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Publication numberUS20070227524 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/761,914
Publication dateOct 4, 2007
Filing dateJun 12, 2007
Priority dateMay 30, 2005
Also published asCN101031228A, WO2006129451A1
Publication number11761914, 761914, US 2007/0227524 A1, US 2007/227524 A1, US 20070227524 A1, US 20070227524A1, US 2007227524 A1, US 2007227524A1, US-A1-20070227524, US-A1-2007227524, US2007/0227524A1, US2007/227524A1, US20070227524 A1, US20070227524A1, US2007227524 A1, US2007227524A1
InventorsMasato Murakami, Yosuke Kojoma
Original AssigneeMasato Murakami, Yosuke Kojoma
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid heating container
US 20070227524 A1
Abstract
A liquid heating container utilizing the exothermic agent which generates heat when combined with water to generate steam. The heating temperature can be controlled by adjusting the quantity of water being poured into the container and adjusting the quantity of the exothermic agent according to the quantity of the matter to be heated. The liquid heating container comprises a tubular container arranged to contain a water permeable bag enclosing a predetermined quantity of exothermic agent, a tubular body engaging with the upper of the tubular container removably and having a plurality of ribs in the inner circumference of the tubular body. The can body can contain water, coffee and/or other liquid and can be inserted into the tubular body.
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Claims(7)
1. A liquid heating container, comprising:
a tubular container;
a first tubular body removably engaging with the tubular container; the first tubular body configured with a plurality of vertical ribs in the inner circumference and having a perforated portion in the bottom;
a can body adapted to contain matter to be heated and having an opening in the upper end and being inserted into the first tubular body along the ribs until getting at the perforated-section and being maintained;
a second tubular body engaging with the first tubular body and having a water supply diffusing unit, the water supply diffusing unit configured with an upper surface of which serves as a water pouring diffusing portion and an under surface which serves as a portion for closing the upper end opening of the can body;
a gap being formed between the first tubular body, the second tubular body and/or the can body with the ribs; and
a measuring cup to measure the quantity of supply water and to pour the measured water into the second tubular body.
2. A liquid heating container, comprising:
a tubular container having a first joint portion at the upper end;
a first tubular body having a plurality of vertical ribs which is projected inside in the inner circumference and having a projected-flange portion in an outer circumference in the middle of the first tubular body and forming a second joint portion engaging with the first joint portion of the tubular container in an inner circumference of the projected-flange portion and providing a third joint portion in the upper end and providing a perforated-section in the bottom;
a second tubular body having a fourth joint portion engaging with the third joint portion of the first tubular body A and having a water supply diffusing unit, the water supply diffusing unit configured with an upper surface which serves as a water pouring diffusing portion and an under surface which serves as a portion for closing can body;
a can body containing matter to be heated and being inserted into the first tubular body along the plurality of ribs until getting at the perforated-section and being maintained;
a gap being formed between first tubular body, second tubular body, and/or can body with the ribs;
a measuring cup to measure the quantity of supply water and to pour the measured water into the second tubular body.
3. A liquid heating container, comprising:
(1) a tubular container;
(2) a first tubular body engaging with an upper portion of the tubular container with a joint portion, and having a water pouring-section with an upper end of the opening edge and having a perforated-section in the bottom and having a plurality of vertical ribs which is projected inside slightly in an inner circumference;
(3) a capped can body containing matter to be heated and being inserted into the first tubular body long the ribs until getting at the perforated-section;
(4) a gap being formed between tubular body and can body with the ribs;
(5) a measuring cup measuring the quantity of supply water and being poured in the tubular body turning the mouth upside down.
4. A liquid heating contained described in any one of claims 1 to 3 wherein tubular container is made of plastic which insulates from heat and is heatproof.
5. A liquid heating contained described in any one of claims 1 to 3, further comprising a water permeability bag enclosing a predetermined quantity of an exothermic agent which generates heat with water.
6. A liquid heating container described in claim 5 wherein the exothermic agent is a granule of quicklime as a main ingredient.
7. A liquid heating container described in any one of claims 1 to 3 wherein when tubular container and the first tubular body are separated, the can body is maintained in the first tubular body.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application is a continuation of International Application PCT/JP2006/309287, filed May 9, 2006, which, in turn, is based on Japanese patent application JP 2005-156875, filed May 30, 2005, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

