot have a pocket or other attachments on the bag obstructing the operation of the computer while mounted.

Because flaps are the preferred hinge means on a bag front, mechanical hinges are rare although some decorative metal fasteners may be hinged. This is especially true if the hinge is part of a panel on the bag front to match a computer or if it is capable of carrying electricity to the bag's interior.

Longer, fall-down flaps are also found on bags (U.S. Pat. No. 4,050,493). This example does not have a computer docking port capable of holding a one to two pound computer. The flap has no electrical connection/plug or wiring to the bag's interior.

An electrical connection from a flap attachment to the inside of a bag is also unusual. Backpack U.S. Pat. No. 6,883,693 has a pocket for a radio on the inside of the bag and speakers mounted in the side pockets of the backpack. It has electrical connection between the inside and outside of the backpack. However, there is no flap with computer attachments and, as a backpack, the equipment cannot be manipulated while it is worn.

Many bags have clips such as side release buckles on them. They are usually used to hold flaps shut, are usually attached to straps and have a matching clip also on the bag. Although such clips may be places anywhere on a bag, their placement and matching attachments or pocket is an indication of their use. The positioning of the clips, right and left along a horizontal axis, along with a cover flap delimiting a free space for a missing piece of equipment defines a use not addressed by other patents.

Patent application 20060113203 deals with computer bags with mounting structures on the outside of the bag's front wall. There are also publicly available bags with pockets, pockets with holes, openings for a variety of purposes.

There are bags/cases which mount or hold computers on their interior and have electrical connections from their interior to the exterior of the bag/case (U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,485,922, 6,223,896, 5,808,865, 4,837,590). The connection may be in the form of an opening or plug facing outward. None, however, have a computer mounting structure on the outside surface of the front wall to removable hold a computer.

Application 20060113213 deals with a bag with an opening in the front wall to operate a computer and a support structure inside the bag to hold the computer up to the bags front wall. The shape of the opening and the keyboard flap disclosed in this application further limit the definition of this invention.

Radio bag U.S. Pat. No. 4,050,493 has a pocket on the inside of the bag's front wall and openings in the front wall to allow controls and sound to pass to the outside. Although this bag has apertures for controls they are not suitable for operating or passing a computer display from the bag's interior to the outside of the bag. The radio bag does not have a computer/bag coupling designed to hold, align and at least partially support a computer; it used a pocket and a bracket to the bag bottom as sole support.

Most computer bags load the computer from the top and some tablet computer bag are designed to operate the computer while loaded in this way. Some computer bags of this sort are specialized (U.S. Pat. No. 5,887,777, 6,763,942, 6,646,866). They do not have an inside support structure to hold the computer to the front wall and, so, cannot store further cargo inside the bag. They do not have a computer entry in the top with a computer/bag coupling separate from the normal interior access opening. They do not provide for keyboards, present a format different from familiar desk top computers and must be lifted and held in that position for use. Because they must be lifted, the bag that holds them is not suitable for carrying additional general cargo or computer equipment. Holding also implies disabling the hands.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

L embodiment. This computer bag has a computer holder toward the upper part of the bag's front wall. A manual character input device, such as a keyboard or electronic write pad, is attached to the bag front below the holder and may be pivotally attached toward the center of the bag so that the input device mounted on it can pivot from its storage position covering the computer and display to an operating position on the lower half of the bag's front wall. The computer holder may be a docking port, holster, pivoting computer equipment mount, an opening in the bag's front with inside mounts, or other means. The manual input device may be removably secured to the bag front by a variety of means including an attachment on a flexible fabric hinge, a long cover flap, and axle/bearing hinge or a half hinge. There may be a separate cover. Electrical access to the bags interior may be provided.

I embodiment. This embodiment mounts computer equipment on a pivoting computer equipment mount on the outside of a bag's front wall. The equipment mount may be a flexible fabric with an attachment, such as a channel, hooks or clips, at the distal end. The equipment mount can also be a pivoting cover with mounts designed to hold the computer equipment by its back or edges. The equipment mount can alternatively be a mechanical hinge with an attachment for the equipment. The attachment may be a half hinge such as a axle or bearing. There may be an electrical connection from the attachment through the bag's front wall to the interior of the bag. The bag interior may have an inside mounting structure for additional computer equipment. There may be a separate cover flap.

I1 embodiment. This bag has pivoting mounts to be used with a self-contained computer such as a PDA or GPS. The pivoting mounts and a pivoting cover on the front wall define the storage area of the computer. The pivoting mount may be flexible fabric with attachments. The mounts may be a combined computer cover and bracket. The mounts may be one or more axle/bearings secured to the bag front with attachments to match the computer. The mounts may be half hinges such as pins or bearings matching a half hinge on the computer.

K embodiment. This bag has an inside mounting structure to mount a computer to the inside of the bag's front wall and an opening/slot in the front wall to pass computer display panel to the outside of the bag's front wall. The opening/slot has a coupling to match the computer and align it to the bag. There may also be an outside panel structure to match the display. There may be a pivoting computer equipment mount to attach a manual character input device, such as keyboard or electronic write pad, on the outside near the center of the bag's front wall and this can pivot down for input device use or up to cover the display panel during storage. Separate electrical access to the bag's interior may be provided for the input device.

K1 embodiment. In addition to the normal top wall access opening, this bag has a computer installation opening in the top panel. It is rigidly trimmed with a computer/bag coupling which matches the computer. The computer slides in from the top. The computer matching the bag has two panels with the display panel remaining on the outside of the bag where it can be folded down flat against the front panel. There may be an inside mounting structure to assist in holding the computer to the inside of the bag's front wall. There may be a pivoting computer equipment mount to attach a manual character input device, such as keyboard or electronic write pad, on the outside near the center of the bag's front wall and this can pivot down for input use or up to cover the display panel during storage. Separate electrical access to the bag's interior may be provided for the input device.

