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Publication numberUS20070215564 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/711,337
Publication dateSep 20, 2007
Filing dateFeb 27, 2007
Priority dateMar 3, 2006
Also published asCA2644516A1, CN101394991A, EP1993822A2, WO2007103242A2, WO2007103242A3
Publication number11711337, 711337, US 2007/0215564 A1, US 2007/215564 A1, US 20070215564 A1, US 20070215564A1, US 2007215564 A1, US 2007215564A1, US-A1-20070215564, US-A1-2007215564, US2007/0215564A1, US2007/215564A1, US20070215564 A1, US20070215564A1, US2007215564 A1, US2007215564A1
InventorsRoxanne Drago Westendorf, Troy Nimrick, Kubica Guevara, Pooja Arora, Jonathan Calderas, Michael Dugas
Original AssigneeRoxanne Drago Westendorf, Nimrick Troy L, Guevara Kubica P, Pooja Arora, Calderas Jonathan J, Dugas Michael B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
In-store display systems
US 20070215564 A1
Abstract
In-store display systems, and methods for displaying products in stores are disclosed. In one embodiment, the in-store display system includes a display structure and at least one sample surface material. The display structure can be any type of structure that is suitable for holding the sample surface material. The sample surface material may be used to demonstrate the application of an architectural surface covering product thereto. In one embodiment, a method is provided for demonstrating an architectural surface covering product to a potential purchaser. In one version of such a method, the method includes a step of marring an area of the architectural surface covering product, and a step of repairing the marred surface.
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Claims(20)
1. An in-store display system for use in conjunction with an architectural surface covering product, said system comprising:
(a) a display structure comprising at least one sample surface material that is at least temporarily joined to said display structure, wherein said display structure is distinct from the interior architectural surfaces of a building; and
(b) at least one sample of an architectural surface covering product for joining to said at least one sample surface material, said architectural surface covering product being in the form of a sheet having a length, a width, a pair of opposed surfaces, said architectural surface covering product comprising a pressure sensitive adhesive on one of its surfaces.
2. The in-store display system of claim 1 wherein said at least one sample surface material comprises a sample panel of a size that is greater than at least one of the length or the width of said sheet of said architectural surface covering product, wherein said sample surface material has a surface that has a micro-texture substantially similar to painted U.S. drywall, and a density of less than about 40 lbs/ft3.
3. The in-store display system of claim 1 wherein said at least one sample surface material is of a size that is greater that at least one of the length or the width of said sheet of said architectural surface covering product wherein said sample surface material has a surface that has a micro-texture substantially similar to painted U.S. drywall and is sufficiently flexible that it can be rolled without bending or cracking.
4. The in-store display system of claim 1 wherein said display structure further comprises a holder attached thereto for holding said at least one sample surface material when said at least one sample of an architectural surface covering product is applied to said at least one sample surface material.
5. The in-store display system of claim 4 wherein said display structure and said holder are configured to hold said at least one sample surface material in a vertical orientation to simulate the surface of a wall.
6. The in-store display system of claim 5 wherein said holder is configured to releasably retain said at least one sample surface material.
7. The in-store display system of claim 1 further comprising additional interchangeable sample surface materials.
8. The in-store display system of claim 1 wherein said display structure is configured to provide a comparative demonstration of the application of said at least one architectural surface covering product with at least one of: paint, faux finish painting, and wallpaper.
9. The in-store display system of claim 1 wherein said display structure further comprises a second sample surface material oriented at an angle relative to said at least one sample surface material.
10. The in-store display system of claim 1 wherein said display structure further comprises a backing to which said at least one sample surface material is joined, and at least one side wall joined to said backing, wherein said side wall is oriented at an angle of greater than 90 ° relative to said backing.