1. Field of the Invention

This present invention relates to a container for heating a matter utilizing an exothermic agent that causes a chemical reaction with water to generate steam, such that matter (e.g., water, coffee, milk) can be heated and/or cooked by the generated steam.

2. Discussion of the Background

A container may store matter that is to be heated, an exothermic agent and water. The exothermic agent can be separated from the water via an isolation wall. When in use, the isolation wall can be broken to supply water to the exothermic agent. The combination of the water and the exothermic agent causes heat to be generated.

In another example, a food heating container can be configured to have a safety belt attached on the container. When the container is used, the safety belt can be removed and the container having an exothermic agent may be combined with water. The following prior art describe a container that can store together in a single container a matter to be heated, an exothermic agent and water. Japanese Patent Publications: 102726/1988, 76873/1992, 228063/1993, 8207/2005. Japanese Utility Model publications: 160736/1988, 23162/1993, 3115586 and 3116128.

Various types of containers can be prepared based on the type and quantity of matter that is being heated. In some cases, the heating temperature can be fixed and cannot be varied to achieve a suitable temperature. Such a condition may arise when the quantity of the exothermic agent and the quantity of water are fixed.

Issues arise as to ways to isolate the exothermic agent from the water within a safe and dry environment of the liquid heating container. There are also issues of ways to pour the water, which has been isolated with aluminum foil, into the exothermic agent, and/or ways to efficiently transmit the generated heat to the matter wherein the generated heat arises from mixing the water, exothermic agent and/or matter.

To solve such problems, some have suggested partitioning the inside of the container and then storing the exothermic agent in one of the partitioned sections. These partitioned sections may be protected with moisture-proof materials such as an aluminum foil that isolate the exothermic agent from water. The water can then be supplied to the exothermic agent by crushing the aluminum foil with a needle or other tips at the time of use. However, such technique is difficult to implement as the heating temperatures are difficult to adjust. This is because the technique uses fixed quantities of the exothermic agent and water to generate the heat.

SUMMARY

An object of this invention is to provide a liquid heating container wherein a tubular body containing a matter to be heated can be removably engaged with the upper section of a tubular container containing an exothermic agent. The quantities of supply water and the exothermic agent can be appropriately selected according to the type and the quantity of the matter to be heated.

Another object is to provide a liquid heating container, wherein an exothermic agent is used in order to cause a chemical reaction with water so that heat can be generated. The generated heat and steam can heat the matter to be heated in the container to a predetermined heating temperature.

Another object of this invention is to provide a liquid heating container wherein, because the tubular body can be removably engaged with the tubular container, the quantity of the exothermic agent can be selected freely and quantity of the water to be poured can be selected according to the type and quantity of the matter to be heated.

Another object is to provide a liquid heating container, wherein the heating temperature of the heated liquid can be controlled by selecting the quantity of the exothermic agent.

Another object of this invention is to provide a liquid heating container, wherein a commercially available capped-can containing coffee, juice and/or other liquid can be heated.

Because several kinds of permeable bags enclosing a given quantity of the exothermic agent have been prepared beforehand, it became easy to make adjustment for replacing or adding the exothermic agent, and the addition or reduction of the water to be poured can then become adjustable in accordance with the type and the quantity of the matter to be heated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Reference is made to the attached drawings, wherein elements having the same reference designations represent like elements throughout and wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of a liquid heating container according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 illustrates a cross sectional view of the liquid heating container of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 illustrates a perspective view of the liquid heating container of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 illustrates a cross sectional view of the liquid heating container showing water pouring on a water supply diffusing unit according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 illustrates an exemplary diagram of the process by which heat rises when water is poured into the exothermic agent according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 illustrates an enlarged bottom view one tubular body according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7 illustrates an enlarged bottom view another tubular body according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 illustrates an enlarged cross sectional view of an upper end of a can body according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 9 illustrates a measuring cup according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 10 illustrates the heated liquid being poured into a cup according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 11 illustrates a perspective view of the liquid heating container when a capped can body is used according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 12 illustrates a cross sectional view of the liquid heating container wherein water is poured according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 13 illustrates an enlarged cross sectional view of a tubular body of FIG. 12.