E embodiment. In another embodiment of the computer bag, there are two elongated sockets on the right and left sides of the bag's front wall designed to match hanger bars on the right and left sides of the computer body that matches the bag. These hangers may be made of sewn on pockets, metal channels or bonded plastic with holes for the bars. The computer is slid in from the top with the bars inserted into the tight fitting sockets thus stretching the bag front tight and making a rigid panel in the bag unnecessary. An electrical plug which leads to the interior of the bag may be fitted to the bag's front panel so that it engages when the computer is slid into the pockets.

A embodiment. This embodiment uses pivoting attachments on a mounting bar on the lower part of the bag front. Toward the upper part of the bag front there is a flap which stretched over the top of the computer and attaches to matching attachments on the front of the computer. The computer is attached by engaging the lower attachments, pivoting the computer up and using the upper flap to stretch the bag front tight so the flap attachments can be engaged to the computer. The lower mounting bar may also have an electrical plug which connects as the computer is hinged up.

BC embodiment. This computer has an inside computer equipment mount and an outside computer equipment mount electrically linked and having appropriate plugs for the equipment. A variety of mount types can be used on the outside. On the inside the mount may be a pocket with a sealing flap that carries the electrical connection so that the plug does not carry the weight of the computer equipment. Alternatively, the inside equipment mount may be a molded coupling that physically and electrically holds the computer equipment. There may also be plugs in the coupling for wire connected peripherals. In another variation of the inside mounting structure, it may be a footing and flap which stretches the bag fronts tight over the inside computer equipment. There may be a computer with shaping and attachments to match the inside computer equipment mounts.

Other aspects of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate, by way of example, the principles of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A shows and exploded view of the computer bag with characteristics which may be found in any computer bag.

FIG. 1B is a view of the inside surface of the front wall of the computer bag with a computer or peripheral mounting structure.

FIG. 2 is a view of the L computer bag with the pivoting cover and manual character input device in stored position.

FIG. 3 shows the L computer bag with a holster computer holder toward the top front and the input device lower on the bag front in open position.

FIG. 4 shows the L computer bag with a docking port computer holder toward the top front and the input device lower on the bag front in open position.

FIG. 5A shows a manual character input device pivotally mounted to the bag front.

FIG. 5B shows details of the “bag computer” style keyboard.

FIG. 6A is the I computer bag with pivoting computer equipment mount in the stored position.

FIG. 6B is the I computer bag opened and without the computer mounted.

FIG. 6C shows the I computer bag with a two panel computer mounted on a pivoting computer equipment mount near the center of the bag's front. Attachments to hold the computer in the “up” position are shown.

FIG. 7A. Here the I computer bag pivoting computer equipment mount is near the top of the front wall and has a channel to match the computer equipment.

FIG. 7B. This is a magnification of the I computer bag pivoting computer equipment mount as a channel to match the computer.

FIG. 7C. This is a magnification of the computer's channel attachment to match the I computer bag pivoting computer equipment mount.

FIG. 8A shows the I computer bag pivoting computer equipment mount as an axle/bearing hinge with attachment.

FIG. 8B is a magnified detail of the axle/bearing equipment mount.

FIG. 8C shows the I computer bag with two axle/bearing equipment mounts, with a display and keyboard in place, connected with a mounting panel.

FIG. 9A shows the I1 computer bag with a flexible fabric hinge means with a footing and retainer mount near the top of the bag's front wall.

FIG. 9B shows a magnified detail of the retainer half of a footing and retainer attachment.

FIG. 9C shows a magnified detail of the footing half of a footing and retainer attachment.

FIG. 10A is the I1 computer bag with two axle/attachments with strap bearings near the top of the bag front.

FIG. 10B is a magnified detail of an axle/attachment with strap bearing.

FIG. 11A is the I1 computer bag with two openable strap bearing half hinges near the top of the bag front.

FIG. 11B is a magnified detail of the axle half hinge on the computer meant to match the half hinge strap bearing on the bag.

FIG. 12A shows the K computer bag with an inside mounted computer in the stored position.

FIG. 12B shows the K computer bag with an inside mounted computer in the operating position.

FIG. 13A is an exploded view of the K computer bag with inside mounts and slot for the display to pass to the outside of the front wall.

FIG. 13B is a view of the inside surface of the K computer bag's front wall with an inside mounting structure.

FIG. 14A shows the K1 computer bag with a top entry inside mounted computer in the stored position.

FIG. 14B shows the K1 computer bag with a top entry inside mounted computer in the operating position.

FIG. 15A shows an exploded view of the top entry inside mount K1 computer bag.

FIG. 15B shows the inside surface of the top entry K1 computer bag with computer mounts.

FIG. 16. This is the right and left hanger E computer bag with sockets for mounting computer hanger bars.

FIG. 17A shows an outside footing and flap mount of the A computer bag and the means of mounting.

FIG. 17B shows the computer mounted to the A computer bag with the footing and flap mounting system.

FIG. 18 is an exploded view of the BC computer bag with the outside mounting structure on front wall.

FIG. 19 is the inside surface of the BC computer bag front wall with a pocket and flap computer/peripheral mount.

FIG. 20 is the inside surface of the BC computer bag front wall with a molded panel computer/peripheral mount.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

General attributes which may be found in any computer bags are shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B. Any bag may have a shoulder strap 55 for carrying. Any may have a rigid panel in the front wall 2, cover flap or mounting flap. There may be reinforced areas in the front wall associated with individual attachments or stress areas. There may be bumpers on the inside or outside of the bag corners near the computing device mounts. There may be a cover flap 21 independent of any mounting flap and it may fold over the bag front from its attachment on the back, top or top front walls of the bag. The cover flap may instead attach to the center or lower half of the front wall where it can fall down to expose the computer equipment. The cover flap may have elastic, distal end plate, finger grasp and removable fasteners 46 such as hooks, snaps, magnets, etc on the distal end to hold the flap, and any equipment that may be mounted on it, snug to the bag front while still being easy to unfasten. Matching removable fasteners may be found on the front or top bag walls. The cover flap may have one or more attachments 56 on its inside surface to match equipment mounted on a short flap or hinge so that the equipment and cover flap may move together as one. The bag may have side pockets 24 with a small access hole or plug to the bag's interior so that a peripheral mounted in the pocket can make electrical connection to the computer via the bag's interior. The bag may be supplied with a rigid peripheral holder(s) 25 to fit both the side pockets and the peripheral. These may have shaping, wires and plug so that its outside can fit the pocket and its inside can fit the specific peripheral. There may be sound openings 23 in the bag's top panel for sound to exit the bag from inside computer speakers. Any inside surface of the bag may have further pockets or lining components 22 to hold computer equipment to the bag and these may be electrically connected with computer equipment mounted to the bag. There may be electrical access from exterior equipment mounted on the bag front to the interior through the front wall to an inside mounting structure 17 to hold further computer equipments or peripherals. Any bag may be outfitted with one or more antennas for radio, TV, GPS or other telecommunications. An inside mounting structure may be a pocket or rigid mounting panel and may include additional components such as footing or flap to hold inside equipment to the bag. There may be fasteners on the inside of the bag's front wall to match the computer equipment.