11. The in-store display system of claim 1 wherein said display structure further comprises an integral lighting system joined to said display structure for illuminating said at least one sample of an architectural surface covering product.
12. The in-store display system of claim 11 wherein said integral lighting system comprises more than one type of lighting.
13. The in-store display system of claim 1 further comprising:
(c) one or more applicators provided with said display structure for applying said architectural surface covering product to said sample surface material.
14. A method for demonstrating an architectural surface covering product to a potential purchaser, said method comprising:
(a) obtaining an architectural surface covering product in the form of at least one sheet comprising an opaque layer of dry paint, said sheet having a length, a width, at least one pair of opposed side edges, side margins disposed inwardly of each of said side edges, and a pair of opposed surfaces, said architectural surface covering product comprising a pressure sensitive adhesive on one of its surfaces, wherein said opaque layer of dry paint is continuous along the length and across the width of the sheet;
(b) providing a display structure comprising at least one sample surface material that is at least temporarily joined to said display structure, wherein said display structure is distinct from the interior architectural surfaces of a building; and
(c) applying a first sheet of said architectural surface covering product to said sample surface material while a potential purchaser is viewing the sample surface material.
15. The method of claim 14 wherein said method is carried out in a store in the presence of said prospective purchaser.
16. The method of claim 15 further comprising providing an applicator for applying said first sheet of said architectural surface covering product to said surface, and said method further comprises allowing said prospective purchaser to apply a sheet of said architectural surface covering product to said sample surface material with said applicator.
17. The method of claim 14 further comprising a step (d) of applying a second sheet of said architectural surface covering product to said sample surface material so that a side margin of said second sheet of said architectural surface covering product overlaps a side margin of said first sheet of said architectural surface covering product while a prospective purchaser is viewing the sample surface material.
18. A method for demonstrating an architectural surface covering product to a potential purchaser, said method comprising:
(a) obtaining an architectural surface covering product in the form of at least one sheet having a length, a width, at least one pair of opposed side edges, side margins disposed inwardly of each of said side edges, and a pair of opposed surfaces, said architectural surface covering product comprising a pressure sensitive adhesive on one of its surfaces;
(b) providing a surface for application of said architectural surface covering product;
(c) applying a first sheet of said architectural surface covering product to said surface;
(d) marring an area of said first sheet of said architectural surface covering product while a potential purchaser is viewing the surface; and
(e) applying a second sheet of said architectural surface covering product to said surface over the marred area of said first sheet of architectural surface covering product while a potential purchaser is viewing the surface.
19. The method of claim 18 wherein step (e) further comprises rotating said second sheet of said architectural surface covering product while said potential purchaser is viewing the surface prior to applying said second sheet of said architectural surface covering product to said surface.
20. The method of claim 18 further comprising providing a comparative demonstration of repairing said at least one architectural surface covering product with an attempt to repair a surface covered by at least one of: paint, faux finish painting, and wallpaper.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/778,996, filed Mar. 3, 2006.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to in-store display systems, and to methods for displaying products in stores.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In the case of some products, such as interior paints, in-store displays generally consist of samples of paint “chips” that are placed in a rack. The display rack of paint chips may be lit with an overhead light.