FIG. 14 illustrates a plan view of the tubular body of FIG. 12.

FIG. 15 illustrates a bottom plan view of the tubular body of FIG. 12.

FIG. 16 illustrates a plan view of a tubular container 18 shown in FIG. 11.

FIG. 17 illustrates a heated liquid being poured into a cup according to one embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF SEVERAL EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1 illustrates an exploded perspective view of an embodiment of the liquid heating container. FIG. 2 illustrates a cross sectional view of an embodiment of the liquid heating container. FIG. 3 illustrates a perspective view of an embodiment of the liquid heating container.

In the FIG. 1, tubular container 2 can be made of plastic such as polypropylene that insulates from heat and is heatproof. A predetermined quantity of the exothermic agent 1 is put in, and a joint portion 3 is provided in the top. When heat insulator a is wrapped around the surrounding edge of a heatproof container, it is strengthened. Can body 4 may be arranged to contain the liquid as the matter to be heated such as water and coffee. The top of the can body 4 is an open mouth edge. The can body 4 may be metallic. A metallic can body 4 may be made from material having good thermal conductivity such as aluminum. Of course, other materials may be used. For instance, the can body can use made of heatproof plastic. Tubular body 5 may be a cap configured with a perforated-section 6 in the bottom, and having a plurality of ribs 7 that project slightly in the vertical direction in the inside of the inner circumference. The can body 4 is held by these ribs. Reference numeral 8 is the projected-flange portion installed in the middle outer circumference of tubular body 5, and forms joint portion 9 of screw-joint in its inside circumference which is arranged to combine joint portion 3 of the container 2. Knurling may be applied on the outer circumference of the projected-flange portion to make it convenient for the rotational manipulation. Reference numeral 10 is a joint portion installed in the upper end of tubular body 5. Reference numeral 11 is a tubular body having a joint portion 12 such as screw-joint in its inside in the bottom part which is arranged to combine joint portion 10 of the tubular body 5. Reference numeral 13 is a water supply diffusing unit the upper surface of which serves as a water pouring diffusing portion and the under surface of which serves as a portion for closing the upper end opening of the can body. The water supply diffusing unit is supported by a plurality of props 14 in tubular body 11. The above-mentioned joint portion 3 is engaged with joint portion 8, and joint portion 10 is engaged with joint portion 12. Other configurations may be used. As one example, the joint portion of an upper tubular body is matched to the joint portion of a lower tubular body, and the upper tubular body can be pushed and rotated a little for closing. Reference numeral 15 is a packing being installed on the under surface of the water supply diffusing unit 13 being formed in a ring, and can blockade the open mouth edge of the can body. When tubular body 11 is engaged with tubular body 5 and fixed, pressure generates in the can body 4 because the top edge of the can body 4 is being blocked by the packing 15. Reference numeral 16 is a measuring cup which is arranged to serve as a measuring cup and also serves as a lid for the opening of the tubular body 11. The top of the tubular body 11 can be covered with the measuring cup by turning the mouth upside down. If the measurement lines 50, 100, 140 or 200 cc are set on the measuring cup, the heating temperature can be adjusted by calculating the quantity of water put in according to the calorific value of the exothermic agent.

FIG. 3 illustrates a perspective view of the container. FIG. 4 illustrates a cross sectional view showing the state water is being poured into the tubular container 2 by using the measuring cup 16. The water is diffused by the water supply diffusing unit and is supplied to the tubular container 2.