Although this computer bag is specifically made for wearing by a strap from the shoulder, the straps may be shifted to the right and left sides of the back wall and worn around the waist as a belly bag without any change of function.

L embodiment. Shown in FIG. 2 to FIG. 4, the L embodiment of computer bag 11 has a computer equipment holder for a computer and/or display unit 1 toward the top outside of the bag's front wall 2 and a manual data input device, such as a keyboard 3, pivotally attached on a horizontal axis near the center of the outside of the bag's front wall. The manual data input device covers the computer/display unit when hinged up in the storage position 5 as in FIG. 2. When hinged down, the keyboard is exposed for use in the operating position as in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4.

The computer/display mounting structure may be a docking port 7, fitted pocket 8, pocket with opening, holster, mechanical hinge with computer attachment or docking port, two right and left pivoting clips, hanger, channels, bracket, pins and sockets, short flap with computer attachments on the distal end, an opening in the front or top bag wall through which a display is passed from the computer inside the bag or other way to attach a computer or display to the front wall so that the display can be hinged out into the line of sight of the operator. There may be an electrical connection 9 such as a plug associated with any computer mounting structure to connect the computer/display unit with the manual input device or to the inside of the bag. There may be an inside mounting structure for additional computer equipment.

There may also be openings in the bag's front wall or mounting structure to align and use IR communication between computer components.

A manual character input device such as a keyboard or electronic write pad is attached to the bag front below the computer equipment holder. It may be fixed directly to the front wall with rivets, adhesive or other means. The input device may be pivotally secured to the front wall along a horizontal axis. The input device may be permanently attached to a pivoting cover such as a cover flap 4 or hinged panel with adhesive, rivets or other attachments so that the cover flap/panel and input device may pivot up over the computer/display unit when closed or down over the lower half of the bag front when in use.

Alternatively, the manual character input device may be removably secured to the bag front wall. The input device may be removably attached with a docking port or bracket. The input device may be removably attached with a pivoting computer equipment mount. The pivoting computer equipment mount may be attached near the center of the bag front so that the input device can pivot horizontally up over the computer/display unit while stored or down over the lower half of the bag's front wall when the computer is in use.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be a short flexible fabric hinge means with an attachment to removably hold the input device so it may pivot around one edge. The flexible hinge may be sewn or riveted along a horizontal axis to the outside of the bag's front wall. The attachment matches the complimentary mounting attachment on the input device.

There may be one attachment. The attachment may plug-in as with a post and clip attachment. The post and clip attachment has one or more pins or flat bars to align and strengthen the connection while one or more clips hold the two parts together. Examples include side release buckles and common suitcase clasps. Alternatively, the attachment may be Velcro or a zipper. Instead, the attachment may be designed to engage laterally using a channel or lateral hooks running along the distal end of the fabric hinge. It may have a lock. The single attachment on the fabric hinge distal edge may be a footing and retainer attachment. The footing and retainer attachment has a footing such as a pin, socket, ring or other footing to hold one corner of the computer's attachment edge and a retainer such as a clip to hold the other corner of the computer's attachment edge.

There may be two attachments near the right and left ends of the short fabric hinge. The attachments may be post and clip attachments, snaps, buttons, button holes, buckle straps or other attachments capable of securing the computer equipment to the bag. The short fabric hinge may be divided into two parts, one on the right and one on left side of the bag front to form tabs on which the attachments are mounted. The tabs may be attachment straps such as buckle straps.

In another option, the attachment on the short fabric hinge distal end may be a bracket, docking port, hanger or other structure that matches and holds the input device.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be combined with the pivoting cover 4. The mount/cover may attach and pivot near the center front of the bag and fall down to open. The mount/cover may be either a long flap or a rigid panel. A flap may be secured to the bag with sewing, riveting, etc. A rigid cover, which may be shaped to fit the computer, may be attached to the bag with an axle/bearing hinge riveted to the bag or a flexible fabric hinge riveted or sewn to the bag front. Attachments for removably holding the input device are located on the inside of the mount/cover so that the mounted input device is exposed when the mount/cover is opened. The attachments may be a docking port, bracket, hanger, etc. which holds the input device by its back or edges.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be one or more axle/bearing hinges and fixed to the outside of the bag's front wall. It pivots horizontally and has an attachment(s) to match a complimentary mounting attachment on the input device.

There may be one axle/bearing hinge continuous across the front of the bag. It may be of the position holding type such as a ratchet or friction hinge. The attachment may be a channel, plug-in clips, hooks, bracket, docking port, socket or other structure that matches and holds the input device.

There may be two axle/bearings, one on the right and one on the left side of the bag's front wall. There may be a single attachment structure, such as a docking port or bracket, connecting the two axle/bearings. Instead, each axle/bearing may have its own attachment such as a post and clip attachment, side release buckle, snaps, sockets, etc.

The axle/bearing equipment mount may be secured to the bag by riveting, permanently clipping or screwing it to the bag's front wall or through the bag's front wall to a backing plate or computer mounting structure on the inside of the bag.

Alternatively, the bearing may be a strap sewn or riveted to the bag front and holding the axle/attachment assembly to the bag front. The axle/attachment assembly may be a single structure such as an axle combined with a docking port, bracket, post and clip attachment, channel or other mounting structure to match and hold the input device.