There are a number of drawbacks associated with display racks such as those that display paint chips. Several drawbacks are that the samples of paint chips are typically quite small, and often do not correspond exactly to the color of the paint when it is applied from a can of paint onto a surface, such as a wall. Another drawback is that the lighting associated with the display rack may be different from that used in the room (or other environment) in which the customer intends to apply the paint. This may be one of the reasons that the color of the sample paint chip does not correspond exactly to the color of the paint when it is applied onto the intended surface.

In addition, to the foregoing drawbacks, current in-store displays are not suitable for displaying, demonstrating, and/or instructing customers how to use new products, such as specialty decor products. Examples of specialty décor products are disclosed in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. US 2004/0200564 A1, Kinsey, et al., published on Oct. 14, 2004.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to in-store display systems, and to methods for displaying products in stores. There are numerous, non-limiting embodiments of the in-store display systems and methods described herein, including the following embodiments.

In one embodiment, an in-store display system is provided for use in conjunction with an architectural surface covering product. In this embodiment, the in-store display system comprises a display structure and at least one sample surface material which may be in the form of an interchangeable board or panel that may be displayed on the display structure. The in-store display system may further comprise at least one sample of an architectural surface covering product for applying to the sample surface material. The architectural surface covering product may be in the form of a sheet having a length, a width, a pair of opposed surfaces. The architectural surface covering product may further comprise a pressure sensitive adhesive on one of its surfaces. The in-store display system may also have associated therewith one or more applicators for applying the architectural surface covering product to the sample surface material.

In another embodiment, a method for demonstrating an architectural surface covering product to a potential purchaser is provided. The method may include a step of allowing a prospective purchaser to apply a sheet of an architectural surface covering product to a surface.

In another embodiment, a method for demonstrating an architectural surface covering product to a potential purchaser is provided which includes a step of marring an area of a first sheet of an architectural surface covering product while a potential purchaser is viewing the surface, and a step of applying a second sheet of architectural surface covering product to the surface over the marred area of the first sheet of architectural surface covering product while a potential purchaser is viewing the surface.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

While the specification concludes with claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the invention, it is believed that the present invention will be better understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a front view of one embodiment of an in-store display system.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of another embodiment of an in-store product display system.

FIG. 3 is a simplified perspective view of another embodiment of an in-store product display.

FIG. 4 is a simplified perspective view of another embodiment of an in-store product display.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to in-store display systems, and to methods for displaying products in stores.

FIG. 1 shows one non-limiting embodiment of an in-store display system 20 that comprises a display structure 22 comprising at least one sample surface material 24. The display structure 22 can comprise any type of structure that is suitable for holding the sample surface material 24. The display structure may be distinct from the interior architectural surfaces of a store or other building. Suitable types of structures include, but are not limited to display boards, display stands, display booths, and kiosks. When the in-store display system 20 is intended to display a wall decor product, it may be desirable for the display structure 22 to hold the sample surface material 24 in a generally vertical position to simulate the surface of a wall.

The display structure 22 can comprise a surface, such as a backing, or a wall (or “back wall”) 26. The backing 26 may be at least temporarily fixed in a stationary position so that the backing 26 and sample surface material 24 will not move when the wall decor product is applied to the sample surface material 24. In other embodiments, it is possible that the backing 26 may be eliminated, and the remainder of the display structure 22 can be attached directly to a wall, or other surface.

The display structure 22 can comprise any suitable article for holding the sample surface material 24 therein, or to the backing 26. Suitable articles include, but are not limited to clamps, clips, frames, and other types of articles or structures. In this particular embodiment, the display structure 22 further comprises a frame 28 joined to the backing 26 for holding the sample surface material 24 to the backing 26. The frame 28 provides a large open window type area inside its boundaries. The frame 28 can be made of any suitable material including, but not limited to wood.

The term “joined”, as used in this specification, encompasses configurations in which an element is directly secured to another element by affixing the element directly to the other element; configurations in which the element is indirectly secured to the other element by affixing the element to intermediate member(s) which in turn are affixed to the other element; and configurations in which one element is integral with another element, i.e., one element is essentially part of the other element.

The frame 28 can be joined to the backing 26 in any suitable manner. In the non-limiting embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the frame 28 is joined to the backing by one or more hinges 30 so that the frame 28 can swing between open and closed positions to insert and remove the sample surface material 24. The embodiment of the display structure 22 shown in FIG. 1 also comprises a closure mechanism, such as a pin, latch, or lock 32 for holding the frame 28 in a closed position.