The exothermic agent 1 can be in the form of a granulated powder of which the principal ingredient is quicklime, which generates heat with water. Several kinds of the water permeable bags that can enclose, for example, 50 g, 100 g, or 150 g respectively of the exothermic agent, can be prepared beforehand. Suitable water permeable bags may be used for long-term preservation if such bags can be wrapped with the bursa material such as aluminum foil before being used. When using such a water permeable bag, a user may simply remove the exothermic agent from the aluminum foil, and put it in the bottom of the tubular container 2. The exothermic agent can be enclosed in the water permeable bag to prevent it from dispersing randomly when water is injected to the agent in order to generate heat. Since the used exothermic agent may be harmless, it is possible to naturally dispose of the residue resulting from the exothermic agent.

FIG. 5 illustrates a cross sectional view of the container, wherein the steam is generated and the can body is heated by the steam. Steam passes through perforated-section 6 of the bottom of the tubular body 5, and passes gap d being formed with a plurality of ribs 7, and passes through props 14, and arrives at the top part of the container as shown by the arrow. (See also FIG. 2). Because the upper end of can body 4 is being blocked by packing 15 on the under surface of water supply diffusing unit 13, the steam or stench generate from the exothermic agent in the can body is prevented from entering the can body 4.

FIG. 6 illustrates an enlarged bottom view of tubular body 5.

FIG. 7 illustrates an enlarged bottom view of tubular body 11.

FIG. 8 illustrates an enlarged cross sectional view of the water supply diffusing unit where the top of can body 4 is blocked.

FIG. 9 illustrates a sketch drawing of the measuring cup 16 which is being used.

In the liquid heating container of this invention, since tubular body 5, can body 4, tubular body 11 and the measuring cup 16 are removably engaged with the upper portion of the tubular container 2, it can be possible to heat the matter in the can body at a suitable temperature. The capability of heating the matter at a suitable temperature can be achieved because the quantity of the exothermic agent can be selected and loaded into the tubular container 2, and/or the quantity of water can be measured and selected according to the type and quantity of the matter being heated. Further, the water permeable bag enclosing the exothermic agent may weigh, for example, 50 g, 100 g, 150 g, and the like, and can be prepared beforehand as one-pack. More than one-pack may be used. Such a pack may be used multiple times.

The control of the desired temperature can be obtained with the addition and/or subtraction of the quantity of water by using a measuring cup 16. Because the can body is maintained in the tubular body 5 by ribs 7, the can body is provided with stability and can be moved by holding the tubular body 5 with the hand after heating the can body. The liquid heating container can be light in weight. When the liquid heating container is provided with water, it can be used to heat up matter contained in the container. The liquid heating container can be used safely in the outdoors or in places where open flames or fuels are prohibited. Further, the liquid heating container can be used in camps for camp cooking, in underground construction sites, and/or by workers working in skyscrapers. It is also possible to use the liquid heating container to cook food when participating in sports for leisure such as the camping, hiking, fishing, a winter mountain climbing mountain, and the skiing tour rings.

Moreover, the liquid heating container can be offered for heating items used in rescue supplies etc. such as emergency food in areas affected by after earthquake damage and/or by flood.

Thus, the liquid heating container 2 utilizes an exothermic agent 1 which can be heated by pouring water into the container in order to generate steam. The quantity of matter to be heated, the quantity of the exothermic agent used, and/or the quantity of water poured into the exothermic agent can each be regulated, in order to control the a heating temperature resulting from the liquid heating container. A tubular body 5 is removably engaged with a tubular container 2. The tubular container 2 can contain the desired quantity of the exothermic agent 1.

The exothermic agent of this invention can be a granule of quicklime, and may serve as a main ingredient and is controlled heating temperature at the maximum of about 110 C. The tubular body can have a can body and can be arranged to contain the desired quantity of liquid. The selected quantity of the exothermic agent is inserted into the tubular container according to the type and quantity of the matter being heated. Such matter to be heated can be, for example, water or coffee. It is preferable that the tubular container 2 is made of plastic that can be insulated from heat and is heatproof.