There may be two bearing straps sewn or riveted on the right and left sides of the bag front holding the axle/attachment assemblies pivotally to the bag front along a horizontal axis. The attachment may be a post and clip attachment, snaps, or other attachment means.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may consist of one or more half hinges matching a half hinge on the input device. The half hinge may be a axle or bearing secured to the bag's front wall. The bearing may be a band or one or more straps sewn or riveted by one end to the bag's front wall with the other end openably attached back to the bag's front or top wall with Velcro, snap, buttons or other suitable attachment means. The band/strap may be passed around the input device's axle and attached back to the bag to pivotally hold the input device to the bag. Instead, the half hinge may be horizontal sockets or tubes to hold a removable axle or axle on the inut device. The bearing may be made of flexible material and split on the side so the input device's axle may snap into the bearing. The bearing may be end rings which engage axle posts extending laterally from the input device's right and left proximal corners.

There may be electrical connections (eg plug and wiring) 9 to connect the manual character input device through the equipment mount and front wall to the bag's interior or to the computer/display unit in the computer holder. This connection may be associated with the equipment mount's attachment. If a flexible fabric hinge means is used for the computer holder or the input device's pivoting computer equipments mount, wiring may pass between two fabric layers to attachments fixed to its distal edge so that the electrical connection may be made without more complicated axle/bearing connections.

There may be a separate cover flap.

The manual character input device, shown in FIG. 5A and FIG. 5B, may have attachments on its edges or back to match the bag's mounting structure. Edge attachments may pivot. It may have appropriate size and shaping, such as extended edges, ridges 15, bumps, hooks, or other fixtures to match the computer equipment to be held on the computer holder so as to cover, fit and protect it while in the stored position. These may also touch and fit the bag's front wall, mounting structure or coupling while closed to serve to protect the display from impact. Including the edge fixtures, the input device may form a box-like enclosure open on one side. The protective shaping may be made of a material softer than the display so as to not scratch it.

The input device may communicate wirelessly with the computer or external devices by radio and/or infrared. There may be a general use infrared antenna located at the input device's end 54 distal to the operator so it can be pointed at external equipment. There may be a camera mounted at this same end. There may also be an infrared antenna located on the proximal end of the input device 10 for communication with the computer in the computer holder. The bag may have a lens on the front wall to direct the signal inside the bag to an antenna on an interior mounted computer body. The associated batteries, antennas and broadcasting equipment may be included.

To provide full size keys for typing and still keep the computer size proportional to the average bag, the manual character input device may be a ten key wide keyboard 12 may be included. The keyboard would be the width of the keys “a” to “;” on a standard QWERTY keyboard. Three or four rows may be included. Thumb keys substitute for essential keys farther to the right and left on the standard keyboard (eg. space, return, shift, backspace, tab, change keyboard, etc). The result is a keyboard with standard ¾ inch keys and totaling about 8″ or less wide. The key rows may have the standard offset or be inline. Alternative key placement may be programmed with software.

To make the keyboard easier to use without looking, tactile guides such as vertical thumb guides 14, vertical finger guided between the keys, depressions and/or outer edge palm guide ridges 15, may be included to assure finger position and to help stabilize the keyboard with the hands/palms.

To make the keyboard weatherproof, easier to clean, easier to use in the vertical position and without looking, it may have a continuous surface with depressions for each standard size key. Small actuating buttons, pegs or cones 16 may be positioned at the bottom of each depression. These would be easier to use in the vertical position because they can be pushed down, in or up to be actuated.

I embodiment. Shown in FIG. 6 to FIG. 8, the I embodiment of the computer bag 11 mounts computer equipment such as a computer 1, display panel 38, touchpad, touch screen, keyboard 3 or other computerized equipment on a pivoting computer equipment mount on the outside of a bag's front wall 2. The pivoting computer equipment mount removably holds a piece of computer equipment so it can pivot horizontally and is composed of a hinge means with one or more attachments matching a piece of computer equipment. The equipment mount may be secured to the bag near the outside center (FIG. 6) or the outside top (FIG. 7) of the bag's front wall. There may be two equipment mounts, one near the center and one near the top (FIG. 8), if two pieces of equipment are to be mounted.

There may be electrical connection using wire and plug or direct connection from the equipment mount, through the mount and bag front wall to the interior of the bag. The plug may be built in with the attachment. If a flexible fabric hinge means is used for display panel mounting, wiring may pass between two fabric layers to attachments fixed to its distal edge so that the electrical connection may be made without more complicated axle/bearing connections.

There may be an inside mounting structure to hold further computer equipments. It may have an electrical connection from the outside of the front wall and may have one or more plugs to match equipment mounted there and/or other peripherals carried in the bag.

If the pivoting computer equipment mount attaches near the center of the bag front and cannot hold its angular position, there may be “up” position attachments 29 on the bag front top half to match attachments on the computer equipment or equipment mount and hold it in the “up” position. Flap mounted double panel computers 47 with distal mounted display may need these attachments to hold the computer up and close to the operator.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be a short flexible fabric hinge means 26 with an attachment to removably hold the computer equipment 1, 47 so it may pivot around one edge. The flexible hinge may be sewn or riveted along a horizontal axis to the outside of the bag's front wall. The fabric may be an extension of the top wall projecting over the front wall. The attachment matches the complimentary mounting attachment on the computer equipment.

There may be one attachment. The attachment may plug-in as with a post and clip attachment. The post and clip attachment has one or more pins or flat bars to align and strengthen the connection while one or more clips hold the two parts together. Examples include side release buckles and common suitcase clasps. Alternatively, the attachment may be Velcro or a zipper. Instead, the attachment may be designed to engage laterally using a channel 27 or lateral hooks running along the distal end of the fabric hinge and matching complimentary attachments on the computer equipment 28. It may have a lock. The single attachment on the fabric hinge distal edge may be a footing and retainer attachment. The footing and retainer attachment has a footing such as a pin, socket, ring or other footing to hold one corner of the computer's attachment edge and a retainer such as a clip to hold the other corner of the computer's attachment edge.