The sample surface material 24 shown in FIG. 1 may be mounted to a wall, or other surface, such as to the surface of a display stand. As shown in FIG. 1, the wall, display stand, or other surface on which the sample surface material 24 is mounted, may have additional elements associated therewith. The phrase “associated”, as used herein, refers to elements which may be joined to the display structure 22, or which are used in conjunction with the display structure 22. Elements may be used in conjunction with the display structure, for example, as part of one or more of the methods described herein. Such additional elements include, but are not limited to: the sample surface material, product samples, full size products, applicators for applying the products to a surface, text and/or graphics, devices such as television and/or computer screens for depicting the product and/or describing or depicting any of the methods described herein in audio and/or visual form.

The display system 20 may comprise one or more pieces of sample surface material 24. More than one piece of sample surface material 24 may be desirable so that a new surface can be presented to prospective purchasers when making a new demonstration. The sample surface material 24 can be any suitable material. It may be desirable for the sample surface material 24 to have characteristics similar to that of the material of the type of surface to which the product is intended to be applied. Several different types of sample surface material can be provided to simulate different surfaces. For applications in the United States, the type of surface that wall surface coverings are applied is often gypsum board or “drywall” material. Drywall material is generally supplied in ½ inch (1.3 cm) thick sheets in the U.S. However, drywall material is quite heavy, and may be difficult to handle in connection with product displays and demonstrations. Therefore, it may be desirable for the sample surface material 24 to have a density that is less than that of standard ½ inch thick U.S. drywall material. The density of standard ½ inch thick U.S. drywall material is about 40 lbs/ft3 (about 640 kg/m3). Pieces of drywall are also susceptible to cracking or breaking if handled extensively. It would also be desirable for the sample surface material 24 to be less subject to susceptible to cracking and breaking.

In some embodiments, it may be desirable for the sample surface material 24 to have a certain minimum thickness, such as greater than or equal to about 3/16 inch (about 0.5 cm) so that it is structurally more “substantial” than paper or cardboard, and able to have the products described herein applied to the surface of the same bending, warping, etc. In some embodiments, it may be desirable for the sample surface material 24 to have a certain maximum thickness for ease in handling. One suitable maximum thickness may be less than or equal to about 1.5 inch (about 3.8 cm). It may also be desirable for the sample surface material 24 to have a minimum density. One suitable minimum density may be greater than or equal to about 0.5 lb/ft3 (about 8 kg/m3).

One suitable material that meets these requirements is a board material with a foam core and a wood-based exterior layer. A commercially available example of such a 5 material is a product known as GATORFOAM® foam board, or referred to as “Gatorboard”. GATORFOAM® foam board is available from Alcan Composites of St. Louis, MO, USA. GATORFOAM® foam board is a board material with a polystyrene foam core, which is covered on each flat surface thereof with a wood-fiber veneer. GATORFOAM® foam board provides a number of advantages: it is lightweight, having a density of about 15 lbs/ft3 (about 240 kg/m3); it has a surface that is similar to drywall; it is able to be painted with standard types of latex interior wall paint without curling, warping, or deforming; and, it is does not have dusting problems or cracking and breaking problems associated therewith as does drywall material.

Other sample surface materials may be used as long as they are supported and held substantially flat by the frame to minimize bending and warping. To this end, certain thinner materials may be used. One exemplary sample surface material is Mohawk Paper Via Felt™ brand cream white color paper with a basis weight of 270 grams per square meter and a caliper of about 15.0 mils. This material is available from Mohawk Mill (www.mohawkpaper.com). A second exemplary sample surface material is Neenah Paper Item #905731, classic linen grade, cranberry color paper which has a basis weight of 216 grams per square meter and a caliper of about 10.4 mils. This material is available from Neenah Paper (www.neenahpaper.com). A third exemplary sample surface material is drywall paper available from Caraustar Mill Group and provided by Sweetwater Paperboard, Austell, Ga., U.S.A. This material is primed with one coat of commercially available primer such as Behr Premium Plus New Drywall Primer and Sealer White #73 available from Behr Corporation, Santa Ana, Calif., U.S.A. The primer is allowed to air dry and then painted with one coat of commercially available interior wall paint such as Behr Interior Satin Enamel Ultra Pure White also available from Behr Corporation. These materials have the advantage of providing relatively thin, lightweight surfaces in comparison to standard U.S. drywall. In addition, they are sufficiently flexible that they may be rolled without bending and cracking and transported to save space. The sample surface material from Mohawk Mill described above has the additional benefit that it simulates the micro texture of painted drywall without the need to use paint.