In an embodiment, the tubular body may consist of tubular bodies 5 and 11. The tubular body 5 can have a can body 4 which is arranged to contain water, coffee and other liquid as a matter being heated. The other tubular body 11 having a water supply diffusing unit is inserted into the tubular body 5. An upper surface of the water supply diffusing unit serves as a water pouring diffusing portion and the under surface of which serves as a portion for closing the upper end opening of the can body. After containing the matter being heated into the can body, the can body is closed by the under surface of the water supply diffusing unit. A desired quantity of water is supplied from the upper side and water is poured down along the gap which is formed between the can body and tubular body 5, and reaches to the exothermic agent in the tubular container 2. The reaction of the exothermic agent starts and generates heat and steam. The matter to be heated is heated by this steam.

Because the tubular body 5 is engaged with the tubular container 2, and the can body 4 containing the matter being heated has been inserted into tubular body 5 until getting at the perforated-section along the ribs 7, the can body is stabilized with respect to the tubular body 5, and such stability is maintained. The beverage as the matter to be heated besides the drinking water, coffee, milk, and the fruit beverage can be contained in the can body 4. In FIG. 4, the open mouth of the can body is covered by the under surface of the water supply diffusing unit 13, and water can be poured into the exothermic agent promptly without having the water enter in the can body.

A measuring cup 16 measures the quantity of the supply water that is supplied to the exothermic agent, and it covers the upper portion of the tubular body before heating starts.

The steam generated by the reaction of the exothermic agent heats the bottom of the can body directly through the perforated-section 6 (See also, FIG. 11 at 23). The steam may rise through gap (d) formed between the can body and the tubular body with the plurality of ribs, and heats the surroundings edge of the can body evenly. See e.g., FIGS. 4 & 5. This causes the liquid in the can body to warm evenly and promptly. See e.g., FIGS. 5 & 12 After the heating, the tubular body can be manually removed from the tubular container 2. The heated liquid can then be poured into a cup and served as a drink. Moreover, it is possible to make hot foods or drinks by directly pouring the heated liquid on the desired products such as packed tea, green tea, and other cup frame. A predetermined temperature can be obtained by properly adjusting the quantity of the exothermic agent and the quantity of pouring water.

With reference to FIGS. 1-9, the following describes the use of the container. A water permeable bag enclosing a predetermined quantity of the exothermic agent 1 is put in the tubular container 2. The tubular body 5 is removably engaged with the upper section of the tubular container 2 using a joint portion installed in the inside circumference of the projected-flange portion of the tubular body 5. Because the tubular container and the tubular body can be removably engaged, it can be possible to add and/or to vary the quantity of the exothermic agent based on a prior selected quantity, in order to select a heating temperature of the matter being heated in the can body more freely. The quantity of the water to be poured into the matter being heated can be easily measure with measuring cup 16, and used in association with the quantity of the exothermic agent 1. The steam that is generated due to the heat by the exothermic agent 1 when water is poured heats the can body 4 from perforated-section 6 of tubular body 5, and the liquid in the can body is heated. Because perforated-section 6 is configured in the bottom of tubular body 5 and the exothermic agent is put in close proximity to the perforated-section, the steam generated is efficiently transmitted to the can body 4 through the perforated-section 6. Measuring cup 16 covers the upper end of tubular body 11.

In FIG. 10, after the heating is completed, the measuring cup 16 is taken off and tubular body 11 is separated from the tubular body 5, and tubular body 5 are separated from the tubular container 2 and then the heated liquid in the can body 4 is properly injected in cup 17 for a drinking by gripping the projected-flange portion 8 with the hand. FIG. 10 illustrates a perspective view showing the state to inject the heated water into cup 17.