There may be two attachments near the right and left ends of the short fabric hinge. The attachments may be post and clip attachments, snaps, buttons, button holes, buckle straps or other attachments capable of securing the computer equipment to the fabric hinge. The short fabric hinge may be divided into two parts, one on the right and one on the left side of the bag front to form tabs on which the attachments are mounted. The tabs may be attachment straps such as buckle straps.

In another option, the attachment on the short fabric hinge distal end may be a bracket, docking port, hanger or other structure that matches and holds the computer equipment.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be combined with a pivoting cover. The mount/cover may attach and pivot near the center front of the bag and fall down to open. The mount/cover may be either a long flap or a rigid panel. A flap may be secured to the bag with sewing, riveting. A rigid cover, which may be shaped to fit the computer, may be attached to the bag with an axle/bearing hinge riveted to the bag or a flexible fabric hinge riveted or sewn to the bag front. Attachments for removably holding the computer equipment are located on the inside of the mount/cover so that the mounted equipment is exposed when the mount/cover is opened. The attachments may be a docking port, bracket, hanger or other attachments which hold the computer equipment by its back or edges.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be one or more axle/bearing hinges 30 and fixed to the outside of the bag's front wall 2. It pivots horizontally and has an attachment(s) 27 to match a complimentary mounting attachment on the computer equipment.

There may be one axle/bearing hinge continuous across the front of the bag. It may be of the position holding type such as a ratchet or friction hinge. The attachment may be a channel, plug-in clips, hooks, bracket, docking port, socket or other structure that matches and holds the computer equipment.

There may be two axle/bearings, one on the right and one on the left side of the bag's front wall. There may be a single attachment structure, such as a docking port or bracket, connecting the two axle/bearings. Instead, each axle/bearing may have its own attachment such as a post and clip attachment, side release buckle, snaps, sockets or other suitable attachment.

The axle/bearing equipment mount may be secured to the bag by riveting, permanently clipping or screwing it to the bag's front wall or through the bag's front wall to a backing plate or computer mounting structure on the inside of the bag.

Alternatively, the bearing may be a strap sewn or riveted to the bag front and holding the axle/attachment assembly to the bag front. The axle/attachment assembly may be a single structure such as an axle combined with a docking port, bracket, post and clip attachment, channel or other mounting structure to match and hold the computer equipment.

There may be two bearing straps sewn or riveted on the right and left sides of the bag front holding the axle/attachment assemblies pivotally to the bag front along a horizontal axis. The attachments may be a post and clip attachments, snaps, or other attachment means.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may consist of one or more half hinges matching a half hinge on the computer. The half hinge may be a axle or bearing secured to the bag's front wall. The bearing may be a band or one or more straps sewn or riveted by one end to the bag's front wall with the other end openably attached back to the bag's front or top wall with Velcro, snap, buttons or other suitable attachment means. The band/strap may be passed around the computer equipment's axle and attached back to the bag to pivotally hold the computer equipment to the bag. Instead, the half hinge may be horizontal sockets or tubes to hold a removable axle or axle on the computer. The bearing may be made of flexible material and split longitudinally so the computer's axle may snap into the bearing. The bearing may be end rings which engage axle posts extending laterally from the computer equipment's right and left proximal corners.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be associated with or combined with an outside mounting panel 31 to assist in holding the hinge to the front wall and spread the torque load of the mounted computer equipment. It may be shaped to fit the computer equipment. There may be a second hinge with the on the bag front as in cases where both a display and manual character input device should be mounted. The outside mounting panel may connect the upper and lower hinges and assist in holding and protecting the mounted components of either hinge. The hinges may be arranged so that one component may fold over or under the other to make the outside computer equipment assembly more compact. They may form a box-like structure when folded shut.

I1 embodiment. This embodiment of the computer bag, shown in FIG. 9 to FIG. 11, mounts a self-contained computer 1 such as a PDA or GPS on a pivoting computer equipment mount on the outside of a bag's front wall 2. The pivoting computer equipment mount removably holds a computer so it can pivot horizontally and is composed of one or more hinge means with attachments matching a computer. The equipment mount may be located near the outside center or the outside top of the bag's front wall.

A pivoting cover is provided to protect an outward facing display and the computer and to hold the computer against the bag front while stored. The pivoting cover may be a cover flap. For quick opening, a fall down cover flap 21 may be used and this may attach near the center of the bag's front wall. It may have releasable attachments, such as hooks, near the distal end and matching attachments 46 near the top of the front wall or on the bag's top wall. The attachments may be hooks, snaps, magnets, etc and there may be elastic in the flap. Instead, the pivoting cover may be a rigid panel, may be shaped to fit the computer and may be pivotally secured near the center of the bag front with an axle/bearing hinge, flexible fabric or other hinge means. The pivoting computer equipment mount along with a pivoting cover define the storage area of the computer equipment.

If the pivoting computer equipment mount attaches near the center of the bag front and cannot hold it angular position, there may be “up” position attachments on the bag front top half to match attachments on the computer or equipment mount and hold it in the “up” position. Flap mounted double panel computers with distal mounted display may need these attachments to hold the computer up and close to the operator.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be a short flexible fabric hinge means with one or more attachments to removably hold the computer so it may pivot around one edge. The flexible hinge may be sewn or riveted along a horizontal axis to the outside of the bag's front wall. The fabric may be an extension of the top wall projecting over the front wall. The attachment matches the complimentary mounting attachment on the computer equipment.

There may be one attachment. The attachment may plug-in as with a post and clip attachment. The post and clip attachment has one or more pins or flat bars to align and strengthen the connection while one or more clips hold the two parts together. Examples include side release buckles and common suitcase clasps. Alternatively, the attachment may be Velcro or a zipper. Instead, the attachment may be designed to engage laterally using a channel or lateral hooks running along the distal end of the fabric hinge. It may have a lock. The single attachment on the fabric hinge 26 distal edge may be a footing and retainer attachment. The footing and retainer attachment has a footing 35 such as a pin, socket, ring or other footing to hold one corner of the computer's attachment edge and a retainer 59 such as a clip to hold the other corner of the computer's attachment edge.