The product samples and full size products can be any suitable type of product depending on the embodiment desired. Types of products that can be displayed with the in-store display system 20 described herein include, but are not limited to paint, wall paper, and specialty decor products. Examples of specialty decor products are disclosed in U.S. Patent Application Publication Nos.: US 2003/0134114 A1, Pallotta, et al., published on Jul. 17, 2003; US 2004/0076788 A1, Steinhardt, et al., published on Apr. 22, 2004; US 2004/0200564 A1, Kinsey, et al., published on Oct. 14, 2004; US 2004/0253421 A1, Truog, et al., published on Dec. 16, 2004; US 2005/0003129 A1, Truog, et al., published on Jan. 6, 2005; and US 2005/0196607 A1, Shih, et al., published on Sep. 8, 2005; and in PCT Publications WO 2004/074003 A2, WO 2004/074009 A2, WO 2005/087490 A1, and WO 2005/087492 A1. These patent applications disclose an article in the form of an architectural surface covering product that comprises a sheet of dry color component. The sheet of dry color component comprises an opaque layer of dry paint. The article comprises an adhesive on one surface of the sheet of dry color component for application of the architectural surface covering product to a wall, or other type of architectural surface.

In the case of the architectural surface covering products described in the foregoing patent applications, product samples can be provided for the customer that are much larger in size than typical paint chips. This will provide customers with a more useful sample. In addition, unlike paint chips, the product samples will be truly representative of the appearance of the product as applied. The full size product may be provided in roll form in any suitable widths including but not limited to 12 inches (about 30.5 cm) for application to walls, 6 inches (about 15 cm), and 2 inches (about 5 cm) for application in corners where two walls meet. The side of the architectural surface covering product opposite the adhesive may be provided with a releasable liner for any of the following purposes: to protect the surface of the product; to allow the product to be provided in roll form and unrolled without sticking to the adhesive; and/or for any other suitable purpose. In the case of the architectural surface covering products described herein, it may be desirable for the sample surface material 24 to be in the form of a panel which is of a size greater than at least one of the length or width of the sheet of the architectural surface covering product.

Applicators suitable for applying the 12 inch width (about 30.5 cm) rolls of the architectural surface covering products described in the foregoing patent applications are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,808,586 B1, Steinhardt and US Patent Application Publication No. US 2005/0092420 A1, Kinne, et al., published on May 5, 2005. An applicator suitable for use in applying the 2 inch (about 5 cm) width rolls of the architectural surface covering products is described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/980,215 filed Nov. 3, 2004 in the name of Steinhardt, et al.

FIG. 1 shows that the display structure 22 further comprises text and/or graphics 34 thereon.

FIG. 2 shows another embodiment of in-store display system 20 that comprises a display structure 22 comprising at least one sample surface material 24. The display system 20 shown in FIG. 2 also comprises a backing 26, a frame 28, hinges 30, a latch 32, and text and/or graphics 34. In addition, the display system 22 may also contain one or more product samples 36. The display structure 22 shown in FIG. 2 contains similar components to the display system 20 shown in FIG. 1; however, the display structure 22 shown in FIG. 2 is in the form of a display booth or kiosk.

The display structure 22 shown in FIG. 2 may also comprise one or more side panels or side walls 38. The side panels or side walls 38 may extend outward at right angles (e.g., 90) from the backing 26, or at an angle of greater than 90° relative to the backing 26. If desired, the display structure 22 may be provided with trim or moulding 40 to simulate the finish of an interior room.