The embodiments of the liquid heating container described herein make it easy to select the quantity of the exothermic agent and the quantity of the supply water in proportion to the quantity of the drinking water, milk and other liquid contained in the can body as the matter desired to be heated. The heating temperature applied to the matter to be heated can be controlled easily if the ratio of the quantity of the exothermic agent and the quantity of poured water selected is 1:1. The exothermic agent can be a granule of quicklime and can be heated to about 110 C. at the highest temperature. One example of an exothermic agent is OZOMAX, which was produced by OZO Chemical Technical Research Institute, and Sekkodo Ltd. put to practical use in Japan as a sales agency.

Table 1 shows in tabular form exemplary parameters used to controlling the temperature of the heated liquid.

TABLE 1
Arranged
Matter being Matter being Arranged Pouring Pouring exothermic After Heating
heated heated exothermic Water Water agent generated Heating warm
Matter being Quantity Initial temp. agent quantity temp. temp. Time liquid temp
heated type (ml) ( C.) quantity (g) (cc) ( C.) ( C.) minute ( C.)
water 100 7  50  50 7  99 5 51
water 100 7 100 100 7 108 5 92
water 150 7 100 100 7 106 5 80
water 180 7 100 100 7 104 5 69
water 200 7 100(first) 100(first) 7 108(first) 5(first) 98
100(second) 100(second) 106(second) 5(second)
Coffee 150 7 100 100 7 106 5 80
Milk 180 7 100 100 7 104 5 70

In Table 1, water, coffee and milk can be used as a matter being heated. The quantity of water is selected from one of 100 ml or 200 ml. Water selected of 200 ml may be heated twice and the warmed water reached to 98 C.

Table 1 provides examples of results achieved by varying the parameters used to controlling the temperature of the heated liquid.

EXAMPLE 1

When using 50 g quantity of the exothermic agent which may be loaded into the tubular container 2, the quantity of water used is 100 ml and is contained as the matter to be heated, and 50 cc of water is poured into the tubular container 2, the temperature of the matter became the arm water of 51 C.

EXAMPLE 2

When using 100 g quantity of the exothermic agent which may be loaded into the tubular container 2. 100 ml of water is used as the quantity of as the matter to be heated, water of quantity of 100 cc is poured into the tubular container 2, the temperature of the matter being heated became the warm water of 92 C.

EXAMPLE 3

When using water as the matter to be heated, 150 ml may be used herein, and the quantity of the exothermic agent is adjusted to 100 g, 100 cc of water is poured, the temperature of the obtained water became 80 C.

EXAMPLE 4

When using water as the matter to be heated, 180 ml may be used herein, and the quantity of the exothermic agent is adjusted to 100 g, 100 cc of water is poured, (Similar to Example 3), the temperature of the obtained water became 69 C.

EXAMPLE 5

The temperature of warm water 98 C. (near the boiling point) was obtained when the quantity of water 200 ml is used, 100 g of exothermic agent is used, quantity of pouring water is 100 cc, and it is cooked twice. Warm food can be obtained without preparation by pouring the warm water into tea, green tea, the instant soup, or the instant noodle, etc.

EXAMPLE 6

When injecting 150 ml of coffee into the can body and the quantity of the exothermic agent and the quantity of pouring water were each 100 g, an improvisation coffee of 80 C. was obtained.

EXAMPLE 7

When injecting 180 ml of milk into the can body and the quantity of the exothermic agent and the quantity of pouring water were each 100 g, milk with a temperature of 70 C. was obtained.

EXAMPLE 8

Water 160 ml and non-rinsed rice 50 g which is wrapped in the unwoven cloth are put in together into the 200 cc capacity can body. Water 100 ml is added to the exothermic agent 100 g, and boiled for 5 minutes twice. The boiled rice was obtained in 20 minutes including steaming time as a whole.

EXAMPLE 9

In the above-described examples, the quantity of the exothermic agent and the quantity of the addition water were executed as a 1:1 ratio by using the can body of capacity of 200 cc as a quantity of the matter being heated. However, it is not the one limited to this.