There may be two attachments near the right and left ends of the short fabric hinge. The attachments may be post and clip attachments, snaps, buttons, button holes, buckle straps or other attachments capable of securing the computer equipment to the bag. The short fabric hinge may be divided into two parts, one on the right and one on the left side of the bag front to form tabs on which the attachments are mounted. The tabs may be attachment straps such as buckle straps.

In another option, the attachment on the short fabric hinge distal end may be a bracket, docking port, hanger or other structure that matches and holds the computer equipment.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be combined with the pivoting cover. The mount/cover may attach and pivot near the center front of the bag and fall down to open. The mount/cover may be either a long flap or a rigid panel. A flap may be secured to the bag with sewing, riveting, etc. A rigid cover, which may be shaped to fit the computer, may be attached to the bag with an axle/bearing hinge riveted to the bag or a flexible fabric hinge riveted or sewn to the bag front. Attachments for removably holding the computer are located on the inside of the mount/cover so that the mounted computer is exposed when the mount/cover is opened. The attachments may be a docking port, bracket, hanger or other attachment which holds the computer equipment by its back or edges.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may be one or more axle/bearing hinges fixed to the outside of the bag's front wall. It pivots horizontally and has one or more attachments to match a complimentary mounting attachment on the computer.

There may be one axle/bearing hinge continuous across the front of the bag. It may be of the position holding type such as a ratchet or friction hinge. The attachment may be a channel, plug-in clips, hooks, bracket, docking port, socket or other structure that matches and holds the computer.

There may be two axle/bearings, one on the right and one on the left side of the bag's front wall. There may be a single attachment structure, such as a docking port or bracket, connecting the two axle/bearings. Instead, each axle/bearing may have its own attachment such as a post and clip attachment, side release buckle, snaps, sockets, etc.

The axle/bearing equipment mount may be secured to the bag by riveting, permanently clipping or screwing it to the bag's front wall or through the bag's front wall to a backing plate or computer mounting structure on the inside of the bag.

Alternatively, the bearing may be a strap sewn or riveted to the bag front and holding the axle/attachment assembly to the bag front. The axle/attachment assembly may be a single structure such as an axle combined with a docking port, bracket, post and clip attachment, channel or other mounting structure to match and hold the computer equipment.

There may be two bearing straps 45 sewn or riveted on the right and left sides of the bag front 2 holding the axle 58/attachment 57 assemblies pivotally to the bag front along a horizontal axis. The attachment may be a post and clip attachment 44, or other attachment means.

The pivoting computer equipment mount may consist of one or more half hinges matching a half hinge on the computer 1. The half hinge may be a axle or bearing secured to the bag's front wall. The bearing may be a band or one or more straps 117 sewn or riveted by one end to the bag's front wall 2 with the other end openably attached back to the bag's front or top wall with Velcro, snap, buttons or other suitable attachment means. The band/strap may be passed around the computer's axle 116 and attached back to the bag to pivotally hold the computer to the bag. Instead, the half hinge may be horizontal sockets or tubes to hold a removable axle or axle on the computer. The bearing may be made of flexible material and split longitudinally on the side so the computer's axle may snap into the bearing. The bearing may be end rings which engage axle posts extending laterally from the computers right and left proximal corners.

The hinge may be associated with or combined with an outside mounting panel to assist in holding the hinge to the front wall and spread the torque load of the mounted computer. It may be shaped to fit the computer equipment.

K embodiment. As shown in FIG. 12 and FIG. 13, this embodiment of the computer bag 11, the computer is held to the inside of the bag's front wall 32 using a mounting structure 33. The display panel 38 passes to the outside of the bag through an opening in the front wall so it can be manipulated. The opening may be slot-like 34.

The inside mounting structure may include a computer/bag coupling 39 around the bag's opening which fits precisely to the computer near the hinge between the computer's body and display panels. It may have shaping, ridges, fasteners or other structures as needed to assure a precision fit between the bag and computer and strengthen the front wall opening to keep the slot from spreading under heavy bag loads. The coupling may have shaping or fixtures on the inside of the bag to align computer speakers or vents with openings in the bag. It may also be shaped or have fixtures on the outside of the bag to match the computer display or a manual character input device made to fit over the display. There may be a footing 35, holster/pocket, fasteners and/or flap(s) 36 to aid in securing the computer to the bag. The footing may be located on the inside of the front wall, may have elastic and may have fasteners such as hooks, snaps or Velcro to match the computer. It may be flap-like. It may be pocket-like with sides to hold it open and resist outward twisting. A pocket-like holster may have one or more openings in any side to provide access to plugs or peripheral mounts on the computer body. A flap may be positioned on the inside of the front or top wall and may have fasteners to match the computer. The footing and flap may work together to stretch the bag front over the computer and keep the front wall flat. The mounting structure may include or consist of fasteners such as hooks or snaps on the inside of the bag's front wall to match the computer. The mounting structure may include an electrical connection such as a plug or wire with plug 37 to connect the computer with an outside manual character input device.

On the outside of the bag there may be a molded panel to match the display panel and assist in holding and protecting it while it is shut.

The bag may have pivotally attached near the outside, front center of the front wall a manual character input device such as a keyboard or electronic write pad. The input device may pivot up over or under the display panel when shut (FIG. 12A) or down to expose the display and input device when open (FIG. 12B). There may be a cover flap 21. There may be an electrical connection from the manual character input device or its mounting structure through the front wall to the bag interior 37. To provide for infrared communication, the bag may have a lens on the front wall or computer/bag coupling to direct the signal inside the bag to an antenna on the computer body. The input device, along with its electrical connection, may be removable secured to the front wall using a pivoting computer equipment mount.

The bag's top wall and general cargo opening may be adapted to ease installation of the computer into the bag. The opening may extend onto the right and left bag side walls, the back wall may be bigger than the front wall and/or the opening may be positioned toward the front of the bag so that the two front top corners of the bag may be turned inside out to expose the front wall opening/slot and the computer/bag coupling. This makes it easier to insert the display panel through the opening and engage the coupling.