The display system 20 in FIG. 2 may further comprise an integrated lighting system 42. The term “integrated”, as used herein, refers to a lighting system that is part of the display system 20 and/or display structure 22, and is joined thereto. Such an integrated lighting system 42 is intended to be distinguished from lighting systems that are otherwise present in the store. The integrated lighting system 42 comprises one or more lights bulbs or lights 44 which may be any suitable light fixtures, and one or more controls 46. It should be understood that the integrated lighting system 42 is not limited to use with display structures 22 of the type shown in FIG. 2. Any other type of display structure 22, including the display structure 22 shown in FIG. 1 can also be provided with an integrated lighting system 42.

The integrated lighting system 42 may comprise any suitable type of lighting for lights 44. Suitable types of lighting include, but are not limited to halogen lights, incandescent lights, fluorescent lights, lights that simulate daylight, fiber optic lights, light emitting diodes (LED), black lights, UV lights, and combinations thereof.

The controls 46 for the lighting system 42 may comprise any suitable type of controls for controlling any of various aspects of the lighting system. In addition to an on/off switch, the controls 46 can include other types of switches, dials, and dimmers. The light fixtures and/or controls 46 can be used to control one or more of the following: angle of the light, color of light, type of light (e.g., such as one or more types of lighting described in the preceding paragraph), duration of lighting, and intensity.

FIG. 3 shows another embodiment of an in-store display structure 22. The in-store display structure 22 shown in FIG. 3 is in the nature of a foldable easel. This display structure 22 is in a form which may be more portable than the display structures 22 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

The display structure 22 shown in FIG. 3 contains some components that are similar to the display system 20 shown in FIG. 1. For example, the display structure 22 shown in FIG. 3 comprises a sample surface material 24, a backing 26, and a frame 28. Instead of hinges, the display system comprises several spring clips 50. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, there are a plurality of spring clips 50 spaced around the perimeter of the frame 28. In addition, the display structure 22 shown in FIG. 3 comprises a pair of legs 52 and 54 that can be folded together so that the display structure 22 can be easily moved around.

FIG. 4 shows another embodiment of an in-store display structure 22. The in-store display structure 22 shown in FIG. 4 is a unit that has more than one side or surface (sample surface material) 24 for applying the architectural surface covering product. The surfaces 24 of in-store display structure 22 shown in FIG. 4 can be made from any of the materials described herein, including but not limited to drywall material. In this particular embodiment, dry wall material is used for stability and so that a separate backing is not necessary. The backing can, thus, be considered to be integral with the sample surface material, and the sample surface material can be an integral portion of the display structure 22. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the in-store display structure 22 is in the form of a column with a base 56 and a top portion 58. The column can have a cross-section in any suitable configuration. Suitable cross-sections include those in the configuration of polygons. In the embodiment shown, the column has a square cross-section with four surfaces 24 for applying the architectural surface covering product (two of these surfaces are hidden from view).

As shown in FIG. 4, the in-store display structure 22 may be provided with one or more extensions 60 of the surfaces 24 forming each side of the in-store display structure 22. These extensions 60 can be used to provide portions of the surfaces 24 that simulate the 90 ° interior comers 62 of the walls of a room during application of the architectural surface covering product to the in-store display structure 22. In addition, the in-store display structure 22 may be provide with other features to simulate other aspects of an interior wall. Such other features include, but are not limited to outlet receptacle plates and crown molding and baseboard trim (not shown).

The in-store display system 20 may be particularly useful when used in conjunction with the launch of a new product since consumers will need to be notified about the benefits of such products, and will often have questions about such products, such as how to use or apply such products. The in-store display system 20 can be used to display and/or demonstrate the application of any of the types of products described herein including known products, such as paint, wallpaper, etc. The in-store display system 20 can also be configured to provide a comparative demonstration of the application of at least one architectural surface covering product comprising a sheet of dry color component and adhesive with at least one of the following products: paint, faux finish painting, and wallpaper. Such a comparative demonstration could involve placing the architectural surface covering product and the other product side-by-side on the same, or different, sample surface material 24.