FIGS. 11-17 illustrate an embodiment using the capped can body. The use of the exothermic agent, and the relationship between the quantity of the exothermic agent and the quantity of the water are similar with the above-mentioned Examples. In FIG. 11, reference numeral 18 is a tubular container made of plastic that can be insulated from heat and is heatproof. The tubular container 18 is arranged to contain the water permeable bag enclosing predetermined quantity of exothermic agent 19. Reference numeral 20 is a joint portion installed in the upper end part of tubular container 18 by the joint portion. Reference numeral 21 is a tubular body having projected-flange portion 22. Joint portion 24 is installed in the bottom part to engage with joint portion 20 of the container 18, and installs a perforated-section 23 at the bottom. A plurality of ribs 25 can be formed in a vertical direction on an inner circumference of the tubular body 21, and water pouring-section 26 can be formed by expanding the upper end opening edge of the tubular body 21. Reference numeral 27 is a capped can body the cap of which can be separated by rotating by the hand. The capacity of the capped can body is 400 ml. The bottles being on the market can be set directly in the tubular body 21 by matching the size. The capped can body 27 is inserted until getting at the perforated-section of the bottom along the ribs of tubular body 21. In this position, the capped can body may be safely maintained by the tubular body 21 by gripping with the plurality of ribs that extends in the vertical direction made of plastic. Reference numeral 27 is a cap installed on free opening and shutting in the upper end of the capped can body 27. The form of cap 28 is not limited to that shown in the FIG. 11. It becomes easy to accommodate the liquid and matter being heated other than water when making it to the capped can body with a little large diameter.

FIG. 12 illustrates a cross sectional view of the liquid heating container wherein the capped can body 27 is inserted in the tubular body 21 and water is being poured into the tubular body 21 by the measuring cup 29. Because the pouring-section has expanded the open mouth edge, the poured water descends through the gap d of the inner circumference of the tubular body 21 without spilling outside the tubular body 21. The poured water combines with the exothermic agent 19 of the container 18. The combination of the exothermic agent 19 and water generates heat and steam, which heats the bottom of the can body 27 through the perforated-section 23, causing the water to be heated.

FIG. 13 illustrates an enlarged view of the tubular body 21 into which the capped can body 27 was inserted.

FIG. 14 illustrates a plan view of tubular body 21.

FIG. 15 illustrates a bottom plan view of the tubular body 21.

FIG. 16 illustrates a plan view of tubular container 18, and with joint portion 20 being installed in four different areas. Of course, the feature of the joint portion is not limited to the above-mentioned examples.

FIG. 17 illustrates a perspective view showing water being poured after removing cap 28 of the capped can body. Because the capped can body was maintained in the tubular body 21, it is possible to use it without touching the heated capped can body directly.

The tubular body 21 is removably engaged with the upper portion of the tubular container 18. A water pouring-section can be installed, and may be formed by expanding the upper end of the opening edge. The tubular body 21 may also include a perforated-section in its bottom surface. The tubular body 21 may also include a plurality of vertical ribs projecting slightly towards the inner circumference of the body 21. Water that is poured into the liquid heating container can be diffused by the shoulder of the capped can body, and may then be completely poured into the exothermic agent. A coffee can or a juice can, or the like. that may be purchased in the market, and that is provided with a cap can be used in place of the can body (Refer to FIG. 11).

Table 2 below illustrates in tabular form the change of the heated value of the liquid by using water as the matter to be heated. Herein, the quantity of water is varied to be either 200 ml or 400 ml, and its corresponding initial temperatures can be 5 C., 10 C. and 15 C. By using Table 2, the heating of the matter being heated can be controlled by selecting the desired temperature. Especially, it is preferable that the ratio of quantity of the exothermic agent to the quantity of the poured water is 1:1.