K1 embodiment. The K1 embodiment the computer bag 11, shown in FIG. 14 and FIG. 15, has, in addition to the normal interior access opening in the top wall, an installation opening 39 to install the computer through the top wall 40. The computer body 41 slides down into the bag from the top while the computer's display panel 38 remains on the outside of the bag where it can fold over the front wall. The installation opening may have a rigid computer/bag coupling surrounding it to strengthen the opening and match the computer. On the inside of the bag there is a mounting structure 33 to hold the computer to the bag's front wall.

The top panel computer/bag coupling around the bag's computer installation opening precisely fits the computer body. It may have shaping, ridges, fasteners and/or depressions as needed to align, fit and secure the computer to the bag. The coupling may extend onto the bag's front wall 2 to assist in positioning, aligning and holding the computer to the bag so that the display can fold flat against the front wall. The coupling may also be shaped or have fixtures to match a manual character input device made to fit over the computer display. There may be a latch or lock to secure the computer in place.

Inside the bag there is a mounting structure and it may consist of a footing 35, holster/pocket, fasteners and/or flap(s) to aid in securing the computer to the bag. The footing may be located on the inside of the front wall, may have elastic and may have fasteners such as hooks, snaps or Velcro to match the computer. It may be flap-like. It may be pocket-like with sides to hold it open and resist outward twisting. A pocket-like holster may have one or more openings in any side to provide access to plugs or peripheral mounts on the computer body. A pocket-like footing may connect to the top wall to form a partition isolating the computer from the rest of the bag's interior. A flap may be positioned on the inside of the top wall and may have fasteners to match the computer. The footing and flap may work together to stretch the bag front over the computer and keep the front wall flat. The mounting structure may include or consist of fasteners such as hooks or snaps on the inside of the bag's front wall to match the computer. The mounting structure may include an electrical connection such as a plug 9 or wire with plug to connect the computer with an outside manual character input device.

The bag may have pivotally attached near the outside, front center of the front wall a manual input device such as a keyboard 3 or electronic write pad. The input device may pivot up over or under the display panel when shut (FIG. 14A) or down to expose the input device when open (FIG. 14B). There may be an electrical connection from the manual character input device or its mounting structure through the front wall to the bag interior. To provide for infrared communication, the bag may have a lens on the front wall or computer/bag coupling to direct the signal inside the bag to an antenna on the computer body. The input device, along with its electrical connection, may be removably secured to the front wall using a pivoting computer equipment mount 4.

On the outside of the bag there may be a molded panel to match the display panel and assist in holding and protecting it while it is shut.

E embodiment. Shown in FIG. 16 is another embodiment of the computer bag 11 which includes two vertical hangers 42 designed to match hangers 43 on the right and left sides of the computer body 41 matching the bag. These hangers may be, but not limited to, sewn on pockets, metal channels or plastic with tubes. The computer is slid in from the top with the computer's hangers inserted into the tight fitting sockets or channels thus stretching the bag front tight.

An electrical plug 9 which leads to the interior of the bag may be fitted to the bag's front panel so that it engages when the computer is slid into the pockets. The electrical plug may be built into one or both of the bag hangers. The bag may have an inside mounting structure to hold additional computer equipment.

A embodiment. The A embodiment of the computer bag 11, shown in FIG. 17A and FIG. 17B, mounts a computer 1 on the outside surface of the bag's front wall 2. There is a bottom mounting plate 48 which is about the width of the computer to be mounted. It is more narrow than wide and is attached to the lower half of the bag front. On the mounting plate are pivoting attachments 49 matching attachments on the computer. The attachments allow the computer to pivot from an approximately horizontal to a vertical position against the bag front. The attachments may be hooks, half hinge axle or bearing, pivoting plate with attachments, ball and socket or other arrangements to hold the computer to the plate while still allowing it to pivot. The mounting plate may have one or more pins or blocks 50 which engage when the computer is pivoted up and these help in resisting twisting of the computer. This block may have an electrical connection in it which leads to the bag's interior. The mounting plate may be riveted, screwed or permanently clipped to the bag front or through the bag front to a backing plate inside the bag. The backing plate may have a plug or plug and wire lead for connecting inside computer equipment.

Higher up on the bag front is a flap 36 with distal attachments 46. The proximal end of the flap may be attached to or be an extension of the front or top walls. The flap is used to pull the bag front flat and to stretch around the top of the computer and fasten to the top front of the computer where its complementary attachments are accessible. The attachment may be hooks, clips, snaps, etc. The flap may have elastic in it to help keep the bag front tight and help keep hooks engaged. Alternatively, the flap may have one or more rigid panels in it to pry the bag front flat and engage the attachments. One of these rigid panels may have projections on its edge to match footing notches in the computer to assist in prying the panel into place.

This arrangement uses the top flap as a handle to pull out any bag bulge and substitute the computer for a rigid bag panel. Thus, the weight of the bag is reduced. The computer can quickly be engaged and disengaged to and from the bag front.

BC embodiment. This embodiment, shown in FIG. 18 to FIG. 20, provides for a bag 11 with an outside computer equipment mounting structure 51 on the outside surface of the bag's front wall and an inside mounting structure 18 on the inside of the bag's front wall. There is provision for an electrical connection 9 associated with the two mounting structures to electrically connect the equipment they hold.

The outside computer equipment mounting structure may be of any kind that holds the computer equipment to the outside of the bag's front wall. Examples may include, but not limited to, holster, docking port, hanger or hanger pocket, bracket, pins or sockets, or pivoting computer equipment mount, such as a flap or hinge. It may hold a computer, display, manual character input device or other computer equipment. There may be more than one outside mounting structure as with, for example, a display and keyboard. Each may have an electrical connection which may lead to one or more inside mounting structures. The electrical connection 9 may be a plug and it may be part of the mounting structure or positioned in the bag's front wall so that the mounting structure aligns and connects the computer equipment to the plug. The outside plug may connect with the inside plug with wires or the inside and outside computer parts may make direct physical and electrical contact without wires through a matching opening in the bag's front wall.