The present invention also relates to methods for displaying products in stores which utilize an in-store display system. The methods can be used to display and/or demonstrate the application of at least one of the following types of products: an architectural surface covering product, paint, faux finish painting, and wallpaper, or to compare any of these with each other.

In one embodiment, a method is provided for demonstrating an architectural surface covering product to a potential purchaser. In one non-limiting version of such a method, the method comprises a step of obtaining an architectural surface covering product in the form of at least one sheet comprising an opaque layer of dry paint.

The sheet of architectural surface covering product has a length, a width, at least one pair of opposed side edges, side margins disposed inwardly of each of the side edges, and a pair of opposed surfaces. The architectural surface covering product comprises a pressure sensitive adhesive on one of its surfaces. The opaque layer of dry paint may be continuous along the length and across the width of the sheet, if it desired to apply an opaque covering across an entire surface. The method also comprises a step of obtaining a surface (such as sample surface material 24) for application of the architectural surface covering product. The method further comprises a step of applying a first sheet of the architectural surface covering product to the surface while a potential purchaser is viewing the surface.

The method described above can be carried out in a store, in a television commercial, and/or in person in the presence of a prospective purchaser. The method may include a step of allowing a prospective purchaser to apply a sheet of an architectural surface covering product to a surface. The terms “prospective purchaser” and “potential purchaser”, as used herein, include any shoppers or consumers viewing the demonstration in person, or on television, regardless of whether they have an actual intention to purchase the product. In either of the foregoing instances, the architectural surface covering product can be applied to the surface using one or more of the applicators described herein. The method may, thus, involve applying, or allowing a prospective purchaser to apply, a full-size width sheet of the architectural surface covering product (e.g., 12 inches in width) to the surface.

The method may also comprise a step of applying, demonstrating, or allowing a prospective purchaser to apply, a sheet of the architectural surface covering product to form a clean edge on a surface, such as for trim purposes. This variation of the method may be carried out by using a sheet of the architectural surface covering product of a reduced width (e.g., 2 inches in width) with an applicator designed for such purposes.

The method may also comprise a step of applying, demonstrating, or allowing a prospective purchaser to apply, a sheet of the architectural surface covering product in a comer between adjacent walls or surfaces. This variation of the method may be carried out by using a sheet of the architectural surface covering product of a reduced width (e.g., 2 inches in width) with an applicator, and a smoothing tool designed for such purposes. One example of a tool that could be used for smoothing is a Speedball Brayer, available from Speedball Art Products, of Statesville, N.C., U.S.A. Another example of a tool that could be used for smoothing is shown in U.S. D 280,247 issued to Jones on Aug.20, 1985, or an article similar thereto.

The frame 28 of the display structure 22 described herein may be used to simulate a corner between adjacent walls or surfaces. The frame 28 of the display structure 22 may project outward from the sample surface material 24 when the sample surface material 24 is in place behind the frame 28. The sample surface material 24 and the inside surface of the frame 28 may meet to form a corner that is useful for demonstrating application of a sheet of the architectural surface covering product in a corner between adjacent walls or surfaces. p The method of demonstrating an architectural surface covering product to a potential purchaser may further comprise a step of applying a second sheet of the architectural surface covering product to the surface so that a side margin of the second sheet of the architectural surface covering product overlaps a side margin of the first sheet of the architectural surface covering product while a prospective purchaser is viewing the surface. This may be done for any suitable purpose, including to convey to the prospective purchaser the fact that the architectural surface covering product provides a benefit in hiding seams between adjacent sheets. In addition, if the architectural surface covering product is provided in a solid color, or a random pattern with a sufficient degree of randomness, the method may be used to convey to the prospective purchaser the fact that there is no need to match patterns, as in the case of many wallpapers. Alternatively, different sheets of an architectural surface covering product, each of which has a different design thereon, can be used to demonstrate different combinations of designs.