TABLE 2
Matter being Matter being Arranged Pouring After Heating
heated heated exothermic Water Heating warm
Matter being Quantity Initial temp. agent quantity Time liquid temp
heated type (ml) ( C.) quantity (g) (cc) minute ( C.)
water 200 5 100 100 5 61
200 10 100 100 5 66
200 15 100 100 5 74
water 400 5 100 100 5 34
400 10 100 100 5 41
400 15 100 100 5 45
water 200 5 150 150 5 92
200 10 150 150 5 95
200 15 150 150 5 97
water 400 5 150 150 5 52
400 10 150 150 5 59
400 15 150 150 5 67

Table 3 below illustrates the change of the temperature of water 200 ml or 400 ml, an initial temperature of water is 5 C., and heat treatment taking place twice. Because the quantity of exothermic agent and the quantity of water correspond to a 1:1 ratio, this table can be applied to various matter being heated as a reference value. When heating treatment takes place twice, temperature of the liquid can be controlled according to this table. Table 3 provides examples of results achieved by varying the parameters used to controlling the temperature of the heated liquid. Other examples are provided below.

TABLE 3
Matter being Matter being Arranged Pouring After Heating
heated heated exothermic Water Heating warm
Matter being Heating Quantity Initial temp. agent quantity Time liquid temp
heated type (twice) (ml) ( C.) quantity (g) (cc) minute ( C.)
water First 200 5 100 100 5 61
second 200 61 100 100 5 98
water First 400 5 100 100 5 34
Second 400 34 100 100 5 56
water first 200 5 100 100 5 61
second 200 61 150 150 5 98
water First 400 5 100 100 5 34
Second 400 34 150 150 5 78
water First 400 5 150 150 5 52
Second 400 52 150 150 5 95

EXAMPLE 10

Setting 250 ml of milk in the capped can body and using 100 g of exothermic agent in the tubular container, when 100 cc of water is poured into the exothermic agent, milk of about 50 C. is obtained after a heating time of 5 minutes.

EXAMPLE 11

The ramen (Chinese noodle)and the seasoning liquid as a matter being heated can be placed in the capped can body, and cooked for 5 minutes after closing the cap. The 400 ml of Ramen came to be eaten as an instant noodle by pouring 150 cc of water into 150 g of the exothermic agent, in order to bring the ramen to a boil.

EXAMPLE 12

The 350 ml of fruit juice of can be placed in the can body, the 150 g of the exothermic agent can be selected, and the juice can be heated by choosing the 150 cc quantity of water. Warm juice of about 50 C. can be obtained.

EXAMPLE 13

Capped can body containing 350 ml of orange juice commonly obtained in the market can be inserted in tubular body 21, and the juice can be heated by pouring 150 cc of water into the 150 g of an exothermic agent. Warm orange juice can be obtained.

EXAMPLE 14

When a capped can body containing water 400 ml is heated using the exothermic agent (150 g) and water (150 cc) for 5 minutes, hot water of 50 C. was obtained. After separating the tubular body from the tubular container, the new exothermic agent (150 g) is put in the tubular container, and water (150 cc) is poured again and heat is generated. Hot water of 95 C. was obtained after heating for 5 minutes. The obtained warm water is poured into the powder of instant coffee, two cups of coffee were obtained.

EXAMPLE 15

The noodle was obtained when the hot water obtained under the Example 14 is poured into the prepared instant noodle.

INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY

The liquid heating container of this invention is a container of no flame, that is scentless, harmlessness, and no fire is used. When this container is manufactured from plastic that insulates from heat and is heatproof, it can be light in weight, and convenient to carry. Because the heating temperature can be controlled according to the type and the amount of water, milk, coffee and other liquid, it is possible to get the suitable temperature for the liquid. The marketability as a container for preserving food in cases arising due to emergencies is high. This is because it is possible to cook food items in emergency situations such as earthquake and/or flooding. Also, the liquid heating container can be used to heat rescue supplies. Such application enable the liquid heating container to preserve items for long durations of time.

Classifications
U.S. Classification126/263.01, 126/263.08
International ClassificationF24J1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47J36/28
European ClassificationA47J36/28