The inside mounting structure, as shown in FIG. 19, may be a pocket 18 with a seal flap 20 through which wires from the outside run. The wiring leads through the seal flap to a plug 9 fixed to the inside of the flap. The plug matches and attaches to the computer equipment to connect it electrically to the outside mount. The plug may attach to the computer equipment at its top or back side and the mounting pocket may have an opening 52 in it through which the flap plug can pass to engage with the computer equipment. The plug on the seal flap may also have physical attachment included and/or there may be a separate attachment to secure the seal flap to the pocket. The pocket may have one or more additional opening(s) to gain access to plugs, peripheral mounts or controls on the surface of the computer equipment while it is installed in the pocket. The pocket and seal flap may be sewn or riveted to the bag front. Equipment mounted in this way may include computing hardware, removable disk, batteries, portable memory or other peripherals. In this arrangement, the pocket takes the weight while the flap connects the electricity without taking a load. There may be matching computer equipment which has shaping, size and electrical connection to match the inside mounting structure's pocket, flap and electrical connection.

Alternatively, the inside mounting structure (FIG. 20) may be a molded coupling 53 to match the computing equipment meant to mount there. It has an integral electrical plug 9 to match the connection on the computing equipment. The coupling may also contain plugs 10 for power, data communication or wire connected peripherals (eg USB) to extend the capabilities of the inside and/or outside computer equipment. Also molded into the coupling may be equipment attachments 27 such as clips, snaps, bracket or channels and there may also be guides such as ridges, or notches meant to hold the computing equipment onto the coupling. The coupling may be bonded or glued to the bag's front wall. It may also be riveted, bolted, screwed or permanently clipped to the bag's front wall or through the bag's front wall to an outside mounting structure on the outside of the bag. The electrical connection may be wires, electrical panel or the inside and outside parts may make direct physical and electrical connection through the front wall without wires. The coupling may fit all or only a part of the computer equipment and the complete mounting structure may include additional inside mounting components such as a footing, pocket, flap(s) or other attachments on the inside of the front wall to match the computer equipment and assist in holding it to the inside of the bag's front wall. There may be matching computer equipment which has shaping, size, coupling, attachments and electrical connection to match the inside mounting structure's attachments and/or coupling. The coupling on the computer equipment may be inset into the equipment to compensate for the thickness of the coupling and allow the computer to be flush with the bag front.

In another variation, the inside mounting structure may be a footing and headpiece. The footing may be located on the inside of the front wall, may have elastic and may have fasteners such as hooks, snaps or Velcro to match the computer. It may be flap-like or may have sides to hold it open and resist outward twisting. The footing may be a molded fixture capable of engaging the lower end of the computer equipment and hold it in place. The footing may be fasteners such as hooks or snaps attached to the front wall. The headpiece is located near the junction of the front and top walls. It may be a flap positioned on the inside of the front or top wall and may have fasteners to match the computer. The headpiece may be fasteners such as hooks or snaps attached to the front or top walls. The headpiece may be a coupling matching the upper part of the computer and holding it in place. In this arrangement, the footing and headpiece work together to stretch the bag front over the computer and keep the front flat. Electrical connection between the inside and outside mounting structures may be a wire and plug, plug or opening in the front wall matching the computer equipment. The electrical connection may be built into a molded footing or headpiece. The electrical connection may be a wire and plug through the layers of a flap-like footing or headpiece.

There may be a matching computer which has shaping, size, attachments and electrical connection to match the inside mounting structure's pocket, attachments and/or coupling.

The preferred embodiments of the invention described herein are exemplary and numerous modifications, variations, and rearrangements can be readily envisioned to achieve an equivalent result, all of which are intended to be embraced within the scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7450372 *Jan 12, 2006Nov 11, 2008Inventec CorporationHanging and desktop dual-purpose computer device
US7821779Feb 2, 2009Oct 26, 2010Daley Iii Charles ABag computer assembly with exposable control surface
US7876558 *Apr 6, 2009Jan 25, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer with interior access coupling
US7881048 *Jul 9, 2008Feb 1, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer system and bag apparatus
US7889496 *Apr 13, 2009Feb 15, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer display panel prop assembly
US7894179 *Jul 9, 2008Feb 22, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer display panel
US7974081 *Jul 28, 2009Jul 5, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer computing unit panel
US7978464 *Mar 30, 2009Jul 12, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer two panel computer with hinge extension
US8014138 *Dec 26, 2007Sep 6, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer manual character input device and cover
US8094440 *Oct 12, 2010Jan 10, 2012Daley Iii Charles ABag computer system and bag apparatus
US8125770 *May 18, 2009Feb 28, 2012Daley Iii Charles ABag computer input output device
US8194398 *Nov 4, 2010Jun 5, 2012Daley Iii Charles ABag computer system and bag apparatus
US8467176 *Aug 18, 2011Jun 18, 2013Charles A. Daley, IIIBag computer system and bag apparatus
US8553401 *Jan 10, 2011Oct 8, 2013Charles A. Daley, IIIBag computer computing unit panel and display panel
US8559168 *Aug 24, 2011Oct 15, 2013Charles A. Daley, IIIBag computer system and bag apparatus
US8605415 *Nov 30, 2010Dec 10, 2013Charles A. Daley, IIIBag computer display panel support assembly
US8605416 *Sep 14, 2011Dec 10, 2013Charles A. Daley, IIIBag computer two part display panel
US20110102992 *Jan 10, 2011May 5, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer computing unit panel and display panel
US20110164366 *Nov 30, 2010Jul 7, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer display panel support assemply
US20110267754 *Jul 7, 2011Nov 3, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer sliding deployment display panel assembly
US20110304965 *Aug 24, 2011Dec 15, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer system and bag apparatus
US20110304970 *Aug 18, 2011Dec 15, 2011Daley Iii Charles ABag computer system and bag apparatus
US20120008261 *Sep 14, 2011Jan 12, 2012Daley Iii Charles ABag computer two part display panel
US20120275102 *Jun 29, 2012Nov 1, 2012Daley Iii Charles ABag computer display panel frame
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/320
International ClassificationB65D85/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C2011/003, A45C2013/025, A45C5/02, G06F1/1628
European ClassificationG06F1/16P4, A45C5/02