In addition, since the architectural surface covering product may be opaque, the benefit of “coverage” provided by the architectural surface covering product may be conveyed to the prospective purchaser. An opaque architectural surface covering product can completely cover colored surfaces (e.g., walls painted with colors that would ordinarily require more than one coat of paint). Opaque architectural surface covering products would also be able to cover darker color surfaces with a lighter colored architectural surface covering product, and lighter colored surfaces with a darker colored architectural surface covering product. These benefits can be demonstrated by providing a color coated sample surface material, and then covering the same with the architectural surface covering product, in the first instance. These benefits can be demonstrated in the second instance, by covering a sheet of darker colored architectural surface covering product with a sheet of lighter colored architectural surface covering product, or lighter colored surfaces with a sheet of darker colored architectural surface covering product.

In another embodiment, a method is provided for demonstrating an architectural surface covering product to a potential purchaser which includes a step of marring an area of a first sheet of an architectural surface covering product while a potential purchaser is viewing the surface, and a step of applying a second sheet of architectural surface covering product to the surface over the marred area of the first sheet of architectural surface covering product while a potential purchaser is viewing the surface. This embodiment may also comprise a step of rotating the second sheet of the architectural surface covering product while the potential purchaser is viewing the surface prior to applying the second sheet of the architectural surface covering product to the surface.

The step of rotating the second sheet of architectural surface covering product may be used if the architectural surface covering product is provided in a solid color, or a random pattern with a sufficient degree of randomness, to convey to the prospective purchaser the fact that there is no need to be concerned with the orientation of the architectural surface covering product when applying a patch to repair the same.

The method of demonstrating the manner of repairing the architectural surface covering material may further comprise a comparative demonstration of repairing at least one architectural surface covering product with an attempt to repair a surface covered by at least one of: paint, faux finish painting, and wallpaper.

The disclosure of all patents, patent applications (and any patents which issue thereon, as well as any corresponding published foreign patent applications), and publications mentioned throughout this description are hereby incorporated by reference herein. It is expressly not admitted, however, that any of the documents incorporated by reference herein teach or disclose the present invention. To the extent that any meaning or definition of a term in this document conflicts with any meaning or definition of the same term in a document incorporated by reference, the meaning or definition assigned to that term in this document shall govern.

It should be understood that every maximum numerical limitation given throughout this specification would include every lower numerical limitation, as if such lower numerical limitations were expressly written herein. Every minimum numerical limitation given throughout this specification will include every higher numerical limitation, as if such higher numerical limitations were expressly written herein. Every numerical range given throughout this specification will include every narrower numerical range that falls within such broader numerical range, as if such narrower numerical ranges were all expressly written herein.

The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the exact numerical values recited. Instead, unless otherwise specified, each such dimension is intended to mean both the recited value and a functionally equivalent range surrounding that value. For example, a dimension disclosed as “40 mm ” is intended to mean “about 40 mm.”

While particular embodiments of the subject invention have been described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications of the subject invention can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. In addition, while the present invention has been described in connection with certain specific embodiments thereof, it is to be understood that this is by way of illustration and not by way of limitation and the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims which should be construed as broadly as the prior art will permit.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8376748 *Mar 28, 2011Feb 19, 2013Julie K. BoneyPortable apparatus for visualizing and practicing wall finishes
US20110177486 *Mar 28, 2011Jul 21, 2011Boney Julie KPortable Apparatus for Visualizing and Practicing Wall Finishes
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/13.1
International ClassificationA47F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47F7/00
European ClassificationA47F7/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 29, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, THE, OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:WASTENDORF, ROXANNE DRAGO;NIMRICK, TROY LEE;GUEVARA, KUBICA PENELOPE;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:019355/0213;SIGNING DATES FROM 20070326 TO 20070521